Ritchie Blackmore http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/1566/all en Bent Out of Shape Show Review: Blackmore's Night Live in Berlin http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-show-review-blackmores-night-live-berlin <!--paging_filter--><p>On August 26, I had the pleasure of seeing Blackmore's Night live in Berlin, Germany. </p> <p>It was my first chance to see guitar legend Ritchie Blackmore in concert, and living on the West Coast, I didn't think I'd ever get the opportunity as Blackmore's Night performs mostly in Europe and, on rare occasions, on the East Coast in the U.S. </p> <p>The 1,600-capacity Admiral Palace theater provided a very intimate setting. The stage looked as if it could've been used for a William Shakespeare play with greenery, flowers and rocks covering musical equipment and curtains painted to look like castle walls hanging on either side. When the concert began, all eyes were on Blackmore as he strummed his acoustic guitar and greeted fans in the front row who dressed as if they were at a renaissance fair. </p> <p>If I had to describe Blackmore's Night musically, I'd say they are a fusion of renaissance, folk and rock. It became clear from the beginning that they didn't have a problem breaking the rules. How many renaissance concerts have you seen with an arena-rock-style drum solo? A very impressive group of young talented musicians provided the perfect backing to Blackmore's Night. </p> <p>The concert was full of dynamics, and each song featured a wide spectrum of different arrangements. The best example of this was probably a Deep Purple cover of "Soldier of Fortune," which began with Ritchie and his wife, Candice Night, alone on stage playing very softly. The stage volume was so low, the entire audience had to be silent. As the song progressed, more instruments joined in until every member of the band played with full force. At that moment, it felt like more like a rock concert.</p> <p>Behind the band was a large screen where different moving images would appear relating to specific songs. The stage production enhanced the live music to create a very enjoyable experience. At times it was easy to forget I was watching one the greatest rock guitarists of all time as songs like "Renaissance Faire" had everybody singing and clapping. </p> <p>Two hours into the concert came the moment I had been waiting for as Blackmore returned from a short break carrying his signature yellow cream Fender Stratocaster. The band played "The Moon Is Shining" from their latest album, and the sound of an electrified Blackmore had the audience on their feet. The highlight came as he began his outro solo, which lasted about five minutes. Like a master, Blackmore built a solo that took the entire audience on an emotional journey. As he moved higher and higher up the neck and held a high bend for several seconds, the audience was in awe. </p> <p>As a guitar fan I thought it couldn't get any better than that. </p> <p>At which point he walked over to the front of the stage, dropped to his knees and began going crazy up and down the neck with both hands, flipping his guitar over and abusing his whammy bar. I cannot describe the audience reaction as the entire venue shook with a deep growl. With that single move, Blackmore reminded everyone that he was still the rock guitar god he's always been. As the song ended, I couldn't help but notice the man next to me was crying. I was also relieved that my friend got the moment on film! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zBC7vejEkM4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>The concert ended up lasting well over two and a half hours with Ritchie and Candice taking requests from the audience. Other highlights included "Fires at Midnight," which began with Ritchie alone on stage, on a stool, improvising acoustically for a few minutes. The beautiful melodic phrases had the audience in silence again, which contrasted perfectly the heavy metal style moves of moments earlier. </p> <p>To say I enjoyed the concert would be a huge understatement. I would urge any guitarist to see Blackmore's Night if you get the chance. </p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-show-review-blackmores-night-live-berlin#comments Bent Out of Shape Blackmore's Night Ritchie Blackmore Will Wallner Videos Blogs Mon, 01 Sep 2014 15:47:09 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22241 Yngwie Malmsteen Tackles Deep Purple's "Highway Star" in the Eighties — Listen http://www.guitarworld.com/yngwie-malmsteen-tackles-deep-purples-highway-star-eighties-listen <!--paging_filter--><p>We admit this one is random — completely inspired by Yngwie Malmsteen's action-packed visit to <em>Guitar World</em> HQ last week. Check out Malmsteen's high-energy instrumental cover of Deep Purple's "Highway Star" from the mid-Eighties. </p> <p>The track originally appeared on a release called <em>I Surrender: Odyssey Tour Rehearsals</em>.</p> <p>"Highway Star" relentlessly charges ahead like the car it was written about, taking no prisoners. Malmsteen takes the heaviness of the 1972 original and injects it with his unmistakable sense of drama and theatrics. </p> <p>Of course, the original guitar solo was performed by one of Malmsteen's biggest six-string influences, one Ritchie Blackmore. </p> <p>“I wrote that out note for note about a week before we recorded it,” Blackmore said. “And that is one of the only times I have ever done that. I wanted it to sound like someone driving in a fast car, for it to be one of those songs you would listen to while speeding. And I wanted a very definite Bach sound, which is why I wrote it out—and why I played those very rigid arpeggios across that very familiar Bach progression—Dm, Gm, Cmaj, Amaj. I believe that I was the first person to do that so obviously on the guitar, and I believe that that’s why it stood out and why people have enjoyed it so much.</p> <p>“[Keyboardist] Jon Lord worked his part out to mine. Initially, I was going to play my solo over the chords he had planned out. But I couldn’t get off on them, so I made up my own chords and we left the spot for him to write a melody. The keyboard solo is quite a bit more difficult than mine because of all those 16th notes." </p> <p>Check out Malmsteen's version of the song below — and don't forget his rendition of <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-yngwie-malmsteen-performs-deep-purples-smoke-water-1992">"Smoke on the Water"!</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/h35FZ6lyzRI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/yngwie-malmsteen">Yngwie Malmsteen</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/deep-purple">Deep Purple</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/yngwie-malmsteen-tackles-deep-purples-highway-star-eighties-listen#comments Deep Purple Ritchie Blackmore Yngwie Malmsteen Videos News Tue, 17 Jun 2014 21:58:12 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21578 Video: Ritchie Blackmore and Deep Purple Perform in New York in 1973 http://www.guitarworld.com/video-ritchie-blackmore-and-deep-purple-perform-new-york-1973 <!--paging_filter--><p>We thought we'd glance back at the classic Mark II lineup of Deep Purple — Ritchie Blackmore (guitar), Roger Glover (bass), Ian Gillan (vocals), Ian Paice (drums) and Jon Lord (keyboards) — tearing it up, live in New York in 1973.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/poll-what-best-deep-purple-song">[[ Guitar World Poll: What Is the Best Deep Purple Song? ]]</a></strong></p> <p>The video's title calls it a "Full Concert." And while that's not quite accurate, the clip does represent 22-plus minutes of Deep Purple at the top of their game. </p> <p>They plow through "Strange Kind of Woman," "Smoke on the Water" and "Space Truckin'" before turning things over to Lord, who is eventually joined by Blackmore, who throws down and steps on his Strat, tosses it in the air, replaces it with another (out-of-tune) Strat and slips into smoke-machine nirvana. </p> <p>While we don't know much about the show's exact date or venue, we know it was filmed before July 1973, when singer David Coverdale stepped in for Gillan.