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Biography: The Cure

Biography: The Cure

One of the more influential New Wave bands in history, The Cure have churned out more than 10 studio albums over the course of four decades. Though more of a post-punk band in the early years, the Cure exploded onto international fame in the late '80s with more pop-friendly hits like “Just Like Heaven” and “Friday I’m in Love.”

Front man Robert Smith, the Cure’s only truly permanent member throughout the years, founded the Cure in the late '70s to moderate success in the United Kingdom. Bassist Simon Gallup and guitarist Port Thompson have been the most consistent contributing musicians the Cure have had over the years, but make no mistake, the Cure is Robert Smith’s brainchild.

The Cure made Goth Rock cool, albeit after they gave up the Goth Rock label. Built around their bass riffs and vocals full of imagery, the Cure became successful off layering their music perfectly and hitting home with their listeners through their lyrics.

The Cure debuted their first album, The Imaginary Boys, in 1979, and the next year followed up with Seventeen Seconds. Prior to these albums, the band drew some acclaim off the singles “Killing an Arab” and “Boys Don’t Cry.”

It would not be until their third album, Faith, when the Cure received some commercial success in the U.K. After years of great success in the U.K., the Cure made it big internationally in 1989 with their hit single “Just Like Heaven,” a perfectly composed rocker that would be the band’s first Top 40 Billboard hit. At this point, the Cure left their goth roots for a more pop-friendly image.

Robert Smith’s beautifully written imagery lyrics for songs such as “Lovesong,” “Pictures of You” and “Friday I’m In Love” would catapult The Cure and Robert Smith to superstardom in the late ‘80s and early '90s. All five studio albums The Cure released between 1985 and 1995 would at least go Gold in the United States, with three going platinum.

Throughout the late ‘90s, the band experienced limited success and many lineup changes. After two lackluster albums, Bloodflowers in 2000 and The Cure in 2004, the Cure brought back the Thompson, who had left the band in 1993.

In 2008, the Cure released 4:13 Dream, a lighter album that brings back memories of the band’s success about 20 years prior. The lead single, “The Only One,” is reminiscent of songs like “Friday I’m In Love” with its upbeat arrangement and vocals. Currently, the band continues to tour, though with no studio album in sight.



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