In Deep http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/184/all en Freddie King Lesson: Going In Deep with a Blues Guitar Legend — with Video and Tab http://www.guitarworld.com/freddie-king-lesson-texas-blues-video-tab-andy-aledort-in-deep <!--paging_filter--><p>Freddie King is among the triumvirate of the greatest and most influential electric blues guitarists ever, revered with equal respect alongside the legendary blues gods B.B. King and Albert King. </p> <p>Together, they are often referred to as "The Three Kings"—all complete masters of their craft and essential subjects of study for any inspiring blues guitar enthusiast. </p> <p>In this edition of In Deep, we'll examine a few of the trademark Freddie King-isms that have earned him his rightful place as the forefront of electric blues guitar.</p> <p>Of the three Kings, Freddie had a hard-driving intensity that gave his guitar lines and solos a fiery spirit. And though he was blessed with what were arguably the most powerful vocal pipes of the three, he distinguished himself as a player and composer by penning the greatest blues guitar instrumentals in the genre’s history, such as the classic masterpieces “Hideaway,” “The Stumble,” “Sen-Sa- Shun,” “San-Ho-Zay,” “Side Tracked,” “In the Open,” and many others, all songs that have been covered brilliantly by such blues-rock heroes as Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Johnny Winter, ZZ Top and Stevie Ray Vaughan.</p> <p>Freddie King was born as Frederick Christian on September 3, 1934. Though his mother’s maiden name was King, in his early days as a performer he was thought to have changed his last name to King to align himself with B.B. King, then a rising star of blues guitar. </p> <p>His earliest records are credited to “Freddy,” but by 1968 he changed the spelling to “Freddie.” His recording career began in 1956, and by 1960 he had recorded the soon-to-be hit songs “Have You Ever Loved a Woman?,” “Love Her with a Feeling” and the instrumental smash "Hideaway," covered brilliantly by Eric Clapton with John Mayall on the <em>Blues Breakers</em> album, recorded in 1966. </p> <p>Early photos of King show him playing a mid-Fifties Gibson gold-top Les Paul with P-90 pickups, which he used along with a Gibson GA-40 amplifier. Shortly thereafter, he switched to his trademark Gibson ES-345 guitars, cranked to massive volume through Fender Quad Reverbs. </p> <p>He picked with his fingers, using a plastic thumb pick along with a metal index-finger pick, and his string gauges were very unusual: the top three string gauges were .010, .011 and .012—very light for the B and especially the G—while the wound strings were normal light-medium-gauge electric strings.</p> <p>King scored many early instrumental hits, the biggest being the aforementioned “Hideaway,” an easy-grooving 12-bar shuffle in E with a distinct, memorable melody. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates a similar melody played within the 12-bar form. </p> <p>As melodic lines are played on the top two strings with abundant use of open notes—akin to the country blues of Lightnin’ Hopkins—a rhythm part is equally attended to, built from palm-muted two-note forms on the bottom two strings and balanced against the melodic development.</p> <p>In bar 2 of the example, a simple open- to-second-fret hammer-on is replaced with a “rolling” hammer-on, wherein the middle finger is hammered onto the first fret, instead of the second, followed by a slide up to the second fret. (This more intricate technique was later adopted and employed frequently by Stevie Ray Vaughan.) </p> <p>Throughout this example, notice the subtle inclusion of single-note phrases that serve to connect the elements of the part while keeping it moving forward.</p> <p>Freddie revisited this melody for another of his classic instrumentals, “The Stumble.” <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> illustrates a similar form, which begins with a melodic line close to that of “Hideaway” but is played over a different chord progression, starting on the IV(four) chord, A, in the key of E. </p> <p>In this 16-bar form, a descending sliding double-stop lick, based on a sixth interval, is played on the G and high E strings, executed by picking the G string with the thumb and the high E string with either the index or middle finger. Pick each pair sharply and in a staccato manner (short and detached), and strive for absolute accuracy as you move quickly down the fretboard.</p> <p>Freddie showcased a similar lick in “Hideaway,” with a band “breakdown” (the band lays out from playing the groove, supplying accented chordal stabs only). <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> offers a lick along these lines, initiated with a very cool and unusual E7add2 chord voicing. The band comes back in at bar 5, over A, and, in this example, further melodic development is performed on the top two strings.</p> <p>A great example of King’s relentlessly hard-driving style is a song called “Boogie Funk,” essentially a one-chord vamp played in A. The roots of this song can be found in the John Lee Hooker classic, “Boogie Chillen.”</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 4</strong> presents a repeating riff, built around an A5 chord, that features muted- string accents along with subtle half-step bends on the low E and A strings. This is played with a “triplet feel,” so what is written as eighth notes is intended to be played as a quarter-note/eighth-note combo within a triplet bracket. I use a pick to play this part, alternating evenly between downstrokes and upstrokes, but Freddie would fingerpick such a part, so try using the thumb for the downstrokes and the index or middle finger (or both) for the upstrokes. In <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>, I add a melodic figure to the form.</p> <p>After building intensity by riding on the I (one) chord, Freddie would switch briefly to the IV (four) chord and play a similar rhythmic lick. <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> offers a part along these lines, to be performed with the pick hand in the same manner as <strong>FIGURES 4</strong> and <strong>5</strong>.</p> <p>These examples just scratch the surface of Freddie King’s genius, so dig deep into his catalog to discover even more for yourself.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1699133089001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1699133089001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2011.35.41%20AM.png" width="620" height="442" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 11.35.41 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2011.36.04%20AM.png" width="620" height="584" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 11.36.04 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2011.37.10%20AM.png" width="620" height="589" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 11.37.10 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2011.38.06%20AM.png" width="620" height="461" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 11.38.06 AM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/freddie-king">Freddie King</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/freddie-king-lesson-texas-blues-video-tab-andy-aledort-in-deep#comments August 2012 blues Freddie King In Deep 2012 Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Thu, 03 Sep 2015 11:26:25 +0000 Andy Aledort 16113 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: Using Various Major-Pentatonic Shapes for Soloing — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-using-various-major-pentatonic-shapes-soloing/25281 <!--paging_filter--><p>Most guitarists will agree that the study of scales is an endeavor that will reap many benefits. </p> <p>Along with helping one to learn the “map” of the fretboard in any given position, studying scales reinforces note recognition all over the fretboard while also instilling a broader range of muscle memory in regard to the way one physically navigates the board via repetitive finger movement. </p> <p>In other words, your fingers will adapt to new specific movement patterns as you move from one pattern and position to the next. </p> <p>The greatest benefit of this endeavor is that it helps you from habitually falling into “lick”-type phrases that so many guitarists find themselves stuck with. We all must learn licks in the pursuit of developing our soloing abilities, and the next step is to break those lick habits and instead use your ear to listen to the many melodic possibilities that can be discovered as you play.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates the E major pentatonic scale played in first position, utilizing open strings. A great way to play this pattern is to keep your index finger at the first fret and your remaining fingers at the second, third and fourth frets. This way, there will be no need for moving out of position while playing the notes of the scale. </p> <p>As a general guideline, ascending and descending through groups of threes and fours is a great way to memorize a scale position; <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> illustrates descending in three-note groups through the pattern, and <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> has you descending in groups of four. </p> <p>Now let’s look at how you can improvise melodies while staying within this position of E major pentatonic. <strong>FIGURE 4</strong> offers an example. As I play, I’m simply moving my fingers among notes that are found in the scale in a variety of different patterns and listening to the results. In this way, I’m thinking more about navigating through the scale in this position as opposed to playing licks that I know or licks that I might always find myself typically playing. </p> <p>And as you move up the fretboard, you will discover that each scale position and pattern will offer different melodic patterns as a product of the way the notes lay on the board.