Loud &amp; Proud http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/1957/all en Loud & Proud with Glenn Proudfoot: Expanding Minor Pentatonic Ideas with Three-Notes-Per-String Phrases http://www.guitarworld.com/loud-proud-glenn-proudfoot-expanding-minor-pentatonic-ideas-three-notes-string-phrases <!--paging_filter--><p>The title of this month’s column refers to the standard minor pentatonic “box” patterns that so many guitar players rely upon when soloing. </p> <p>While they are valuable, they can be restricting if they represent the primary way in which one utilizes these scale patterns on the fretboard. </p> <p>When playing in the standard box pattern, we generally play two notes per string. What I will do in this column is demonstrate a way to break free of the two-notes-per-string approach by combining it with three-notes-per-string patterns using sweep picking. </p> <p>All of this month’s examples are played in the B minor pentatonic scale (B D E F# A). <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates the scale played in a standard seventh-position box pattern. When playing the scale in this pattern, the index finger is used for all the notes that fall at the seventh fret, the ring finger frets all the notes at the ninth fret, and the pinkie is used for any notes at the 10th fret. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0512_1.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p>In <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, I show how to break out of the box by starting the pattern using three notes per string, followed by a sweep across the low E, A and D strings, and a return to the three-notes-per-string shape. A similar pattern is employed across the D, G and B strings, after which I descend in the same manner. </p> <p>Although I’m playing the same scale ascending and descending through two octaves as I did in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, this three-notes-per-string approach with sweeps allows me to create licks and soloing patterns that can be performed at a much faster speed than what would be attainable using the two-notes-per-string boxes. For the first three notes, I use alternate picking: down-up-down. </p> <p>The last downstroke begins a sweep across the bottom three strings as I drag the pick in a single downward motion to sound the next three notes. The same picking scheme is then used across the D, G and B strings. On beat three into beat four, I use a pull-off to set up an upstroke sweep across the B, G and D strings, then perform a similar move across the bottom three strings.</p> <p>The sweeps incorporated in this run represent three-string arpeggios, and a rather wide fret-hand stretch is mandatory for proper execution. I keep my fret-hand thumb squarely on the back of the neck so that my fretting fingers will remained arched throughout, allowing the maximum reach and physical comfort. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0512_3.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p>Now let’s start the pattern on the A string (<strong>FIGURE 3</strong>). A good way to practice these “shapes” is to break them into individual one-octave patterns. In <strong>FIGURE 4a</strong>, I play the patterns as 16th notes; in <strong>FIGURE 4b</strong>, I play them as 16th-note triplets. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0512_5.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p>Now let’s combine the low E string and A string approaches into a single run. In <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>, beats one through three represent the pattern starting from the low E string. At beat four, I begin the pattern from the A string, ultimately wrapping up with a descent back down to the low E. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0512_6.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0512_7.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p>In the final two examples, <strong>FIGURES 6 and 7</strong>, I demonstrate what I refer to as “monster runs” when using this approach. Eric Johnson is my primary inspiration for licks like these. In writing them, I attempted to create similarly breathtaking “sheets of sound” while remaining within the minor pentatonic structure. </p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1524883523001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1524883523001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/loud-proud-glenn-proudfoot-expanding-minor-pentatonic-ideas-three-notes-string-phrases#comments Glenn Proudfoot Loud & Proud May 2012 Blogs News Lessons Magazine Mon, 09 Jun 2014 17:54:46 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/15169 Loud & Proud: Creating Alien Guitar Sounds by Combining Wide Stretches with Legato Techniques http://www.guitarworld.com/loud-proud-creating-alien-guitar-sounds-combining-wide-stretches-legato-techniques <!--paging_filter--><p>When I was a kid, I used to love to listen to incredible guitarists like Shawn Lane, Rusty Cooley and Buckethead, all players that would simply amaze me with their mind-boggling speed and technical prowess. </p> <p>For some of the really fast passages, I could hear that they were using a legato approach—incorporating an abundance of hammer-ons, pull-offs and finger slides—but I had absolutely no idea how to play the guitar in that way or achieve anywhere near their speed and precision. It sounded like nothing I’d ever heard before, so I always referred to it as “alien guitar.” </p> <p>Later on, as my playing progressed, I figured out some of the techniques these players used and how to adopt those techniques into my own soloing. </p> <p>In this column, I’d like to demonstrate a few of the fret-hand techniques and patterns I use that enable me to execute fast, fluid lines. I’ll be utilizing diminished-seven arpeggios in the key of E (E G Bb C#) as the musical structure upon which these riffs are built, with string-skipping being an integral part of the overall approach.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0910_1.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0910_2.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>FIGURES 1 and 2</strong> are played on the G and high E strings only, using a wide fret-hand stretch with the first, second and fourth fingers in order to fret notes at the ninth, 12th and 15th frets on both strings. In <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I begin by “rolling” up the G string with consecutive hammer-ons. </p> <p>This “shape” shifts over to the high E string, and I follow the double-hammer-on with a double pull-off back down from the 15th to the 12th to the ninth frets. I then reverse the process back on the G string, starting with a double pull-off followed by a double hammer-on, in order to keep the riff rolling. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 2</strong> is essentially the same thing, except I initially play only one note on the high E string, return to the G string and then play the complete pattern illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>. This approach breaks up the monotony of repeating the same movement on both strings. </p> <p>The next logical step in the pursuit of “legato heaven” is to incorporate finger slides into the patterns. