Frank Viele &amp; The Manhattan Project http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/1680/all/www.kungfumusic.com en Pushin’ & Pullin' With Frank Viele: Keep Your Name in the Hat http://www.guitarworld.com/pushin-pullin-frank-viele-keep-your-name-hat <!--paging_filter--><p>While it seems like I start every one of my blog posts with an apology for not posting sooner, I assure you my delay in posting is due solely to the lack of hours in the day associated with the unbelievable musical journey I’ve been on the last half of the year.</p> <p>After performing at the New England Music awards in March, opening for Adam Ezra at The Stone Church in April, bringing the full band out for a performance at The Cambridge Mayfair Festival in May and the Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, Steel Stacks in June and opening for Foreigner in July, the truth is I’m not really sure which crazy story to share with you today.</p> <p>However, as I sit in a Starbucks in Baltimore, killing time before load-in on the last leg of my November acoustic run, the story that comes to mind is the story of my acoustic performance at Club Passim in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on June 28 with Nemes and Ashley Jordan. While the show was five months ago, the story of that evening began in 2004.</p> <p>As a freshman in college, unsure as to where my life was heading but having a strong love for music, I walked onto campus a few towns outside of Boston with a killer record collection and listening to a lot of music my dorm mates had never really heard of before. One of my favorite artists at the time (still is) was a singer/songwriter named Ari Hest. A girl I was dating the summer before college had gotten me into him, and the CD she burned for me before leaving of her favorite Ari tracks was never far from my car stereo.</p> <p>About three months into college, a sophomore who lived across the hall from me knocked on my door and said, “Hey, this singer/songwriter I like is playing with that singer/songwriter you like at this little club in Cambridge called Club Passim. You have a car, right?” The answer was yes, and we opted to head out an hour later toward Cambridge. </p> <p>Performing at Club Passim that night in a “singer/songwriter in the round” scenario sat the three songwriters who would own my iPod for years to come. On stage left was Ari Hest. Dead center sat female singer/songwriter Mieka Pauley. On stage right was Stephen Kellogg.</p> <p>While I went there to see Ari, I quickly became enthralled with Mieka’s version of Sting’s “Fields of Gold” followed by always the entertaining Stephen Kellogg’s version of Poison’s “Every Rose Has It’s Thrown." Their own songs got me hooked, and tracks like Mieka’s “Run” and Stephen’s “Anthem of Our Discovery” would join the ranks of Ari Hest’s “Holding On” at the top of my college playlist. I left their performance that night saying to myself that someday I’ll play Club Passim.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/1.jpg" width="620" height="412" alt="1.jpg" /></p> <p>Fast forward a little less than a year later. I had transferred colleges to a school in Poughkeepsie, New York, and knew very few people on campus upon my arrival except for a few musical buddies from high school. Within three weeks of the first semester, I was delighted to find that Stephen Kellogg was performing at the campus auditorium of my new college, and the school was looking for an opener. Less than a year after seeing him play live at Club Passim, I had the opportunity to perform in front of him and his band, Stephen Kellogg &amp; The Sixers, playing lead guitar for an old high school friend and band mate. </p> <p>Stephen and the band treated us like family the entire time, letting us participate in their pre-show routine, hang out back stage, and even join them on stage for their final song, which was a rendition of The Band’s “The Weight." I would stay in touch with Stephen via email after the performance for a little while, and he gave me the motivation and courage to pursue music as a singer/songwriter myself.