2012 http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/1740/all en Metal for Life: Killer Runs to Sharpen Your Pick-Hand and Fret-Hand Skills http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-killer-runs-sharpen-your-pick-hand-and-fret-hand-skills <!--paging_filter--><p>In this month’s column, I’d like to present a few single-note patterns that are designed to fortify fret-hand/pick-hand coordination while they strengthen your overall chops and ability to play fast and clean. In my own experience, I have found that drilling on one or two very specific melodic fretboard shapes works wonders in uncovering technical areas of weakness in both hands. Doing this over a long period of time will deliver solid results and make a marked improvement in your playing. <img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/metalforlife0612_1.jpg" /> <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> is a 16th-note run that begins with two bars of a melodic pattern based on the G major scale (G A B C D E F#), which I then transpose, in bars 3 and 4, up a fourth, to C major (C D E F G A B), via a quick position shift. For both of these shapes, I use my fret-hand’s first, second and fourth fingers (index, middle and pinkie) throughout. Playing a shape like this over and over will uncover any shortcomings in your fret-hand dexterity. Be sure to fret using only your fingertips, with the thumb placed squarely on the back of the guitar neck in order for the fret-hand fingers to be positioned with a nice, high arch. Additionally, I use alternate (down-up) picking throughout and strive for absolute smoothness and even execution as the patterns are played over and over across the top two strings. <img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/metalforlife0612_2.jpg" /> Now let’s add a slight twist to the melodic shape in order to work the fret hand a little more. In <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, the melody played across beats one and two is identical to that of <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, but I play different shapes across the last two beats of the bar, beginning with a pull-off on the high E string, followed by more alternate picking. Here, the initial melodic shape is played four times in G before I transpose it up to C. Notice, however, that I do change the very end of the initial phrase, in bar 3, to accommodate the abrupt shift up to 12th position on the last 16th note. <img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/metalforlife0612_3.jpg" /> In <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I use the previous melodic sequence as the basis for a new exercise run that ascends the fretboard through three different fingering patterns of the G major scale. Here, I play the patterns as 16th-note triplets, ascending and then descending on each successive eighth note. Again, I rely on strict alternate picking and strive for absolute clean, even execution. As a whole, this pattern is much simpler than the previous ones, as it simply ascends and descends, but as you will find, getting it up to “shred speed” will require real work and diligence.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience1573989017001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1573989017001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-killer-runs-sharpen-your-pick-hand-and-fret-hand-skills#comments June 2012 Metal For Life Metal Mike Metal Mike Chlasciak 2012 Blogs News Lessons Magazine Wed, 22 Apr 2015 19:53:51 +0000 Metal Mike 15510 at http://www.guitarworld.com Hole Notes: The Acoustic Guitar Artistry of The Beatles' George Harrison http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-acoustic-artistry-beatles-george-harrison <!--paging_filter--><p>Of the four Beatles, George Harrison brought to the group an assortment of electric and acoustic guitar approaches, flavors influenced by everyone from Chet Atkins and Carl Perkins to the Byrds and Bob Dylan. </p> <p>Harrison’s pioneering use of the Rickenbacker 360/12 electric 12-string on songs like “A Hard Day’s Night” and “Ticket to Ride” added another dimension to the sound of Beatles music and left an imprint on Sixties-era rock: soon after, the Byrds, Beach Boys and Rolling Stones began to use 12-string guitars. </p> <p>In the mid-Sixties, influenced by Indian culture and Hinduism, Harrison introduced the sitar and exotic scales into the Beatles’ catalog on songs like “Norwegian Wood” and “Within You Without You.” In essence, he played a huge role in stylizing the Beatles’ music. </p> <p>But Harrison also contributed a wealth of guitar-centric hits to the band’s repertoire, many of which center around an acoustic guitar (his Gibson J-200). In this lesson, we’ll look at musical examples inspired by Harrison-penned Beatles classics like “Here Comes the Sun,” “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” and “Something.” </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holenotes1010_1.jpg" /></p> <p>“While My Guitar Gently Weeps” revolves around strummed versions of the chords in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>. Much of this song’s emotional power stems from its mostly chromatic (notes one half step apart, the distance of one fret) descending A–G–F#–F bass line. The song also features a famous, inspired solo by Eric Clapton. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holenotes1010_2.jpg" /></p> <p>Chromatic movement is a characteristic common to many of Harrison’s popular Beatles tracks, among them, “Something,” which informs <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>. While the original Abbey Road version is played on electric guitars (in the key of C), the original demo (key of A) on <em>The Beatles: Anthology 3</em> is a solo performance by Harrison, who plays a hollowbody electric, warranting its relevance here. Use the picking pattern in bar 1 for the A, Amaj7 and A7 chords, and note the descending chromatic line on the G string. Similar chromaticism is also encountered in a later F#m–F#m(maj7)–F#m7 change. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holenotes1010_3.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holenotes1010_4.jpg" /></p> <p>Hands down, the most popular acoustic guitar “picking” riff in the Beatles oeuvre is the passage that opens Harrison’s “Here Comes the Sun,” which gets its sparkling quality from the fact that it is capoed at the seventh fret. <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> is a passage inspired by the song’s main riff, containing mostly D, A7 and G chords (use alternate picking throughout, beginning with a downstroke). <strong>FIGURE 4</strong> features a variation on the chords used in the song’s bridge.</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1783830205001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1783830205001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1783799364001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1783799364001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <strong>Part 3</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1783804763001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1783804763001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-acoustic-artistry-beatles-george-harrison#comments George Harrison Hole Notes Musicians Institute October 2012 The Beatles 2012 Videos Musicians Institute Video Lessons News Lessons Magazine Thu, 09 Apr 2015 12:05:26 +0000 Dale Turner 16555 at http://www.guitarworld.com Hole Notes: A Look at the Acoustic Guitar Artistry of Yes Guitarist Steve Howe — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-look-acoustic-techniques-steve-howe <!--paging_filter--><p>While Steve Howe is perhaps best known for his electric and acoustic contributions to the progressive rock band Yes, the über-eclectic axman has also played key roles in bands like Asia and GTR and released well over a dozen solo albums. When Howe joined Yes in 1970, his classical influences, jazz-tinged electric guitar lines and general “experimental” musical nature had a profound impact on the band’s art-rock sound, resulting in a string of classic Seventies-era progressive rock records like <em>The Yes Album, Fragile</em> and <em>Close to the Edge.</em> Furthermore, live Yes photos from this era show Howe wielding “unlikely” rock instruments, including a Gibson ES-175 electric and innumerable steel-, nylon- and 12-string acoustics. In doing so, he made many guitarists reconsider their own perceptions of what makes an “acceptable” rock ax. While Yes has endured many lineup changes since then, the band—with Howe in the fold—is still active today and released their latest album, <em>Heaven &amp; Earth</em> in 2014. Let’s take a closer look at Howe’s acoustic output with this timeless prog act. Howe uses a pick-and-fingers (“hybrid- picking”) technique on “Clap” (<em>The Yes Album,</em> 1970), an acoustic solo piece that informs <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>. Grip your pick between your thumb and index finger and pluck with your middle (m) and ring (a) fingers. Get the D/A pattern together first—downstroke the lowest note, pluck the highest with your ring finger (a) and then downstroke the chord’s middle notes—and pick/pluck the remaining chords in a similar manner. This figure’s last four bars feature E7 chord fragments shifted up the neck, played with a “banjo-rolling” technique and punctuated with a strummed E6/9 chord. Howe’s intro to “Roundabout” (<em>Fragile,</em> 1971), not unlike <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, is also performed using hybrid picking and is played in “free time” (with no discernible pulse) for expressive effect. After sounding the signature harmonics, “pre-fret” the third, fifth and seventh frets along the high E string, and pull off. For Am, G and D/F#, pick the bass notes and pluck the B and G strings with your ring and middle fingers, respectively. Now let’s put the pick aside and focus on Howe’s fingerstyle chops. “Mood for a Day” (<em>Fragile</em>, 1971) is a flamenco-influenced (with Celtic overtones) nylon-string solo piece featuring counterpoint moves—upper-register scalar lines played over shifting bass notes—like those in <strong>FIGURE 3a</strong>. Pluck each bass note with your thumb (p), using your middle and index fingers to sound notes on the top three strings. <strong>FIGURE 3b</strong> is reminiscent of another recurring theme in the piece and requires all four fret-hand fingers for high-E string pull- offs while low open strings sound beneath. Our final examples are inspired by the song “Masquerade” (<em>Union</em>, 1991) and fall in open position, decorating a D chord. Fret Dsus2 in <strong>FIGURE 4a</strong> with your index and middle fingers on the G and B strings, respectively; this frees up your other fingers to add hammer-on/ pull-off ornaments and comfortably grab later chords. <strong>FIGURE 4b</strong> embellishes the open D with sixths intervals (two notes, six scale steps apart), played with hammer-ons and pull-offs and plucked with the index (i) and ring (a) fingers, throughout. <strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience1310987072001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1310987072001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience1310916229001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1310916229001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <strong>Part 3</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience1310916189001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1310916189001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-04-08%20at%203.50.42%20PM.png" alt="Screen Shot 2015-04-08 at 3.50.42 PM.png" width="620" height="819" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/steve-howe">Steve Howe</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/yes">Yes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-look-acoustic-techniques-steve-howe#comments Hole Notes January January 2012 Musicians Institute Steve Howe Yes 2012 Videos Musicians Institute Video Lessons News Lessons Magazine Wed, 08 Apr 2015 20:04:10 +0000 Dale Turner 13820 at http://www.guitarworld.com The Guitarist's Guide to Playing Bass: 20 Guidelines to Help You Think and Play Like a Real Bass Guitarist http://www.guitarworld.com/guitarists-guide-playing-bass <!