Joe Satriani http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/202/all en Deep Purple's Ritchie Blackmore Talks "Highway Star" Guitar Solo — Covers by John Petrucci, Joe Satriani and More http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-purple-ritchie-blackmore-highway-star-solo-covers-john-petrucci-joe-satriani <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The bulk of this story is from the </em>Guitar World<em> archives, from our "100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time" series. Enjoy!</em></p> <p>“Highway Star” is but one highlight of <em>Machine Head</em>, Deep Purple’s greatest triumph. Ironically, it almost never came to be. </p> <p>In early 1972, shortly after retreating to Montreaux, Switzerland, to record, the British band was beset by a wealth of problems. </p> <p>"First, the place they were staying, which overlooked Lake Geneva, burned down—inspiring them to write “Smoke on the Water.” Then, in response to a complaint about excessive noise, the police kicked the band out of the ballroom where they were recording.</p> <p>“We were stuck in Switzerland with nowhere to go, and a friend of ours who was the mayor of the town said that there was an empty hotel we could use,” recalls guitarist Ritchie Blackmore. “We gladly accepted and retreated to this lonely hotel in the mountains. We set up all the equipment in the corridor, with the drums and some amps tucked into alcoves.</p> <p>“We had the Rolling Stones’ mobile recording unit sitting outside in the snow, but to get there we had to run cable through two doors in the corridor into a room, through a bathroom and into another room, from which it went across a bed and out the veranda window, then ran along the balcony for about 100 feet and came back in through another bedroom window. </p> <p>"It then went through that room’s bathroom and into another corridor, then all the way down a marble staircase to the foyer reception area of the hotel, out the front door, across the courtyard and up the steps into the back of the mobile unit. I think that setup led to capturing some spontaneity, because once we got to the truck for a playback, even if we didn’t think it was a perfect take, we’d go, ‘Yeah, that’s good enough.’ Because we just couldn’t stand going back again.”</p> <p>But while the vibe may have been loose, Blackmore’s solo on ‘Highway Star’ was well planned. “I wrote that out note for note about a week before we recorded it,” says the guitarist. “And that is one of the only times I have ever done that. I wanted it to sound like someone driving in a fast car, for it to be one of those songs you would listen to while speeding. And I wanted a very definite Bach sound, which is why I wrote it out—and why I played those very rigid arpeggios across that very familiar Bach progression—Dm, Gm, Cmaj, Amaj. I believe that I was the first person to do that so obviously on the guitar, and I believe that that’s why it stood out and why people have enjoyed it so much.</p> <p>“[<em>Keyboardist</em>] Jon Lord worked his part out to mine. Initially, I was going to play my solo over the chords he had planned out. But I couldn’t get off on them, so I made up my own chords and we left the spot for him to write a melody. The keyboard solo is quite a bit more difficult than mine because of all those 16th notes. </p> <p>"Over the years, I’ve always played that solo note for note—again, one of the few where I’ve done that—but it just got faster and faster onstage because we would drink more and more whiskey. Jon would have to play his already difficult part faster and faster and he would get very annoyed about it.”</p> <p><strong>Deep Purple (with Ritchie Blackmore) perform "Highway Star" in 1972:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kb5EfvVkcfA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Chickenfoot (with Joe Satriani) perform "Highway Star":</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GQVTtpE9J7s" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Street musician Damian Salazar plays "Highway Star":</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zQKDhIKxgAQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Deep Purple (with Steve Morse) perform "Highway Star" in 1999:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7FNPwEK9HgU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Dream Theater perform "Highway Star":</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gy1Rxjfinq4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Deep Purple, "Highway Star" isolated guitar track (studio version):</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/lJH90H531hw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/deep-purple">Deep Purple</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/chickenfoot">Chickenfoot</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/steve-morse">Steve Morse</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-purple-ritchie-blackmore-highway-star-solo-covers-john-petrucci-joe-satriani#comments Deep Purple Dream Theater Joe Satriani Ritchie Blackmore Steve Morse Videos News Tue, 14 Apr 2015 11:56:44 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24281 at http://www.guitarworld.com Engines of Creation with Joe Satriani: An Introduction to Modal Theory http://www.guitarworld.com/engines-creation-introduction-modal-theory <!--paging_filter--><p><em>In this classic </em>Guitar World<em> column, Joe Satriani goes in-depth with understanding modal theory.</em></p> <p>A major stepping stone in my musical development was when I was introduced to the study of modes. </p> <p>Learning how modes work really opened my eyes and ears and gave me a lot of insight into how melodies relate to chords.</p> <p>The term “mode” refers to a set of notes that can be derived from a specific scale. For example, the C major scale is spelled C D E F G A B; this is also known as the C Ionian mode. </p> <p>If you were to take this same set of notes and start from the second scale degree, D, and continue up to D one octave higher, the resultant “scale” is known as the D Dorian mode (D E F G A B C) (see <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>). As you can see and hear, both modes (C Ionian and D Dorian) are composed of the same seven notes, the only difference being the way they’re oriented.