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0910_3.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0910_4.jpg" /></p> <p>In <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I begin in the same manner as <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> but then slide up to the next higher position of Edim7 and then move back down to the G string. I slide up again when returning to the high E string as the line continues. <strong>FIGURE 4</strong> offers the same pattern but in reverse.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0910_5.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0910_6.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0910_7.jpg" /></p> <p>In <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>, I move this idea over to the D and B strings. Notice the absolute symmetry between this line and the previous examples. <strong>FIGURES 6 and 7</strong> offer a few more twists on how to expand on this approach.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1738220975001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1738220975001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/loud-proud-creating-alien-guitar-sounds-combining-wide-stretches-legato-techniques#comments Glenn Proudfoot Loud & Proud September 2012 Blogs News Lessons Magazine Thu, 05 Jun 2014 18:19:17 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16328 Sick Licks: An Allan Holdsworth-Inspired Pentatonic Run http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-allan-holdsworth-inspired-pentatonic-run <!--paging_filter--><p>In this Sick Lick, I'm using a technique inspired by Allan Holdsworth. </p> <p>I remember listening to Holdsworth play when I was a kid -- with complete disbelief at what I was hearing. It almost didn’t sound like a guitar. The speed and the wide intervalic playing was simply amazing. It wasn’t until I saw live footage of him playing that I began to understand how he created that amazing sound. </p> <p>Obviously, it was a combination of his incredible knowledge and technique. The technique was what really grabbed me, rather than the theoretical side of his playing, as I was simply to young to grasp the complexities of his musical knowledge. What I saw was Holdsworth’s incredible stretches and use of four-note-per-string fingerings to create the most unbelievable-sounding runs. (Traditionally, we are taught to play scales and runs using a combination of two and three notes per string). </p> <p>I'm not saying that this the secret to his playing -- not by any stretch of the imagination. Rather, this was what I took out of his style and approach. I believe it's important to listen to as many guitar players as possible and do your best to learn something from them all. </p> <p>It’s not hard to play wide stretching runs on a single string, but it gets tricky when you attempt to use this technique all over the neck. When you start applying this approach, you tend to cover the neck very quickly. It requires immense concentration and control of your fingerings. </p> <p>Being a rock guy, I tend to apply all of my techniques to the pentatonic scale first then slowly branch out into other scales. The problem with this is that these techniques are not really suited to the pentatonic. They are better suited to modal playing, but I always love a challenge, and as you can hear from this lick, it really creates an amazing sound! You will notice I incorporate my thumb in this lick also; I do this to enable myself to play longer one-string runs.</p> <p>I start this lick with a four-note run on the A string with the fourth note being the start of the three-string arpeggio. This is repeated on the G string, but this time its only a three-note run with the third note being the start of the arpeggio. From here it gets tricky! On the high E string, we are fretting four consecutive notes moving up the scale of the pentatonic, then we move back down the scale using the same notes. From here it leads into a six-string arpeggio starting on the high E and ending on the low E. This is played with all up-strokes.</p> <p>From here I play nine descending notes all on the low E string, I do this is with a combination of my left thumb and utilizing the “over the top technique." It's a very complex line but extremely fun! I use the same approach to ascend back up the scale. This particular line is what I would focus on the most. It is by far the most technically challenging part and a very unique way to play up and down the pentatonic scale on one string. The final run in this lick is similar to the way I start the lick; I finish with a four-note run on the high E string leading into to a full bend on the 22nd fret.</p> <p>As with any technique I create, my main focus is that they enable me to play lines or runs that would otherwise not be possible at speed. There's no point using techniques that only “look cool” if they have no practical use or if they don’t allow you to do anything different on the guitar that you could do using traditional techniques.</p> <p>Thanks and I hope you enjoy! Please feel free to <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/atomicguitaraudio">join me on YouTube here.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/R7UFqsFO7kM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Sick%20Licks%20No%2013a.jpg" width="620" height="487" alt="Sick Licks No 13a.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Australia's Glenn Proudfoot has played and toured with major signed bands and artists in Europe and Australia, including progressive rockers Prazsky Vyber. Glenn released his first instrumental solo album, </em>Lick Em<em>, in 2010. It is available on iTunes and at <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a>. Glenn was featured in the October 2010 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> and now creates "Betcha Can’t Play This" segments and lessons for GW. Glenn also has a monthly GW column, "Loud &amp; Proud," which offers insight into his style and approach to the guitar. Glenn is working on a project with Ezekiel Ox (ex Mammal) and Lucius Borich (Cog), which is managed by Ted Gardner, ex-Tool and Jane's Addiction manager. The band has done pre-production on 22 tracks and is set to hit the studio and finish their first studio album. The album is set for release in 2012. Glenn also is working on the followup to his debut album; it, too, will be released in 2012.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-allan-holdsworth-inspired-pentatonic-run#comments Allan Holdsworth Glenn Proudfoot Loud & Proud Sick Licks Blogs Lessons Wed, 25 Jul 2012 18:45:08 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16381 Sick Licks: Achieving That "Alien" Sound With a Shawn Lane-Inspired Lick http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-achieving-alien-sound-shawn-lane-inspired-lick <!