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 5</strong> shows E major pentatonic as it falls in fourth position, and <strong>FIGURES 6</strong> and <strong>7</strong> illustrate descending groups of threes and fours, respectively, played in this pattern, or shape. Once your fingers become accustomed to the shape, try soloing in a free and random way while listening to the melodic contour of the lines and letting your ear decide which note to play next. </p> <p>The next step is to continue the process by moving up through all scale positions of E major pentatonic and then improvising in each new area.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1cFMGcmZ7Y0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-13%20at%202.36.55%20PM.png" width="620" height="488" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-13 at 2.36.55 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-13%20at%202.37.27%20PM.png" width="620" height="356" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-13 at 2.37.27 PM.png" /></p> <p><em>Photo: Cindy Moorhead</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-using-various-major-pentatonic-shapes-soloing/25281#comments Andy Aledort In Deep October 2015 Videos Lessons Magazine Fri, 28 Aug 2015 12:59:10 +0000 Andy Aledort 25281 at http://www.guitarworld.com Stevie Ray Vaughan Lesson: How to Play "Couldn't Stand the Weather" http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-stevie-ray-vaughans-playing-couldnt-stand-weather <!--paging_filter--><p>Stevie Ray Vaughan’s distinctive playing style is earmarked by equal parts pure power, intensity of focus, razor-sharp precision and deeply emotional conviction. And then there’s his tone—probably the best Stratocaster-derived sound ever evoked from the instrument. </p> <p>Stevie tuned his guitar down one half step (low to high, Eb Ab Db Gb Bb Eb), a move inspired by one of his biggest influences, Jimi Hendrix. He also preferred heavy gauge strings: high to low, .013, .015, .019, .028, .038, .058, occasionally switching the high E string to either a .012 or .011. To facilitate the use of such heavy strings, Stevie’s guitars were re-fretted with large Dunlop 6100 or Stewart-MacDonald 150 fretwire.</p> <p>Let’s begin this lesson with a look at the title track from Stevie’s second album, <em>Couldn’t Stand the Weather</em>. The song begins in “free time” (no strict tempo). </p> <p>While brother Jimmie Vaughan tremolo-strums the opening chords—Bm-A7-G7-F#7—Stevie adds improvised solo lines (see transcription bars 1-8): over Bm, Stevie sticks with the B blues scale (B D E F F# A), over A7 he utilizes the A blues scale (A C D Eb E G) and over G7 he uses G blues (G Bb C Db D F). Strive to recreate Stevie’s precision when it comes to his articulation. </p> <p>Over Jimmie’s F#7 chord, Stevie plays a first inversion F#7#9, which places the third of the chord, A#, in the bass (as the lowest note). (Stevie employed this same unusual voicing for E7#9 in “Cold Shot.”) </p> <p>A four-bar, R&amp;B/soul-style single-note riff follows, doubled in octaves by guitar and bass (see bars 9-17). Played four times, two extra beats of rest are added the third time through. This is shown as a bar of 6/4 in bar 13 of the transcription.</p> <p>In bars 18-23, Stevie adds a very Hendrix-y rhythm guitar part, played in 10th position and beginning on beat two with an F octave fretted on the G and high E strings, strummed in 16th notes. Stevie maintains the rhythmic push of steady 16ths through most of the riff by consistently strumming in a down-up-down-up “one-ee-and-a” pattern. </p> <p>At the end of bar 18, barre your middle finger across the top three strings at the 12th fret, and then bend and release the G and B strings one half step. As the notes are held into the next bar, add subtle finger vibrato. Keep your fret-hand thumb wrapped over the top of the fretboard throughout the riff, using it to fret the D root note on the low E string’s 10th fret. Stevie intersperses this low root note into the lick in a few essential spots, akin to Hendrix on his songs “Freedom” and “Izabella.” </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/HppszdNQNXs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_1.jpg" /></p> <p>Stevie displays his true brilliance as an improviser when playing over a slow blues. All of the following examples are played in the key of G, utilizing the G blues scale (G Bb C Db D F) as a basis. Across the first two bars of <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I play two- and three-note chord figures against the low G and C root notes, fretted with the thumb. On beat three of both bars, I play a trill by barring the index finger across the D and G strings and then quickly hammering on and pulling off with the middle finger one fret higher on the G string. </p> <p>When playing bar 3, keep your index finger barred across the top two strings at the third fret while bending notes on the G and B strings. On beat two, quickly hammer on and pull off to the fourth fret on the high E string. This G-Ab-G hammer/pull is a staple for Stevie, used in myriad different and creative ways.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_2.jpg" /></p> <p>Another essential element of Stevie’s slow-blues lead playing approach is the use of Albert King–style multiple-string bends. As shown in <strong>FIGURE 2a</strong>, I bend the high E string up one whole step at the eighth fret using the ring finger (supported by the middle) and simultaneously catch the B string under the fingertip and bend it up a whole step as well so that it “goes along for the ride.” In <strong>FIGURE 2b</strong>, I catch the top three strings under the fingertip. It will take practice to build up the strength and “finger traction” to execute these bends properly.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_3ab.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_3c4a.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_4b.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>FIGURES 3a and 3b</strong> illustrate another way to add pull-offs on the high E string, this time fretting A and then pulling back from Ab to G. This is followed by repeated pull-offs on the B string, illustrated more clearly in <strong>FIGURE 3c. FIGURES 4a and 4b</strong> offer two more permutations of this idea.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5ab.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5c.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5de.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5f.jpg" /></p> <p>Another nod to Albert is the use of fingerpicking to accent notes on the high E string. I use my middle finger to pick and snap the string back against the fretboard, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURES 5a–5f</strong>. Notice in <strong>FIGURES 5b, 5c and 5e</strong> the use of a half-step bend at the seventh fret on the high E string. Albert was a master of microtonal bending, a technique learned well by Stevie.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_6.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_7.jpg" /></p> <p>Stevie devised some unique position shifts, utilizing bends and slides on the G string. <strong>FIGURES 6a–c</strong> present three examples. </p> <p>The use of the notes A, Ab and G on the high E string allude to the V (five) chord, D, and the D blues scale (D F G Gb A C). <strong>FIGURE 8a</strong> illustrates the scale, and <strong>FIGURES 7 and 8b–d</strong> offer examples played over the V chord. Another staple of Stevie’s style is the use of slides on the G string, exemplified in <strong>FIGURES 9a–c</strong>.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_8ab.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_8c.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_8d.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_9a.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_9b.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_9c.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/stevie-ray-vaughan">Stevie Ray Vaughan</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmie-vaughan">Jimmie Vaughan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-stevie-ray-vaughans-playing-couldnt-stand-weather#comments In Deep Jimmie Vaughan July 2010 Stevie Ray Vaughan Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort Blogs Lessons Magazine Thu, 27 Aug 2015 14:23:58 +0000 Andy Aledort 17124 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: How to Create Sweet-Sounding Twin Leads with the Major Hexatonic Scale — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-how-create-sweet-sounding-twin-leads-major-hexatonic-scale/24942 <!--paging_filter--><p>A signature element in many great, enduring rock songs is the use of harmonized single-note lead guitar lines. </p> <p>Examples include Thin Lizzy’s “The Boys Are Back in Town,” “Reelin’ in the Years” by Steely Dan, the Eagles’ “Hotel California” and the Allman Brothers Band’s “Blue Sky,” “Whipping Post,” “Ramblin’ Man,” “Hot ’Lanta,” “Revival” and many others. </p> <p>Dickey Betts, composer of so many of these classic ABB tunes, has made harmonized single-note leads a part of his own signature sound, and for a great many of these harmonized lines, he has relied on the major hexatonic scale, also known as hexatonic major. </p> <p>In fact, many players refer to the scale as “the Dickey Betts scale” because his music is so closely associated with it. In this lesson, I will show you how to create sweet harmony leads with this scale, in the style of Betts.