--paging_filter--><p>Bass is more than just a guitar with two fewer strings. It has a different tone, scale length, feel and musical role, and in many cases it requires a different conceptual and technical approach. </p> <p>Guitarists who are new to playing bass will often double the guitar part one octave lower. There is certainly a place for lockstep octave doubling—just listen to Aerosmith’s “Sweet Emotion,” Led Zeppelin’s “The Ocean” and Pantera’s “I’m Broken.” </p> <p>But there is so much more that can be done with the bass guitar.</p> <p>As a bassist who later took up guitar, I have developed 20 general guidelines that I live by when I play the bass. Apply them to the instrument, and hear your playing improve as they help you to think and play like a real bass guitarist. </p> <p><strong>1. PLAY FOR THE SONG</strong></p> <p>More often than not, solid bass playing requires that you exercise restraint and subtlety rather than showcase your technique and slick moves. In many situations, it’s best to work mostly with the root notes of the chords and lock in with the drummer’s kick and snare drums. </p> <p><strong>2. LEARN TO WALK</strong></p> <p>“Walking bass” originated in jazz and blues, but it has since been adopted in other styles. The term refers to a way of playing in which the bass line remains in perpetual motion as opposed to staying on or reiterating one note. The line “walks” from one chord’s root note up or down to the next, mostly in a quarter-note rhythm, with the occasional embellishment. </p> <p>To achieve this, you use “transition notes” to smoothly connect the dots and bridge the gap between different root notes as the chords change. The transition notes can be any combination of chord tones (arpeggios), scale tones that relate to the chords, or chromatic passing tones. </p> <p>In general, chord tones are the musically safest bet, as they sound harmonically consonant, while scale tones add a touch of light dissonance when heard against an underlying chord. The more chromatic notes that are used, the more dissonant the line becomes, as these notes momentarily clash with the prevailing chord. Whether this is a good thing or not is up to your discretion and instincts. </p> <p>FIGURE 1 shows a stock blues walking bass line. Although the line is rhythmically animated, with staccato (short, clipped) swing eighth notes and a triplet fill at the end of each bar, it is fairly tame harmonically, as it uses mostly chord tones (the root, fifth and dominant seventh) with a brief chromatic run-up to the fifth. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass1.jpg" /></p> <p>By contrast, FIGURE 2 illustrates a jazz-style walking bass line played over these same two chords for which chromatic passing tones are liberally employed. Note the difference in contour between these two examples, the first being very angular and the second being smooth and rolling. Also note the use of “dead” notes (indicated by Xs in the notation), which help propel the line. These are performed by picking the string while lightly muting it with the fret hand.</p> <p>When crafting a walking bass line, it’s best to land on the root note whenever there’s a chord change. If you’re staying on the same chord for several bars, it’s a good idea to play the root on the downbeat of every other bar or every fourth bar, depending on how grounded you want the line to sound.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass3.jpg" /></p> <p>The walking bass concept isn’t just for swing grooves and can be also employed with great results in a rock context with an even-eighths feel. Inspired by Herbie Flowers’ tasteful bass work on David Bowie’s 1974 hit, “Rebel Rebel,” FIGURE 3 is a fairly straightforward example of a great way to use scalar passing tones and fills to spice up a bass line over a repeating two-chord progression.</p> <p><strong>3. LOCK IN WITH THE DRUMMER</strong></p> <p>In a rhythm section, part of the bass guitar’s role is to function as a liaison between the drums and the rest of the band. In most cases you want to make the bass and drums sound like one entity, and a great way to do this is to craft bass lines that fit like a glove with the drummer’s kick and snare drums. Using octave root notes is often an excellent way to do this, the low octave corresponding to the kick drum and the high octave hitting with the snare, typically on beats two and four, which are also known as the backbeats. </p> <p>Octaves allow you to create an active bass line with an interesting, angular melodic contour without clashing harmonically with the underlying chords, as the octave root note “agrees” perfectly with the chord.</p> <p>“Grooving” doesn’t necessarily mean playing the same thing over and over. John Paul Jones’ playing throughout Led Zeppelin’s “The Lemon Song” is a perfect case in point, as he embellishes the groove and stays within the bass’ role as a support instrument for six solid minutes without repeating himself once.</p> <p><strong>4. USE OCTAVES AND FIFTHS</strong></p> <p>After the octave root, the fifth is the most harmonically agreeable note you can play. Many classic bass lines have been constructed using mostly roots, octaves and fifths as the framework. The great thing about this approach is that it allows you to create a bass line that is interesting and melodic, locks in perfectly with the drums and doesn’t clash harmonically with the underlying chords. FIGURE 4 is an example of this kind of approach, inspired by John Paul Jones’ nimble playing on Led Zeppelin’s “Thank You.”</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass4.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>5. TONE IS IN THE HANDS </strong></p> <p>This old adage could not ring truer for bass playing. Plucking the strings hard and near the base of the fretboard (FIGURE 5a) like Black Sabbath’s Geezer Butler makes them slap against it; plucking the strings near the bridge with just the very tips of your fingers (FIGURE 5b) lets you get that punchy Jaco Pastorius/Rocco Prestia machine-gun 16th-note attack. (Be sure to check out the video demonstrations for these musical examples on GuitarWorld.com to hear the difference in tone between them.) </p> <p>You can go from a dull thud to a sharp, funky punch simply by choosing where along the string you pick it and how aggressively you hit it. Between that, your pickup selector (if your bass has one) and tone controls, you have a considerable range of tonal possibilities before the signal even hits the amp.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass5.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>6. TO PICK OR NOT TO PICK? </strong></p> <p>Not all bassists use their fingers to pluck the instrument. Megadeth’s David Ellefson, Rex Brown of Pantera and Down, Yes’ Chris Squire and Paul McCartney use a pick, and John Paul Jones, the Who’s John Entwistle and Michael Anthony in his Van Halen days were known for switching from fingers to pick depending on the song. If playing with a pick works for you, go for it. I recommend the large, non-celluloid kind, such as Dunlop’s Tortex Triangle, with a thick gauge (at least 1mm). </p> <p>The large surface area of the big triangle picks is well suited to the wide spacing of bass strings and will help you keep a grip on the pick. Tortex (or Delrin, depending on the manufacturer) is also sturdier than celluloid and less likely to break, and the thick, unbendable gauge will allow you to get more volume and power out of those thick strings, with less effort. </p> <p><strong>7. SINGLE-FINGER TECHNIQUE</strong></p> <p>Some record producers actually prefer having bass players use a pick because the attack is more even. But if you’re a fingerstyle player and want to achieve a more consistent attack, try using only one finger, such as the index (instead of alternating between the index and middle fingers) as much as possible. John Paul Jones copped this technique from Motown bass legend James Jamerson and made great use of it on several classic Led Zeppelin tracks, such as “Good Times Bad Times” and “Ramble On.” </p> <p><strong>8. GET YOUR TIME SOLID </strong></p> <p>Someone has to keep the tempo steady, and if the drummer can’t, than the bassist has to. The pocket depends on you, so learn how to be your own metronome. Don’t just count in 4/4—you should also feel in 8/8, especially when playing ballads, where the tendency to rush the tempo is greater. To help you land on the beat more accurately, listen to the drummer’s hi-hat or ride cymbal, not just his kick and snare drums. </p> <p><strong>9. TO FILL OR NOT TO FILL?</strong></p> <p>Fills are the little pieces of ear candy that embellish a solid bass line and help propel a song. Listen to how other bass players set up a new section, and shamelessly jack anything that grabs your ear. Playing fills that conclude one section of a song (such as a verse) and lead into the next (such as the chorus) is a great way to break monotony in a bass part and set yourself apart from whatever the guitarist is doing. </p> <p>Filling is an art form in and of itself, in that there’s a fine line between adding to the song or groove and obscuring it and detracting from it. In keeping with the “bass-and-drums-as-one” concept, make your fills coincide with a drummer’s so that they sound like the same person’s idea being expressed. If a drummer plays a fill, it’s usually at the end of every second, fourth or eighth bar, so listen to the drums and pick your spots to fill accordingly. Of course, all your playing decisions should depend on the style of music you’re playing, and some styles, such as hip-hop or club music, are more about maintaining a relentless groove, with very little variation.</p> <p>For examples of great fills, check out R&amp;B/soul session players such as James Jamerson (countless Motown hits), Chuck Rainey (Aretha Franklin, Steely Dan) and Nathan Watts (especially on Stevie Wonder’s “Do I Do”), or rock players such as Rex Brown, Stone Temple Pilots’ Robert DeLeo (another Jamerson disciple) and Duff McKagan of Guns N’ Roses. And don’t let genre get in the way—just because it’s a “Motown” fill doesn’t mean it can’t be used in a rock context, and vice versa.