</p> <p>Years pass, bands come and go, and 2010 finds me gigging all over the Northeast with my band, Frank Viele &amp; The Manhattan Project, supporting our first album, <em>Neon Lights</em>. Via Sonicbids we get a rare opportunity to play a festival in Newport, Rhode Island, and we are co-headlining the event with a band out of the Boston area, Air Traffic Controller. Due to this opportunity, I meet a big supporter of theirs and a troubadour of the Cambridge/Boston Music scene, Joe G. from WMBR Radio. Joe becomes an invaluable supporter and friend of me and my music, having me on his show on numerous occasions and helping me cement myself in the Massachusetts music scene. </p> <p>Now, with a growing crowd in the Cambridge area, Joe G. helps me land my first slot at Club Passim supporting two other talented Massachusetts acts that had also graced the stage on his radio show. </p> <p>The performance had a magical feeling, as it truly was one of the rare moments in life when things seem to run full circle and decisions I had made in the past that maybe didn’t make sense at the time finally seemed justified. </p> <p>So why am I thinking about it now, six months after the gig? </p> <p>Well, that random performance with three amazing singer/songwriters that I experienced as a teenager in Cambridge came to the forefront of my thoughts on Wednesday when I performed at my first singer/songwriter in the round scenario in Ardmore, Pennsylvania. En route to gigs in DC and Maryland, I stopped at Milkboy in Ardmore and was asked to perform as part of <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auQnY0l8NjE">The 9 Singer/Songwriter Series</a>. This is a phenomenal collection of musicians led by a DC-based singer/songwriter Justin Trawick, where nine different songwriters perform two sets, totaling three songs each, get to tell stories about their tunes and truly offer crowds in markets across the East Coast the unique opportunity to see nine great performers for the price of one. </p> <p>Aside from what the opportunity offers crowds, it gives musicians like me the rare opportunity to see and meet other performers in different markets who are walking the same streets, playing the same venues and pursuing the same goals. In the world of Facebook, it’s amazing to see the amount of “mutual friends” that exist among us all that night performing with “The 9." It is a true testament to how small this industry actually is and to what a good friend of mine always told me about the music industry, "KEEP YOUR NAME IN THE HAT," because you never know what opportunities lie in front of you, who is going to find an attraction to the music you create and how one opportunity will lead into the other.</p> <p>In closing, check out the videos below of some of my favorite Ari Hest, Mieka Pauley and Stephen Kellogg tunes, and check out Justin Trawick and The 9 Singer Songwriter Series when they roll through your area.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/iAiMueE2SMI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/3LmlqjCm8yU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/auQnY0l8NjE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>And as I’m supposed to give advice for other artists out there, my message of the day is simply, KEEP YOUR NAME IN THE HAT! And be thankful for the wonderful experiences and people you get to meet along the way!</p> <p>I’ll be posting again real soon!</p> <p><em>Frank Viele started playing at the age of 3. His infectious style of guitar-playing and soulful rock voice are key elements to the success of his band Frank Viele &amp; The Manhattan Project. But his solo shows bring the same raw energy and crowd-stirring excitement to audiences across the country. His sound has been compared to John Fogerty, Otis Redding, and even Dave Matthews but it’s the authenticity people hear most. A soulful stew of rock, pop, blues, and jazz are ever present. Being so well versed in so many styles means that Viele can deliver an incredible performance to any audience. “I started out doing the acoustic singer-songwriter thing, so this is really my first love. Having such great bandmates, I’m lucky to bring a few along sometimes to add another level of energy and funk to the shows,” Viele explains. Performing solo allows him to give his songs a different spin. “When you’re in a band, your songs take on a different life sometimes. It’s great to be able to revisit them. It allows the tunes to really stand and speak on their own,” he elaborates.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/pushin-pullin-frank-viele-keep-your-name-hat#comments Frank Viele Frank Viele & The Manhattan Project Pushin’ & Pullin' With Frank Viele Blogs Thu, 27 Dec 2012 16:24:21 +0000 Frank Viele http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17457 Pushin’ & Pullin' with Frank Viele: Love Songs, Yacht Rock and Sharing the Stage This Summer with Foreigner! http://www.guitarworld.com/pushin-pullin-frank-viele-love-songs-yacht-rock-and-sharing-stage-summer-foreigner <!