</p> <p>One of Dickey’s most well-known and immediately recognizable usages of major hexatonic harmony leads is the intro riff to “Blue Sky.” <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> offers a part played along these lines, arranged for one guitar, wherein the lower note represents the melody and the higher note represents the harmony, which stays diatonic to (within the scale structure of) E major hexatonic (E F# G# A B C#). </p> <p>The best way to learn the major hexatonic scale is to first analyze the more commonly used five-note major pentatonic scale, upon which it is based. <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> illustrates E major pentatonic (E F# G# B C#), as played in seventh position. The intervallic structure of this scale is one (the root), major second, major third, perfect fifth and major sixth. </p> <p>To get major hexatonic, simply add the perfect fourth to this structure, which will result in an intervallic spelling of one (the root), major second, major third, perfect fourth, perfect fifth and major sixth, as illustrated in the key of E in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>. </p> <p>By simply adding the fourth to this scale, now the triadic chord tones of E major (E G# B) and A major (A C# E) are present, making this scale perfectly suited for soloing over a repeating I-IV (one-four) chord progression in the key of E (E to A), as is the case with “Blue Sky.”</p> <p>Whereas the type of interval remains consistent when diatonically harmonizing a seven-note scale, such as E major, for example, harmonized in thirds, fourths, fifths, etc., when harmonizing the six-note major hexatonic scale, the intervallic relationship will switch from thirds to fourths at certain points due to the wider gaps between some of the notes. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 4</strong> illustrates E major hexatonic played up and down the high E string, and <strong>FIGURE 5</strong> illustrates the same scale played entirely on the B string, starting from B, the fifth. If we play both strings together, the result is shown in <strong>FIGURE 6</strong>: the first two harmonies are fourths, followed by four thirds, major or minor, then everything repeats an octave higher, when you get to the 12th fret. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 7</strong> offers an example of how these major hexatonic harmonies might be used in a “Blue Sky”–inspired melody. Once you have the basic idea, try inventing some two-note harmonized lead melodies of your own. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sfo0WuqYozo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-08-07%20at%2010.55.45%20AM.png" width="620" height="743" alt="Screen Shot 2015-08-07 at 10.55.45 AM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-how-create-sweet-sounding-twin-leads-major-hexatonic-scale/24942#comments Andy Aledort In Deep September 2015 Videos Lessons Magazine Fri, 07 Aug 2015 14:47:53 +0000 Andy Aledort 24942 at http://www.guitarworld.com Robert Johnson Lesson: How to Unlock the Guitar Mysteries of the Delta Blues Great http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-unlocking-guitar-mysteries-delta-blues-great-robert-johnson <!--paging_filter--><p>Delta blues giant Robert Johnson (May 8, 1911–August 16, 1938) is one of the most fascinating and mysterious performers in music history. </p> <p>He created an essential body of blues guitar music, recording 29 songs in 1936 and 1937 that would exert a powerful influence on the likes of Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix, Keith Richards, Johnny Winter and many others. </p> <p>In this edition of In Deep, we’ll examine the variety of picking techniques and tunings that Johnson used to craft his timeless, deeply emotional music.</p> <p>One of the staples of Johnson’s style is his ability to sound at times like two guitar players, combining driving rhythms on the lower strings with melodic figures on the higher strings. Due to the fact that his recordings were intentionally sped up when first released, definitive analyses of his tunings and capo positions is near impossible. That said, the interpretations offered here are practical and easily achieved. </p> <p>Johnson’s tunings can be broken down into four categories: standard tuning, open G, open D and drop D. Some of the songs interpreted as open G or open D may have in fact been performed in open A or open E, respectively. </p> <p>Let’s start with standard tuning, which is the tuning Johnson used for the recordings “Kind Hearted Woman Blues,” “I’m a Steady Rollin’ Man,” “Love in Vain” and “Sweet Home Chicago.” The last song was performed in standard tuning with a capo at the second fret. A complete transcription of “Sweet Home Chicago” begins on page 126 (note that all tab numbers represent the distance from the capo; i.e., “12” represents 12 frets above the capo, though the note is actually played at the 14th fret). </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience906500703001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="906500703001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> The intro is a “turnaround,” normally found in the last two bars of a 12-bar blues progression. Johnson started many of his songs in this way: through bars 1 and 2, the high E tonic note is used as a pedal tone while other notes descend the D string. At the end of bar 2 into bar 3, he transitions to B7, the five chord. </p> <p>The verse is initiated at bar 3, and at this point Johnson creates the sound of two “voices” by playing a solid rhythm on the bottom two strings, alternating between root-fifth, root-sixth and root-flatted seventh chords while adding melodic notes on the G and high E strings. In bars 13 and 14, he performs a different turnaround, alternating between descending two-note figures on the G and B strings and the open high E. </p> <p>Johnson achieved great definition between the low and high string parts by fingerpicking and using a thumb pick. I perform these licks using hybrid picking, holding a pick between the thumb and index fingers and using the other pick-hand fingers, primarily the middle and ring, to fingerpick.</p> <p>Played in the same tuning and capo position, “When You’ve Got a Good Friend” features a similar intro, albeit one slightly more complex in the fingerpicking pattern. Here, Johnson incorporates irregular bar lengths, a common practice among country blues guitarists. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> includes a bar of 3/8 at the end of the intro, which functions as a pick-up for singing. In evidence again is the inclusion of simple melodic additions on the G and high E strings played against the driving rhythm of the low strings. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience906477013001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="906477013001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0411_1.jpg" /></p> <p>“Love in Vain” was performed in standard tuning in the key of G, with the capo at the first fret, as approximated in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>. This excerpt starts with a turnaround consisting of chromatically descending double-stops (two-note figures), thirds apart and played on the top two strings. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience906477002001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="906477002001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0411_2.jpg" /></p> <p>In the verse section, the strong rhythm is maintained on the bottom strings while harmonic interest is added through subtle changes in chord voicings on the top two strings. </p> <p>While these high notes are allowed to ring, the lower notes should be slightly palm muted and played with staccato accents. Bar 9 offers a twist, with a shift to the II7 (two-dominant seventh) chord, A7, before resolving to the five chord, D7/F#, for which the low F# bass note is thumb-fretted.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0411_3.jpg" /></p> <p>Johnson employed open G tuning (low to high, D G D G B D: see <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>) for tunes such as “Crossroad Blues,” “Walkin’ Blues” and “Come on in My Kitchen.” He utilized specific chord voicings designed to work with open tunings, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>, akin to “Stones in My Passway.” The example begins with slide guitar (Johnson wore a metal slide on his pinkie), before switching to chord voicings made up of all open strings combined with notes fretted on the top two strings. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0411_5.jpg" /></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience906500682001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="906500682001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> The verse section (bar 5) features classic Johnson chord voicings for G6 and G7 on the downbeats of beats two, three and four. In bar 5, the four chord, C7, is sounded by barring across the top three strings at the fifth fret, adding and removing a high Bf note at the eighth fret of the first string. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0411_7.jpg" /></p> <p>The final example is played in open D tuning (low to high: D A D Fs A D), illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7</strong> offers an example in the style of “Ramblin’ on My Mind” and features slide guitar extensively. The example begins with slide figures, positioned on the top four strings at the 12th fret and played against the open low-string “rhythm” part. When playing these slide licks and vibratos, position the slide directly over the fretwire for proper intonation.