</p> <p><strong>10. OCTAVE APPROPRIATE</strong></p> <p>Are you playing in the right register (octave)? Perhaps that cool part you came up with sounds badass played down low but may be too heavy for the mood of the song. Or perhaps it’s too high and is interfering with the vocal or guitar part. Make sure your note-range choices are right for the situation.</p> <hr /> <p><strong>11. AVOID LOW-B OBSESSION</strong></p> <p>If you’re playing a five-string, don’t just play sub-E notes, as it can become annoying. It’s one thing to hit a low B or C every now and then for dramatic effect and to show everyone who’s boss, but unless you’re in a Korn or Type O Negative tribute band, don’t live there.</p> <p><strong>12. SUBSTITUTE DIFFERENT CHORD TONES </strong></p> <p>Occasionally playing the third or fifth of the underlying chord instead of its root note can radically change the whole feel of a chord progression, and when done tastefully it can add warmth or tension. This device has been used for centuries by great classical composers like Bach and Beethoven and creates what are known as chord inversions. Master pop songwriters such as Elton John and Paul McCartney use inversions, via bass line substitutions, to build their chord progressions to a harmonic climax. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass6.jpg" /></p> <p>Realize that the ear reckons harmony from the ground up, so as a bass player you have the power to dictate how the chord is going to sound and fundamentally change its character. FIGURE 6 is an example of a common rock chord progression for which the bass line takes a left turn (in bars 2 and 3) to create chord inversions. In the second and third bars, instead of playing the roots (shown in cue-size notes and tab numbers), the third or fifth of the chord are substituted, creating a continually ascending and more melodic bass line in the process. </p> <p><strong>13. GREASE</strong></p> <p>It’s that grimy, funky stuff that oozes between the beats. With all due respect to hardcore prog-rock bands, for which precision is key, rock and roll has always been more about attitude and spirit. </p> <p>This isn’t an excuse to be sloppy and unmusical, but more an exhortation to make low, rumbling noises and revel in it. Listen to John Paul Jones’ low-end grumble during the “Hey baby, oh baby, pretty baby” chorus section of Zeppelin’s “Black Dog” (played with a pick) or Black Sabbath’s Geezer Butler on pretty much any song. For a more modern take, check out session legend Pino Palladino’s work on D’Angelo’s <em>Voodoo</em> album. In some situations, it’s perfectly okay to make excessive fret noise, be a little behind the beat or slide out of a note perhaps a bit longer than you should, as long as it’s not disruptive to the music and contributes to the intended vibe.</p> <p><strong>14. SHAKE IT</strong></p> <p>I’m not talking about a long trill or extreme vibrato but literally shaking a pitch. Fret the note, pick it, then quickly slide, hammer on or pull off to another fret and back, as demonstrated in FIGURE 7. Regardless of what style you’re playing, the resulting sound is funky and adds a little extra kick to the sound of the rhythm section. Sure, guitarists can do this too, but it just doesn’t sound the same (or as good) on that little instrument. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass7.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>15. USE DEAD NOTES AND RAKES</strong></p> <p>Just as you might mute the strings on your guitar with your fretting hand while you strum “chucka-chucka,” the same principle and function applies to bass, whether it’s funk (FIGURE 8) or hard rock (FIGURE 9). Rakes on a bass are executed a bit differently than on guitar: you perform them by dragging a picking finger across the strings in an upstroke, usually in a specified rhythm, as demonstrated in FIGURE 10. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass8.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass9.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>16. ARTICULATION VARIATION</strong></p> <p>As a guitarist, you employ all sorts of techniques to convey your musical statements, and you can do that on bass, too. Check out session legend Will Lee’s work in Dionne Warwick’s “Déjà Vu.” Lee makes use of rakes, palm muting while picking with his thumb, slapping, and finger slides in addition to plain-old conventional fingerstyle playing (FIGURE 11). And he does it without ever interrupting the groove or getting in the way of the vocal. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass11.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>17. IT’S ALL BASS</strong></p> <p>A cool bass part is a cool bass part, regardless of what instrument it was played on, be it electric bass, synth or piano, so be open to hearing new ideas. Next time you’re at that bar and hear house or club music blasting over the sound system, listen to the bass lines. No matter how far-flung it is from your preferred musical style, you can translate it to your own bass playing.</p> <p><strong>18. LESS IS MORE</strong></p> <p>Take “September,” one of Earth, Wind &amp; Fire’s most enduring tunes. Bassist Verdine White is capable of playing so much more, but in this song his bass line is almost rudimentary. Even so, it’s funky as hell, making great use of rests and staccato phrasing—space between notes—and, without fail, people get up and move as soon as that bass line kicks in. For a more modern example, listen to Branden Campbell of Neon Trees. His lines never get more complicated than eighth notes with the rare fill, but his fat tone and solid playing more than adequately complement drummer Elaine Bradley’s grooves and help propel the songs.</p> <p><strong>19. MORE IS MORE</strong></p> <p>A master groove monster like Juan Nelson from Ben Harper’s band can lull you into a groove, then hit you with a fill like the one heard at 4:30 in “Faded,” from The Will to Live album. The groove and lick shown in FIGURE 12 draws its inspiration from this approach.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass12.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>20. LET IT ALL HANG OUT</strong></p> <p>What do you want people to hear in your playing? Anger? Joy? Whatever it is, get in that zone and play it like you mean it. Whether you’re a shredder or a “feel” player, express yourself. Because if you’re not connecting with people, what’s the point?</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1876118165001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="360" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1876118165001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitarists-guide-playing-bass#comments Articles December 2012 GW Archive 2012 Videos News Features Lessons Magazine Thu, 02 Apr 2015 11:07:35 +0000 Matt Scharfglass 16961 at http://www.guitarworld.com Hole Notes: Randy Rhoads' Acoustic Techniques and Riffs http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-randy-rhoads-acoustic-techniques-and-riffs <!--paging_filter--><p>When Ozzy Osbourne was booted from Black Sabbath and went solo in 1979, his quest for a heavy-metal soulmate ended with his discovery of Randy Rhoads. </p> <p> The pair would go on to pen such classic metal cuts as “Crazy Train,” “I Don’t Know,” “Mr. Crowley” and “Flying High Again,” among others. Unfortunately, Rhoads was around long enough to record only two full-length albums with Ozzy: <em>Blizzard of Ozz</em> and <em>Diary of a Madman</em> (the live album, <em>Tribute</em>, was released posthumously in 1987). </p> <p>On March 19, 1982, while “joyriding” in a small plane piloted by Ozzy’s tour bus driver, Rhoads was killed when the pilot flew too close to the band's parked tour bus, clipped its wing and careened into a nearby house.</p> <p>A fan of classical music, Randy Rhoads was one of the first American guitarists to successfully incorporate classical music elements into heavy metal. (“Euro-metal” guitarists, including Ritchie Blackmore, Yngwie Malmsteen, Uli Jon Roth and Michael Schenker, had also experimented with melding the two genres.) </p> <p>Reportedly, Rhoads was contemplating retiring from rock after the tour to study classical guitar at UCLA. In this lesson, we’ll take a look at examples in the style of Rhoads’ classically influenced solo piece “Dee” as well as “Diary of a Madman” and “Goodbye to Romance,” two other Ozzy favorites that prominently feature acoustic guitar. </p> <p>Randy pulled out all the stops for <em>Diary of a Madman</em>’s title track, an epic six-minute-plus piece packed with acoustic and electric guitar textures. Its intro, similar to <strong>Figure 1</strong>, is structured around an elaborate arpeggio passage reminiscent of a modern classical guitar etude by Leo Brouwer (entitled "Etudes Simples: VI," published in 1972) which Rhoads likely learned in his classical guitar studies. Use economy picking to tackle these arpeggios throughout, employing a single pick stroke to sound successive notes found on adjacent strings, as indicated.</p> <p>Rhoads also had a talent for composing striking ballads, as evidenced by the track “Goodbye to Romance” (<em>Blizzard of Ozz</em>), the first song Ozzy cowrote with Rhoads. </p> <p>Penned as Osbourne’s personal farewell to Black Sabbath, the song blends clean-tone electrics with steel-string acoustic sounds, resulting in an almost “harpsichord”-like tonal quality. <strong>Figure 2</strong> depicts a composite in-the- style-of arrangement.</p> <p>“Dee” (Blizzard of Ozz), which inspires <strong>Figure 3</strong>, is a lilting waltz (3/4 meter felt “in one”) that Randy dedicated to his mother, Delores. (Perhaps as a further tribute to his mom, the majority of "Dee" falls in the key of D.) </p> <p>With this track, Rhoads used one of his favorite acoustic multitracking approaches: overdubbing a steel-string acoustic on top of his primary nylon-string part for added sparkle (he also did this in “Diary of a Madman.") Note the pick-hand fingerings included below the notation. For further insight into Randy’s classical guitar technique, check out the “Dee” studio outtakes at the end of the <em>Tribute</em> album.</p> <p><Strong>Check out the videos below and the complete tabs below that.</strong></p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1886514571001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1886514571001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1886475000001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1886475000001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-06-20%20at%201.19.25%20PM_0.png" width="620" height="533" alt="Screen Shot 2014-06-20 at 1.19.25 PM_0.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-06-20%20at%201.19.34%20PM_0.png" width="620" height="349" alt="Screen Shot 2014-06-20 at 1.19.34 PM_0.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/randy-rhoads">Randy Rhoads</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-randy-rhoads-acoustic-techniques-and-riffs#comments December 2012 Hole Notes Ozzy Osbourne Randy Rhoads 2012 Videos News Lessons Magazine Thu, 19 Mar 2015 17:46:16 +0000 Dale Turner 16953 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Early Blues Masters John Lee Hooker and Lightnin' Hopkins — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-john-lee-hooker-and-lightnin-hopkins <!