--paging_filter--><p>There’s a great line in <em>High Fidelity</em> where John Cusack says, “What came first, the music or the misery? People worry about kids playing with guns, or watching violent videos, that some sort of culture of violence will take them over. Nobody worries about kids listening to thousands, literally thousands of songs about heartbreak, rejection, pain, misery and loss. Did I listen to pop music because I was miserable? Or was I miserable because I listened to pop music?”</p> <p>From movies to cartoons: There’s a great scene in <em>The Simpsons</em> Episode 1014, titled “I’m With Cupid,” where Homer Simpson, Moe Szyslak, Dr. Hibbert and Chief Wiggum meet Elton John in an airport and tell him that they are inducting him as a Knight of The Grand Concourse. When he asks why, Chief Wiggum eventually says, “for teaching us to love again."</p> <p>While this is a funny anecdote, if we believe John Cusack’s character in <em>High Fidelity</em> and subscribe to the notion that sad breakup songs make people “miserable” and sad, then we must certainly believe Chief Wiggum when he tells Elton John that his songs, such as “Your Song” and “Someone Saved My Life Tonight,” taught him “how to love again."</p> <p>Take that quote one step further and listen to tracks by artists like Ambrosia ("The Biggest Part if Me"), Toto ("Rosanna"), REO Speedwagon ("I Can’t Fight This Feeling"), Journey (Open Arms) and Foreigner ("I Wanna Know What Love Is"), and realize that it might be possible that the best mainstream love songs of all time were written in the mid to late '70s and very early '80s! </p> <p>This revelation really hit me in May 2011 when my band and I had the unbelievable opportunity to support what Jimmy Fallon refers to as a “Yacht Rock” band ...</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="345" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/YqT15PSK-AE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>... but what I refer to as truly one of the mast killer bands I’ve ever had the pleasure to play with: Ambrosia. </p> <p>Listening to tracks like “How Much I Feel," “The Biggest Part of Me” and “You’re The Only Woman" every night made me want to write nothing but groove-oriented long songs. In addition, even though I heard these tracks every night live on the road, I still found myself popping in their CD on the way back to the hotel and in between every gig. he tunes just don’t get old!</p> <p>Now, you may wonder why this whole chain of thoughts is running through my head at this moment. Was I watching the infomercial for <em>Solid Gold Seventies</em> at 4 a.m.? Nope! </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/19990214EltonJohnSimpsons.jpg" width="300" height="261" align="left" style="padding:10px 20px 10px 0;" alt="19990214EltonJohnSimpsons.jpg" /></p> <p>But I was driving home from the last date of my April Acoustic Run in Maryland when I got the word that I will be bringing my band on stage in Stamford Connecticut on Thursday, August 4, and supporting one of the top 10 classic rock bands of all time (according to Neilsen Soundscan Ratings) -- Foreigner!</p> <p>I had to stop at a record store immediately and pick up a Foreigner greatest-hits album for the rest of the ride home. </p> <p>Tracks like “Waiting For A Girl Like You” and “I Want To Know What Love is” reminded me of the other great late-'70s-era love songs and the aforementioned quote from Chief Wiggum.</p> <p>I got a little nostalgic listening to this record all the way home and truly realized how timeless this music is. And while I have tons of other stories to tell you from my performance at The New England Music Awards in March and my April acoustic run from Vermont to Maryland, I’ll leave you for now with this video of one of my new tunes, “Monsters In The Hall,” performed during my February Acoustic run with a couple of my good friends joining me on stage. Hopefully this song will “teach you how to love again”…</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="345" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/U_RY0NcgHXk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/424213_2534245893970_1788255078_1570333_828148192_n.jpg" width="620" height="413" alt="424213_2534245893970_1788255078_1570333_828148192_n.