</p> <p>The verse (bar 6) consists of four bars of the one chord, followed by two bars on the four chord, G7, fretted at the fifth fret. Likewise, the five chord, A7 (bar 14) is positioned at the seventh fret. </p> <p>Each Robert Johnson composition offers an invaluable lesson in country blues guitar. Hopefully this column has shed light on his playing style and will inspire you to investigate his music further. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience906500673001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="906500673001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience906492203001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="906492203001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/robert-johnson">Robert Johnson</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-unlocking-guitar-mysteries-delta-blues-great-robert-johnson#comments April 2011 In Deep Robert Johnson Videos Blogs Lessons Magazine Tue, 04 Aug 2015 18:10:18 +0000 Andy Aledort 17333 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep Lesson with Andy Aledort: How to Play "Little Wing" by Jimi Hendrix http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-jimi-hendrixs-little-wing <!--paging_filter--><p>Jimi Hendrix's stature as rock's greatest guitarist is by now an absolute and indisputable fact. In this month's edition of "In Deep," I'll examine his genius within the realm of rhythm guitar.</p> <p>Let’s begin with a breakdown of the intro to the live version of “Little Wing,” transcribed in this issue [see page 136 of the December 2011 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>]. Before we begin, keep in mind that, as was his nature, Jimi never played any song exactly the same way twice. </p> <p>Live or in the studio, he always strove for spontaneously inspired performances of every song. For guitarists, this offers a vast treasure of musical lessons to be learned when studying any one of Hendrix’s compositions.</p> <p>This version of “Little Wing,” recorded at what is acknowledged as the Jimi Hendrix Experience’s greatest live performance—on February 24, 1969, at London’s Albert Hall—differs in many subtle but fascinating ways from the studio track heard on <em>Axis: Bold as Love</em>. </p> <p>In the pickup and through bar 1, Jimi first strikes muted strings by lightly laying his fret hand across the fretboard. This is followed by an expressive slide down from the 12th fret; Jimi barres across the top two strings while lightly fretting the sixth string at the 12th fret by wrapping his thumb over the top of the fretboard.</p> <p>Across beats three and four, he works off a 12th-position Em7 chord shape, striking different pairs of strings in conjunction with single notes to create a “chord/melody” effect.</p> <p>In bar 2, Jimi plays a third-position G major chord by fretting the sixth-string bass note with his thumb and choosing not to barre the index finger across all six strings or fret the A string with the ring finger, which frees up his pinkie to embellish the chord with fast hammer-ons and pull-offs on the G and high E strings. The same approach is used for bar 3 over Am.</p> <p>Notice how he moves smoothly from sounding pairs of strings to single notes while weaving an evolving and forward-moving rhythm part. Back over Em7 on bar 4, Jimi uses the seventh-position shape to execute a series of delicate hammer-ons and pull-offs, setting up the chord change to Bm in the next bar, which is also played in seventh position.</p> <p>Using Bf to shift down to Am in fifth position, on beat two he begins with a ring-finger barre across the D, G and B strings at the seventh fret to hammer up to the ninth fret on the D string with the pinkie. This is followed by a full arpeggiation of C on beat three into incorporation of C/E on beat four, sliding up to E on the A string’s seventh fret.</p> <p>Bar 7 features Hendrix’s signature “sliding sus2” voicings, as Gsus2 slides up to Asus2 and then down to Fsus2. Though the thumb is used to fret the low bass notes throughout, keep this finger loose as to limit the amount of pressure that the palm of the hand exerts against the back of the neck. In bars 8 and 9, Jimi utilizes fifth-string-root voicings of C and D major, wrapping up the intro with chord-melody figures based on D/Fs.</p> <p>Let’s now expand on the rhythm techniques Jimi uses on this version of “Little Wing.” In <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I begin with the same G major voicing found in bar 2, but I incorporate more elaborate hammer-ons and pull-offs on the top three strings as well as utilize quick finger slides and hammer-ons based on the G major pentatonic scale (G A B D E).</p> <p>Another great example of Jimi’s inventiveness with this chord form is heard on his Monterey Pop version of Bob Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone.” In <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, I fret only the sixth, fourth and second strings while sliding between G and Fsus2 chord voicings, incorporating the open G string throughout to provide a powerful sustaining quality.</p> <p>Similar in execution is Jimi’s rhythm part to the intro and verse sections of “Love or Confusion” from Are You Experienced. In <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I emulate this part by adding quick hammerons and pull-offs on the B and G strings within both the G5 and Fsus2 voicings. The “sliding sus2” chords of “Little Wing,” alluded to in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>, also appear in another great Hendrix ballad, “Castles Made of Sand.” <strong>FIGURE 5</strong> offers an extended version of sliding these chord forms up and down the fretboard.</p> <p>Now let’s apply these techniques to a few chord progressions. In <strong>FIGURE 6</strong>, I move from sixth-string-root G, Am, Bm and C voicings back to G while adding quick hammers and pulls within each voicing. In <strong>FIGURE 7</strong>, a similar approach is taken for C-Bf-F along the lines of Hendrix’s classic “The Wind Cries Mary.” Live versions of this song reveal great inventiveness over the one chord, F, along the lines of <strong>FIGURES 8 and 9.</strong></p> <p>In <strong>FIGURE 10</strong>, fifth-string-root voicings are used to illustrate other chord embellishment ideas. As always, feel free to experiment with your own inventions once you have these techniques firmly under your fingers.</p> <p>The last example, <strong>FIGURE 11</strong>, illustrates a few more commonly used Hendrix techniques for embellishing a sixth-string-root chord, with quick hammer/pulls on the G string followed by a chord resolution to A/Cs. You’ll hear great examples of this on Jimi’s “Bold as Love.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="370" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/XKSjRfDfP5A?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-01-13%20at%202.50.48%20PM.png" width="620" height="723" alt="Screen Shot 2015-01-13 at 2.50.48 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-01-13%20at%202.50.58%20PM.png" width="620" height="272" alt="Screen Shot 2015-01-13 at 2.50.58 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-01-13%20at%202.56.11%20PM.png" width="620" height="730" alt="Screen Shot 2015-01-13 at 2.56.11 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-01-13%20at%202.56.20%20PM.png" width="620" height="407" alt="Screen Shot 2015-01-13 at 2.56.20 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-jimi-hendrixs-little-wing#comments 2011 Andy Aledort December December 2011 In Deep Jimi Hendrix In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Wed, 29 Jul 2015 13:07:40 +0000 Andy Aledort 13150 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Early Blues Masters John Lee Hooker and Lightnin' Hopkins — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-john-lee-hooker-and-lightnin-hopkins <!--paging_filter--><p>The blues is ripe for endless and constant reinvention. </p> <p>Through the decades, it has developed in many different incarnations. </p> <p>These include plantation field hollers; the acoustic guitar playing and songwriting mastery of Charlie Patton, Blind Blake, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Blind Willie McTell and Robert Johnson; the Chicago, Memphis and Texas blues of Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf and T-Bone Walker; and the mid-to-late-Sixties blues-rock revolution spearheaded by Cream and the Jimi Hendrix Experience. </p> <p>Today, bands such as the North Mississippi All-Stars, the Black Keys and Alabama Shakes continue to explore new ways to navigate the dark, swampy sounds honed through this long tradition of blues interpretation. In this edition of In Deep, we’ll be taking a look at the guitar work of two essential early blues guitar masters: John Lee Hooker and Lightnin’ Hopkins.</p> <p>John Lee Hooker was born in 1917 in Coahoma County, Mississippi, and learned to play guitar from his stepfather, Willie Moore, who, conveniently for John Lee, was friends with Blind Lemon Jefferson and Charlie Patton. Hooker went on the road at age 14, joining legendary bluesman Robert Nighthawk in Memphis. </p> <p>In 1948, Hooker began his recording career in style, cutting two incredible tunes—“Boogie Chillen’ ” and “Sally Mae”—at his first sessions, cut in Detroit. The songs were released on the Modern label, owned by the Bihari Brothers (who also recorded B.B. King’s earliest sides), and Hooker’s ascent to blues superstardom was underway. </p> <p>Hooker performed and recorded a great many tunes on both acoustic and electric guitar in open A tuning (low to high, E A E A C# E), oftentimes using a capo at the first, second or third fret to perform in different keys. He picked with his fingers, primarily using his thumb to strike the bass strings and index finger to pluck the higher strings, and achieved a warm and very percussive sound, often performing alone or with another guitarist for accompaniment. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_1.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates a rhythm figure along the lines of “Boogie Chillen’.” Though written in 4/4, this figure is played with a triplet, or swing-eighths, feel, which means that notes indicated as pairs of eighth notes are actually sounded as a quarter note followed by an eighth note within a triplet bracket. </p> <p>Throughout this passage, the thumb and index finger alternate striking the lower and higher strings, with a quick, rolling double hammer-on occurring at the end of each bar. In bar 1, the hammer-on begins on the fourth fret and moves chromatically (one fret at a time) up to the sixth fret. In bar 2, the hammer-on starts on the second fret and moves up chromatically to the fourth fret. In bar 3, rapid slides up to the third fret are executed with an index-finger barre across the top two strings.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_2.jpg" /></p> <p>One of the fascinating aspects of Hooker’s open A playing was that he often used only two primary chords, the “I” (one) and the “IV” (four), forgoing the use of a “V” (five) chord that is common to the majority of blues music. In open A tuning, Hooker would use a standard C “cowboy” chord grip as his four chord, which yields an unusual Dadd9/C sound, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_3.jpg" /></p> <p>Another interesting aspect of Hooker’s solo work is that he would often shift from a swinging triplet feel to the use of even, or “straight,” eighth notes, which provides great rhythmic contrast and tension. As shown in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I begin with straight eighths on a sliding A7 chord voicing and then move back to the swinging feel when the initial riff is restated in bars 5–7.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_4.jpg" /></p> <p>Hooker also often used the D7/A voicing shown in FIGURE 4 for his four chord: with the index finger barred across the top three strings at the fifth fret, the pinkie is added and removed from the high E string’s eighth fret. Robert Johnson often used this pattern to great effect as well.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_5.jpg" /></p> <p>Hooker devised some great and very distinct licks in open A tuning, a few of which are presented in <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>. Following index-finger slides on the top two strings, different A and A7 voicings are followed by great single-note and double-stop licks played on the middle strings using a bit of rhythmic syncopation. You can hear Hooker play riffs like these on his classic song “Sally Mae.” ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons is a Hooker fanatic, and you can hear many of these kinds of licks on Top classics like “La Grange” and “Jesus Just Left Chicago.”</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_6.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_7.jpg" /></p> <p>Combining open strings with single-note riffs is a central element of Hooker’s style, made more effective with fingerpicking. FIGURE 6, inspired by “Crawling Kingsnake,” and FIGURE 7, a nod to “Tease Me,” offer a few more examples of how Hooker would combine a catchy melody with an insistent root-note, open-string pedal tone. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_8.jpg" /></p> <p>In later years, Hooker relied more often on standard tuning, while still using the capo on the first few frets for changing keys. A great example of his playing style in standard tuning can be heard on “Boom Boom Out Go the Lights.” <strong>FIGURE 8</strong> offers an example in this style, marrying a repeated melody, based on E minor pentatonic (E G A B D) to an alternating bass line. </p> <p>Lightnin’ Hopkins was born in 1912 in Centerville, Texas. Like Hooker, he learned directly from encounters with Blind Lemon Jefferson. He began his recording career in 1946 and went on to become one of the most influential blues guitarists ever. Elements of his style are clear in the playing of Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, Stevie Ray Vaughan and just about everyone that played or plays blues guitar.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_9.jpg" /></p> <p>Hopkins often performed unaccompanied acoustic guitar (or amplified acoustic), picking with his fingers in a manner similar to Hooker but with the use of a thumb pick. <strong>FIGURES 9 and 10</strong> offer examples of a mid-tempo swinging 12/8 blues played in his style, akin to his take on the blues classic “Goin’ Down Slow.”</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qVfzkTSFS9w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1783865990001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1783865990001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-john-lee-hooker-and-lightnin-hopkins#comments In Deep John Lee Hooker Lightnin’ Hopkins October 2012 2012 Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort Blogs Features Lessons Magazine Tue, 14 Jul 2015 21:31:39 +0000 Andy Aledort 16556 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: Part 2 of a Tribute to Mountain Guitarist Leslie West — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-part-2-tribute-legendary-mountain-guitarist-leslie-west-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Last month’s column was dedicated to the incredible and highly influential playing of Mountain’s Leslie West, whose beautifully melodic phrasing, signature slow, wide vibrato, and rich guitar tone set the standard for blues-rock–style guitar of the highest order in the late Sixties and early Seventies. </p> <p>West’s many disciples include fellow guitar gods Eddie Van Halen, Randy Rhoads, Jethro Tull’s Martin Barre, Pete Townshend, Warren Haynes and Ritchie Blackmore of Deep Purple. Blackmore has stated that Leslie’s phenomenal playing on “Mississippi Queen” redirected the course of Deep Purple’s music in an instant, ultimately resulting in the brutal power and hard rock intensity displayed on <em>Deep Purple in Rock</em>. </p> <p>For Barre, Leslie’s gift to him of one of his late-Fifties Gibson Les Paul Junior guitars inspired the writing and playing on Jethro Tull’s most successful album in the band’s history, <em>Aqualung</em>. West was also instrumental in the development of the music recorded for the Who’s masterpiece, <em>Who’s Next</em>.</p> <p>The band Mountain dominated rock radio in 1970 with their smash debut album, <em>Climbing!</em>, but true Leslie West fans know well that his solo debut, <em>Mountain</em>, preceded <em>Climbing!</em> by eight months, and was for many the introduction to his brilliant singing and guitar playing. </p> <p>A solid effort throughout, the signature track from Mountain is the album’s side-two opener, “Dreams of Milk and Honey,” a song destined to become the centerpiece of every live Mountain show from 1970–72. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> presents a 16-bar solo played in the style of “Dreams of Milk and Honey.” Akin to most blues and rock players, Leslie’s improvisations are based primarily on pentatonic scales, specifically alternating between E minor pentatonic (E G A B D) over bars 1–6 and 11–14, and A minor pentatonic (A C D E G) over bars 7-10 and 15–16. While playing his improvisations based on each of these scales, he remains rooted in standard “box” positions for each, using the 12th-position box of E minor pentatonic and the fifth-position box of A minor pentatonic.</p> <p>My primary goal in crafting this tribute solo was to demonstrate Leslie’s solid melodic sense combined with his effortless but equally aggressive rhythmic drive. The lines all employ a combination of rhythms, featuring phrases formed by starting and ending with sustained notes, with steady 16th-note driven melodies placed in between, or lines that begin with a long stream of 16th notes that then culminate with heavily vibrato-ed quarter notes. </p> <p>In both cases, be sure to lean into the beat when playing these lines, using a robust fret- and pick-hand attack, along with a heavily distorted guitar tone, in order to best replicate the power Leslie always generates in his solos. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2Ad8tw2-_FY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/leslie-west">Leslie West</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-part-2-tribute-legendary-mountain-guitarist-leslie-west-video#comments Andy Aledort August 2015 In Deep Leslie West Mountain Thu, 18 Jun 2015 19:50:17 +0000 Andy Aledort 24748 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: Tribute to the Influential Style of Mountain's Leslie West — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-tribute-legendary-and-influential-style-mountains-leslie-west <!--paging_filter--><p>Though rarely mentioned in the pantheon of great rock guitarists, Mountain’s Leslie West is unquestionably one of the most influential and original players to emerge from the burgeoning late-Sixties rock scene. </p> <p>West, a native New Yorker, first gained national exposure at the age of 21 via his scorching cover of Otis Redding’s “Respect,” released in 1966 while a member of the Vagrants. </p> <p>The band’s producer, Felix Pappalardi, began producing Cream in 1967 (starting with <em>Disraeli Gears</em>) and in 1969 joined forces with West on the guitarist’s breakthrough solo debut, <em>Mountain</em>, which includes the seminal classics, “Blood of the Sun,” “Long Red,” “Baby I’m Down” and the immortal masterpiece, “Dreams of Milk and Honey.” </p> <p>Their alliance soon adopted the moniker Mountain as the group’s name, and the classic lineup of West, Pappalardi on bass, drummer Corky Laing and keyboardist Steve Knight were described by <em>Rolling Stone</em> as “a louder version of Cream.” The group’s fourth show ever was in front of 400,00 people at Woodstock on August 16, 1969. The band achieved worldwide success on the release of their breakthrough smash single, “Mississippi Queen,” in March 1970.