</p> <p>The current version of Deep Purple features the same rhythm section seen in the video below — Glover and Paice — plus Gillan on vocals. Dixie Dregs axeman Steve Morse and keyboardist Don Airey round out the band's current lineup. Lord, who died last year, retired from the band in 2002. Blackmore quit in 1993. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="400" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/3AL73LYo64A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/deep-purple">Deep Purple</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-ritchie-blackmore-and-deep-purple-perform-new-york-1973#comments Deep Purple Ritchie Blackmore Roger Glover Videos News Thu, 09 Jan 2014 17:46:16 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18274 Video: Ritchie Blackmore Interviewed by RT — "The Whole World is Kind of Phony" http://www.guitarworld.com/video-ritchie-blackmore-interviewed-rt-whole-world-kind-phony <!--paging_filter--><p>Besides his recent albums with Blackmore's Night, we really don't hear a lot from former Deep Purple guitarist Ritchie Blackmore these days.</p> <p>Which is why it's nice to have stumbled upon this recently uploaded (August 2013) video of Blackmore in full interview mode.</p> <p>"I've noticed that a lot of people who say a lot of things are actually saying nothing," Blackmore says in the clip, which was created by <a href="http://rt.com/on-air/">RT</a>. Perhaps that's why we haven't heard from him in a while ... .</p> <p>The clip was uploaded by a Blackmore fan site, which also has posted a clip of "Blackmore's Best Solos." We've included both videos for your viewing pleasure!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="400" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zZEKrA_nsc4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/nsk94xfNKls" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-ritchie-blackmore-interviewed-rt-whole-world-kind-phony#comments Blackmore's Night Deep Purple Ritchie Blackmore News Fri, 25 Oct 2013 19:11:05 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19578 Video: Ritchie Blackmore-Era Deep Purple Perform "Knocking at Your Back Door" from Live DVD http://www.guitarworld.com/video-ritchie-blackmore-era-deep-purple-perform-knocking-your-back-door-live-dvd <!--paging_filter--><p>Check out this newly released video of Deep Purple performing "Knocking at Your Back Door" in Melbourne, Australia, during their lengthy mid-'80s reunion tour.</p> <p>The clip is from <em>Perfect Strangers Live</em>, the band's new live DVD, which was released this week by Eagle Rock Entertainment.</p> <p>The DVD represents the only full-length recording of the band from that time (which is sort of bizarre, when you think about it). <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-mid-80s-ritchie-blackmore-era-deep-purple-perform-perfect-strangers-new-live-dvd">Although we've already posted the official video of "Perfect Strangers" from this DVD</a>, "Knocking at Your Back Door" has a lot more guitar action to enjoy. Ritchie Blackmore's slide solo starts at 3:48 (Don't worry — there's more Blackmore after the 5:30 mark). </p> <p>The Mark II version of Deep Purple — Blackmore, Ian Gillan, Roger Glover, Jon Lord and Ian Paice — reunited in 1984 to record a killer of a comeback album, <em>Perfect Strangers</em>, marking the first time the lineup had worked together since 1973. "Knocking at Your Back Door" is one of the many standout tracks from the album.</p> <p>From Eagle Rock: “<em>Perfect Strangers Live</em> is a stunning concert with the band in incendiary form. The setlist mixes new tracks from <em>Perfect Strangers</em> with favorites from the early '70s, culminating in the "Smoke on the Water" finale. This is one of the finest Deep Purple concerts ever filmed.”</p> <p>Deep Purple are among the 2014 nominees for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="400" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wfW3Plbi3J4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong><em>Perfect Strangers Live</em> Tracklist</strong>:</p> <p>01. Highway Star<br /> 02. Nobody’s Home<br /> 03. Strange Kind Of Woman<br /> 04. A Gypsy’s Kiss<br /> 05. Perfect Strangers (<a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-mid-80s-ritchie-blackmore-era-deep-purple-perform-perfect-strangers-new-live-dvd">Hear it HERE</a>)<br /> 06. Under The Gun<br /> 07. Knocking At Your Back Door<br /> 08. Lazy (including Ian Paice drum solo)<br /> 09. Child In Time<br /> 10. Difficult To Cure<br /> 11. Jon Lord Keyboard Solo<br /> 12. Space Truckin’ (with Ritchie Blackmore guitar solo)<br /> 13. Black Night (<a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-mid-80s-ritchie-blackmore-era-deep-purple-perform-black-night-new-live-dvd">Hear it HERE</a>)<br /> 14. Speed King<br /> 15. Smoke On The Water</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/deep-purple">Deep Purple</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-ritchie-blackmore-era-deep-purple-perform-knocking-your-back-door-live-dvd#comments Deep Purple Ritchie Blackmore News Wed, 16 Oct 2013 15:20:48 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19482 Video: Mid-'80s, Ritchie Blackmore-Era Deep Purple Perform "Black Night" from New Live DVD http://www.guitarworld.com/video-mid-80s-ritchie-blackmore-era-deep-purple-perform-black-night-new-live-dvd <!--paging_filter--><p>Check out this newly released clip of Deep Purple performing "Black Night" in Melbourne, Australia, during their lengthy mid-'80s reunion tour.</p> <p>The video from an upcoming DVD, <em>Perfect Strangers Live</em>, which will be released this coming Tuesday, October 14, by Eagle Rock Entertainment.</p> <p>The concert on the DVD is the only full-length recording of the band from that time (which is sort of odd). <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-mid-80s-ritchie-blackmore-era-deep-purple-perform-perfect-strangers-new-live-dvd">Although we've already posted the official video of "Perfect Strangers" from this same DVD</a>, "Black Night" has a lot more guitar action to enjoy. You can watch Ritchie Blackmore run back to grab his slide at around the 1:25 mark; his slide solo kicks in at 1:29. </p> <p>The Mark II version of Deep Purple — Blackmore, Ian Gillan, Roger Glover, Jon Lord and Ian Paice — had reunited to record a killer of a comeback album, 1984's <em>Perfect Strangers</em>, marking the first time the lineup had worked together since 1973.</p> <p>From Eagle Rock: “<em>Perfect Strangers Live</em> is a stunning concert with the band in incendiary form. The setlist mixes new tracks from <em>Perfect Strangers</em> with favorites from the early '70s, culminating in the "Smoke on the Water" finale. This is one of the finest Deep Purple concerts ever filmed.”</p> <p><strong><em>Perfect Strangers Live</em> Tracklist</strong>:</p> <p>01. Highway Star<br /> 02. Nobody’s Home<br /> 03. Strange Kind Of Woman<br /> 04. A Gypsy’s Kiss<br /> 05. Perfect Strangers (<a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-mid-80s-ritchie-blackmore-era-deep-purple-perform-perfect-strangers-new-live-dvd">Hear it HERE</a>)<br /> 06. Under The Gun<br /> 07. Knocking At Your Back Door<br /> 08. Lazy (including Ian Paice drum solo)<br /> 09. Child In Time<br /> 10. Difficult To Cure<br /> 11. Jon Lord Keyboard Solo<br /> 12. Space Truckin’ (with Ritchie Blackmore guitar solo)<br /> 13. Black Night<br /> 14. Speed King<br /> 15. Smoke On The Water</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="400" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/OSLfwpYbFNg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/deep-purple">Deep Purple</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-mid-80s-ritchie-blackmore-era-deep-purple-perform-black-night-new-live-dvd#comments Deep Purple Ritchie Blackmore News Fri, 11 Oct 2013 14:42:23 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19444 Video: Mid-'80s, Ritchie Blackmore-Era Deep Purple Perform "Perfect Strangers" from New Live DVD http://www.guitarworld.com/video-mid-80s-ritchie-blackmore-era-deep-purple-perform-perfect-strangers-new-live-dvd <!