--paging_filter--><p>In this Sick Lick, I'm using the diminished 7th arpeggio. I combine a few different techniques to create what I call an “alien" sound. </p> <p>This lick is very heavily influenced buy one of my favorite guitarists, Shawn Lane.</p> <p>Lane really pushed the boundaries of guitar playing. He had flawless technique and speed, and he used this technical prowess to write some incredible music.</p> <p>The three techniques I'm using here are:</p> <p>1. Five-string arpeggios<br /> 2. Tapping arpeggios<br /> 3. Wide-voiced legato </p> <p>The combination of all of these techniques creates a very unique and alien sound. To come up with licks like this requires some thought, but obviously the more you do, it the easier and more natural it gets. </p> <p>1. I start this lick with <strong>five-string arpeggios</strong>, the first starting on the low E string. From here, the following arpeggios start from the A string. You will notice in the transcription how I combine these five-string patterns and switch the starting notes to enable myself to cover the neck and lead into other runs. What I mean by this is, I only look at arpeggios as passing runs, either to a bend or a another technique. It's very important to be able to switch in and out of these different techniques easily as there is nothing worse than “getting stuck” in one technique. I tend to practice the transitions between different techniques a lot to make sure I can move in and out of them very freely. This is essential for total mastery of your instrument.</p> <p>2. <strong>Tapping arpeggios</strong>. This section is a little tricky, especially as we have fast runs on either side of this tapping section. It is very important that the action on your guitar is low to enable you to sound the notes -- and also that you focus on muting the other strings when tapping these arpeggios. As we tend to use high-gain settings when applying these kind of techniques, muting is a huge part of making licks like these sound great. I use a combination of my left and right hands to mute. It sounds complicated, but it's actually something you will do naturally anyway. Just make sure you are aware of it.</p> <p>3. <strong>Wide-voiced arpeggios</strong>. This is one of my favorite sounds on the guitar. I use this technique a lot when soloing as it is great for creating that outside sound. It's also a fantastic way to move up and down the fretboard with speed. As we are applying this technique to the diminished 7th arpeggio, you will notice that the patterns repeat, so what we play on the G string we have the same fingering for on the high E string. The stretches required to pull off this section are a little challenging, so I suggest that if you find the stretches a little too much for you at the moment, simply move the idea up to a higher position on the neck and practice there. Once you're comfortable in the higher position, move it back down.</p> <p>Thanks very much and I hope you enjoy!</p> <p>Please feel free to <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/atomicguitaraudio">join me on YouTube here.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/hZ-SHnWQwvU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Sick%20Licks%20No%2012a.jpg" width="620" height="587" alt="Sick Licks No 12a.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Australia's Glenn Proudfoot has played and toured with major signed bands and artists in Europe and Australia, including progressive rockers Prazsky Vyber. Glenn released his first instrumental solo album, </em>Lick Em<em>, in 2010. It is available on iTunes and at <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a>. Glenn was featured in the October 2010 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> and now creates "Betcha Can’t Play This" segments and lessons for GW. Glenn also has a monthly GW column, "Loud &amp; Proud," which offers insight into his style and approach to the guitar. Glenn is working on a project with Ezekiel Ox (ex Mammal) and Lucius Borich (Cog), which is managed by Ted Gardner, ex-Tool and Jane's Addiction manager. The band has done pre-production on 22 tracks and is set to hit the studio and finish their first studio album. The album is set for release in 2012. Glenn also is working on the followup to his debut album; it, too, will be released in 2012.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-achieving-alien-sound-shawn-lane-inspired-lick#comments Glenn Proudfoot Loud & Proud Shawn Lane Sick Licks Blogs Lessons Thu, 19 Jul 2012 14:22:12 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16319 Sick Licks: Practice Playing Intricate Patterns Up and Down the Neck http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-practice-playing-intricate-patterns-and-down-neck <!--paging_filter--><p>In this Sick Lick, I'm using the G major scale. </p> <p>It was because of my experimenting with major scales and modes that I originally came up with the “Thumb Technique”; I was searching for ways to play descending arpeggio patterns while keeping an even flow and rhythm. What I eventually came up with is the pattern played in this lick.</p> <p>Whenever I'm searching for a new sound or lick, I look for something I can apply all over the neck and scale (once I've discovered the pattern), then I practice it by playing it all the way down the scale -- or all the way up. </p> <p>Basically, in this lick is I'm starting in the highest-possible position, then moving the pattern down. Obviously the shapes and notes change but the principle or mechanics of the lick remain unchanged.</p> <p>I find this is the best way to nail a new technique. You practice and play it all over the neck and create exercises and runs and start applying them in all positions.</p> <p>As these licks are very complex, I find the best way to approach them is in sections. Here's an example of how I would break this down to practice it: </p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong>: The set-up of the lick, which is the first six notes. An arpeggio starting on the low E ascending to the high E, one note per string.</p> <p><strong>Part 2</strong>: The five-string descending arpeggio with the fifth note being fretted with our left thumb on top of the fretboard.</p> <p><strong>Part 3</strong>: Another six-string arpeggio moving down the neck. It has the last note of that arpeggio being fretted with our first finger pulling off to a descending note that is, once again, fretted with our left thumb on top of the fretboard. So there are seven notes in total in this section.</p> <p>From here all I do is rotate parts 2 and 3 down the neck. </p> <p>I tend to do this with a lot of the licks I create. As there can be a lot to take in, I find it easier if I break them down and focus in on the individual parts. This is also a great way to practice them because it enables you to build speed and accuracy more proficiently in these areas of the lick. Obviously, once you have mastered every individual part, you can then work on putting them together.