</p> <p>Leslie’s signature soloing style is characterized by smooth, melodic phrasing, an exquisitely slow, wide vibrato and a dense, heavy guitar tone. Eddie Van Halen, Randy Rhoads, Warren Haynes, Joe Bonamassa and many other rock guitar gods have hailed West as a primary influence. </p> <p>Like most blues and rock players, the majority of his improvisations are based on pentatonic scales, and, akin to his influences Albert, B.B. and Freddie King, as well as Eric Clapton and Jimi Hendrix, West often alternates freely between parallel minor and major pentatonic phrases in his improvised solos. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates the E minor pentatonic scale (E G A B D) played in a highly useful extended pattern that begins with the open low E string and moves diagonally up and across the neck. <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> shows E major pentatonic (E F# G# B C#) played in a similarly diagonal pattern. Be sure to memorize both shapes, and then try transposing them to different keys and areas of the fretboard. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 3</strong> is a 12-bar solo played in Leslie’s style. In bar 1 into the first half of bar 2, the lines are based on E major pentatonic, starting with an oblique bend on the top two strings. On beat two of bar 2, I bring a high G note into the phrase, alluding to E minor pentatonic and stick with this scale through the end of bar 6. In bars 7–9, I utilize notes from both scales, leaning a little more heavily on the E major pentatonic sound, then close out the last three bars with lines firmly based on E minor pentatonic. </p> <p>When studying this solo, notice the attention paid to melodic phrasing, and strive for proper bend intonation and to produce a wide, even vocal-like vibrato, all essential elements in replicating West’s trademark guitar voice. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vjUj5zOk4Qo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/andy%20aledort.jpg" width="620" height="790" alt="andy aledort.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/leslie-west">Leslie West</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-tribute-legendary-and-influential-style-mountains-leslie-west#comments Andy Aledort In Deep July 2015 Leslie West Mountain Tue, 19 May 2015 20:33:43 +0000 Andy Aledort 24522 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: How to Create Flowing, Stylish Licks Like Eric Clapton — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-how-create-flowing-stylish-licks-eric-clapton-video <!--paging_filter--><p>The eternally great Eric Clapton—sometimes known as “God” in certain circles—turned 70 this year, and is set to celebrate this milestone with a pair of spring concerts at New York’s legendary Madison Square Garden. </p> <p>What better time than to examine his effortlessly beautiful and seamlessly flowing soloing technique, first heard in full bloom on his timeless recordings with Cream, featuring the late, great Jack Bruce on bass and Ginger Baker on drums. </p> <p>When it comes to spontaneous, improvised phrasing, there is perhaps no better blues-rock guitarist than Eric, especially when heard within the context of the many extended jams he performed with Cream and Blind Faith. </p> <p>He has the innate ability to move smoothly from one great, imminently melodic phrase into the next while also both riding the groove and pushing it along. When improvising, Clapton will subtly mix up the rhythms of his lines to create clearly defined syncopations that serve to strengthen the melodic quality of his solos. </p> <p><strong> FIGURE 1</strong> presents an extended solo that moves through an entire 12-bar blues progression in the key of D, the three chords being D7, G7 and A7. The tempo is a fairly slow 80 beats per minute, which allows for the steady articulation of 16th-note rhythms that employ subtle phrasing variations. In bars 1–3, I stick with the notes from the D minor pentatonic scale (D F G A C). At the end of bar 3, I transition to sliding sixth intervals by sounding pairs of notes that are six scale degrees apart within the D Mixolydian mode (D E F# G A B C), with all of the notes played on the D and B strings. </p> <p> This sets up the move to the four chord, G7, in bar 5, and here I play a simple melody based on G minor pentatonic (G Bb C D F), returning to D minor pentatonic in bar 6 to anticipate the change back to the one chord, D7, in bar 7. </p> <p>On beat three of bar 7, I make very brief reference to the parallel D major pentatonic scale (D E F# A B), used to add some brightness and warmth to the melody and also as a transition to get back into D minor pentatonic in 10th position. Alternating between parallel minor and major pentatonic scales is a standard technique used by all blues guitar greats, such as T-Bone Walker, B.B. King, Buddy Guy and many others, and Clapton learned this technique from his intense study of the recordings of all of these masters and made it one of the hallmarks of his unique style.</p> <p> Bar 9 moves to the five chord, A7, and bar 10 shifts to the four chord, G7, and for each of these chords I base my lines on the associated minor pentatonic scales (A minor pentatonic: A C D E G). At the return to the tonic in bars 11 and 12, I revert to D minor pentatonic and move freely between third and fifth positions. </p> <p> When playing these melodic shapes and ideas, strive for smooth articulation and, as always, listen closely to the many great live recordings of Cream—and the studio recordings of Blind Faith—to hear priceless examples of Clapton’s stellar soloing. <strong>FIGURES 2 and 3</strong> illustrate extended patterns for D minor pentatonic and D major pentatonic, so be sure to study these too. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zo69fF8FmFE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-04-21%20at%204.32.55%20PM.png" width="620" height="783" alt="Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 4.32.55 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eric-clapton">Eric Clapton</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-how-create-flowing-stylish-licks-eric-clapton-video#comments Andy Aledort Eric Clapton In Deep June 2015 Videos News Lessons Magazine Tue, 12 May 2015 13:59:19 +0000 Andy Aledort 24348 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: Riffs and Licks That Define Rock and Roll Guitar, from Chuck Berry to Joan Jett — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-riffs-and-licks-define-rock-and-roll-guitar-chuck-berry-joan-jett-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the May 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-15-joan-jett?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=May2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>When Joan Jett recorded the title track to <em>I Love Rock ’N’ Roll,</em> which was a cover version of a song originally released in 1975 by the British band the Arrows, little did she know that this pagan battle cry would in time earn her status as one of rock’s most iconic figures.</p> <p>Upon its release in 1982, the song stayed at Number One on the Top 100 chart for seven weeks and has since been named Billboard’s 56th greatest rock song of all time.</p> <p>Now, more than three decades later, Joan is still rockin’ hard, and rock and roll is still alive and well. In this extended edition of In Deep, we’ll examine the roots of true rock and roll guitar and its essential, foundational elements that were chiseled into stone by the style’s founding father—the immortal Chuck Berry—the man whose playing would inspire and inform many of the world’s greatest rock bands, from the Beatles and the Rolling Stones to AC/DC.</p> <p>One of the small handful of records regarded as the “first” rock and roll song is “Rocket 88,” recorded in March 1951 by Jackie Brenston and his Delta Cats. Brenston was actually a horn player and singer in guitarist/keyboardist Ike Turner’s band, the Kings of Rhythm, and he is credited with writing “Rocket 88.”</p> <p>roduced by Sam Phillips in Memphis and released on the Chess label, “Rocket 88” went straight to Number One and it’s incredible success enabled Phillips to launch Sun Records.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-15-joan-jett?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=May2015VideosPage">For the rest of this column, including the tabs, check out the May 2015 issue of Guitar World.