--paging_filter--><p><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-purples-ian-gillian-has-no-desire-reunite-ritchie-blackmore">Speaking of Ritchie Blackmore-era Deep Purple</a>, check out this newly released clip of Deep Purple performing "Perfect Strangers" in Melbourne, Australia, during their lengthy mid-'80s reunion tour.</p> <p>It's from an upcoming DVD, <em>Perfect Strangers Live</em>, which will be released October 14 by Eagle Rock Entertainment.</p> <p>The concert on the DVD is the only full-length recording of the band from that time (which is sort of odd).</p> <p>The Mark II version of Deep Purple — Ian Gillan, Ritchie Blackmore, Roger Glover, Jon Lord and Ian Paice — had reunited to record a killer of a comeback album, 1984's <em>Perfect Strangers</em>, marking the first time the lineup had worked together since 1973. Blackmore has said the album's title track (which you can hear below) is his favorite Deep Purple song.</p> <p>According to Eagle Rock: “<em>Perfect Strangers Live</em> is a stunning concert with the band in incendiary form. The setlist mixes new tracks from <em>Perfect Strangers</em> with favorites from the early '70s, culminating in the "Smoke on the Water" finale. This is one of the finest Deep Purple concerts ever filmed.”</p> <p><strong><em>Perfect Strangers Live</em> Tracklist</strong>:</p> <p>01. Highway Star<br /> 02. Nobody’s Home<br /> 03. Strange Kind Of Woman<br /> 04. A Gypsy’s Kiss<br /> 05. Perfect Strangers<br /> 06. Under The Gun<br /> 07. Knocking At Your Back Door<br /> 08. Lazy (including Ian Paice drum solo)<br /> 09. Child In Time<br /> 10. Difficult To Cure<br /> 11. Jon Lord Keyboard Solo<br /> 12. Space Truckin’ (with Ritchie Blackmore guitar solo)<br /> 13. Black Night<br /> 14. Speed King<br /> 15. Smoke On The Water</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="400" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/RNiqA_lynH4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/deep-purple">Deep Purple</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-mid-80s-ritchie-blackmore-era-deep-purple-perform-perfect-strangers-new-live-dvd#comments Deep Purple Ritchie Blackmore News Thu, 19 Sep 2013 20:04:17 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19285 Hear Isolated Guitar Solos from Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody," Deep Purple's "Highway Star," Judas Priest's "Painkiller," Metallica's "Fade to Black" and More http://www.guitarworld.com/isolated-guitar-solos-queen-bohemian-rhapsody-deep-purple-highway-star-judas-priest-painkiller-metallica-fade-black <!--paging_filter--><p>Below, check out the isolated guitar parts from Brian May's solo on Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" and Ritchie Blackmore's solo on Deep Purple's "Highway Star."</p> <p>But wait, there's more! </p> <p>If you keep listening to the playlist, you'll hear several more isolated guitar tracks, including "Painkiller" by Judas Priest, the Eagles' "Hotel California," Eddie Van Halen's solo from Michael Jackson's "Beat It" and Metallica's "Fade to Black." </p> <p>What do these songs have in common? Not a hell of a lot, except that all the clips were posted by the same YouTube account (the guy who made this playlist). </p> <p>If nothing else, these clips are fun to listen to — and they'll help you figure out what you've been doing wrong all these years! Enjoy!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/etswaxT7Mkg?list=PL3LmXKKwXUCM50650o7Gudig4t6N9IrAn" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/isolated-guitar-solos-queen-bohemian-rhapsody-deep-purple-highway-star-judas-priest-painkiller-metallica-fade-black#comments Brian May Deep Purple Eddie Van Halen Metallica Queen Ritchie Blackmore News Thu, 05 Sep 2013 20:58:23 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19160 Deep Purple's Ian Gillan Has No Desire to Reunite with Ritchie Blackmore http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-purples-ian-gillian-has-no-desire-reunite-ritchie-blackmore <!--paging_filter--><p>Deep Purple released a successful album earlier this summer. So did Ritchie Blackmore's band, Blackmore's Night.</p> <p>But is there a chance these guys will get together and release a Deep Purple album <em>with</em> Blackmore?</p> <p>According to Deep Purple singer Ian Gillan, it's never gonna happen.</p> <p>Gillan, whose decades-long feuds with the ex-Deep Purple guitarist are part of rock lore, was asked about the possibility of reaching out to Blackmore during a recent interview with Argentina radio station Vorterix Rock 103.1. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-purple-release-perfect-strangers-live-dvd-october">[[ Check out Ritchie Blackmore with Deep Purple in a new DVD — <em>Perfect Strangers Live</em> ]]</a></strong></p> <p>His response (<strong>which you can hear in the video below</strong>): “If you want to talk about Ritchie, I guess we have to — not many people do these days. But the truth of the matter is, from a historical point of view, the band was dying. If Ritchie had stayed in the band, it would have been the end of Deep Purple. </p> <p>"The shows were getting shorter and shorter, the audiences were getting smaller and smaller. We were playing in small halls, and they weren't even full — they were half empty — and Ritchie was walking off stage every night. </p> <p>"And so, when he left 20 years ago, it stopped raining and the sun came out, and Jon Lord, amongst others, started walking up straight; his personality re-emerged. So did Roger Glover and Ian Paice; they became they were people originally, instead of fending and cowering in case they upset Ritchie. And so this situation ended, and we're all glad it ended, and we had to rebuild. And, of course, now the distance of time is so great that we just remember the good times. </p> <p>"And we remember Ritchie as a great player, a great performer, a great writer, and I remember him as my roommate; I used to share rooms with him. But something happened with Ritchie, and that's the end of that. So we remember the past as it was; it was completely and totally different to Jon Lord." </p> <p>Blackmore left Deep Purple (for good) in November 1993.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zY8TXnJHYd4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="400" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/3AL73LYo64A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/deep-purple">Deep Purple</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-purples-ian-gillian-has-no-desire-reunite-ritchie-blackmore#comments Deep Purple Ian Gillan Ritchie Blackmore News Thu, 01 Aug 2013 15:08:43 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18940 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time Readers Poll: Round 2 — "Highway Star" (Ritchie Blackmore) Vs. "Little Wing" (Jimi Hendrix) http://www.guitarworld.com/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time-readers-poll-round-2-highway-star-ritchie-blackmore-vs-little-wing-jimi-hendrix <!--paging_filter--><p>A few years ago, the editors of <em>Guitar World</em> magazine compiled what we feel is the ultimate guide to the 100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time.