--paging_filter--><p>The blues is ripe for endless and constant reinvention. </p> <p>Through the decades, it has developed in many different incarnations. </p> <p>These include plantation field hollers; the acoustic guitar playing and songwriting mastery of Charlie Patton, Blind Blake, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Blind Willie McTell and Robert Johnson; the Chicago, Memphis and Texas blues of Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf and T-Bone Walker; and the mid-to-late-Sixties blues-rock revolution spearheaded by Cream and the Jimi Hendrix Experience. </p> <p>Today, bands such as the North Mississippi All-Stars, the Black Keys and Alabama Shakes continue to explore new ways to navigate the dark, swampy sounds honed through this long tradition of blues interpretation. In this edition of In Deep, we’ll be taking a look at the guitar work of two essential early blues guitar masters: John Lee Hooker and Lightnin’ Hopkins.</p> <p>John Lee Hooker was born in 1917 in Coahoma County, Mississippi, and learned to play guitar from his stepfather, Willie Moore, who, conveniently for John Lee, was friends with Blind Lemon Jefferson and Charlie Patton. Hooker went on the road at age 14, joining legendary bluesman Robert Nighthawk in Memphis. </p> <p>In 1948, Hooker began his recording career in style, cutting two incredible tunes—“Boogie Chillen’ ” and “Sally Mae”—at his first sessions, cut in Detroit. The songs were released on the Modern label, owned by the Bihari Brothers (who also recorded B.B. King’s earliest sides), and Hooker’s ascent to blues superstardom was underway. </p> <p>Hooker performed and recorded a great many tunes on both acoustic and electric guitar in open A tuning (low to high, E A E A Cs E), oftentimes using a capo at the first, second or third fret to perform in different keys. He picked with his fingers, primarily using his thumb to strike the bass strings and index finger to pluck the higher strings, and achieved a warm and very percussive sound, often performing alone or with another guitarist for accompaniment. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_1.jpg" /></p> <p>FIGURE 1 illustrates a rhythm figure along the lines of “Boogie Chillen’.” Though written in 4/4, this figure is played with a triplet, or swing-eighths, feel, which means that notes indicated as pairs of eighth notes are actually sounded as a quarter note followed by an eighth note within a triplet bracket. </p> <p>Throughout this passage, the thumb and index finger alternate striking the lower and higher strings, with a quick, rolling double hammer-on occurring at the end of each bar. In bar 1, the hammer-on begins on the fourth fret and moves chromatically (one fret at a time) up to the sixth fret. In bar 2, the hammer-on starts on the second fret and moves up chromatically to the fourth fret. In bar 3, rapid slides up to the third fret are executed with an index-finger barre across the top two strings.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_2.jpg" /></p> <p>One of the fascinating aspects of Hooker’s open A playing was that he often used only two primary chords, the “I” (one) and the “IV” (four), forgoing the use of a “V” (five) chord that is common to the majority of blues music. In open A tuning, Hooker would use a standard C “cowboy” chord grip as his four chord, which yields an unusual Dadd9/C sound, as illustrated in FIGURE 2. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_3.jpg" /></p> <p>Another interesting aspect of Hooker’s solo work is that he would often shift from a swinging triplet feel to the use of even, or “straight,” eighth notes, which provides great rhythmic contrast and tension. As shown in FIGURE 3, I begin with straight eighths on a sliding A7 chord voicing and then move back to the swinging feel when the initial riff is restated in bars 5–7.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_4.jpg" /></p> <p>Hooker also often used the D7/A voicing shown in FIGURE 4 for his four chord: with the index finger barred across the top three strings at the fifth fret, the pinkie is added and removed from the high E string’s eighth fret. Robert Johnson often used this pattern to great effect as well.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_5.jpg" /></p> <p>Hooker devised some great and very distinct licks in open A tuning, a few of which are presented in FIGURE 5. Following index-finger slides on the top two strings, different A and A7 voicings are followed by great single-note and double-stop licks played on the middle strings using a bit of rhythmic syncopation. You can hear Hooker play riffs like these on his classic song “Sally Mae.” ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons is a Hooker fanatic, and you can hear many of these kinds of licks on Top classics like “La Grange” and “Jesus Just Left Chicago.”</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_6.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_7.jpg" /></p> <p>Combining open strings with single-note riffs is a central element of Hooker’s style, made more effective with fingerpicking. FIGURE 6, inspired by “Crawling Kingsnake,” and FIGURE 7, a nod to “Tease Me,” offer a few more examples of how Hooker would combine a catchy melody with an insistent root-note, open-string pedal tone. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_8.jpg" /></p> <p>In later years, Hooker relied more often on standard tuning, while still using the capo on the first few frets for changing keys. A great example of his playing style in standard tuning can be heard on “Boom Boom Out Go the Lights.” FIGURE 8 offers an example in this style, marrying a repeated melody, based on E minor pentatonic (E G A B D) to an alternating bass line. </p> <p>Lightnin’ Hopkins was born in 1912 in Centerville, Texas. Like Hooker, he learned directly from encounters with Blind Lemon Jefferson. He began his recording career in 1946 and went on to become one of the most influential blues guitarists ever. Elements of his style are clear in the playing of Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, Stevie Ray Vaughan and just about everyone that played or plays blues guitar.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_9.jpg" /></p> <p>Hopkins often performed unaccompanied acoustic guitar (or amplified acoustic), picking with his fingers in a manner similar to Hooker but with the use of a thumb pick. FIGURES 9 and 10 offer examples of a mid-tempo swinging 12/8 blues played in his style, akin to his take on the blues classic “Goin’ Down Slow.”</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qVfzkTSFS9w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1783865990001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1783865990001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-john-lee-hooker-and-lightnin-hopkins#comments In Deep John Lee Hooker Lightnin’ Hopkins October 2012 2012 Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Wed, 04 Feb 2015 16:20:49 +0000 Andy Aledort 16556 at http://www.guitarworld.com Interview: Billy Duffy of The Cult Answers Readers' Questions on Gear, Songwriting and More http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-billy-duffy-cult-answers-readers-questions-gear-songwriting-and-more <!--paging_filter--><p>Below, guitarist Billy Duffy of The Cult answers a series of questions from <em>Guitar World</em> readers.</p> <p><strong>As the only constant members of the Cult, you and [singer] Ian [Astbury] are the heart and soul of the band. What is that partnership like? How does Ian complement your creativity? <em>— Kelly Youngblood</em></strong></p> <p>We’re both the same birth sign, and there are a lot of similarities between us. We provide each other with the creative tension we need to create better art than if we were working independently. We have a special creative nature that was revealed when we first got together in a small apartment in Brixton, London, in 1983. </p> <p>One example of how our relationship works is illustrated in how the song “The Wolf” came together. It was a particularly difficult song to bring together. I had the main riff even before the last Cult album, but Ian didn’t want to work on it; he wouldn’t even touch it, so I let it lie. But I brought it back, because I knew it was good. </p> <p>This time out, Ian and the rest of the guys were really patient with my obsession to work it out, and we were able to. I’m very happy with the results, possibly because of its difficult upbringing.</p> <p><strong>I heard the single “Lucifer” from <em>Choice of Weapon</em>, and I love it! Judging from the album name and cover art, it seems like you’re exploring some dark subject matter. What can you tell us about the album’s themes? <em>— Francis Soyer</em></strong></p> <p>“Lucifer” is certainly about hedonism, but that song isn’t indicative of the whole album. It’s more of a teaser track than a single. But most of our records are kind of dark, and that’s Ian’s deal. If I could sum up <em>Choice of Weapon</em>, I’d say it’s about urban shamanism. The album was written in New York and Los Angeles but also in the California desert. It’s trying to connect the dichotomy of living in urban areas but realizing that outside of those areas is where our food and water comes from. </p> <p>You can have all the technology you want, but if you don’t have clean air to breathe, it’s game over. That said, I’m a guitar player and not the lyricist, so I’m just talking about what I’m observing coming from the singer of our band. But those have always been reoccurring themes for the Cult: love and appreciation of nature but also appreciation of an urban society’s vibe, violence and sexuality.</p> <p><strong>I love the Gretsch White Falcon. Are you using it or the Les Paul on the new record? And I’m also wondering what’s your trick to prevent the Gretsch from feeding back in live situations? <em>— Dave Belknap</em></strong></p> <p>I’ve always used the Les Paul and Gretsch White Falcon, and they’re both heavily featured on the new album. Regarding the second part, that’s a very pragmatic question. One thing I’ve done with the White Falcon is put things in the body — little bits of T-shirts or whatever — to help stop some of the feedback.</p> <p>But don’t overfill it or the guitar will sound dead. You also have to be conscious of where you’re playing onstage. We spend a lot of time soundchecking at every Cult gig, trying to remove the frequencies that create that real deep, low-mid feedback. And finally, I’ve always put high-output, hot pickups in my Gretsches. My original pickups in the Seventies were so puny that you’d have to run the amp really loud, and it would create horrible feedback problems. I’ve used Seymour Duncan and TV Jones pickups, and they work really well. They keep the Gretsch tone and chime but prevent feedback from the amp.</p> <p><strong>The transitions in your songs from chorus to verse are so seamless. Do you have to really focus and work these out, or do you simply write in a linear way? <em>— Arnon Wiggond</em></strong></p> <p>It used to be very linear, out of necessity. Then Pro Tools came along, and it’s changed how people construct songs. When Bob Rock came in to finish the production on the new album, he helped us with the arrangements. We laid everything down organically, and then changed and moved sections around with Pro Tools. So it can be a really useful tool, if you make sure to keep an organic feel to it.