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LrAI-ikHZUk" width="620" height="365" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/chuck-berry">Chuck Berry</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joan-jett">Joan Jett</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-riffs-and-licks-define-rock-and-roll-guitar-chuck-berry-joan-jett-video#comments Andy Aledort Chuck Berry In Deep Joan Jett May 2015 Videos News Lessons Magazine Wed, 08 Apr 2015 14:44:27 +0000 Andy Aledort 23802 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: Using Voice Leading and Close Voicings to Devise Improvised Rhythm Guitar Parts — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-using-voice-leading-and-close-voicings-devise-improvised-rhythm-guitar-parts-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Part of my role as a member of former Allman Brothers Band guitarist Dickey Betts’ band, Great Southern (along with his son, guitarist Duane Betts), is to provide improvised rhythm guitar parts to songs that oftentimes develop into long jams with many instrumental solos. </p> <p>In this type of musical environment, it’s essential for the rhythm guitars to keep the accompaniment interesting and moving forward while also laying down a solid groove for the soloists to play over. </p> <p>Many of these songs—like “Blue Sky,” “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed” and “No One Left to Run With”—feature soloing sections built upon repeating chord vamps. </p> <p>In this endeavor, I have developed a rhythm guitar approach that I can use in any of these jamming-type situations, which is to explore small chord voicings that connect to one another via voice leading techniques, such as close voicing. </p> <p>Voice leading is a harmonic device wherein individual chord tones, or “voices” that make up a chord, move minimally from chord to chord in a progression. This facilitates the connecting of chord shapes in a smooth and seamless manner on the fretboard. Close harmony is defined as “the arrangement of the notes of a chord within a narrow range,” such as the containment within one octave of the three notes that form a triad, for example, the notes A, C# and E of an A major triad. If moving from an A major triad to E major (E G# B), one can employ both techniques by moving the A note down one fret to G# and the C# down two frets to B while keeping the E where it is—as a common tone—to sound the notes G#, B and E, which results in an E major triad in first inversion, which is with the third, G#, on the bottom, or “in the bass.” </p> <p>These days, Dickey likes to begin “Blue Sky” with a three-chord jam that is intended as a tribute to the Grateful Dead and his good friend Jerry Garcia, reminiscent of the Dead classic, “Franklin’s Tower.” The Dead original is in the key of A, and the three chords are, A, G and D. Dickey plays “Blue Sky” in G so, transposed down a whole step, the chords are G, F and C. The original Allman Brothers Band arrangement and recording of “Blue Sky,” however, was in the key of E; transposing the chords down another step and a half results in an E-D-A progression, which is that used in the following examples. </p> <p><strong>FIGURES 1</strong> and <strong>2</strong> offer two approaches to playing the repeating two-bar rhythm vamp four times across eight bars. In <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I begin with a first-inversion E triad (voiced, low to high, G# B E), initiated with a hammer-on on the D string from the second, F# to the third, G#, sounded together with the open low E string. The three fretted notes then move down a whole step to a first-inversion D triad (low to high, F# A D) with the D root note octave doubled on the A string’s fifth fret. I then transition to the A triad by moving the F# note down two frets to E and D down one fret to C# while keeping the A note on the G string. Across the last four bars, the concept is moved up higher on the fretboard and over to the A, D and G strings. Use alternate (down-up) 16th-note “pendulum” strumming throughout this figure in order to perform the 16th-note rhythms with the proper, desired feel.</p> <p>These devices are expanded on in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, so work through this example slowly with attention paid to the way in which each chord shape connects to the next.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DTk72XmeBEU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-using-voice-leading-and-close-voicings-devise-improvised-rhythm-guitar-parts-video#comments Andy Aledort April 2015 In Deep Videos News Lessons Magazine Fri, 20 Mar 2015 19:52:59 +0000 Andy Aledort 23615 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: Slidedog — the Slide Guitar Mastery of Duane Allman http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-slidedog-slide-guitar-mastery-duane-allman <!--paging_filter--><p>Last month, we examined the guitar genius of the great Duane Allman, who, as founder of the Allman Brothers Band, rose to prominence as one of the greatest and universally heralded blues-rock guitarists of all time. </p> <p>In honor of the expansive new box set from Rounder Records, <em>Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective</em>, we focused on his single-note soloing on classic Allman Brothers’ cuts like “Stormy Monday” and “Whipping Post.” This month’s column is dedicated to Duane’s mastery of the art of slide guitar.</p> <p>Duane possessed an instantly recognizable sound on electric slide, earmarked by masterful phrasing and smooth, “singing” vibrato.</p> <p>Great examples of his slide guitar prowess include “Trouble No More” and “Dreams” from the band’s debut release, <em>The Allman Brothers Band</em>; “Don’t Keep Me Wonderin’,” from <em>Idlewild South</em>; “Statesboro Blues” and “Done Somebody Wrong” from <em>At Fillmore East</em>; and “One Way Out” from <em>Eat a Peach</em>. </p> <p>He also lent inspired slide work to the title track and many others on the Derek and the Dominoes album <em>Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs</em>.</p> <p> Incredibly, Duane had been playing slide guitar for only about a year at the time of the band’s debut release. He recalled, “I heard Ry Cooder playing slide on Taj Mahal’s debut album, and I said, ‘Man, that’s for me.’ ” Brother Gregg Allman concurs. “He just picked it up and started burnin’. He was a natural.”</p> <p> For slide playing, Duane wore a small glass Coricidin bottle (Coricidin was a cold medication) on his ring finger. He usually played slide in open tunings, most often open E (low to high, E B E G# B E) and occasionally open A (E A E A C# E). He also played slide in standard tuning on songs such as “Dreams” and “Mountain Jam.” </p> <p>In the early days, Duane would retune his gold-top Gibson Les Paul between songs in order to play slide. Later, co-guitarist Dickey Betts gave Duane a two-pickup 1961 Gibson SG/Les Paul Standard that was used solely for slide playing. The design of the SG, with its double-cutaway body, is well suited to slide work, allowing easy access to the upper regions of the fretboard.</p> <p> Duane chose to wear the SG high on his body to facilitate navigating the board overall. The musical examples in this column focus on the use of open E tuning for slide. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates how to tune to open E: the sixth, second and first strings are tuned normally (E, B and E); the fifth and fourth strings are tuned one whole step higher (A to B and D to E); and the third string is tuned one half step higher (G to G#). The resulting tuning is, low to high, E B E G# B E. Strumming across all of the open strings sounds an E major chord.</p> <p>The same is true when barring or placing the slide across all of the strings at the 12th fret. Likewise, barring a finger or placing the slide across all of the strings at any given fret will form a major chord, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 2.</strong> A great majority of slide licks in open E tuning are formed by moving back and forth between a two-fret span of the fretboard.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 3</strong> illustrates one such pattern, which forms an E hybrid scale, one that combines elements of E minor pentatonic (E G A B D) and E major pentatonic (E F# G# B C#). Two notes are sounded on each string at either the 10th or 12th fret, and three notes are sounded on<br /> the fifth string with the inclusion of Gs, at the ninth fret. </p> <p>Practice this pattern by first fretting normally, and then play it using the slide. Some basic rules for slide playing: For proper intonation, you’ll want to, in most cases, position the slide directly over and parallel to the fret wire. Apply only enough pressure against the string to sound a note clearly; do not allow the slide to “bang” into the frets. Also, lightly lay unused fret-hand fingers across the strings behind the slide to help suppress unwanted overtones and ghost notes.</p> <p> When playing slide, Duane fingerpicked exclusively, using his thumb, index and middle fingers to pick the strings. A major element in the uniqueness of his sound was his pick-hand muting techniques: while one finger picked a string, the other two were used for muting. </p> <p>For example, when he picked a string with his thumb, his index and middle fingers would rest lightly on the higher strings, muting them; when he picked a string with his index finger, his thumb would mute the lower strings; and when he picked with his middle finger, he would mute the string with his thumb and index fingers. This technique afforded Duane’s slide playing unparalleled clarity and precision. An essential slide exercise involves sliding back and forth between notes of the E hybrid scale, with careful attention paid to playing “in tune.” </p> <p> <strong>FIGURES 4 and 5</strong> offer two different ways one can practice sliding to and from each note in this position. One of the most common vehicles for slide soloing in blues and rock is the 12-bar blues shuffle. <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> illustrates a basic shuffle rhythm part played in the key of E using open E tuning. Use only conventional fretting (no slide) to perform this part. <strong>FIGURE 7</strong> offers an example of how to play a slide solo over this rhythm part: repeatedly moving the slide back and forth (higher and lower) on the fretboard creates the sound of a slide vibrato. </p> <p>The “width” of this movement, as well as the speed, is every player’s choice; strive to keep the center of the vibrato movement over the fret for proper intonation. The aforementioned “Statesboro Blues” and “One Way Out” are celebrated slide guitar masterpieces. <strong>FIGURE 8</strong> illustrates a “Statesboro Blues”-like solo, and <strong>FIGURE 9</strong> offers a solo in the style of “One Way Out.”