Professor Shred http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/1391/all en Professor Shred with Guthrie Govan: Tapping in 16th-Note Triplets http://www.guitarworld.com/professor-shred-guthrie-govan-tapping-16th-note-triplets <!--paging_filter--><p>In this month’s column, I’d like to show you the complex fretboard-tapping section from a song of mine called “Bad Asteroid.” It’s from my self-titled album with the Aristocrats, which includes bassist Brian Bellar and drummer Marco Minneman.</p> <p>“Bad Asteroid” is a song that’s been bubbling away in my collection of unused tunes for about 18 or 19 years, and this new album gave me a good excuse to finally record it properly. </p> <p>It’s good material for this column because, in addition to requiring wacky and unusual tapping procedures, it features some nice harmonic interest in the chord progression over which the riff is played—what I like to describe as the “budget Steely Dan” chords.</p> <p>Without them, the riff just sounds weird. The chords are essential in providing a context to the tapped melodic idea. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates the chord progression over which I play the tapped riff, which is essentially four bars long and followed by a fifth bar that resolves to Em9sus4. I begin in bar 1 with C/Bb, followed by A/B. Bar 2 consists of C9 to Fmaj7. </p> <p>Bar 3 sits on a chord that could be named a variety of things, but let’s call it Eadd2/G#, which is followed by a bar of Bbmaj7#11—that “Lydian mode” sound—and the resolution to Em9sus4.</p> <p>All of the chords, with the exception of the last, are performed fingerstyle, wherein I either pluck all the strings at once or subtly pick out individual notes of the chords, such as moving from the bass note to the higher strings, or vice versa. I also like to apply a little whammy-bar vibrato whenever a chord sustains.</p> <p>Equally important is the feel, which is a slow-ish swing. As a result, what are written as 16th-note rhythmic subdivisions are played as eighth-note/16th-note triplets. Now let’s look at the tapped figure, illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 2. </strong></p> <p>Throughout this pattern, I alternate between fret-hand and pick-hand tapped notes. Except for a couple of spots, I constantly switch from one hand to the other. For tapping, I generally use the middle finger and pinkie of my pick hand; in this section, I hold the pick in the crook of my pick-hand index finger, so that finger is unavailable for tapping.</p> <p>The rhythm is also essential to this riff. I’m superimposing an eighth-note triplet rhythm on each beat, then splitting each eighth note into two 16ths. This is the best way to look at the lick, because it progresses in two-note pairs, and representing it this way makes it easier to conceptualize.</p> <p>The other thing to keep in mind is that the two hands sort of mirror each other in their intervallic movement throughout. Slow practice will be mandatory to get a firm handle on this one. Although I wrote it, even I can’t play it unless I start from the beginning each time.</p> <p>This will be the last installment of my GW column for now, so thanks very much for reading. Check out the new Aristocrats album, and get more information about the group at <a href="http://the-aristocrats-band.com/music/">the-aristocrats-band.com.</a> See you on the road.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-03-17%20at%202.16.14%20PM.png" width="620" height="298" alt="Screen Shot 2014-03-17 at 2.16.14 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-03-17%20at%202.16.26%20PM.png" width="620" height="565" alt="Screen Shot 2014-03-17 at 2.16.26 PM.png" /></p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1311026888001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1311026888001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1310972898001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1310972898001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/professor-shred-guthrie-govan-tapping-16th-note-triplets#comments Guthrie Govan January January 2012 Professor Shred The Aristocrats 2012 Blogs News Features Lessons Mon, 17 Mar 2014 18:25:18 +0000 Guthrie Govan http://www.guitarworld.com/article/13817 Professor Shred: Take Four — Using Four Fingers to Tap Arpeggios, and How to Play the Lick to "Sevens" http://www.guitarworld.com/professor-shred-take-four-using-four-fingers-tap-arpeggios-and-how-play-lick-sevens <!--paging_filter--><p>This month I’d like to demonstrate the technique I use to perform the two-handed-tapping riff that occurs during the bridge/chorus section of the song “Sevens,” from my <em>Erotic Cakes</em> album. </p> <p>Before getting to the “Sevens” lick, I’m going to break down the technique involved so that you will be able to apply this idea to creating riffs of your own. The genesis of the lick was in trying to find a new way to play a major-seven arpeggio. I started out by breaking it down into two notes per string, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 1a</strong>. </p> <p>Using the index finger and pinkie only, I descend from the major seventh of Eb, D, at the 22nd fret of the high E string, to a low Eb on the sixth string’s 11th fret. I then took this idea and performed it with fretboard tapping, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 1b.