</p> <p>You should apply this kind of approach to all kinds of areas of your playing. I find that a lot of the time guitarists get overwhelmed with runs or the speed of some licks, but, like anything, when you start to break it down it becomes easier. </p> <p>If you break down even the most complex of runs, you'll be left with a single note! This is the way I practiced as a young kid, the harder something was the more I broke it down -- until I could play it, even if that meant I could only play the first two or three notes. This is what I would do and just keep building from there.</p> <p>It's things like this that will make you great! Thanks and enjoy! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/379CKp15P0g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Sick%20Licks%2011a%20GMAJ%281%29.jpg" width="620" height="600" alt="Sick Licks 11a GMAJ(1).jpg" /></p> <p><em>Australia's Glenn Proudfoot has played and toured with major signed bands and artists in Europe and Australia, including progressive rockers Prazsky Vyber. Glenn released his first instrumental solo album, </em>Lick Em<em>, in 2010. It is available on iTunes and at <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a>. Glenn was featured in the October 2010 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> and now creates "Betcha Can’t Play This" segments and lessons for GW. Glenn also has a monthly GW column, "Loud &amp; Proud," which offers insight into his style and approach to the guitar. Glenn is working on a project with Ezekiel Ox (ex Mammal) and Lucius Borich (Cog), which is managed by Ted Gardner, ex-Tool and Jane's Addiction manager. The band has done pre-production on 22 tracks and is set to hit the studio and finish their first studio album. The album is set for release in 2012. Glenn also is working on the followup to his debut album; it, too, will be released in 2012.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-practice-playing-intricate-patterns-and-down-neck#comments Glenn Proudfoot Loud & Proud Sick Licks Blogs Lessons Tue, 10 Jul 2012 18:43:06 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16244 Sick Licks: An Introduction to the "Claw Technique" http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-introduction-claw-technique <!--paging_filter--><p>In this Sick Lick, I'm using the whole tone scale. You have to be careful with this scale when adapting it to rock, as tonally it is way outside what the listener would normally be used to -- so it's important not to get lost! </p> <p>Make sure you are always mindful of where you are on the neck and that you are thinking about what other scales you can switch in and out of if you start to get too far outside the tonal core.</p> <p>The technique I use in this Sick Lick is what I call the “claw technique." What I actually do is use my right-hand fingers to pluck the arpeggios, as a bluegrass guitarist would do when he's got the thumb-bass technique going. </p> <p>This enables me to skip strings and create some different sounds and rhythmic ideas. It's a very cool technique and also can be adapted to melodic and chordal playing. This idea spawned from the fact that I played a lot of banjo as a kid. </p> <p>I start this Sick Lick with a crazy arpeggio section. This is very tricky, due to the claw technique and the unique shape of the arpeggio. I find it's always great to experiment with things that aren't deemed traditional. It's not that I'm setting out to reinvent the wheel, but it's simply great fun to experiment and see what you can come up with!</p> <p>The first arpeggio is a combination of hammers and string skipping with the claw technique. In order to get used to this technique, I would trill the first four notes of this arpeggio and get a flow going before moving on. Like I said, it's tricky, but like anything else, practice it slowly then build it up! </p> <p>The second arpeggio is the same as the first; it's simply played up a tone.</p> <p>From here I move into some descending three-string arpeggios with the claw technique. Why do I use the claw technique in this section? Because I have more control over the rhythmic pattern of the run than I would if I just swept the pattern. It also enables me to play this section faster and cleaner than if I where sweeping. </p> <p>The next section is with sweep picking, using a combination of five- and six-string arpeggios, which leads into another section of the claw technique. This is interesting: It's a descending three-string arpeggio section, but what I actually do here is play a descending run starting on the 11th fret of the A string. Then I actually move up the scale and start the next arpeggio on the 12th fret of the D string, which is also a descending run. </p> <p>Sounds a little confusing, but it's actually easier done than said! </p> <p>This is why I love the claw technique. You can move up and down the neck using three-string arpeggios and create really unique and crazy-sounding runs and arpeggios! </p> <p>Thanks very much and I hope you enjoy!</p> <p>Please feel free to <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/atomicguitaraudio">join me on YouTube here.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/LvdA_Fn_9pc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Sick%20Licks%20No%2010a.jpg" width="620" height="618" alt="Sick Licks No 10a.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Australia's Glenn Proudfoot has played and toured with major signed bands and artists in Europe and Australia, including progressive rockers Prazsky Vyber. Glenn released his first instrumental solo album, </em>Lick Em<em>, in 2010. It is available on iTunes and at <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a>. Glenn was featured in the October 2010 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> and now creates "Betcha Can’t Play This" segments and lessons for GW. Glenn also has a monthly GW column, "Loud &amp; Proud," which offers insight into his style and approach to the guitar. Glenn is working on a project with Ezekiel Ox (ex Mammal) and Lucius Borich (Cog), which is managed by Ted Gardner, ex-Tool and Jane's Addiction manager. The band has done pre-production on 22 tracks and is set to hit the studio and finish their first studio album. The album is set for release in 2012. Glenn also is working on the followup to his debut album; it, too, will be released in 2012.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-introduction-claw-technique#comments Glenn Proudfoot Loud & Proud Sick Licks Blogs Lessons Thu, 28 Jun 2012 09:37:30 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16146 Sick Licks: Crazy Combination of the Whole Tone, Diminished and Pentatonic Scales http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-crazy-combination-whole-tone-diminished-and-pentatonic-scales <!--paging_filter--><p>I'm using a pretty crazy combination of scales in this Sick Lick. We start with the whole tone scale then move into the diminished and finish with the pentatonic.