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Frank Viele started playing at the age of 3. His infectious style of guitar-playing and soulful rock voice are key elements to the success of his band Frank Viele &amp; The Manhattan Project. But his solo shows bring the same raw energy and crowd-stirring excitement to audiences across the country. His sound has been compared to John Fogerty, Otis Redding, and even Dave Matthews but it’s the authenticity people hear most. A soulful stew of rock, pop, blues, and jazz are ever present. Being so well versed in so many styles means that Viele can deliver an incredible performance to any audience. “I started out doing the acoustic singer-songwriter thing, so this is really my first love. Having such great bandmates, I’m lucky to bring a few along sometimes to add another level of energy and funk to the shows,” Viele explains. Performing solo allows him to give his songs a different spin. “When you’re in a band, your songs take on a different life sometimes. It’s great to be able to revisit them. It allows the tunes to really stand and speak on their own,” he elaborates.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/pushin-pullin-frank-viele-love-songs-yacht-rock-and-sharing-stage-summer-foreigner#comments Foreigner Frank Viele Frank Viele & The Manhattan Project Pushin’ & Pullin' With Frank Viele Blogs Tue, 22 May 2012 15:45:32 +0000 Frank Viele http://www.guitarworld.com/article/15803 Pushin’ & Pullin’ With Frank Viele: An Acoustified February http://www.guitarworld.com/pushin-pullin-frank-viele-acoustified-february <!--paging_filter--><p>Well I did it! Ten shows, as far north as The Radio Bean in Burlington, Vermont, and as far south as The Dogfish Head Brewery in Rehobeth Beach, Delaware. Me and my acoustic guitar … for the most part.</p> <p>As a longtime songwriter, 99 percent of my music starts with me by myself with my acoustic guitar. As lead singer, songwriter and frontman for Frank Viele &amp; The Manhattan Project for more than three years now, I’m used to hearing my songs “electrify” into funk rock jams with horns, driving percussion and electric guitars. </p> <p>However, with studio time booked for March and the challenge laid out to walk in there with at least 15 new tunes, I needed to get back to my roots. I had to knuckle down, complete some musical ideas and thoughts I’ve had rolling around my fret board and road test my new material and myself in a truly bare-bones fashion. </p> <p>The tour started out in Massachusetts on <a href="http://www.unregularradio.com/">UnRegular Radio</a>, where I met my tour mate, Jamie Lynn Hart, for the first official time. I decided to challenge myself right away on the air when I opted to perform a solo acoustic version of “Anticipation” off the <em>Neon Lights,/em> album. This track is usually chock full of guitar and sax solos as well as backup vocal hooks. Despite my doubts, I’m happy to say I pulled it off and was able to still portray the passion and groove commonly associated with that tune.</em></p> <p>I then headed cross town to the MIT Campus in Cambridge, where I hopped on the <a href="http://wmbr.mit.edu/">WMBR Droppin Knowledge Radio Show</a> and decided to take my second risk of the day and play a new tune I had just written the bridge for the night before. The track is called “Someday I’m Gonna Make You Mine,” and it, too, went over very well. Based on the reaction I got from the performance, it became a staple for the rest of the tour. By the last show of the run in Delaware, a couple folks in the crowd asked me where they could get a recording of it. Needless to say, I can’t wait to get in the studio and lay it down! </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/407043_10100553912362071_9032547_52091428_1696806140_n.jpg" width="190" height="253" align="left" style="padding:10px 20px 10px 0;" alt="407043_10100553912362071_9032547_52091428_1696806140_n.jpg" /></p> <p>I performed the first night in Cambridge at The Middle East. I went a little farther north the next night to play in Lowell, Massachusetts, at The Back Page. When I got off stage, I found out that I was nominated, out of hundreds of independent bands, for Best Connecticut Based Act of 2011 by the <a href="http://www.nemusicawards.com/">New England Music Awards</a>. I also found out I was officially asked to perform at the awards ceremony at The Hard Rock in Boston in March. The night turned into an instant party after receiving that news!