</strong> Now, the higher note in each pair is sounded with a pick-hand fretboard tap, and the lower note is sounded with a fret-hand “hammer-on from nowhere.” Be sure to tap hard onto each note so that it will sound clearly, and try to not allow any of the notes to ring into each other.</p> <p>The next step was to break up the descending pattern and play it non-sequentially. What I arrived at was <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>. Here, I sound consecutive single notes on the high E and B strings, both sounded with fretboard taps, followed by the lower associated notes on the top two strings, sounded with fret-hand hammer-ons. The fret hand mirrors this approach by also using the pinkie and middle fingers. Start by playing this pattern slowly and then increase the speed.</p> <p>Now let’s take this same approach and apply it to the four-note groups on the lower pairs of strings, starting with the B and G strings, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>. I use the same technique here but switch to the ring and middle fingers for both the pick-hand taps and the fret-hand hammer-ons. </p> <p>In <Strong>FIGURE 4</strong>, I’ve moved the idea down one more pair of strings to the G and D. Here, I tap with the middle and ring fingers of the pick hand but use my frethand pinkie and middle finger to fret the other notes. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 5</strong> then runs the three patterns together. You can take this idea further by continuing onto the two bottom pairs of strings, as demonstrated in <strong>FIGURES 6a and 6b.</strong> Now that you’ve got the idea, try some different arpeggios: <strong>FIGURE 7</strong> outlines Ebm7, and <strong>FIGURE 8</strong> begins with Efsus4 and then moves through Ebmaj7 and Ebm7.</p> <p>Finally, the “Sevens” lick, appropriately played in a meter of 7/4, is shown in <strong>FIGURE 9</strong>. Using the same technique, I move through the different pairs of strings in a specific alternating pattern.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1264908571001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1264908571001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-03-13%20at%2011.23.40%20AM.png" width="620" height="607" alt="Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 11.23.40 AM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-03-13%20at%2011.23.51%20AM.png" width="620" height="301" alt="Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 11.23.51 AM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/professor-shred-take-four-using-four-fingers-tap-arpeggios-and-how-play-lick-sevens#comments 2011 Guthrie Govan Holiday 2011 Professor Shred Holiday Blogs News Lessons Magazine Thu, 13 Mar 2014 15:31:33 +0000 Guthrie Govan http://www.guitarworld.com/article/13550 Professor Shred: Big Jumps — Using String Skipping to Create Multi-Octave Tapped Arpeggios http://www.guitarworld.com/professor-shred-big-jumps-using-string-skipping-create-multi-octave-tapped-arpeggios <!--paging_filter--><p>This month I’d like to talk about the technique I use to perform the fast arpeggiated phrases on the song “A Wonderful Slippery Thing,” from my <em>Erotic Cakes</em> album. </p> <p>For these licks, I employ fretboard tapping in conjunction with string skipping to achieve a very smooth and even sound throughout. </p> <p>I know many guitarists prefer to use sweep picking when playing arpeggios, but to me, the sound of dragging the pick up and down across the strings is a little too abrasive and percussive.</p> <p>In this month’s column, I’d like to demonstrate my basic approach to performing these types of arpeggios, which involves a combination of fretboard tapping and string skipping. My love for the sound of the saxophone inspired me to pursue this approach. </p> <p>When sax players play fast arpeggios, they sound very fluid, liquid and bubbly. I devised a system that works for me, and the idea is to apply the concept in a variety of different ways.</p> <p>The first question I ask myself is, “How many notes do I want to play in this arpeggio?” I then play each note once on one string before moving this specific note series to a different string. </p> <p>For example, starting with a basic minor triad, which consists of three notes, I’ll play three notes on a given string and then move those same three notes to another string, as demonstrated in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>. Here I’m playing the notes of a B minor triad—B, D and F#—on the sixth string, sounding the highest note with a fretboard tap. I then move these three notes over to the D string, execute them in the exact same way, and then repeat the process on the high E string.</p> <p>You’ll notice that the “shape” on each string is identical, and I think this is not unlike the way pianists play arpeggios, in that they repeat the same fingering “shape” as they move to higher octaves. Just listen to the insane multioctave arpeggios that Art Tatum plays—I think there must be some logic like that going on.