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Rolling Stones Tease New Cover of Little Walter's "Just Your Fool"

Rolling Stones Tease New Cover of Little Walter's

Amid all the news coverage of the Rolling Stones' latest album announcement, the band quietly posted a one-minute-long snippet of their new single, "Just Your Fool," last night.

The song, which you can hear below, was originally written and recorded in 1960 by Chicago bluesman Little Walter. The recording is stipped down and devoid of frills, truly capturing the band in a "live in the studio" setting.

"Just Your Fool" is available for purchase at iTunes. The rest of the album—which is titled Blue & Lonesome—is scheduled to be released December 2, but it's available now for preorder.

Blue & Lonesome is the album a lot of longtime Stones fans have been waiting for. Its 12 tracks, which were recorded in just three days at London's British Grove Studios, are covers of classic blues songs by Howlin' Wolf ("Commit a Crime"), Little Walter ("I Gotta Go") and Jimmy Reed ("Little Rain") and several more. Eric Clapton appears on two tracks, covers of Little Johnny Taylor's "Everybody Knows About My Good Thing" and Otis Rush's "I Can't Quit You Baby."

"It was fun – always is," Keith Richards told Rolling Stone several months ago when discussing the Blue & Lonesome sessions. At the time, he claimed the album would contain "a lot of Chicago blues." He wasn't kidding. You can check out the complete track list below.

Blue & Lonesome Track List

1. "Just Your Fool" (Little Walter)
2. "Commit a Crime" (Howlin’ Wolf)
3. "Blue and Lonesome" (Little Walter)
4. "All of Your Love" (Magic Sam)
5. "I Gotta Go" (Little Walter)
6. "Everybody Knows About My Good Thing" (Little Johnny Taylor) with Eric Clapton
7. "Ride ‘Em on Down" (Eddie Taylor)
8. "Hate to See You Go" (Little Walter)
9. "Hoo Doo Blues" (Lightnin’ Slim)
10. "Little Rain" (Jimmy Reed)
11. "Just Like I Treat You" (Willie Dixon/Howlin’ Wolf)
12. "I Can’t Quit You Baby" (Willie Dixon/Otis Rush) with Eric Clapton

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