</p> <p>The rest of the tour proved to be epic. I met some killer artists throughout my journeys, worked out a lot of new material, played some amazing rooms, and got my groove on to a street performing saxophone player on South Street in downtown Philly (notice the photo)!</p> <p>With another acoustic tour slated for April, and an NYC full-band performance on a Powerhouse bill with The Folkadelics on March 16, I’ll have lots more to share with ya’ll real soon.</p> <p>In the meantime, wish me luck at the New England Music Awards, be sure to like <a href="http://www.facebook.com/FrankViele">the new Facebook page</a> and check out this video of my aforementioned performance of “Anticipation” on UnRegular Radio in Boston:</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="345" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/T1PFcOjiFtE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> </p> <p>Rock 'n' Roll, ya”ll!!</p> <p><em>Frank Viele started playing at the age of 3. His infectious style of guitar-playing and soulful rock voice are key elements to the success of his band Frank Viele &amp; The Manhattan Project. But his solo shows bring the same raw energy and crowd-stirring excitement to audiences across the country. His sound has been compared to John Fogerty, Otis Redding, and even Dave Matthews but it’s the authenticity people hear most. A soulful stew of rock, pop, blues, and jazz are ever present. Being so well versed in so many styles means that Viele can deliver an incredible performance to any audience. “I started out doing the acoustic singer-songwriter thing, so this is really my first love. Having such great bandmates, I’m lucky to bring a few along sometimes to add another level of energy and funk to the shows,” Viele explains. Performing solo allows him to give his songs a different spin. “When you’re in a band, your songs take on a different life sometimes. It’s great to be able to revisit them. It allows the tunes to really stand and speak on their own,” he elaborates.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/pushin-pullin-frank-viele-acoustified-february#comments Frank Viele Frank Viele & The Manhattan Project Blogs Wed, 07 Mar 2012 16:13:38 +0000 Frank Viele http://www.guitarworld.com/article/14911 Frank Viele & The Manhattan Project: The Jam, The Scene, The Party http://www.guitarworld.com/frank-viele-manhattan-project-jam-scene-party <!--paging_filter--><p>For my band, Frank Viele &amp; The Manhattan Project, 2011 ended with four funky gigs and a memorable radio show lying in the center of the North East Jam Scene, a scene and a party like no other.</p> <p>The Tuesday before Thanksgiving found me and the band on stage at Connecticut’s legendary rock club, Toad’s Place, playing with one of the jam scene’s top solo acts, <a href="http://www.zachdeputy.com/">Zach Deputy</a>. As a fan of Zach’s music for years, the band and I were truly honored to not only play in front of him that evening, but have him grace the stage with us on lead guitar for our last two songs of the night!</p> <p>The Zach Deputy show proved to be a true touring highlight for the year and got the band and me ready to roll for two shows that weekend at the first annual <a href="http://www.rocknrollresort.com/v1-5/">Rock n Roll Resort Thanksgiving Affair</a>. As if jamming with Zach Deputy wasn’t a cool enough highlight for the month of November, Rock n Roll Resort was chock full of smokin’ acts from Deep Banana Blackout to Ivan Neville’s Dumpstaphunk to The Ryan Montbleu Band and Kung Fu. </p> <p>In addition to the killer lineup, the entire four-day festival was contained within a hotel/resort in Kerhonkson, New York, so the vibe was beyond the typical jam festival and proved to create an intimate gathering of musicians and music lovers alike.</p> <p>The band and I hit the late-night stage at midnight Saturday night/Sunday morning. By the time our set was done, Ryan Snow of <a href="www.SisterSparrow.com">Sister Sparrow &amp; The Dirty Birds</a> was sitting in with us on trombone, and Ryan Montbleu and I were singing “Sittin’ On The Dock of The Bay." This would only be the start of what truly was an epic evening.</p> <p>After our set was over, people began to disperse back to their hotel rooms and to other stages as music was scheduled until 6 in the morning. Or so they thought.