</p> <p><strong>Reality TV shows like <em>Gene Simmons Family Jewels</em> and <em>The Osbournes</em> have been a way for rockers to show another side of themselves. In retrospect, do you think your participation in <em>Married to Rock</em> was a positive thing, or do you wish you had taken a pass? <em>— Jessie Chadwick</em></strong></p> <p>I’m happy that I participated in that show. I think I was comfortable with the legitimacy of the other band guys involved: Duff [McKagan] with Guns N’ Roses, Perry [Farrell] with Jane’s Addiction and Steve Stevens with Billy Idol. I didn’t hear the sound of a barrel being scraped, if you know what I mean. </p> <p>The show was about the women, and some of the guys were in it more than others. For me, it was kind of interesting. I never want to be the kind of person that says no to everything. I wanted to participate in a contemporary experience like reality TV and see how it impacted me. It was also good because it got the Cult out there to an audience of millions during a time when the band didn’t have an album out.</p> <p><strong>In interviews over the years, you’ve mentioned you witnessed a lot of special gigs as a teenager in Manchester. Was there one that topped the list for you and made you say, “I wanna do this for a living”? <em>— Steve Wood</em></strong></p> <p>Yeah, there were two gigs: one that made me think, Yes, I wanna do this for a living, and another that made me realize, Yes, it’s possible for me to do this for a living. The former was Queen. They were touring the <em>Sheer Heart Attack</em> album, and I was blown away. I will take to my grave the image of Queen opening before a 2,000-seat hall with “Now I’m Here.” </p> <p>It was a black stage, the guitar was chugging a D chord, which I’ve ripped off a million times, and Freddie Mercury appeared in some window with just his face visible. Then, when the song kicked in, every light on the stage lit up. The entire band was dressed in white, and Brian May had a cape. </p> <p>That experience, which is utterly indelibly printed in my mind, made me realize I wanted to do that for a living. The gig that made me realize it was possible was the Sex Pistols. I saw their second show in Manchester in June 1976. There were, like, 300 people there. It was heavy, violent, and there was a fight, and a lot of people left. It was also the Buzzcocks’ debut show. That show blew my mind. At that point, the idea of playing music for a living changed from being a fantasy to a reality.</p> <p><strong>Which of your songs ranks as your defining “guitar” moment? <em>— Filipe Dias</em></strong></p> <p>“She Sells Sanctuary.” There’s a guitar sound on that record [<em>Love</em>] that I’ve heard no one create before or since. It’s a combination of feel and the music itself, which keeps it fresh even to this day. It was just in the Budweiser Super Bowl commercial with the Flo Rida mash-up, and it sounded great. The guitars still jump out of the speakers.</p> <p><strong>I saw a YouTube clip of Matthew McConaughey playing bongos with the Cult during your recent South by Southwest performance. What’s the story behind his guest appearance? <em>— Russ Ziskey</em></strong></p> <p>Matthew is a longtime Cult fan. You’re more likely to find him in the pit banging it out with the fans than find him backstage. So we were going to South by Southwest to promote the new record, and Matthew wanted to come to one of the gigs. My manager actually pointed out that Matthew really likes to participate and had the idea of asking him to play congas on a couple songs, including the new one, “Lucifer,” and an old one, “Spiritwalker.” </p> <p>Matthew was into it, so he came out to the big gig and played with us in front of 25,000 people. It was a lot of fun, but it was also about raising awareness for the new record in this media-saturated world. So with Matthew McConaughey and the Cult, it was like “two plus two equals seven.”</p> <p><em>Photo: Travis Shinn</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-billy-duffy-cult-answers-readers-questions-gear-songwriting-and-more#comments Billy Duffy Dear Guitar Hero June 2012 The Cult Travis Shinn 2012 Interviews News Features Magazine Mon, 12 May 2014 14:37:45 +0000 Brad Angle, Photo by Travis Shinn 16681 at http://www.guitarworld.com Metal For Life with Metal Mike: How to Craft a Rhythmically and Harmonically Challenging, Heavy Single-Note Riff http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-how-craft-rhythmically-and-harmonically-challenging-heavy-single-note-riff <!--paging_filter--><p> One of the most important aspects of becoming a good metal guitarist is developing the ability to play long single-note lines with absolute precision, in regard to both picking articulation and locking into the beat. </p> <p>Every great metal guitarist I know of—including James Hetfield, Kirk Hammett, Dave Mustaine and Dimebag Darrell—have always displayed the power and precision essential to great metal guitar playing. </p> <p> For this month’s column, I’ve composed a fairly long, rhythmically and harmonically challenging metal-style riff that is intended to help you to sharpen your single-note chops. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> is an original 17-bar riff that is based primarily in the key of E minor but is harmonically ambiguous here and there as well as rhythmically deceptive. </p> <p> For me, some of the best metal songs, like many of the classic tracks on Metallica’s <em>Master of Puppets</em> or Megadeth’s <em>Rust in Peace</em>, have these qualities. </p> <p>The majority of the riff is played in even eighth notes, and I stick with alternate (down-up) picking throughout. In many of the bars, I shift back and forth between a picked note and a pair of notes sounded on the next higher string with a single pick stroke followed by a descending or ascending legato finger slide. </p> <p> In these instances, I still stick with the alternate-picking approach in order to maintain consistency in my attack with the pick hand. Bars 1–9 feature notes played on the bottom two strings only, with palm muting (P.M.) used on the sixth string throughout. </p> <p> Palm muting involves laying the edge of your pick hand across the strings by the bridge saddles. It produces a darker, more percussive and heavier sound. In bars 1–3, all of the notes are derived from the E Aeolian mode (E F# G A B C D), also known as the E natural minor scale. Notice the repeated use of descending index-finger slides on the A string, which serve to set up position shifts.</p> <p> In bar 4, I introduce a line that repeatedly ascends chromatically on the low E string, followed by either a B or C note on the A string. This sets up the switch back to the riff played in bar 3, followed by an inverted version of the riff from bar 2. To accommodate the odd phrasing of the line, the meter changes here from 4/4 to 5/4 and back.</p> <p> In bars 8 and 9, I introduce a diminished-based sequence that moves across the bottom three strings. On each string, a series of three notes is sounded, with each pair of fretted notes being a minor third apart. To provide yet another twist, bars 10–15 shift alternately between 4/4 and 3/4 meters.</p> <p> Using the open A string as a pedal tone, I slide between different positions of E natural minor, working my way up the fretboard. I then wrap things up in the last two bars with a phrase based on the E Phrygian mode (E F G A B C D), applying a pinch harmonic (P.H.) and some hearty finger vibrato to the final E note.</p> <p> As usual, begin practicing this figure at a slow to moderate metronome setting, ramping up the tempo as the notes become more comfortable to play. This exercise riff will help you build solid, dependable single-note metal rhythm chops.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1472151574001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1472151574001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-24%20at%205.44.12%20PM.png" width="620" height="514" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 5.44.12 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-how-craft-rhythmically-and-harmonically-challenging-heavy-single-note-riff#comments April 2012 Metal Mike Chlasciak 2012 Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Thu, 24 Apr 2014 21:50:25 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak 21101 at http://www.guitarworld.com Professor Shred with Guthrie Govan: Tapping in 16th-Note Triplets http://www.guitarworld.com/professor-shred-guthrie-govan-tapping-16th-note-triplets <!--paging_filter--><p>In this month’s column, I’d like to show you the complex fretboard-tapping section from a song of mine called “Bad Asteroid.” It’s from my self-titled album with the Aristocrats, which includes bassist Brian Bellar and drummer Marco Minneman.</p> <p>“Bad Asteroid” is a song that’s been bubbling away in my collection of unused tunes for about 18 or 19 years, and this new album gave me a good excuse to finally record it properly. </p> <p>It’s good material for this column because, in addition to requiring wacky and unusual tapping procedures, it features some nice harmonic interest in the chord progression over which the riff is played—what I like to describe as the “budget Steely Dan” chords.</p> <p>Without them, the riff just sounds weird. The chords are essential in providing a context to the tapped melodic idea. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates the chord progression over which I play the tapped riff, which is essentially four bars long and followed by a fifth bar that resolves to Em9sus4. I begin in bar 1 with C/Bb, followed by A/B. Bar 2 consists of C9 to Fmaj7. </p> <p>Bar 3 sits on a chord that could be named a variety of things, but let’s call it Eadd2/G#, which is followed by a bar of Bbmaj7#11—that “Lydian mode” sound—and the resolution to Em9sus4.</p> <p>All of the chords, with the exception of the last, are performed fingerstyle, wherein I either pluck all the strings at once or subtly pick out individual notes of the chords, such as moving from the bass note to the higher strings, or vice versa. I also like to apply a little whammy-bar vibrato whenever a chord sustains.</p> <p>Equally important is the feel, which is a slow-ish swing. As a result, what are written as 16th-note rhythmic subdivisions are played as eighth-note/16th-note triplets. Now let’s look at the tapped figure, illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 2. </strong></p> <p>Throughout this pattern, I alternate between fret-hand and pick-hand tapped notes. Except for a couple of spots, I constantly switch from one hand to the other. For tapping, I generally use the middle finger and pinkie of my pick hand; in this section, I hold the pick in the crook of my pick-hand index finger, so that finger is unavailable for tapping.</p> <p>The rhythm is also essential to this riff. I’m superimposing an eighth-note triplet rhythm on each beat, then splitting each eighth note into two 16ths. This is the best way to look at the lick, because it progresses in two-note pairs, and representing it this way makes it easier to conceptualize.</p> <p>The other thing to keep in mind is that the two hands sort of mirror each other in their intervallic movement throughout. Slow practice will be mandatory to get a firm handle on this one. Although I wrote it, even I can’t play it unless I start from the beginning each time.