</p> <p>Work through each example carefully, and for inspiration, listen to the recordings and pay strict attention to every detail in Duane’s articulation.</p> <p><strong>PART ONE</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yJjV1-7ZMd4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-11-20%20at%2011.59.04%20AM.png" width="620" height="669" alt="Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 11.59.04 AM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-11-20%20at%2011.59.51%20AM.png" width="620" height="340" alt="Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 11.59.51 AM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-11-20%20at%2012.00.12%20PM.png" width="620" height="435" alt="Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 12.00.12 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-11-20%20at%2012.00.35%20PM.png" width="620" height="670" alt="Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 12.00.35 PM.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2294181381001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2294181381001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/duane-allman">Duane Allman</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/allman-brothers-band">Allman Brothers Band</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-slidedog-slide-guitar-mastery-duane-allman#comments Allman Brothers Band Andy Aledort Duane Allman In Deep June 2013 Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Thu, 12 Mar 2015 15:07:28 +0000 Andy Aledort 18241 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: Constructing Solo Phrases in the Style of Jimi Hendrix http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-constructing-solo-phrases-style-jimi-hendrix <!--paging_filter--><p>All things that are truly great only become greater with the passing of time, an attribute that can certainly be applied to the incredible music of the legendary Jimi Hendrix. </p> <p>The power, passion, individuality and influence of Jimi’s instantly recognizable style are more apparent now than ever and his legacy will continue to grow as the years pass. </p> <p>This month, I’d like to explore the intricacies of Hendrix’s soloing style with specific attention on phrasing, melodic content and groove.</p> <p>One of the earmarks of Jimi’s 1969/1970 Band of Gypsys period was a focus on fat, funky grooves, provided by one of the rock’s greatest rhythm sections—drummer Buddy Miles and bassist Billy Cox. </p> <p>The line-up of Jimi, Buddy and Billy occurred in order to fulfill a contractual obligation for an album, and the three musicians subsequently recorded the truly revolutionary <em>Band of Gypsys</em> album live, on New Year’s Eve, December 31, 1969. Throughout each track, Miles and Cox lay down a rock-solid foundation while Hendrix soars above, delivering consistently iconic performances.</p> <p> The album’s opening track, “Who Knows,” consists of a repetitive three-chord progression played over a churning groove. <strong>FIGURES 1 and 2</strong> are played over a “Who Knows”-type feel, offered here in the key of C# and built from a chord progression starting on the four chord, F#7, moving to the flat-three, E7, then to the one, C#7. The majority of the soloing in these examples is based on the C# minor pentatonic scale (C# E F# G# B), with brief reference to C# major pentatonic (C# D# E# G# A#), via the inclusion of the major sixth, A#.</p> <p> A key element to capturing the Hendrix vibe is to seamlessly shift between phrases built from even, or “straight,” 16th notes to phrases played with a triplet feel, either through the use of steady 16th-note triplets or leaning on the swing feel of an eighth- note/16th-note figure within a triplet bracket.</p> <p> Bars 1-4 of <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> are played in ninth and seventh positions and rhythmically phrased with an emphasis on straight 16th notes, with 16th-note triplets adding rhythmic push to the line. Jimi’s crystal-clear sense of melody is emulated here; blazing speed and acrobatic technique are not part of the equation. </p> <p> Bar 5 begins with a shift down to second position after which I work my way back up to ninth position. When playing these lines, strive above all else for rhythmic accuracy and clear note definition.</p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> begins with the signature Hendrix technique of bending two strings at once under a single fretting finger: I start with a whole-step bend at the 12th fret on the high E string, and while this string is bent, I catch the B string under the fingertip so that it is pre-bent up a whole step, after which the bend is picked and released; this is then replicated on the B and G strings. Most of this example places the emphasis on a triplet feel, but at the end of bar 4 into bar 5, I switch to straight 16ths, offering contrast to the swinging feel of the bass and drums.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NFhY-DxOspM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-03-02%20at%204.10.31%20PM.png" width="620" height="732" alt="Screen Shot 2015-03-02 at 4.10.31 PM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-03-02%20at%204.10.49%20PM.png" width="620" height="105" alt="Screen Shot 2015-03-02 at 4.10.49 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-constructing-solo-phrases-style-jimi-hendrix#comments Andy Aledort February 2015 In Deep Jimi Hendrix Videos News Lessons Magazine Mon, 02 Mar 2015 21:16:34 +0000 Andy Aledort 23201 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: Jamming Rhythm and Lead Guitar Over a Classic Blues-Type Form — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-jamming-rhythm-and-lead-guitar-over-classic-blues-type-form-video <!--paging_filter--><p>When going to an open jam, it’s important to be prepared to improvise over any one of the dozens of standard blues-type songs that are routinely played at jams all over the world. </p> <p>Along with the typical 12-bar and eight-bar blues forms, there are a few specific songs that feature their own distinct patterns and forms. </p> <p>One of these tunes is the Albert King classic, “Born Under a Bad Sign,” a track covered brilliantly by Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker on the essential Cream album, <em>Wheels of Fire</em>. </p> <p>Cream played the song in the key of G, but it was originally recorded by King in the key of C#. The following examples are played in the song’s original key of C#. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates a rhythm guitar part played along the lines of the “Born Under a Bad Sign” main riff, which is built from a repeating C#7(no3) chord that alternates with a single-note bass-line figure. After striking the low C# root note on beat one, one beat two I sound 16th-note accents on C#7s9, with notes fretted on the A, G and high E strings while the D and B strings are muted. This is known as a “spread” voicing because each note of the chord is far away from the others, which creates wide intervals. Across beats three and four, I play a single-note riff based on the C# minor pentatonic scale (C# E F# G# B). Bar 4 ends with a slight variation on the figure, and bar 5 ends with a double hammer-on phrase played on the sixth string. In bar 6, I cap off the eight-bar phrase by playing an ascending single-note “lead”-type lick, as a means to create a deviation from the pattern and to delineate the end of what is essentially an eight-bar section.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 2</strong> is a 16-bar solo played over the vamp from <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, which is played twice. The solo is based primarily on C# minor pentatonic, but I do include the flatted fifth, G, in a few spots, making reference to the C# blues scale (C# E F# G G# B). In bars 1-6, the phrases are all centered around a variety of bends on the high E string, emulating the sound and style of Albert King. Bar 1 begins with an aggressive bend up to the fifth, G#; this note is fingerpicked by snapping the string against the fretboard to achieve an aggressive attack. I begin bar 3 the same way but develop the melodic content by including half-step bends from the major third, E#, to the fourth, F#. While holding this half-step bend, I add a finger one fret higher on the same string, sounding the fourth, which is pre-bent up one half step, and then proceed to bend the string further, up to a whole step. This is a very effective way to emulate the “over-bends” that are a hallmark of King’s soloing style.</p> <p>Check out the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9fJE4__wVoE/">very cool version</a> of “Born Under a Bad Sign” recorded by Jimi Hendrix, which was included on his <em>Blues</em> album. He plays the song as one long vamp over the main riff, and it’s fascinating how many twists and turns he invents over the steadily rocking groove.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MZblpuT67KE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-jamming-rhythm-and-lead-guitar-over-classic-blues-type-form-video#comments Andy Aledort In Deep March 2015 Videos News Lessons Magazine Sun, 22 Feb 2015 20:15:40 +0000 Andy Aledort 23393 at http://www.guitarworld.com