Black Oak Arkansas Resurface with 'Back Thar N’ Over Yonder,' Their Latest Heapin’ Helpin’ of Southern-Fried Boogie Rock

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johnnycnote

Black Oak Arkansas was often on shows like Midnight Express and In Concert back in the 70s. Growing up in Jacksonville, FL, one was saturated with southern rock because of the Allman Brothers and, of course, Lynyrd Skynyrd. It was as if every 10 minutes the DJ on the radio would say "and now Jacksonville's own Lynyrd Skynyrd". Being much more of a Jimi Hendrix fan, I quickly grew quite tired of southern rock.

So when Black Oak Arkansas came along, I was not favorably predisposed to their style. But that's not what really bothered me. At the end of their set, the guitar players would smash their guitars together and destroy them on stage. Even if I overlooked the very tired cliché of destroying one's guitar, I could not forgive the whole idea of destroying their instruments instead of giving them to someone who couldn't afford one himself (like me). If they did this at every performance, who knows how many good instruments were destroyed? I imagine it could get rather expensive, too.

It sums up their sound and act in general: a very tired cliché. Even if they've gotten tired of smashing their instruments, I see little reason to be optimistic about their return. No doubt they'd be quite devastated to learn I will not be in the audience of any of their shows for the foreseeable future…

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GEENGADE

A washboard straight out from his crotch, running his hand up and down its side as if jacking it off while the guitarist was doing their guitar solos. The drummer Tommy Aldridge became a well known drummer for Ozzy. CAL-JAM was in my backyard. There where many JAM in that part of Cali. I didn't have a good FM radio back then so listening was brutal no Dolby. Static the mono tone commercials on and on with the 70's. The sound was very prosthetic no matter what you where listening on. Billionaire Sound Pioneer Ray Dolby Dies, Age 80 Sept 13, 2013 his first U.S. patent was not filed until 1969.

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