</p> <p>This will be the last installment of my GW column for now, so thanks very much for reading. Check out the new Aristocrats album, and get more information about the group at <a href="http://the-aristocrats-band.com/music/">the-aristocrats-band.com.</a> See you on the road.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-03-17%20at%202.16.14%20PM.png" width="620" height="298" alt="Screen Shot 2014-03-17 at 2.16.14 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-03-17%20at%202.16.26%20PM.png" width="620" height="565" alt="Screen Shot 2014-03-17 at 2.16.26 PM.png" /></p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1311026888001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1311026888001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1310972898001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1310972898001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/professor-shred-guthrie-govan-tapping-16th-note-triplets#comments Guthrie Govan January January 2012 Professor Shred The Aristocrats 2012 Blogs News Features Lessons Mon, 17 Mar 2014 18:25:18 +0000 Guthrie Govan 13817 at http://www.guitarworld.com La Grunge: The Top 10 Blues-Approved Overdrive/Distortion Pedals http://www.guitarworld.com/la-grunge-top-10-blues-approved-overdrive-distortion-pedals <!--paging_filter--><p>The origin of guitar distortion goes back to the earliest electrified blues guitarists. </p> <p>They didn’t care that their primitive tube amps were breaking up and distorting, as long as they were loud. Soon, blues guitarists grew quite fond of those nasty, gnarly distorted tones, and they sought to replicate them by any means necessary. </p> <p>Enter the overdrive pedal. Designed to push an amp to the brink, the overdrive pedal allows players to summon singing sustain, compelling crunch, and glorious grit at any volume level, giving guitarists the bite and balls they need for genuine blues-approved tone. </p> <p>While a handful of purists prefer to plug a guitar straight into an amp, most blues guitarists these days have a handful of overdrive, distortion and even fuzz boxes in their rigs. </p> <p>Thanks to the proliferation of boutique pedal builders over the past 20 years, there are easily more than a thousand distortion devices available to help guitarists find their signature blues sound. </p> <p>The following pedals are the top 10 classics and modern marvels that get our mojo working when we spank that plank and crank up the volume.</p> <p><strong>10. Way Huge Pork Loin</strong> </p> <p>By blending modern soft-clipping BiFET overdrive and classic clean “British” preamp tone pathways, the Pork Loin allows players to dial in raw, raunchy tones that never lose bottom-end clarity or definition. The Pork Loin plays a massive role in Joe Bonamassa’s bigger-than-life modern blues sound. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/gearphotos/PorkLoin.jpg" width="500" /> </p> <p><strong>9. Klon Centaur</strong> </p> <p>The Klon Centaur’s legendary clean boost transforms a guitar’s natural tone the same way a livestock farmer turns a piglet into a prize-winning porker—by making it bigger, fatter, juicier, meatier and more muscular. </p> <p>Centaur designer Bill Finnegan discontinued production several years ago, driving prices for used Klons well above $1,000, but he’s trying to bring a similar pedal to the market again with the same hand-selected parts, attention to detail and signature sound that the numerous “klones” have failed to match. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/gearphotos/KlonCentaur.jpg" width="500" /></p> <p><strong>8. PaulC Audio Tim</strong> </p> <p>Thanks to its impressive tonal range and expressive touch sensitivity, the Tim is a favorite of tube amp aficionados who don’t want to sacrifice the dynamic response of their favorite amps but need more gain and tonal-shaping capabilities. With the EQ controls set at 12 o’clock, it provides some of the most transparent clean boost and overdrive tones available. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/gearphotos/Fin.jpg" width="500" /> </p> <p><strong>7. Fulltone Full-Drive 2</strong> </p> <p>Fulltone makes an impressive variety of incredible overdrive, distortion and fuzz pedals, including the OCD, PlimSoul and Fat-Boost FB-3, but when it comes to the blues, most guitarists choose the Fulltone Full-Drive 2. </p> <p>With separate overdrive and boost footswitches and mini toggle switches for selecting clean boost, midrange emphasis, MOSFET clipping and more, the Full-Drive 2 is a versatile overdrive pedal that makes it easy to dial in your own signature blues tones. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/full%20drive.jpg" alt="full drive.jpg" width="540" height="429" /></p> <hr /> <p><strong>6. Ibanez TS-808 Tube Screamer</strong> </p> <p>Thanks to Stevie Ray Vaughan’s use of an Ibanez Tube Screamer (he replaced the TS-808 with a TS-9 and TS-10 later in his career), this pedal has gone on to become the best-selling and most copied overdrive pedal of all time. </p> <p>The Tube Screamer’s output boost and signature midrange hump, along with a characteristic warmth that the TS-808’s successors lack, make it ideal for playing fat, aggressive solos that destroy everything else in its path. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/gearphotos/Tubescreamer.jpg" width="500" /> </p> <p><strong>5. Electro-Harmonix Big Muff π</strong> </p> <p>Most staunch traditionalists think that the raunchy fuzz tones of a Big Muff π are a little too furry and furious for the blues, but that hasn’t stopped a new generation of blues-inspired players from using one. The Big Muff is a key element of 21st century blues as envisioned by Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys and Jack White of the White Stripes, the Raconteurs and the Dead Weather. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/gearphotos/BigMuff.jpg" width="500" /></p> <p><strong>4. Dallas-Arbiter Rangemaster Treble Booster</strong> </p> <p>Eric Clapton’s alleged use of a Dallas-Arbiter Rangemaster Treble Booster on John Mayall’s legendary <em>Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton</em> album remains the source of much controversy, but the Rangemaster was also a key element of Rory Gallagher’s late-Sixties rig that similarly redefined blues guitar tone during the British blues revival, thanks to its marvelous midrange and gritty germanium transistor grind. </p> <p>Numerous clones are available today, including the Analog Man Beano Boost and Keeley Java Boost. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/gearphotos/Rangemaster.jpg" width="500" /> </p> <p><strong>3. Boss BD-2 Blues Driver</strong> </p> <p>Not since the late Seventies, when the Ibanez Tube Screamer and Boss OD-1 made their debut, has a mass-produced overdrive pedal won over the great unwashed and cork-sniffing tone snobs alike. The BD-2 delivers a wide variety of overdrive tones, from creamy to crunchy, with personality that ranges from retro smooth to modern blues-rock raunch. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/gearphotos/BossBluesDriver.jpg" width="500" /></p> <p><strong>2. Blackstone Appliances MOSFET Overdrive</strong> </p> <p>This pedal’s nameplate and crinkle finish may have the retro-cool vibe of a Thirties toaster, but underneath the hood lies a modern circuit that uses small-signal MOSFETs and an unconventional input stage to cook up distortion and overdrive with rich harmonic overtones that will melt your face off like a million-watt microwave. </p> <p>“It’s heavy stuff, not the sound of a popcorn machine,” says Billy Gibbons, who used the Blackstone in tasteful excess on several new ZZ Top tunes.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Blackstone.jpeg" width="620" height="472" alt="Blackstone.jpeg" /></p> <p><em>Blackstone photo by William Baeck, <a href="http://williambaeck.com/WilliamBaeck.com/Home.html">williambaeck.com</a></em></p> <p><strong>1. Analog Man King of Tone</strong> </p> <p>With a two-year waiting list, the Analog Man King of Tone is one of the most sought-after overdrive pedals, and for a very good reason: it provides a clean boost that preserves a guitar’s tone, making it sound bigger, badder and more bodacious, with just the right amount of natural-sounding distortion. </p> <p>Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Gary Clark Jr. and Buddy Miller are just a handful of the pros who have discovered that the King of Tone truly rules.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/gearphotos/AnalogMan.jpg" width="500" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/la-grunge-top-10-blues-approved-overdrive-distortion-pedals#comments Boss EHX Electro-Harmonix Fulltone Ibanez Kion October 2012 PaulC 2012 Guitar World Lists Effects News Features Gear Magazine Mon, 23 Dec 2013 14:43:34 +0000 Chris Gill 16822 at http://www.guitarworld.com The Capo Crusader: An Acoustic Arrangement of The Who's "Baba O'Riley" http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the April 2012 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://secure.nps1.net/guitarworld/index.php?main_page=product_info&amp;cPath=9&amp;products_id=295&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=thewho">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>In the second edition of the Capo Crusader, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Jimmy Brown shows you a nifty acoustic arrangement for the Who classic "Baby O' Riley." </p> <p>Check out the first installment of the Capo Crusader <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-guns-n-roses-sweet-child-o-mine">here</a>, which features an acoustic arrangement of Guns N' Roses' "Sweet Child O Mine."</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1472063128001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1472063128001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><strong>Lesson Contents</strong><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,0">Intro, Verse, Chorus Performance</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,1">Intro, Verse, Chorus Teaching</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,2">Post-Chorus Break</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,3">Grand Finale Jam</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,4">Grand Finale Teaching</a></p> <hr /> <em>The following content is related to the April 2012 issue of </em>Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://secure.nps1.net/guitarworld/index.php?main_page=product_info&amp;cPath=9&amp;products_id=295&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=thewho">online store</a>. <p>In the second edition of the Capo Crusader, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Jimmy Brown shows you a nifty acoustic arrangement for the Who classic "Baby O' Riley." </p> <p>Check out the first installment of the Capo Crusader <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-guns-n-roses-sweet-child-o-mine">here</a>, which features an acoustic arrangement of Guns N' Roses' "Sweet Child O Mine."