</p> <p>The list, which has been quoted by countless artists, websites and publications around the world, starts with Richie Sambora's work on Bon Jovi's “Wanted Dead or Alive” (100) and builds to a truly epic finish with Jimmy Page's solo on "Stairway to Heaven" (01). </p> <p>To quote our <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-1-stairway-heaven-jimmy-page">"Stairway to Heaven" story that ran with the list</a>, "If Jimmy Page is the Steven Spielberg of guitarists, then 'Stairway' is his <em>Close Encounters</em>." </p> <p>In June, we kicked off a summer blockbuster of our own — a no-holds-barred six-string shootout. We pitted <em>Guitar World</em>'s top 64 guitar solos against each other in an NCAA-style, 64-team single-elimination tournament. Every day, we asked you to cast your vote in a different guitar-solo matchup as dictated by the 64-team-style bracket. Now Round 1 has come and gone, leaving us with 32 guitar solo and 16 (sweet) matchups. </p> <p>You can vote only once per matchup, and the voting ends as soon as the next matchup is posted (Basically, that's one poll per day). </p> <p>In some cases, genre will clash against genre; a thrash solo might compete against a Southern rock solo, for instance. But let's get real: They're all guitar solos, played on guitars, by guitarists, most of them in some subset of the umbrella genre of rock. When choosing, it might have to come down to, "Which solo is more original and creative? Which is more iconic? or Which one kicks a larger, more impressive assemblage of asses?"</p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Yesterday's Results</span></p> <p><strong>Winner:</strong> "Since I've Been Loving You" (53.48 percent)<br /> <strong>Loser:</strong> "Time" (46.52 percent)<br /> <br /><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Today's Round 2 Matchup (3 of 16)</span><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;"><em>"Highway Star" Vs. "Little Wing"</em></span></p> <p>Today, Deep Purple's "Highway Star" (15), featuring a solo by Ritchie Blackmore, goes up against Jimi Hendrix's "Little Wing" (18). Get busy! You'll find the poll at the bottom of the story.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-15-highway-star-ritchie-blackmore">15. “Highway Star”</a></strong><br /> <strong>Soloist</strong>: Ritchie Blackmore<br /> <strong>Album</strong>: Deep Purple—<em>Machine Head</em> (Warner Bros., 1972)</p> <p>“I wrote that out note for note about a week before we recorded it,” says Ritchie Blackmore. “And that is one of the only times I have ever done that. I wanted it to sound like someone driving in a fast car, for it to be one of those songs you would listen to while speeding. </p> <p>And I wanted a very definite Bach sound, which is why I wrote it out—and why I played those very rigid arpeggios across that very familiar Bach progression—Dm, Gm, Cmaj, Amaj. I believe that I was the first person to do that so obviously on the guitar, and I believe that that’s why it stood out and why people have enjoyed it so much.</p> <p>“[Keyboardist] Jon Lord worked his part out to mine. Initially, I was going to play my solo over the chords he had planned out. But I couldn’t get off on them, so I made up my own chords and we left the spot for him to write a melody. The keyboard solo is quite a bit more difficult than mine because of all those 16th notes. </p> <p>Over the years, I’ve always played that solo note for note—again, one of the few where I’ve done that—but it just got faster and faster onstage because we would drink more and more whiskey. Jon would have to play his already difficult part faster and faster and he would get very annoyed about it.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/41qfIecwXFg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-18-little-wing-jimi-hendrix">18. “Little Wing”</a></strong><br /> <strong>Soloist</strong>: Jimi Hendrix<br /> <strong>Album</strong>: The Jimi Hendrix Experience—<em>Axis: Bold as Love</em> (Experience Hendrix/MCA, 1968)</p> <p>Covered by artists like Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan and Sting, “Little Wing” is one of Jimi Hendrix’s most beautiful and enduring compositions. It’s easy to see why. The original is seductively warm, poignant and light as a feather. Engineer Eddie Kramer explains how Jimi achieved the song’s ethereal glow in the studio.</p> <p>“One of my favorite touches on that track is the glockenspiel part, which was played by Jimi,” says Kramer. “Part of the beauty of recording at Olympic Studios in London was using instruments that had been left from previous sessions. The glockenspiel was just laying around, so Jimi used it.”</p> <p>Hendrix’s rich and watery guitar solo was, says Kramer, in part the product of a secret weapon. “One of the engineers had built this miniature Leslie,” continues Kramer. “It was like it was built out of an Erector set and had a small eight-inch speaker that rotated. Believe it or not, the guitar solo was fed through this tiny thing, and that’s the lovely effect you hear on the lead.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/LWvJztH5wuc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/tab-books/products/guitar-worlds-100-greatest-guitar-solos-of-all-time/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=ReadersPollRound2">[[ When you're done voting, start learning every guitar solo in this poll — and more! Check out a new TAB book from Guitar World and Hal Leonard: 'The 100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time: A Treasure Trove of Guitar Leads Transcribed Note-for-Note, Plus Song Notes for More Than 40 of the Best Solos.' It's available now at the Guitar World Online Store for $29.99. ]]</a></strong></p> <h1>Voting Closed!</h1> <p><strong>Winner:</strong> "Little Wing" (56.51 percent)<br /> <strong>Loser:</strong> "Highway Star" (43.49 percent)</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time">Head HERE to see today's matchup and all the matchups that have taken place so far!</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/deep-purple">Deep Purple</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time-readers-poll-round-2-highway-star-ritchie-blackmore-vs-little-wing-jimi-hendrix#comments Deep Purple Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time Jimi Hendrix Poll Polls Ritchie Blackmore News Features Wed, 17 Jul 2013 15:49:59 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18826 Blackmore's Night Premiere Music Video for "Dancer and the Moon" http://www.guitarworld.com/blackmores-night-premiere-music-video-dancer-and-moon <!--paging_filter--><p>Ritchie Blackmore's current band — Blackmore's Night — have released a new music video for the title track from their latest album, <em>Dancer and the Moon</em>. </p> <p>The album was released June 11 by Frontiers Records.</p> <p><em>Dancer and the Moon</em>, the band's eighth studio album, features several instrumentals, including "Galliard" and "Carry On… Jon," which Blackmore wrote as a tribute to the late Jon Lord of Deep Purple.</p> <p>You can check out "Carry On... Jon" <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/hear-carry-onjon-ritchie-blackmores-instrumental-tribute-deep-purples-jon-lord">right here</a>. You can hear another track from the new album, "The Moon Is Shining (Somewhere Over the Sea)," <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/listen-blackmores-night-premiere-new-song-moon-shining-somewhere-over-sea">which we debuted here on GuitarWorld.com</a>, via the Soundcloud player below. </p> <p><strong><em>Dancer and the Moon</em> Track Listing:</strong></p> <p>01. I Think It's Going To Rain Today<br /> 02. Troika<br /> 03. The Last Leaf<br /> 04. Lady In Black<br /> 05. Minstrels In The Hall<br /> 06. The Temple Of The King<br /> 07. Dancer And The Moon<br /> 08. Galliard<br /> 09. The Ashgrove<br /> 10. Somewhere Over The Sea (The Moon Is Shining)<br /> 11. The Moon Is Shining (Somewhere Over The Sea)<br /> 12. The Spinner's Tale<br /> 13. Carry On... Jon</p> <p>For more information about Blackmore's Night and <em>Dancer and the Moon</em>, visit <a href="http://www.blackmoresnight.com/">blackmoresnight.com</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/aTdSm4Rn1XA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F92326252%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-nVsCp"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/blackmores-night-premiere-music-video-dancer-and-moon#comments Blackmore's Night Ritchie Blackmore Videos News Tue, 09 Jul 2013 14:50:24 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18753 Deep Purple's Ritchie Blackmore Discusses His Development as a Guitarist in 1991 Guitar World Interview http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-purples-ritchie-blackmore-discusses-his-development-guitarist-1991-guitar-world-interview <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>This interview with Ritchie Blackmore of Deep Purple appeared in the February 1991 issue of <em>Guitar World</em></strong>. <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/photo-gallery-guitar-world-magazine-covers-through-years-1991">To see the Blackmore cover -- and all the GW covers from 1991 -- click here.