</p> <p>When I'm combining scales, I always base it around the pentatonic scale. As in, even though I might be using many different scales, I tend to focus the solo or lick around the pentatonic. Basically, I use it like my road map! This gives me the comfort of knowing that at any part of the lick I can quickly switch back into the pentatonic scale if I feel I'm getting too far away from the tonal core of the idea. </p> <p>To give you an example: At the start of this lick, I'm using a whole-tone five-string sweep. What I'm actually focusing on is what box of the pentatonic scale does this arpeggio run through; in this case, it runs through the third box of the pentatonic scale. </p> <p>You may think this is pointless, but I assure you it's not. I do this so that when I'm moving in and out of scales, it doesn't sound disjointed. By focusing on the pentatonic, I can easily -- at any time -- switch back to it anywhere on the neck. This allows a very smooth transition. This is what all the great jazz or fusion players, such as Frank Gambale, do with such mastery! </p> <p>I start this Sick Lick with a five-string arpeggio using the whole tone scale; from here I move the same pattern up a tone and play the same shape arpeggio again before moving into the diminished scale. The three-finger tapping section is what I move into next. I'm using the diminished scale for this section. The arpeggio that I actually tap is the same shape as the arpeggio that I hammer with my right hand. </p> <p>From here I switch my hand to fret the guitar over the top and I play two five-string arpeggios starting on the A string. The two arpeggios are the same shape; all we're doing is moving the shape up three frets and playing the same thing.</p> <p>The next section is where I switch my hand back to the normal fretting position. Remember to focus on the note the left thumb frets, as this note creates the pivot so we can swing our hand back to the normal position while still sounding a note. </p> <p>I finish this lick with a combination of the diminished and pentatonic scale. </p> <p>It's important to note that I'm not just randomly adding scales or notes. These are all thought out and based around a tonal center. This is why it works. </p> <p>I hope you enjoy!</p> <p>Feel free to <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/atomicguitaraudio">join me on Youtube here.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/uIKNASaC0ns" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Sick%20Licks%20No%209a.jpg" width="620" height="609" alt="Sick Licks No 9a.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Australia's Glenn Proudfoot has played and toured with major signed bands and artists in Europe and Australia, including progressive rockers Prazsky Vyber. Glenn released his first instrumental solo album, </em>Lick Em<em>, in 2010. It is available on iTunes and at <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a>. Glenn was featured in the October 2010 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> and now creates "Betcha Can’t Play This" segments and lessons for GW. Glenn also has a monthly GW column, "Loud &amp; Proud," which offers insight into his style and approach to the guitar. Glenn is working on a project with Ezekiel Ox (ex Mammal) and Lucius Borich (Cog), which is managed by Ted Gardner, ex-Tool and Jane's Addiction manager. The band has done pre-production on 22 tracks and is set to hit the studio and finish their first studio album. The album is set for release in 2012. Glenn also is working on the followup to his debut album; it, too, will be released in 2012.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-crazy-combination-whole-tone-diminished-and-pentatonic-scales#comments Glenn Proudfoot Loud & Proud Sick Licks Blogs Features Wed, 20 Jun 2012 18:26:03 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16071 Sick Licks: Create Wide-Open Arpeggios by Fretting With Your Thumb http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-create-wide-open-arpeggios-fretting-your-thumb <!--paging_filter--><p>In this Sick Lick, I'm using the E Pentatonic Blues Scale (Pentatonic Flat 5). Whenever I'm soloing, this is the scale I naturally gravitate toward because I love its aggressive sound and power! </p> <p>For me, Stevie Ray Vaughan used this scale better than anyone, and he was my inspiration to explore the possibilities with this scale and sound.</p> <p>As a musician, I've always searched for new ways and techniques to create different sounds and unique solos. I gain a lot of my inspiration from all kinds of musicians -- not only guitarists. I love watching and listening to players like Virgil Donati or Jaco Pastorius. These are people who really pushed the boundaries of their instruments and created something new and exciting.</p> <p>Which leads me to this Sick Lick!</p> <p>The thumb technique is something that is very unique. I love the wide-open arpeggios I can create with it, along with the manic sound.</p> <p>Since I was a kid, I've been looking for ways to play runs all over the neck of the guitar -- like a piano player would. You know, you watch a great pianist and they have both hands on the keys, just wailing up and down all over the piano! I wanted to be able to do a similar thing on the guitar; so I started messing around with bringing my thumb from behind the neck. </p> <p>I must say it wasn’t “smooth sailing” in the beginning; actually, it was quite painful ... hahahahaha. But after a few blisters and many months of practice, I started to master the idea and put it into action!</p> <p>This technique is not for esthetics. It enables me to play runs that otherwise would be impossible. This is why I do it! You may be wondering, "What's the point?" Well, the point is, “Why not?!” </p> <p>You can clearly hear the uniqueness of this lick with the thumb technique. The sound may not be for everyone, but my belief is that in order to grow and get better as a musician, you must always be challenging yourself, whether that be by practicing new techniques, learning another instrument or playing with a new band -- or all of the above! You must challenge yourself, and that is why I'm always searching for new ideas and ways to convey my musical message through the guitar.</p> <p>We start this lick with a six-string arpeggio moving down toward the nut. Then I bring the thumb into play to create arpeggios that otherwise wouldn't be possible. Once I bring my thumb around from the back of the neck, it doesn't go back behind until the end of the lick. There are four notes in total that I fret with my thumb, and it is not until the last of these notes that I then put my thumb back behind the neck.</p> <p>The section where I have my thumb on the fretboard requires a lot of finger strength. The pressure you have to apply is far greater than it would be if your thumb were behind the neck. Keep this in mind when you're practicing this. Also be sure not to be straining your wrist.</p> <p>This entire lick is using the E Blues Scale. I tend to accent the “flat 5” (Bb) instead of using it as a passing note. This creates a very aggressive sounding lick!