</p> <p><strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1472008825001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1472008825001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><strong>Lesson Contents</strong><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,0">Intro, Verse, Chorus Performance</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,1">Intro, Verse, Chorus Teaching</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,2">Post-Chorus Break</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,3">Grand Finale Jam</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,4">Grand Finale Teaching</a></p> <hr /> <em>The following content is related to the April 2012 issue of </em>Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://secure.nps1.net/guitarworld/index.php?main_page=product_info&amp;cPath=9&amp;products_id=295&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=thewho">online store</a>. <p>In the second edition of the Capo Crusader, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Jimmy Brown shows you a nifty acoustic arrangement for the Who classic "Baby O' Riley." </p> <p>Check out the first installment of the Capo Crusader <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-guns-n-roses-sweet-child-o-mine">here</a>, which features an acoustic arrangement of Guns N' Roses' "Sweet Child O Mine."</p> <p><strong>Part 3</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1471942578001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1471942578001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><strong>Lesson Contents</strong><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,0">Intro, Verse, Chorus Performance</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,1">Intro, Verse, Chorus Teaching</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,2">Post-Chorus Break</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,3">Grand Finale Jam</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,4">Grand Finale Teaching</a></p> <hr /> <em>The following content is related to the April 2012 issue of </em>Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://secure.nps1.net/guitarworld/index.php?main_page=product_info&amp;cPath=9&amp;products_id=295&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=thewho">online store</a>. <p>In the second edition of the Capo Crusader, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Jimmy Brown shows you a nifty acoustic arrangement for the Who classic "Baby O' Riley." </p> <p>Check out the first installment of the Capo Crusader <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-guns-n-roses-sweet-child-o-mine">here</a>, which features an acoustic arrangement of Guns N' Roses' "Sweet Child O Mine."</p> <p><strong>Part 4</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1471942551001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1471942551001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><strong>Lesson Contents</strong><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,0">Intro, Verse, Chorus Performance</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,1">Intro, Verse, Chorus Teaching</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,2">Post-Chorus Break</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,3">Grand Finale Jam</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,4">Grand Finale Teaching</a></p> <hr /> <em>The following content is related to the April 2012 issue of </em>Guitar World. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://secure.nps1.net/guitarworld/index.php?main_page=product_info&amp;cPath=9&amp;products_id=295&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=thewho">online store</a>. <p>In the second edition of the Capo Crusader, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Jimmy Brown shows you a nifty acoustic arrangement for the Who classic "Baby O' Riley." </p> <p>Check out the first installment of the Capo Crusader <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-guns-n-roses-sweet-child-o-mine">here</a>, which features an acoustic arrangement of Guns N' Roses' "Sweet Child O Mine."</p> <p><strong>Part 5</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1471943338001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1471943338001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><strong>Lesson Contents</strong><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,0">Intro, Verse, Chorus Performance</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,1">Intro, Verse, Chorus Teaching</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,2">Post-Chorus Break</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,3">Grand Finale Jam</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley?page=0,4">Grand Finale Teaching</a></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/who">The Who</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/pete-townshend">Pete Townshend</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/capo-crusader-acoustic-arrangement-the-who-baba-oriley#comments April 2012 Capo Crusader Pete Townshend The Who 2012 News Features Lessons Magazine Fri, 13 Dec 2013 15:47:59 +0000 Jimmy Brown 14813 at http://www.guitarworld.com Joe Walsh: "You Have to Go Out and Play in Front of People; Even if You Suck at It at First, You Have to Do It" http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-walsh-you-have-go-out-and-play-front-people-even-if-you-suck-it-first-you-have-do-it <!--paging_filter--><p><em>From the GW archive: The story was originally published in the August 2012 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. The legendary guitarist discusses his first song, first guitar, first show and more.</em></p> <p><strong>What inspired you to start playing guitar?</strong></p> <p>I had first played other instruments growing up. I had lessons on several instruments, and I knew I was musical because I heard music in my head a lot. </p> <p>But the guitar was the first instrument that I could really express myself with. I found that it was the best vehicle I had to get what was inside my head out of it and into somebody’s ears. And when I heard the Beatles while I was in high school, it was inspirational to me. I wanted to be like them, so I took up the guitar as well. </p> <p><strong>What was your first guitar?</strong></p> <p>It was a Silvertone acoustic that we ordered when I was 10 years old from the catalog of the mail-order company Sears Roebuck. It cost about $30. Let me tell you, when that thing finally arrived in the mail, after waiting for it for three weeks, I was on top of the world. And though I couldn’t yet play anything, it was the coolest thing.</p> <p><strong>What was the first song you learned?</strong></p> <p>It was the Ventures song “Walk, Don’t Run,” and it was the first song where I realized that playing guitar was all I wanted to do. And I learned the rhythm part, the lead part, the bass part and everything. I learned every note of that song.</p> <p><strong>Do you remember your first time onstage?</strong></p> <p>Yes, I was 12 and in ninth grade, and it was at a school assembly. I had learned to play stuff on the top four strings of the guitar, more like a ukulele, but I learned enough to be able to play a song, and I had a friend who played trumpet, so it was me on guitar and him on trumpet. It probably sounded horrible, and I remember being absolutely petrified. I eventually became more confident onstage, but I never forgot that first experience.</p> <p><strong>Ever had an embarrassing onstage moment?</strong></p> <p>I have had many. Everything that you think can happen has happened to me somewhere along the way—from totally forgetting the words to tripping on a guitar cord and falling down onstage to blowing up my amp a couple of times. And once that happens, you’re done for the night!</p> <p><strong>What is your favorite piece of gear?</strong></p> <p>I always come back to my 1958 Les Paul “Goldtop” and a 1956 Fender Stratocaster. They were two of the first electric guitars ever designed, and I am not sure anybody has topped them in all these years.</p> <p><strong>Got any advice for young players?</strong></p> <p>You have to go out and play in front of people; even if you suck at it at first, you have to do it. For anybody going onstage the first time, it can be a terrifying experience, and it can be so scary that they never go again. But you have to do it a couple times before you can make your mind up.</p> <p><em>Photo: Ross Halfin</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-walsh">Joe Walsh</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/eagles">Eagles</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-walsh-you-have-go-out-and-play-front-people-even-if-you-suck-it-first-you-have-do-it#comments August 2012 Eagles GW Archive Inquirer Joe Walsh The Eagles 2012 Interviews News Features Magazine Tue, 19 Nov 2013 21:42:25 +0000 Joe Matera 16624 at http://www.guitarworld.com Dear Guitar Hero: Johnny Marr Talks Guitars, 'Inception' Soundtrack, Working with John Frusciante and More http://www.guitarworld.com/dear-guitar-hero-johnny-marr-talks-guitars-inception-soundtrack-working-john-frusciante-and-more <!--paging_filter--><p><em>From the July 2012 issue of GW: He forged new rock paths with the Smiths, released a successful new solo album and just got his own signature edition guitar. But what </em>Guitar World<em> readers really want to know is ...</em></p> <p><strong>You’ve had many amazing haircuts over the years that always seem to go perfectly with your instrument choice. Can you talk about the importance of having a look in rock and roll? — Andrew M.</strong></p> <p>[laughs] I maintain it’s my absolute prerogative to wear whatever hairstyle goes with my guitar at any point in my life. It amazes me when people make a big deal about people changing their hair. Surely that’s one of the bonuses of being in a band. When I was a kid, David Bowie was big, so that’s where it started for me. </p> <p>Then I grew up watching bands like Siouxsie Sioux, the Birthday Party and Public Image Ltd. And I don’t think there was an ordinary haircut in the pack. I joined my first proper band around the time of new wave. Coming from where I came from [in Manchester] it was the law: You weren’t even allowed to plug in if your hair wasn’t at least halfway decent. [laughs] I’m still flying the flag and fighting the good fight, and I’m glad it’s being appreciated.</p> <p><strong>I heard that you got the crazy tremolo sound on [the Smiths’] “How Soon Is Now?” by having the engineers pick up and drop Fender Twin Reverb amps while you played them. Is there any truth in this and if not can you finally set the record straight? — Owen McDevitt</strong></p> <p>No, that is very wrong. [laughs] I think you may be confusing it with another story. On a few Smiths songs, like “This Charming Man” and “Stop Me If You’ve Heard This One Before,” I put a compressed Telecaster through a very loud Fender Twin with tremolo on and dropped big metal knives on the guitar. But for “How Soon Is Now?” the straight rhythm track was fed out from tape to a live room with me controlling two Fender Twins on one side and the producer, John Porter, controlling two Fender Twins on the other side.</p> <p>The signal was going through the amps and we were both riding the vibrato on the amps by hand. We’d get 10 or 12 seconds in and one of us would look at the other and shake his head because it went out of sync. It’s a long song too; so it was a labor of love. The sound changes throughout the song in intensity and vibe, and I’m really glad digital recording wasn’t around back then because it would not have been as good.