</a></p> <p>It’s a cold, rainy night in Connecticut. Executive Editor Brad Tolinski and I are in the lobby of a fine hotel, waiting to meet Ritchie Blackmore. </p> <p>The veteran guitarist has, in his infinite mercy, granted us a rare interview. (Perhaps the imminent release of the new Deep Purple album, <em>Slaves And Masters</em>, featuring Purple's latest member, Joe Lynn Turner, has something to do with this.) At the moment, Blackmore is dining with some friends; he is to join us at the conclusion of his meal.</p> <p>Tolinski and I are a bit apprehensive. Blackmore's irascibility is legend, as is his antipathy toward the press. To make matters worse, even some of those close to the star have warned that he could become "troublesome." I feel like I'm about to meet Darth Vader.</p> <p>As I examine my tape recorder to ensure that everything is in working order (I'm always worried that it will break down), a grim scenario plays itself repeatedly in my brain: The interview has commenced. I ask my first question --"How does this version Deep Purple differ from past formations?" Blackmore stares at me, his features growing black with rage. </p> <p>“How <em>dare</em> you ask me that?” he barks. "Take that!" He bops me over the head with a white Strat, which falls all around me in splinters. The angry man rises and stalks out. End of interview.</p> <p>I return to an uneasy reality, but calm myself with the thought that my guitar hero can't possibly be such an ogre. Then I remember that as a youth, Blackmore had a penchant for throwing eggs, tomatoes and four-pound bags of flour from moving vehicles at passersby (with particular preference, presumably, for elderly women in wheelchairs.)</p> <p>At last, a member of Blackmore's entourage comes by to say that the great one is ready. We enter the dimly-lit dining area to the accompaniment of mellow piano music, diners' chattering and dishes clattering, and seat ourselves. After a few moments, we are joined by Ritchie Blackmore.</p> <p>He looks great -- better than he did ten years ago, which is far more than can be said of most longtime rockers. As usual, he's dressed in black, except for a white ruffled shirt that makes him look like a French nobleman. He grasps our outstretched hands ("a good sign," I think) and we introduce ourselves. Blackmore seats himself, and orders a beer.</p> <p>"Are you ready?" I ask, and Blackmore nods his assent. But before I can ask the first question, he points at my tape recorder and in thick British tones says, "By the way, that's not on."</p> <p>"Oh no," I think. "The tape's busted!" My worst fears, realized. Tolinski stares at me, horror etched on his features. I examine the contraption, but it seems to be running smoothly. I turn to Blackmore, a bit befuddled, and insist, "It's moving. It's on.”</p> <p>"Just checking," he says slyly. And with that, the interview commences. Within a few dizzying moments he demonstrates that, his reputation notwithstanding, he is a hell of a nice guy, funny -- a great dude to hang out with. He even performs a magic trick, changing a nickel into a quarter before our very appreciative eyes.</p> <p>Two hours pass. The restaurant 's proprietor stops by to announce, "Closing time." I wholeheartedly thank Ritchie for being so cooperative. "Thank you for being so attentive," says this amiable bane of rock journalists.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: How does this edition of Deep Purple differ from past formations?</strong></p> <p>Musically, I would say the singer doesn't drink as much. [laughs] But seriously, the older I get, the more I want to hear melodies. We really worked hard on constructing good, memorable songs and interesting chord progressions. That 's what excites me at the moment.</p> <p>It also helped that our new singer, Joe Lynn Turner, writes and sings great melodies. With Joe, we didn't have to rely as much on heavy riffs. When I was 20, I didn't give a damn about song construction. I just wanted to make as much noise and play as fast and as loud as possible.</p> <p><strong>As a guitarist, what were you looking to do differently on this new record? For instance, the solo on "King Of Dreams" has an exotic tinge that doesn't appear in any of your previous work.</strong></p> <p>I wanted that solo to evoke a certain mood. It isn't meant to be a pointless exercise in speed; that's why it's very sparse. I was trying to make it an extension of the vocal melody and have it express something that was connected to the bloody song. I didn't want to just show off some trick I'd learned at the music store on Saturday morning.</p> <p><strong>When writing, or when engaged in preproduction for an album, do you work solos out in advance?</strong></p> <p>I never work out my leads. Everything I do is usually totally spontaneous. If someone says, "That was good; play that again," I'm not able to do it. The only solo I've committed to memory is "Highway Star" [from I972's <em>Machine Head</em>]. I like playing that semitone run in the middle.</p> <p><strong>[Keyboardist] Jon Lord plays more textures, rather than actual lines, on this new album.</strong></p> <p>Jon likes to see what I'm going to do and he enhances that. He's not a leader; he likes to follow.</p> <hr /> <strong>Is that why your relationship has lasted so long?</strong> <p>Yes, because we don't tread on each other's toes.</p> <p><strong>Let's go back to the beginning of Deep Purple. How did you and Jon meet?</strong></p> <p>I met him in a transvestite bar in '68, in Hamburg, Germany. [laughs] Back in the late Sixties, there were few organists who could play like Jon. We shared the same taste in music. We loved Vanilla Fudge -- they were our heroes. They used to play London's Speakeasy and all the hippies used to go there to hang out -- Clapton, The Beatles -- everybody went there to pose. According to legend, the talk of the town during that period was Jimi Hendrix, but that's not true. It was Vanilla Fudge. They played eight-minute songs, with dynamics. People said, "What the hell's going on here? How come it's not three minutes?" Timmy Bogert, their bassist, was amazing. The whole group was way ahead of its time.</p> <p>So, initially we wanted to be a Vanilla Fudge clone. But our singer, Ian, wanted to be Edgar Winter. He'd say, "I want to scream like that, like Edgar Winter." So that's what we were -- Vanilla Fudge with Edgar Winter!</p> <p><strong>After your breakthrough record, <em>Concerto For Group And Orchestra</em> [1970] with The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, your playing took a more aggressive turn. <em>In Rock</em> [1970] almost became the blueprint for all subsequent Purple records.</strong></p> <p>I became tired of playing with orchestras. <em>In Rock</em> was my way of rebelling against a certain classical element in the band. Ian Gillan, Roger Glover and I wanted to be a hard rock band -- we wanted to play rock and roll only. So off we went in that direction.</p> <p>I felt that the whole orchestra thing was a bit tame. I mean, you're playing in the Royal Albert Hall, and the audience sits there with folded arms, and you're standing there playing next to a violinist who holds his ears every time you take a solo. It doesn't make you feel particularly inspired.