</p> <p>Please feel free to <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/atomicguitaraudio">join me on Youtube here.</a></p> <p>Thanks, and play hard! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/VwV0TBCBiZg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Sick%20Licks%20No%208a.jpg" width="620" height="484" alt="Sick Licks No 8a.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Australia's Glenn Proudfoot has played and toured with major signed bands and artists in Europe and Australia, including progressive rockers Prazsky Vyber. Glenn released his first instrumental solo album, </em>Lick Em<em>, in 2010. It is available on iTunes and at <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a>. Glenn was featured in the October 2010 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> and now creates "Betcha Can’t Play This" segments and lessons for GW. Glenn also has a monthly GW column, "Loud &amp; Proud," which offers insight into his style and approach to the guitar. Glenn is working on a project with Ezekiel Ox (ex Mammal) and Lucius Borich (Cog), which is managed by Ted Gardner, ex-Tool and Jane's Addiction manager. The band has done pre-production on 22 tracks and is set to hit the studio and finish their first studio album. The album is set for release in 2012. Glenn also is working on the followup to his debut album; it, too, will be released in 2012.</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/stevie-ray-vaughan">Stevie Ray Vaughan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-create-wide-open-arpeggios-fretting-your-thumb#comments Glenn Proudfoot Loud & Proud Sick Licks Stevie Ray Vaughan Blogs Wed, 13 Jun 2012 16:28:02 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16000 Sick Licks: Combining the Natural E Minor Pentatonic, Flat 5 and Major 3rd Pentatonic Scales http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-combining-natural-e-minor-pentatonic-flat-5-and-major-3rd-pentatonic-scales <!--paging_filter--><p>In this Sick Lick, I'm using a combination of the “Natural E Minor Pentatonic," Flat 5 (blues scale) and Major 3rd Pentatonic. </p> <p>Many players forget there is a difference between these scales, and the “Natural Pentatonic” often gets overlooked and replaced by these other variations. There is a significant difference between them, and they should all be given the same respect and attention. </p> <p>The straight pentatonic scale is fantastic for runs, and I particularly love it when it's applied with arpeggios and legato. I've always been one for making sure I'm using the whole fretboard and not getting stuck in one position. This is obviously easier said than done. And, like anything else, it requires a lot of practice, but it's definitely worth it! </p> <p>There's nothing like the feeling that you have complete mastery over your instrument.</p> <p>I start this lick with a combination of three-string arpeggios and legato while moving up the neck to the first position of the pentatonic scale (at the 12th fret). The secret to this first run is the hammers and pulls. </p> <p>When practicing this, it's important to make sure everything is flowing evenly and you're not rushing any part, so practice slowly to a metronome or drum groove and then bring the lick up to speed. Once again, we have some very wide stretches that come into play. If some of these are too much for you at the moment, simply move the idea to a higher position on the neck and practice there.</p> <p>Your finger stretch is something that can be worked on -- like all things on the guitar! But do not strain yourself. It's very important that you have your thumb behind the neck correctly and that you're not causing any discomfort to your wrist. </p> <p>The next section of the lick I'm fretting a note with my right hand to create a long legato line. As I move down the neck, I bring my left hand over the top of the fretboard to fret the six-string arpeggio. From here I use my thumb as the pivot to swing my left hand back into the normal fretting position and finish the lick with a combination of the Major 3rd Pentatonic and the Flat 5 Pentatonic. </p> <p>I like the sound of these scales on their own; combining them gives a it really manic "outside" sound! But like I said, it's important to to respect these as individual scales as it gives you a lot more scope when soloing and writing.</p> <p>I hope you enjoy! </p> <p>Please <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/atomicguitaraudio">join me on Youtube here.</a></p> <p>Rock on!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/4BGGbFCKfcc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Sick%20Licks%20No%207a.jpg" width="620" height="615" alt="Sick Licks No 7a.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Australia's Glenn Proudfoot has played and toured with major signed bands and artists in Europe and Australia, including progressive rockers Prazsky Vyber. Glenn released his first instrumental solo album, </em>Lick Em<em>, in 2010. It is available on iTunes and at <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a>. Glenn was featured in the October 2010 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> and now creates "Betcha Can’t Play This" segments and lessons for GW. Glenn also has a monthly GW column, "Loud &amp; Proud," which offers insight into his style and approach to the guitar. Glenn is working on a project with Ezekiel Ox (ex Mammal) and Lucius Borich (Cog), which is managed by Ted Gardner, ex-Tool and Jane's Addiction manager. The band has done pre-production on 22 tracks and is set to hit the studio and finish their first studio album. The album is set for release in 2012. Glenn also is working on the followup to his debut album; it, too, will be released in 2012.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-combining-natural-e-minor-pentatonic-flat-5-and-major-3rd-pentatonic-scales#comments Glenn Proudfoot Loud & Proud Sick Licks Blogs Lessons Wed, 06 Jun 2012 16:48:26 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/15939 Sick Licks: Create Longer Legato Lines by Fretting With Your Right Hand http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-create-longer-legato-lines-fretting-your-right-hand <!--paging_filter--><p>In this Sick Lick, I'm using the D Minor pentatonic scale. The idea behind this lick is to be able to move all around the neck while using your right middle finger to fret notes, creating longer legato lines and providing huge coverage on the neck.</p> <p>For a long time when I was younger, I felt trapped with the pentatonic scale. Most players only use the scale in the box form or two-note-per-string technique. Now, while I absolutely love the sound this creates, I was searching for ways to create runs that were tonally similar to my personal favorites such as Stevie Ray Vaughan or Jimi Hendrix but that utilize techniques that Steve Vai or Satch would use in their soloing. </p> <p>Obviously, working with the pentatonic scale can be very challenging due to the massive stretches required to pull off some of these licks. It's very important that your thumb is behind the neck in a more classical-style approach. It's the same with your posture and guitar position; this allows your left hand to really open up.