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String Theory: Minor Bossa, Part 2 — Second Half of My Solo Over the Minor-Key Latin Jazz Standard “Blue Bossa”

String Theory: Minor Bossa, Part 2 — Second Half of My Solo Over the Minor-Key Latin Jazz Standard “Blue Bossa”

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Continuing where we left off last month, here’s the second half (bars 17–32; see FIGURE 1) of a two-chorus solo entitled “Minor Bossa,” which I composed over the chord structure to the popular Latin jazz standard “Blue Bossa,” a fairly simple instrumental tune set to a bossa nova beat and written 50 years ago by trumpeter Kenny Dorham.

As I mentioned previously, among jazz musicians “Blue Bossa” has become a perrenial favorite vehicle for soloing (or “blowing,” as they say). The tune has been recorded by many great artists over the years, such as saxophonists Joe Henderson and Dexter Gordon, trumpeter Chet Baker, trombonist J.J. Johnson, pianist Chick Corea, guitarists Kenny Burrell and George Benson, vocalist Bobby McFerrin and many other musicians.

Remember too that while “Blue Bossa” is rooted in the key of C minor, my solo is played in the more guitar-friendly key of A minor. I chose that key to make the piece more accessible to rock and blues players who are interested in exploring jazz, and to tie it in with the keys and chord changes we’ve worked with in previous lessons.



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