Fresh Steel: How to Re-String a Floyd Rose-Equipped Guitar — and Stay in Tune

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RonZabrocki

Great blog as usual! Any advice for the guy who took all his strings off to change them and his Floyd is now completely screwed! Lol! I remember this happening to me when I first started using locking systems. Basically, is there a zero starting point to begin with and once that's done you can do it one string at a time?
No need to answer here. But it could make a great blog. "SO YOUR FLOYD IS FUCKED-NOW WHAT."lol!

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TheMetalMike

Ha. Agree, Ron. I call this the point of no return.

But, if anyone out there goes that far as to take all the strings off the guitar - at that stage, just put all new strings on at once and tune the guitar while stretching your strings. You might get lucky, but to get the Floyd to play perfectly, some adjustments might have to be made which might also include the springs on the back, etc.

Best bet is to change strings one string at a time and start with the low E.

If your Floyd goes up and is not parallel to the guitar's body anymore, loosen the strings and tune up again. This will help.

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Triad999

I'm running an original Floyd with locking Sperzels and no locking nut. It solves a ton of the issues I had with these things when I was younger, and it stays in tune no matter how hard you are on it.

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carpenterrpaul

I could write another complete article on the minutiae of the Floyd Rose double-locking tremolo. I can't stress enough the importance of the anchor-screw adjustment. The guitar's action (distance from fret-to-string), it's intonation, and one's palm muting technique are all determined more by the angle of the tremolo relative to the body than by any other single factor. The knife-edge and posts aren't meant to be adjusted at all. They should be tight in their metal receivers and their receivers should be snug and all the way to the bottom of their holes.

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TheMetalMike

Definitely agree that the Floyds should sit parallel to the body of the guitar. A bit point in the entire system working properly. Thanks.

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roofdrake

Great advice Mike but I have only one question. When I tighten the screws on the locking nut the pitch on my strings goes a few cents higher, is this normal?

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TheMetalMike

Thanks. Yes, it is normal from my experience. Notice which strings seem to go a bit sharp after you clamp them down and give yourself a bit more room in the fine tuners by the bridge, so you have enough "tuning room" to fine tune once you clamp the strings.

And, you do not need to power clamp the strings. Some players clamp their strings so hard that the strings almost go flat. This equals bad intonation and tuning problems as well.

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carpenterrpaul

It's because your string tree (the bar just above the nut) is too loose. If you lower it until your strings are touching the nut all the way across the nut that problem will disappear.

Airric

i dont understand i have never had a problem with my floyd rose. i think people are just doing it wrong. they didnt invest the time they didnt do the research. i got my first floyd a month before i installed it on my guitar and i could take it apart and put it back together learned every piece ect....

i love floyds.

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AndreMaq

I've always found running the strings backward, with the ball end at the machine head to be a time saver. I also give myself a little extra length on the D and high E string in order to "restuff" them, as they are the most prone to breakage at the bridge.

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TheMetalMike

Like wise here, Andre. I run the strings backwards in as well, meaning the balls of the strings happen to be on the side of the tuning pegs. It works, saves a tiny bit of time on the top 3 strings.

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The Shred King ...

Great tips Mike! What do you recommend for setting intonation properly?

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TheMetalMike

Preferably a strobe tuner as far as the tuner goes. It is a long subject to answer via this space, but please look around as I do see some great info on the subject! Thanks. Horns.

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