</p> <p>As you can hear from the first legato line in this lick, it actually contains 11 notes, all on the high E string. All the notes leading up to the note we tap and all the notes after we tap are legato. This gives a very nice and smooth sound while enabling us the time we need to tap the notes with our right hand. </p> <p>From here it leads to a six-string arpeggio, then into another long legato line. It's the same as the first legato line, but this time we are moving forward. Once again, all notes leading up to and after the note we tap are all legato. Then we finish with a three-string arpeggio into a bend.</p> <p>The combination of the wide stretches along with fretting notes with your right hand is difficult, but this technique sounds great at any speed. I often use this for very melodic playing or slow runs, so just practice it at a pace that is good for you! </p> <p>Like with all these licks, if it's all a little too much for you, just dissect it and focus on a part you find useful for where your playing is at now. For me to play and create licks like this has been a lot of work. So if you are a beginner, I do not want you to be put off by these licks. Instead, let them inspire you! Let them be the thing you focus on to help get you where you want to be!! </p> <p>Please feel free to <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/atomicguitaraudio">join me on Youtube here.</a></p> <p>Thanks, and play hard! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="348" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Omw4yvguCs4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Sick%20Licks%20No%206a.jpg" width="620" height="490" alt="Sick Licks No 6a.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Australia's Glenn Proudfoot has played and toured with major signed bands and artists in Europe and Australia, including progressive rockers Prazsky Vyber. Glenn released his first instrumental solo album, </em>Lick Em<em>, in 2010. It is available on iTunes and at <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a>. Glenn was featured in the October 2010 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> and now creates "Betcha Can’t Play This" segments and lessons for GW. Glenn also has a monthly GW column, "Loud &amp; Proud," which offers insight into his style and approach to the guitar. Glenn is working on a project with Ezekiel Ox (ex Mammal) and Lucius Borich (Cog), which is managed by Ted Gardner, ex-Tool and Jane's Addiction manager. The band has done pre-production on 22 tracks and is set to hit the studio and finish their first studio album. The album is set for release in 2012. Glenn also is working on the followup to his debut album; it, too, will be released in 2012.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-create-longer-legato-lines-fretting-your-right-hand#comments Glenn Proudfoot Loud & Proud Sick Licks Blogs Features Lessons Thu, 31 May 2012 12:17:35 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/15875 Loud & Proud: A New Approach to Diminished-Seven Arpeggios http://www.guitarworld.com/loud-proud-new-approach-diminished-seven-arpeggios <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the July 2012 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-july-12-slash/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=loudproud">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>One of my favorite ways to expand on the typical blues/rock/metal vocabulary is to introduce fast melodic bursts based on diminished-seven arpeggios. In this month's column, the focus will be on the E diminished-seven arpeggio, which consists of the notes E, G, Bb and C#. I like to challenge myself to find all possible ways to utilize this arpeggio up and down the fretboard in as seamless a way as possible.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1644548247001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1644548247001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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What this does is create an extremely aggressive sound, and it makes the scale awesome to use in heavier styles of music. </p> <p>This is apparent straight away from the first arpeggio sweep that I do. Rather than fret the E note on the 12th fret of the high E, I fret the D# (flat 5), which really sets up the lick as a super-aggressive-sounding run. </p> <p>The first section of this lick is one of my favorite runs! I love how it creates a really alien-like sound. One of the keys to getting this right is making sure you're double picking the G string (19th fret) on the transition on the way back down the guitar to the first arpeggio position, as this sets up the picking pattern and creates and even flow with the sweeping. </p> <p>It's very important to focus hard on your picking hand. You need to have perfect control over the sweeping sections, even though, in principle, all we are doing when sweep picking is dragging the pick across the strings in one direction as if we were strumming a chord. We still need to have control of that motion and make sure your left and right hands are syncing up. This is the secret to playing this type of technique, so, like anything else, practice slowly and focus on the timing and syncopation between your hands.</p> <p>The next section where I tap the note on the 20th fret is a very cool way of creating a very fast sounding arpeggio. It's important when tapping this note that you are picking the notes before as close as possible to the spot where you will actually be tapping so you don't have to move your right hand too far. This might not seem so important, but believe me, once you get this lick up to speed, it is essential! It’s little things like this that can make the difference!</p> <p>Please feel free to <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/atomicguitaraudio">join me on Youtube here.</a></p> <p>Rock on! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="345" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/7NHyPfTNRS0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/lick.jpg" width="620" height="498" alt="lick.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Australia's Glenn Proudfoot has played and toured with major signed bands and artists in Europe and Australia, including progressive rockers Prazsky Vyber. Glenn released his first instrumental solo album, </em>Lick Em<em>, in 2010. It is available on iTunes and at <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a>. Glenn was featured in the October 2010 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> and now creates "Betcha Can’t Play This" segments and lessons for GW. Glenn also has a monthly GW column, "Loud &amp; Proud," which offers insight into his style and approach to the guitar. Glenn is working on a project with Ezekiel Ox (ex Mammal) and Lucius Borich (Cog), which is managed by Ted Gardner, ex-Tool and Jane's Addiction manager. The band has done pre-production on 22 tracks and is set to hit the studio and finish their first studio album. The album is set for release in 2012. Glenn also is working on the followup to his debut album; it, too, will be released in 2012.