</p> <p><strong>You said before that the Fender Telecaster was the ultimate guitar due to its simplicity, sturdiness and reliability. How do you make the more complex Jaguar work while handling frontman duties with the Healers? — Jacques K. Vignavong</strong></p> <p>I thought a lot about that aspect. When I first started playing Jaguars in 2005, they reminded me of the experience of driving a cool old vintage car. It’s exciting and a lot of fun, but you have to make sure the gearshift doesn’t go in the wrong gear or that one of the pedals doesn’t get pushed through the floorboards. </p> <p>[laughs] At first I found that I was able to stay on top of the Jaguar when I wasn’t singing lead vocals. I’d be changing switches and tones while hoping the trem arm wouldn’t start whizzing around or that the entire circuit wouldn’t switch off accidentally.</p> <p>As fun as it was, I couldn’t really see how I was gonna do all that as a lead singer, without lots of duct tape keeping everything in its place. But when I started going out on tour with the Healers, it was one of those things where I just had to become a better player. I had to make myself technically better to keep my tone right. But one thing that really helped was that I made sure my signature model couldn’t be switched off accidentally.</p> <p><strong>So let’s imagine [British prime minister] David Cameron actually decided that the coalition government would step down. [Marr stated at the 2012 NME Awards that the Smiths would reunite if the government stepped down.] When you reform the Smiths, what would be the first song you all play onstage? — Mike Matthews</strong></p> <p>Man. This is a total minefield for so many reasons. You’ll find out…when it never happens. [laughs] Which is a Smiths song in waiting if ever I’ve heard one: “You’ll Find Out When It Never Happens.” [laughs]</p> <p><strong>Tell me about working with Hans Zimmer on the <em>Inception</em> soundtrack. How did that challenge you as a guitarist? — Peter Finan</strong></p> <p>As a guitar player I used to think that you could approach soundtracks in an abstract fashion, perhaps because of Neil Young’s work on Dead Man. It seemed like there was a lot of scope for experimentation. That may be so, but my experience doing two different soundtracks—<em>Inception</em> and <em>The Big Bang</em>—taught me that there are two aspects that you absolutely have to follow. </p> <p>The first is that you must be appropriate to the scene’s emotion, whether it’s sad, dramatic, tense, excited, erotic or whatever. The second is that you have to click with the director, because it’s his vision. Working with Hans was great, because he insisted on me being free to make it sound like me. The most challenging thing about the <em>Inception</em> pieces was that the parts were originally composed on a piano and written for 10 fingers to play.</p> <p>Even though some of the parts sound simplistic, I had to really work it out by detuning and playing in weird positions. Then there were the odd time signatures and key changes to deal with. But I really love Hans’ voicings, so it was fun to work them out on guitar.</p> <p><strong>You have impeccable harmonic and melodic taste, but I read that you don’t have any knowledge of conventional notation and instead create your own mental system for chords. Can you talk about that process? — Zach Kochan</strong></p> <p>When I was a young teenager I learned music at school and got enough knowledge to understand what chords and keys were useful to me. But the crucial thing for me was that I never had a guitar teacher, and I was determined to learn from records: new wave and early Seventies stuff like Mick Ronson, Patti Smith, Television, Talking Heads and Nile Rodgers from Chic. When I was 12, I also used to love this one dumb disco record by Hamilton Bohannon. </p> <p>And the only jazz musician that I liked for the longest time was McCoy Tyner. I loved his choice of chords. I think they were 11ths, but I knew them as McCoy Tyner chords. So I practiced, by ear, crossing McCoy Tyner chord changes with Bohannon rhythms. So I have systems like that, which come from weird subjective connections that I’ve made with records. “Girl Afraid” by the Smiths was me trying to play something like a Little Richard piano part. “The Headmaster Ritual,” which is done in odd chord voicings, was me trying to play a Joni Mitchell outro. As musicians I think it’s a really good thing to put two and two together and come up with five.</p> <p><strong>I love the tracks you did with John Frusciante on his album <em>The Empyrean</em>. John has such a distinct musical vision. What was it like collaborating with him? — Sophie Caley</strong></p> <p>John is always keen to avoid the obvious. He’s someone who’s very into emotion in music. He has idealism about sound. When I worked with him on that record, he struck me as someone who was always searching. He’s not at all blasé. If you’re hearing him playing a sound that is very clean, to John it’s the result of him looking for something that’s pure. Every sound he puts together is deliberate and meaningful to him. </p> <p>When we did those songs he inspired me, so I worked very quickly. I would grab an acoustic, put it into a drone and play by ear without worrying about being too precise. I’d go with my feelings. Then for another song I’d grab a Strat and just do harmonics. He let me do a lot of textures. I don’t think it will surprise anyone to hear this, but John is a very deep guy.</p> <p><strong>You’re an incredibly active musician. But I’m wondering, when all that gets too hectic, what do you do to relax and clear your mind? — Julie Voit Levinson</strong></p> <p>I like what I’m doing, and I’m okay with hectic. But I’ll just put my hoodie up and go on a long run and listen to early Eighties electronic music, like The The, New Order, Bobby O and Giorgio Moroder. That’s served me really well, particularly on tour. If you wake up in some city at 5:30 in the morning and you want to see the sights, it’s a great way. Running around cities also gives me a keen appreciation of how lucky I am.</p> <p>How else would you get to see Tokyo if you’ve gotta do a soundcheck, interviews and a show. I’ve seen more of the world this way in the last 10 years than the previous 20 combined.</p> <p><a href="https://plus.google.com/u/0/+BradAngle?re=author">Brad Angle Google +</a></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/dear-guitar-hero-johnny-marr-talks-guitars-inception-soundtrack-working-john-frusciante-and-more#comments Dear Guitar Hero Johnny Marr July 2012 2012 Interviews News Features Magazine Thu, 31 Oct 2013 20:29:36 +0000 Brad Angle 19636 at http://www.guitarworld.com Talkin' Blues: The Brilliance of Jimi Hendrix's Rhythm Guitar Playing http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-brilliance-jimi-hendrixs-rhythm-guitar-playing <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the August 2012 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-aug-12-van-halen/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=talkinblues">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>When Jimi Hendrix first exploded onto the scene, much attention was riveted on his radical reinvention of guitar-soloing vocabulary, technique and sound, inspired by a now-familiar roster of great blues soloists. But Hendrix had another musical asset that set him apart from similarly influenced British blues-rock contemporaries: years of experience as a professional R&amp;B rhythm guitarist.</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1699260092001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1699260092001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1699250087001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1699250087001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-brilliance-jimi-hendrixs-rhythm-guitar-playing#comments August 2012 Jimi Hendrix Keith Wyatt Talkin' Blues 2012 Lessons Magazine Wed, 18 Sep 2013 12:22:55 +0000 Keith Wyatt 16110 at http://www.guitarworld.com Inquirer: Seven Questions with Eric Johnson http://www.guitarworld.com/inquirer-seven-questions-eric-johnson <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: What inspired you to start playing the guitar?</strong></p> <p><strong>ERIC JOHNSON</strong>: It was Nokie Edwards of the Ventures. He was one of the first guys I ever heard play guitar, and I really enjoyed the sound. And when I was a kid it was something new and different to try. Then I got into guys like Clapton and Hendrix, who had these amazing sounds, which further inspired me to play. </p> <p><strong>Do you remember your first guitar?</strong></p> <p>It was a white Fender Musicmaster that my mom and dad bought for me when I was 11. There was a student model in a local music store that I had seen, so I talked my parents into getting it. </p> <p><strong>What was the first song you learned to play?</strong></p> <p>It was “Your Cheatin’ Heart” by Hank Williams. A friend taught me how to play it. From there, I moved onto listening to the Ventures’ records and trying to pick out the songs by ear, listening to them over and over until I could play them.</p> <p><strong>Do you remember your first gig?</strong></p> <p>It was at a club in Austin called the Eleventh Door. I was 13 and playing in a Top-40 band that did parties and little club gigs. We were called the Sounds of Life. Our set consisted of everything from Wilson Pickett to Steppenwolf. It was a great first gig, and I had so much fun doing it for the next couple of years. When I got to around 15, I thought, Wow, I want to do this for a living!</p> <p><strong>Ever had an embarrassing onstage moment?</strong></p> <p>Oh yeah. Once, I was playing in Corpus Christi, Texas, and there was a hole in the stage that was there for when the venue presented theatrical plays. They used to cover the hole when they didn’t need it. I was performing onstage and happened to break through the cover and into the hole. It wasn’t a really deep hole, but it was big enough for me to fall into. Luckily enough, it didn’t break my guitar, but it broke the cord off it, so we had to stop so I could crawl out of the hole and get another guitar cord.</p> <p><strong>What is your favorite piece of gear?</strong></p> <p>My Dumble amplifier, because Dumbles have a one-of-a-kind sound. There really is nothing else like them, and I have never heard any other amps do what they do.</p> <p><strong>Got any advice for young players?</strong></p> <p>It’s important to find two or three players that you like and really try to emulate their style. Doing that helps you learn all the ins and outs of what makes them play the way they do, and it gives you a guideline by which to really hone your craft. Listen to their tone, the way they pick or fret the instrument and how they go about their approach. Once you hit that point, take all the bits and pieces you’ve gleaned from those players and start creating your own thing.</p> <p><em>Photo: Jimmy Fontaine</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eric-johnson">Eric Johnson</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/inquirer-seven-questions-eric-johnson#comments Eric Johnson GW Archive Inquirer 2012 Interviews News Features Sun, 18 Aug 2013 16:44:57 +0000 Joe Matera 15471 at http://www.guitarworld.com