</p> <p>If you are not used to playing in this way, the big challenge is hammering with the index finger to start each phrase on each string. Begin with just the first three notes on the sixth string, making sure they sound clear, with no extraneous noises. Then hop over two strings and up two frets, to the D string, and the shape is exactly the same. Strive to make these transitions seamless. </p> <p>Now let’s play each three-note arpeggio in a repeated sequence, moving from low to high strings, back and forth, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>. If I want a more complex arpeggio, I can add one note, the flat seventh, as I do in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>. </p> <p>If we transpose the idea to a major triad, we get <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>. To build up your technique, I suggest practicing each phrase on each string repeatedly, as shown in <strong>FIGURES 5a and 5b.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/VC_-2hpzQt0?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-03-07%20at%203.33.26%20PM.png" width="620" height="392" alt="Screen Shot 2014-03-07 at 3.33.26 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-03-07%20at%203.33.38%20PM.png" width="620" height="539" alt="Screen Shot 2014-03-07 at 3.33.38 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/professor-shred-big-jumps-using-string-skipping-create-multi-octave-tapped-arpeggios#comments 2011 December December 2011 Guthrie Govan Professor Shred Artist Lessons Blogs Lessons Magazine Fri, 07 Mar 2014 20:39:04 +0000 Guthrie Govan http://www.guitarworld.com/article/13153 Professor Shred: 12-Step Program — Using Chromatic Passing Tones to Add Color to Your Soloing Ideas http://www.guitarworld.com/professor-shred-12-step-program-using-chromatic-passing-tones-add-color-your-soloing-ideas <!--paging_filter--><p>I am often asked how I incorporate chromatic notes into my solos and how I approach playing “outside” the given key center of a song.</p> <p>If you have ever used the blues scale, then you have already employed chromatic notes in some of the most musical ways possible.</p> <p>FIGURE 1 shows the A minor pentatonic scale. To get the A blues scale, we simply add Eb, the flatted fifth (f5), as shown in FIGURE 2.</p> <p>Now, that Eb can sound like the worst note in the world—if you land on it and stop, you’ll be hurting people—but most of us use it as a passing tone, as I do in four spots in FIGURE 3: in the key of A, at the end of bar 1, I slide from Eb up to E, the fifth, which is a nice solid chord tone, and in bar 2, I move from beat one to beat two by sliding down from Eb to D, the fourth.</p> <p>I use the same concept into beat four and on beat one of the next bar. Here, I use the b5 as an ornament to add “funkiness” to the lines. If you can employ this concept successfully, in theory you know everything you need to know in order to use any one of the 12 notes as a passing tone at any point—as long as you use it responsibly. The safest approach is to follow every jarring, passing note with a “good” note that sits close by melodically.</p> <p>Moving into a chord tone immediately justifies the jarring note you played right before it. It’s also important that the “good” notes land rhythmically on the more important parts of the beat or groove.</p> <p>Let’s go back to A minor pentatonic and simply fill in the gaps between the scale tones with most of the available passing tones, as I do in FIGURES 4 and 5. You can also go back to basics and start with chord tones only. FIGURE 6a shows the triadic chord tones for C major: C, G and E, played through three octaves. </p> <p>FIGURE 6b shows how to add the chromatic “approach note,” or “lower neighbor,” one half step below each chord tone. FIGURE 7 illustrates a typical way to use this concept in a swinging, bluesy line. This approach can be heard in well-known songs like “Politician” by Cream, and Henry Mancini’s “The Pink Panther.”</p> <p>When people talk about playing “outside,” it’s often just a broader approach to creating lines. Instead of a “wrong” note followed by a “right” note, it’s often the wrong key followed by the right key. In FIGURE 8, I play a long line based around B minor, using as many passing tones as possible but ending up squarely back in B minor.</p> <p>If you can “get lost” without traveling too far away and then land on your feet, you’ve done a successful job at weaving chromaticism into a solo phrase. The key is to keep your ears wide open and don’t be afraid to explore uncharted musical waters.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-03-06%20at%203.30.55%20PM.png" width="620" height="555" alt="Screen Shot 2014-03-06 at 3.30.55 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-03-06%20at%203.31.07%20PM.png" width="620" height="354" alt="Screen Shot 2014-03-06 at 3.31.07 PM.png" /></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1149666760001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1149666760001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/professor-shred-12-step-program-using-chromatic-passing-tones-add-color-your-soloing-ideas#comments 2011 Guthrie Govan November 2011 Professor Shred November Blogs Lessons Magazine Thu, 06 Mar 2014 20:39:11 +0000 Guthrie Govan http://www.guitarworld.com/article/12748