</p> <p><strong>You started using the vibrato bar extensively on <em>In Rock</em>.<strong></strong></strong></p> <p>Yes, that's right. I'd seen the James Cotton Blues Band at the Fillmore East, and the guitarist in the band played with the vibrato bar. He got the most amazing sounds. Right after seeing him, I started using the bar. Hendrix inspired me, too.</p> <p><strong>You used to give the whammy bar a real workout.</strong></p> <p>I went crazy with it. I used to have quarter-inch bars made for me because I'd keep snapping the normal kind. My repairman would look at me strangely and say, "What are you doing to these tremolo bars?" Finally, he gave me this gigantic tremolo arm made of half-an-inch of solid iron and said, "Here. If you break this thing, I don't wanna know about it!"</p> <p>About three weeks later I went back to the shop. He looked at me and said, "No -- you <em>haven't.</em>" And I said, "Yes, I have." In graphic detail, I explained to him how I would twirl the guitar around by the bar, throw it to the floor, put my foot on it and pull the bar off with two hands. He was a bit of a purist, so he wasn't amused.</p> <p><strong>There is a lot of unusual noise during the final solo of "Hard Lovin' Man" [<em>In Rock</em>]. Is that you, throwing your guitar around in the studio?</strong></p> <p>If I remember right, I was knocking my guitar up and down against a door in the control room. The engineer looked at me oddly. He was one of your typical, old-school engineers. Like my repairman, he wasn't amused, either.</p> <p><strong>Did you ever try a locking-nut tremolo system?</strong></p> <p>No. I don't use the twang bar anymore. It's become too popular.</p> <p><strong>Between <em>In Rock</em> and <em>Fireball</em> [1971], you switched from Gibsons to Fender Strats. How did that affect your playing style?</strong></p> <p>It was difficult, because it's much easier to flow across the strings on a Gibson. Fenders have more tension, so you have to fight them a little bit. I had a hell of a time. But I stuck with the Fenders because I was so taken with their sound, especially when they were paired with a wah-wah.</p> <p><strong>Around <em>Fireball</em> and <em>Machine Head</em> [1972], your playing took on a blues and funk edge. Did Hendrix have anything to do with that?</strong></p> <p>I was impressed by Hendrix. Not so much by his playing, as his attitude -- he wasn't a great player, but everything else about him was brilliant. Even the way he walked was amazing. His guitar playing, though, was always a little bit weird. Hendrix inspired me, but I was still more into Wes Montgomery. I was also into the Allman Brothers around the time of those albums.</p> <p><strong>What do you think of Stevie Ray Vaughan?</strong></p> <p>I knew that question was coming. His death was very tragic, but I'm surprised that everybody thinks he was such a brilliant player when there are people like Buddy Guy, Albert Collins, Peter Green and Mick Taylor; Johnny Winter, who is one of the best blues players in the world, is also very underrated. His vibrato is incredible.</p> <p>Stevie Ray Vaughan was very intense. Maybe that's what caught everybody's attention. As a player, he didn't do anything amazing.</p> <p><strong>How did you develop your own unique finger vibrato style?</strong></p> <p>In my early days, I never used finger vibrato at all. I originally carved my reputation as one of the "fast" guitar players. Than I heard Eric Clapton. I remember saying to him, "You have a strange style. Do you play with that vibrato stuff?" Really an idiotic question. But he was a nice guy about it. Right after that I started working on my vibrato. It took about two or three years for me to develop any technique. Around '68 or '69 you suddenly hear it in my playing.</p> <p><strong>I've noticed that your rhythm parts aren't always played with a pick.</strong></p> <p>That's from being lazy. It's like Jeff Beck -- when he can't find a pick, he just plays with his fingers. You know how it is. You're watching television and you can't find a pick, so you just play with your fingers. Even on something as simple as the riff to "Smoke On The Water," you 'd be surprised at how many people play that with down strokes, as though it were chords. I pluck the riff, which makes a world of difference. Otherwise, you're just hitting the tonic before the fifth.</p> <p><strong>Why do you think that, of all your work, "Smoke On The Water" is so enduring? The riff is the rock equivalent to the opening of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony.</strong></p> <p>Simplicity is the key. And it is simple -- you can still hear people playing it at music stores. I never had the courage to write until I heard "I Can't Explain" and "My Generation." Those riffs were so straightforward that I thought, "All right, if Pete Townshend can get away with that, then I can, too!"</p> <p><strong>What did you think of Tommy Bolin when he took your place in Deep Purple, following your '74 departure?</strong></p> <p>I originally heard him on Billy Cobham's <em>Spectrum</em> album, and thought, "Who is this guy?" Then I saw him on television and he looked incredible -- like Elvis Presley. I knew he was gonna be big.</p> <p>When I heard that Purple hired him I thought it was great. He was always so humble. I remember he would always invite me out to his house in Hollywood to see his guitar. One day I went to his place. I walked in and tried to find him, but no one was around. There were no furnishings -- nothing. I stayed there for ten minutes before he finally appeared. He showed me his guitar, and the strings must have had a quarter-inch of grime on them, as though he hadn't changed them in four years. I asked him when was the last time he'd changed strings, and he said very seriously, "Gee, I don't know. Do you think I should change them?"</p> <hr /> <strong>Following your departure from Purple, you drifted back to a slightly classical direction in Rainbow.</strong> <p>I was never sure <em>what</em> I wanted to be. I found the blues too limiting, too confining. I'd always thought -- with all due respect to B.B. King -- that you couldn't just play four notes. Classical, on the other hand, was always too disciplined. I was always playing between the two, stuck in a musical no-man's land.</p> <p><strong>Did you ever toy with the idea of playing strictly classical music?</strong></p> <p>Yes. I would love to go back to the 1520s, the time of my favorite music. A few of my friends in Germany have a very authentic four-piece, and they play medieval music. I've always wanted to play with them, but it hasn't panned out yet. But in general, I'm not good enough, technically, to be a classical musician. I lack discipline. When you're dealing with classical music, you have to be rigid. I'm not a rigid player. I like to improvise.</p> <p><strong>The song "Stargazer," from the second Rainbow album [<em>Rainbows Rising</em>, 1976], has a strong classical feel. How did you come up with that one?</strong></p> <p>That was a good tune. I wrote that on the cello. I had given up on the guitar between '75 and '78. I completely lost interest. I was sick of hearing other guitar players and I was tired of my tunes. What I really wanted to be was Jacqueline DuPrey on cello. So I started playing cello.</p> <p><strong>Did you ever record with a cello?</strong></p> <p>Yes, just on a small backing track -- I can't remember on what. But you have to give your whole life to a cello. When I realized that, I went back to the guitar and just turned the volume up a bit louder.</p> <p><strong>Was there anything you learned from the cello that you applied to the guitar?</strong></p> <p>Not really. The cello is such a melancholy instrument, such an isolated, miserable instrument.... But it was an appropriate choice for me at the time, because my girlfriend had left me and I was going through this miserable phase.