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/sick-licks-getting-aggressive-minor-blues-scale#comments Glenn Proudfoot Loud & Proud Sick Licks Blogs Lessons Tue, 22 May 2012 16:14:32 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/15804 Loud & Proud: A New Approach to the Blues Scale http://www.guitarworld.com/loud-proud-new-approach-blues-scale <!--paging_filter--><p>If I had to choose my favorite scale for soloing, it would be the blues scale, that cool, slippery scale that adds the flatted fifth (f5) to the minor pentatonic. Among traditional players and modern shredders, it is probably the most commonly used scale in blues and rock.</p> <p>This month, I’m going to revisit the wide fret-hand stretching techniques we’ve examined in previous lessons and apply them to the blues scale on different areas of the fretboard to create very unique and distinctly challenging licks and runs. These kinds of licks can be applied to a great variety of musical styles, from blues to rock to jazz to metal, and they don’t have to be played at warp speed with maximum gain to sound cool.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0612_1.jpg" /></p> <p>For reference, FIGURE 1 illustrates the B blues scale (B D E F Fs A) as played in its seventh-position “box” pattern. In the following examples, I use wide stretches to combine adjacent, overlapping scale positions, which enables me to create unusual phrases and melodies. The incorporation of sweeps and economy picking enhances my ability to execute these runs very quickly. </p> <p>FIGURE 2 introduces the first lick, and here I incorporate a three-string arpeggio, one note per string, moving from the A string to the G string using sweep picking. In bar 2, I use an upward sweep across these strings, along with two essential pull-offs. You’ll notice that there is a bit of a random, “cramming” quality to the phrasing, especially in bar 1. </p> <p>Keep in mind that the only way to execute wide stretches such as these is to keep the fret-hand thumb positioned squarely on the back of the neck, which allows the fingers to come down at a very straight angle to the strings. This will also allow a greater fretting span than what can be achieved when wrapping the thumb over the top of the fretboard, as you might do when bending strings. Try to keep the fret hand as relaxed as possible.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0612_3.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0612_6.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0612_8.jpg" /></p> <p>A great way to practice a phrase like this is to cycle a small part of it, as shown in FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4 offers a similar approach but moved down one scale position. FIGURES 5 through 8 illustrate this approach applied to four more areas of the fretboard, with different fretting options and melodic shapes offered. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0612_9.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/loudproud0612_10.jpg" /></p> <p>Our last two examples demonstrate how I might apply these different shapes to a longer soloing idea. In FIGURE 9, I begin in fifth position but quickly move up to seventh while applying some very wide stretches. In FIGURE 10, I essentially remain in seventh position, but the stretches are again wide and will require practice to execute with speed and facility.</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong><br /></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1573743120001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1573743120001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <strong>Part 2</strong><br /></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1573712423001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1573712423001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/loud-proud-new-approach-blues-scale#comments Glenn Proudfoot June 2012 Loud & Proud Thu, 26 Apr 2012 17:04:41 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/15509 Loud & Proud: Building Patterns in the Pentatonic Scale, Part 2 http://www.guitarworld.com/loud-proud-building-patterns-pentatonic-scale-part-2 <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the April 2012 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://secure.nps1.net/guitarworld/index.php?main_page=product_info&amp;cPath=9&amp;products_id=295&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=proudfoot">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>In his second <em>Guitar World</em> column, Glenn Proudfoot continues his look a building patterns in the pentatonic scale, this month focusing on using pentatonic sequences to create what he calls "power burst" runs.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1471869511001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1471869511001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/loud-proud-building-patterns-pentatonic-scale-part-2#comments Glenn Proudfoot Loud & Proud Wed, 29 Feb 2012 16:14:21 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/14815 Loud & Proud: Building Patterns in the Pentatonic Scale, Part 1 http://www.guitarworld.com/loud-proud-building-patterns-pentatonic-scale-part-1 <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This video is related to the March 2012 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full text and tablature for the column, you can pick up the issue of newsstands now or in our <a href="http://secure.nps1.net/guitarworld/index.php?main_page=product_info&amp;cPath=9&amp;products_id=292&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=MarProudfoot">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>In the first edition of Glenn Proudfoot's new <em>Guitar World</em> column, "Loud &amp; Proud," the Australian guitarist looks at a few simple ways of building patterns inside the pentatonic box.</p> <p>"Early in my development, I always struggled to find ways to build nice-sounding runs that moves across the neck," said Proudfoot. "I found that grouping notes in different patterns of threes, fours and gives, as well as other patterns, helped me tremendously in this pursuit."</p> <p>For all of the March 2012 videos, head <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/Mar2012">here</a>.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1423819378001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1423819378001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/loud-proud-building-patterns-pentatonic-scale-part-1#comments Glenn Proudfoot Loud & Proud Blogs Lessons Wed, 22 Feb 2012 16:50:38 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/14443