</p> <p>At about 3 in the morning, I walked through the hotel lobby to find a pair of females (Kit and Lindsay of the Nephrok Allstars) singing and a guy on the hotel’s grand piano absolutely getting funky. With ukelele in hand, I went over to introduce myself and get a closer look. The result was a four-hour jam session that would eventually include <a href="www.RyanMontbleu.com">Ryan Montbleu</a>. <a href="www.facebook.com/NephrokAllstars">The Nephrok Allstars</a>, Antar Goodwin on bass and Kareem Walkes on alto sax from my band, a flask full of Southern Comfort, and a whole mess of people I never got the chance to officially meet. </p> <p>With a crowd amassing and a collective vibe of like-minded musicians introducing themselves to one another over classic funk and soul tunes, the true meaning and purpose behind the “jam scene” was on full display for all the folks in Kerhonkson to see!</p> <p>With little to no sleep under our belts, my acoustic trio (Kareem, Antar and myself) graced that same lobby Sunday afternoon for an hour-long set to help close out the festival. Before heading back out on the road, Ryan Montbleu shared the mic with me one more time on a jazzy rendition of Bill Withers' “Use Me” and the weekend was complete!</p> <p>With one more full band performance and an acoustic radio show left on the calendar for 2011, I could only hope the good vibes and great times that closed out my November would continue. They certainly did!</p> <p>Sunday, December 11, found me on Connecticut’s WPKN Radio talking about the unbelievable musical year it had been and getting the word out about our last show of the year, December 15 at Daniel Street with the aforementioned Sister Sparrow &amp; The Dirty Birds.</p> <p>I had brought my acoustic guitar along to do a few songs on the air, and to my surprise, one of my all-time favorite saxophone players, Rob Summerville of Deep Banana Blackout and <a href="www.kungfumusic.com">Kung Fu</a>, was in the local area, was set to be on the radio show later that afternoon, heard the start of my interview on his car radio and decided to swing by early with his soprano sax. The result was a killer improv jam over two of my latest tunes ("Anticipation" and "Push &amp; Pull") like only you can get on live radio! Luckily, the whole show was recorded and can be streamed <a href="http://archives.wpkn.org/bookmarks/listen/29041">on WPKN Radio’s archive.</a></p> <p>Our final show of the year found my band in rare form. As this was one of the last shows being played at the soon-to-be-closed Daniel Street Club in my hometown of Milford, Connecticut, it seemed only fitting to pull out all of the stops and call in some old friends. </p> <p>With three saxes on stage and two lead guitarists on top of myself, bass and drums, the last Frank Viele &amp; The Manhattan Project set of 2011 will go down as one of the most enjoyable musical experiences of my career! Sister Sparrow &amp; The Dirty Birds were as funky and killer as ever and the show was the perfect way for me to end 2011! </p> <p>I’ll get much more into the 12/15 show in my next post, but for now, check out these videos of Zach Deputy sitting in with the band and me at Toad’s Place. The band lineup that night included Eddie Arjun Peters on lead guitar, Mario Capodifero on drums, Ben Golder-Novik on tenor sax, Kareem Walkes on alto sax and Antar Goodwin on bass.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="345" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/9B8DkZiU0q8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="345" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/PlPmf_JNRJ8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="345" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/4lSxxggRKLM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>I wish you all a happy and healthy new year, and I look forward to sharing all of my musical adventures with you in 2012.</p> <p><em>Frank Viele started playing at the age of 3. His infectious style of guitar-playing and soulful rock voice are key elements to the success of his band Frank Viele &amp; The Manhattan Project. But his solo shows bring the same raw energy and crowd-stirring excitement to audiences across the country. His sound has been compared to John Fogerty, Otis Redding, and even Dave Matthews but it’s the authenticity people hear most. A soulful stew of rock, pop, blues, and jazz are ever present. Being so well versed in so many styles means that Viele can deliver an incredible performance to any audience. “I started out doing the acoustic singer-songwriter thing, so this is really my first love. Having such great bandmates, I’m lucky to bring a few along sometimes to add another level of energy and funk to the shows,” Viele explains. Performing solo allows him to give his songs a different spin. “When you’re in a band, your songs take on a different life sometimes. It’s great to be able to revisit them. It allows the tunes to really stand and speak on their own,” he elaborates.