</p> <p><strong>What do you think of Yngwie Malmsteen? He's often credited you as an influence.</strong></p> <p>He's always been very nice to me, and I always get on very well with him. I don't understand him, though -- his playing, what he wears. His movements are also a bit creepy. Normally you say, "Well, the guy's just an idiot." But, when you hear him play you think, "This guy's no idiot. He knows what he's doing." He's got to calm down. He's not Paganini -- though he thinks he is. When Yngwie can break all of his strings but one, and play the same piece on one string, then I'll be impressed. In three or four years, we'll probably hear some good stuff from him.</p> <p><strong>What do you think of tapping?</strong></p> <p>Thank goodness it's come to an end. The first person I saw doing that hammer-on stuff was Harvey Mandel, at the Whisky A Go-Go in '68. I thought "What the hell is he doing?" It was so funny [laughs], Jim Morrison was carried out because he was shouting abuse at the band. Jimi Hendrix was there. We were all getting drunk. Then Harvey Mandel starts doing this stuff [mimes tapping]. "What's he doing?" everybody was saying. Even the audience stopped dancing. Obviously, Eddie Van Halen must have picked up a few of those things.</p> <p><strong>What do you think of him?</strong></p> <p>It depends on my mood. He is probably the most influential player in the last 15 years 'cause everybody's gone out and bought one of those, what does he play, Charvel, Carvel ...</p> <p><strong>Kramer, with the locking nut.</strong></p> <p>Yes, with the locking nut! And everyone's gone hammer-on crazy! So he's obviously done something. He's a great guitar player, but I'm more impressed by his recent songwriting and keyboard work. I think he's going to be remembered -- he could be the next Cole Porter.</p> <p><strong>How do you feel about your own guitar hero status?</strong></p> <p>It's funny to find myself in that position, because when I first came to America I thought, "Why go to America when they have these fantastic players?" I was brought up on [pedal steel great] Speedy West and [country guitarist] Jimmy Bryant, people like that. When I was 13 years old, I couldn't believe how good they were. I thought, "When I go to America, I'm going to get killed."</p> <p>Everything changed when we had a hit with "Hush." I found people saying, "Oh, you play guitar really well." I'd say, "How can you say that when you've got these guys in Nashville who just tear me apart?" I still say it. If you tune into <em>Hee Haw</em> you'll see these guys who are absolutely amazing. Jeff Beck once told me that he went to Nashville to do a record. While he was in the studio, this guy who was sweeping up asked him, "Can I borrow your guitar for a second?" Jeff said, "Oh, of course." The guy started playing and completely blew Jeff away. He left soon after that. Thank goodness all those amazing players stay in Nashville!</p> <p><strong>Has your approach to sound processing changed? Have you checked out any of these multi-effects racks?</strong></p> <p>I don't put myself on Jeff Beck's level, but I can relate to him when he says he'd rather be working on his car collection than playing the guitar. I'm enjoying other things in life, but when I do pick up the guitar, I want to simply plug into a loud amplifier, and that's it. Maybe if I were 20, I'd pay more attention to equipment trends; at 45, you start to go in other directions. I get turned on by soccer shoes; I listen to Renaissance music -- those are the things that really stir my soul.</p> <p>There are so many effects and new guitar players. I can't comprehend it all. When you hear them, you suddenly realize that they all sound the same -- like Eddie Van Halen, speeded up. </p> <p><strong>Do you have a home studio?</strong></p> <p>No, I don't. It's gotten out of hand -- everybody has their own studio. I'd rather write something on the spur of the moment, while doing a formal recording. I believe in inspiration.</p> <p><strong>What does the future hold for you?</strong></p> <p>I'm very moved by Renaissance music, but I still love to play hard rock -- though only if it's sophisticated and has some thought behind it. I don't want to throw myself on a stage and act silly, 'cause I see so many bands doing that today. There's a lot going on today that disturbs me -- so much derivative music. Where are the progressive bands like Cream, Procul Harum, Jethro Tull or the Experience? I could go on, but we have to live with it.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/deep-purple">Deep Purple</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-purples-ritchie-blackmore-discusses-his-development-guitarist-1991-guitar-world-interview#comments Deep Purple GW Archive Ritchie Blackmore Roger Glover Interviews News Features Sat, 29 Jun 2013 13:54:45 +0000 Mordechai Kleidermacher http://www.guitarworld.com/article/13141 Hear "Carry On...Jon," Ritchie Blackmore's Instrumental Tribute to Deep Purple's Jon Lord http://www.guitarworld.com/hear-carry-onjon-ritchie-blackmores-instrumental-tribute-deep-purples-jon-lord <!--paging_filter--><p>Blackmore's Night released their new studio album, <em>Dancer and the Moon</em>, June 11 through Frontiers Records.</p> <p>Among the album's highlights is an instrumental track called "Carry On...Jon," which Ritchie Blackmore wrote as a tribute to his former Deep Purple bandmate Jon Lord, who died in 2012 at age 71.</p> <p>On the nearly six-minute-long minor-key track, which you can hear below, Blackmore employs a creamy, overdriven Strat tone. The track has an organic, almost live feel to it; you can even hear what sounds like Blackmore flipping his five-way pickup switch at the 1:01 mark.</p> <p>Blackmore recently discussed the track with <a href="http://www.nj.com/entertainment/index.ssf/2013/06/ritchie_blackmore.html">New Jersey's Star-Ledger</a> newspaper:</p> <p>"We were snowed in ... the engineer and myself, the producer, we had nothing to do. I said, ‘I have an instrumental I’ve vaguely finished. Do you want to try it?’</p> <p>"I wrote it on the spur of the moment. I had a very melancholy kind of tune. Then I started thinking about Jon. I thought maybe we should do an organ part at the end, as a tip of the hat to Jon. Pat Regan is an accomplished organist. We put the organ sound on, and off he went. I guided him on a few things, like riffs and how Jon played syncopation with his right hand.</p> <p>"It was a throwaway idea that turned into something. It was something to Jon, a way of saying thanks for the years. It’s hard to talk about, when someone says, ‘What did you think of Jon?’ I’d rather play a tune. We wouldn’t have put it on if we hadn’t been snowed in. Maybe Jon caused the blizzard."</p> <p>Regan's keyboard work can be heard on albums by Blackmore's Night, Warrant, Billy Sheehan, Vanilla Fudge, Mr. Big and more.</p> <p>For the rest of the Star-Ledger's story about Blackmore's Night, <a href="http://www.nj.com/entertainment/index.ssf/2013/06/ritchie_blackmore.html">head here.</a> For more about Blackmore's Night, visit <a href="http://www.blackmoresnight.com/">blackmoresnight.com</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/R5bc06vGF_c" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/deep-purple">Deep Purple</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/hear-carry-onjon-ritchie-blackmores-instrumental-tribute-deep-purples-jon-lord#comments Blackmore's Night Deep Purple Jon Lord Ritchie Blackmore News Mon, 17 Jun 2013 14:40:30 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18578 Listen: Blackmore's Night Premiere New Song, "The Moon Is Shining (Somewhere Over the Sea)" http://www.guitarworld.com/listen-blackmores-night-premiere-new-song-moon-shining-somewhere-over-sea <!--paging_filter--><p>Today, GuitarWorld.com presents the premiere of "The Moon Is Shining (Somewhere Over the Sea)," a new track by Ritchie Blackmore's band, Blackmore's Night. </p> <p>The song is from the band's new album, <em>Dancer and the Moon</em>, which will be released June 11 by Frontiers Records.</p> <p>Good news for Blackmore fans: <em>Dancer and the Moon</em>, the band's eighth studio album, features several instrumentals, including "Galliard" and "Carry On… Jon," which Blackmore wrote as a tribute to the late Jon Lord of Deep Purple.</p> <p><em>Dancer and the Moon</em> will be released June 11 in North America and June 14 in Europe in regular CD configuration and deluxe edition in digipak, including a bonus DVD featuring a 40-minute "making of" documentary and acoustic versions of "The Spinner's Tale," "Somewhere Over The Sea/Moon Was Shining," "The Ashgrove" and "Queen For A Day".</p> <p>For more information about Blackmore's Night and <em>Dancer and the Moon</em>, visit <a href="http://www.blackmoresnight.com/">blackmoresnight.com</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F92326252%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-nVsCp"></iframe></p> <p><strong><em>Dancer and the Moon</em> Track Listing:</strong></p> <p>01. I Think It's Going To Rain Today<br /> 02. Troika<br /> 03. The Last Leaf<br /> 04. Lady In Black<br /> 05. Minstrels In The Hall<br /> 06. The Temple Of The King<br /> 07. Dancer And The Moon<br /> 08. Galliard<br /> 09. The Ashgrove<br /> 10. Somewhere Over The Sea (The Moon Is Shining)<br /> 11. The Moon Is Shining (Somewhere Over The Sea)<br /> 12. The Spinner's Tale<br /> 13. Carry On... Jon</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/listen-blackmores-night-premiere-new-song-moon-shining-somewhere-over-sea#comments Blackmore's Night Deep Purple Ritchie Blackmore Features Mon, 17 Jun 2013 10:31:29 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18371 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time Readers Poll: Round 1 — "Highway Star" (Ritchie Blackmore) Vs. "Shock Me" (Ace Frehley) http://www.guitarworld.com/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time-readers-poll-round-1-highway-star-ritchie-blackmore-vs-shock-me-ace-frehley <!--paging_filter--><p>A few years ago, the editors of <em>Guitar World</em> magazine compiled what we feel is the ultimate guide to the 100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time.</p> <p>The list, which has been quoted by countless artists, websites and publications around the world, starts with Richie Sambora's work on Bon Jovi's “Wanted Dead or Alive” (Number 100) and builds to a truly epic finish with Jimmy Page's solo on "Stairway to Heaven" (Number 1). </p> <p>To quote <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-1-stairway-heaven-jimmy-page">our "Stairway" story that ran with the list</a>, "If Jimmy Page is the Steven Spielberg of guitarists, then 'Stairway' is his <em>Close Encounters</em>." </p> <p>We've kicked off a summer blockbuster of our own — a no-holds-barred six-string shootout. We're pitting <em>Guitar World</em>'s top 64 guitar solos against each other in an NCAA-style, 64-team single-elimination tournament. Every day, we will ask you to cast your vote in a different guitar-solo matchup as dictated by the 64-team-style bracket, which you can see in the photo gallery below. </p> <p>Note that you can vote only once per matchup. The voting for each matchup ends as soon as the next matchup is posted (Basically, that's one poll per day during the first round of elimination, including weekends and holidays). </p> <p>In some cases, genre will clash against genre; a thrash solo might compete against a Southern rock solo, for instance. But let's get real: They're all guitar solos, played on guitars, by guitarists, most of them in some subset of the umbrella genre of rock. When choosing, it might have to come down to, "Which solo is more original and creative? Which is more iconic? or Which one kicks a larger, more impressive assemblage of asses?"</p> <p><strong>Voting started Monday, June 10, 2013. Today's matchup pits Ritchie Blackmore's work on Deep Purple's "Highway Star" (15) against Kiss' "Shock Me," featuring Ace Frehley (50). Get busy! You'll find the poll at the bottom of the story.</strong><br /> <br /><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Yesterday's Results</span></p> <p><strong>Winner</strong>: "For the Love of God" (67.82 percent)<br /> <strong>Loser</strong>: "Black Star" (32.18 percent)<br /> <br /><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Round 1, Day 3: "Highway Star" Vs. "Shock Me"</span></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-15-highway-star-ritchie-blackmore">15. “Highway Star”</a></strong><br /> <strong>Soloist</strong>: Ritchie Blackmore<br /> <strong>Album</strong>: Deep Purple—<em>Machine Head</em> (Warner Bros., 1972)</p> <p>“I wrote that out note for note about a week before we recorded it,” says Ritchie Blackmore. “And that is one of the only times I have ever done that. I wanted it to sound like someone driving in a fast car, for it to be one of those songs you would listen to while speeding. And I wanted a very definite Bach sound, which is why I wrote it out—and why I played those very rigid arpeggios across that very familiar Bach progression—Dm, Gm, Cmaj, Amaj. I believe that I was the first person to do that so obviously on the guitar, and I believe that that’s why it stood out and why people have enjoyed it so much.</p> <p>“[Keyboardist] Jon Lord worked his part out to mine. Initially, I was going to play my solo over the chords he had planned out. But I couldn’t get off on them, so I made up my own chords and we left the spot for him to write a melody. The keyboard solo is quite a bit more difficult than mine because of all those 16th notes. Over the years, I’ve always played that solo note for note—again, one of the few where I’ve done that—but it just got faster and faster onstage because we would drink more and more whiskey. Jon would have to play his already difficult part faster and faster and he would get very annoyed about it.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/jh0iihjANPc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-50-shock-me-ace-frehley">50. "Shock Me”</a></strong><br /> <strong>Soloist</strong>: Ace Frehley<br /> <strong>Album</strong>: Kiss—<em>Alive II</em> (Mercury, 1977)</p> <p>“I basically did the same solo every night on that tour, with minor alterations, so I had it kind of planned out when I did it the night we recorded it live for <em>Alive II</em>,” says Ace Frehley.</p> <p>“But if you listen carefully to the ‘Shock Me’ solo you can hear me make a mistake about two thirds of the way through. Instead of tapping a B at the 19th fret of the high E string, I accidentally hit the A# note at the 18th fret—that’s definitely a wrong note for the scale I’m using. We could have fixed it in the mix, but I said to Eddie [Kramer, <em>Alive II</em> producer], ‘Screw it! Leave it in. The run sounds cool, so who cares—it’s rock and roll!’ ”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/iauaDVVPGW8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <h1>Voting Closed!</h1> <p><strong>Winner</strong>: "Highway Star" (68.58 percent)<br /> <strong>Loser</strong>: "Shock Me" (31.42 percent)</p> <p><strong><em>Please check out our current Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time poll at <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/">GuitarWorld.com!</a></em></strong></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time">Head HERE to see all the matchups that have taken place so far!</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/kiss">Kiss</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/deep-purple">Deep Purple</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ace-frehley">Ace Frehley</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time-readers-poll-round-1-highway-star-ritchie-blackmore-vs-shock-me-ace-frehley#comments 100 Greatest Guitar Solos Ace Frehley Deep Purple Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time Kiss Poll Polls Ritchie Blackmore News Features Wed, 12 Jun 2013 11:44:21 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18554