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/frank-viele-manhattan-project-jam-scene-party#comments Frank Viele Frank Viele & The Manhattan Project Blogs Tue, 03 Jan 2012 18:32:21 +0000 Frank Viele http://www.guitarworld.com/article/14005 Pushin’ and Pullin' With Frank Viele: The Introduction http://www.guitarworld.com/pushin-and-pullin-frank-viele-introduction <!--paging_filter--><p>So after six months of saying, “I’m gonna start writing this monthly blog,” I’ve finally found the moment and inspiration needed to sit down and begin typing. </p> <p>As a touring singer/songwriter and front man for Frank Viele &amp; The Manhattan Project, I’ve had quite a year so far in 2011. 2012 should bring me close to 200 shows in a year. I’ve made every mistake in the book, fallen for almost every trick, and through these experiences have found myself sharing the stage with some of my favorite artists of all time and playing some of the greatest rooms the East Coast and Mid-Atlantic have to offer.</p> <p>Where it all began? Some say it started on my grandmother’s piano. She was from Macon, Georgia, and played some of the meanest keys I had ever heard. Wherever it started, by the age of 13, my Epiphone Les Paul Junior and Sam Ash store brand acoustic guitar never left my side. The result to this day yielded a touring musician with one busted pair of duck-taped shoes, but 15 guitars, 3,000 vinyl records, 7,000 CDs and a ukulele.</p> <p>Every day in the modern music industry is an experience unlike any other. From touring, to song writing, to recording, to finding the right tone, to mastering the use of the “hash tag” on Twitter, there’s gonna be tons of stories to tell!</p> <p>The pursuit of instrumentation and songwriting excellence is without a doubt my life’s passion. From every club, highway rest stop, record store and instrument shop, I’ll be sending y'all a monthly update chock full of videos, pictures and live tracks. </p> <p>My next post will come live from Kerhonkson, New York, where The Manhattan Project and I will be hitting the stage at The Rock 'n' Roll Resort Festival w/ Ryan Montbleau, Zach Deputy, Deep Banana Blackout, Ivan Neville’s Dumpstafunk, Sister Sparrow &amp; The Dirty Birds and tons of other killer acts! Tune in as I ride this roller coaster and discuss music, guitars, new gear and the open road as a singer/songwriter.</p> <p>Until then, check out these crowd videos of my acoustic trio set in September opening for Michael Glabicki of Rusted Root. I’m playing a 2002 Breedlove Focus K, and that’s my new Kala electric/acoustic ukulele standing behind me (we’ll get into that soon)…</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="345" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/bSy-FG1mPsk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="345" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/nn9SgQJPCg4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Rock 'n' rock, y'all!</p> <p><em>Frank Viele started playing at the age of 3. His infectious style of guitar-playing and soulful rock voice are key elements to the success of his band Frank Viele and The Manhattan Project. But his solo shows bring the same raw energy and crowd-stirring excitement to audiences across the country. His sound has been compared to John Fogerty, Otis Redding, and even Dave Matthews but it’s the authenticity people hear most. A soulful stew of rock, pop, blues, and jazz are ever present. Being so well versed in so many styles means that Viele can deliver an incredible performance to any audience. “I started out doing the acoustic singer-songwriter thing, so this is really my first love. Having such great bandmates, I’m lucky to bring a few along sometimes to add another level of energy and funk to the shows,” Viele explains. Performing solo allows him to give his songs a different spin. “When you’re in a band, your songs take on a different life sometimes. It’s great to be able to revisit them. It allows the tunes to really stand and speak on their own,” he elaborates.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/pushin-and-pullin-frank-viele-introduction#comments Frank Viele Frank Viele & The Manhattan Project Blogs Mon, 14 Nov 2011 16:35:22 +0000 Frank Viele http://www.guitarworld.com/article/13542