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/engines1_1.gif" width="620" /></p> <p>This same modal relativity concept can be applied to each degree of the C major scale: if we begin on the third scale degree, E, and continue through the same note series to E one octave higher, we’d be playing the E Phrygian mode (E F G A B C). </p> <p>The remaining modes that are built from the C major scale are F Lydian (F G A B C D E), G Mixolydian (G A B C D E F), A Aeolian (A B C D E F G) and B Locrian (B C D E F G A). These seven modes—Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian and Locrian—are all simply different orientations of the “parent” major scale, each beginning on a different scale degree, and are known collectively as the “fundamental modes.”</p> <p>I used this particular scale to illustrate the theory of the fundamental modes because, unlike the other major scales, it contains no sharps or flats and is easier to “think in.” Realize, however, that this same principle of modal relativity applies to every key, not just C. For example, the G major scale (G A B C D E F#) spawns seven modes, one for each note of the scale.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/engines1_2.gif" width="620" /></p> <p>Though thinking of a mode as being the same as some other major scale is a very useful learning device, it is only when one fully understands and internalizes the sound of each mode’s intervallic structure that one will master the modal concept. </p> <p>One day, back when was in my first year of music college, I was taking a piano lesson when my teacher and I came to a particular section of improvisation. I said, “This is in the A Dorian mode.” My teacher said, “Well, it’s really the same as playing in G major,” but I disagreed. I said that if I’m playing in A Dorian, I’ll emphasize the notes differently than if I were thinking G major.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/engines1_3.gif" width="620" /></p> <p>As I began to study the seven fundamental modes, I became fascinated with the differences in their intervallic structures and the inherent chord forms that can be constructed out of them. I also liked to compare them by playing them off of the same root note (as parallel modes, as opposed to relative modes). I discovered that certain modes were nearly identical in form, except for a single interval. </p> <p>An example of this would be the E Phrygian (E F G A B C) and E Aeolian (E F# G A B C D) modes, the former being the third mode of the C major scale and the latter being the sixth mode of the G major scale. Comparing modes this way—back to back, in the same key—helped me understand the differences in their structure and sound.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/engines1_4.gif" width="620" /></p> <p>One of my early mentors, a very open-minded high school music teacher who also taught Steve Vai, once told me that one should not change the way one listens to music in order to understand the theory behind it. He said that the whole point of studying theory and harmony should be to discover more ways to better express one’s own musical vision.</p> <p>My song “Time” (hear it below) is based on the B Phrygian mode (B C D E F# G A). As illustrated in <strong>FIGURES 2a and 2b,</strong> this mode is theoretically formed by taking the G major scale and using the third, B, as the root note. <strong>FIGURE 3a</strong> illustrates the B Phrygian mode in the seventh position. Memorize this fingering pattern by playing it up and down repeatedly. </p> <p>The exercises depicted in <strong>FIGURES 3b-3e</strong> are intended to get the unique sound of the B Phrygian mode into your mind. Before playing these patterns, tape-record yourself strumming sustained B5 chords, enough to fill about 5 or 10 minutes of tape. Listening back to the tape while you play these modal exercises will reinforce the sound of the B root note beneath these Phrygian “melodies.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/C9sK-Bm8O0c" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/engines-creation-introduction-modal-theory#comments Joe Satriani Blogs News Lessons Magazine Mon, 06 Apr 2015 12:09:22 +0000 Joe Satriani 15019 at http://www.guitarworld.com Joe Satriani, Tosin Abasi and Guthrie Govan Join Forces for 2015 G4 Experience — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-tosin-abasi-and-guthrie-govan-join-forces-2015-g4-experience-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This is an excerpt from the April 2015 issue of Guitar World. For the complete interview, plus new-album previews from Joe Satriani, Guthrie Govan, Dream Theater, Megadeth, Warren Haynes and more, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-april-15-abasi-satriani-govan?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=G4Excerpt">check out the April issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <p>Seated across from one another in a cavernous, chilly San Francisco photo studio, Tosin Abasi and Guthrie Govan are deep in conversation, dissecting and debating the relative merits of various guitar neck tone woods. </p> <p>They’re both clearly attuned to the same profound level of guitar geekery—fretboard brothers. But it’s hard to imagine two human beings more different in appearance. </p> <p>Abasi is impeccably and stylishly dressed in head-to-toe black, including a well-cut jacket that’s the handiwork of his sibling, the fashion designer Abdul Abasi. His hair is styled with razor-sharp precision in a kind of asymmetrical, post-modern pompadour. </p> <p>Tosin’s professorial, tortoise rim eyeglasses lay primly on the table before him. His body language is angular and precise. He’s been pumping some iron of late…as if the dazzling virtuosity and abstract intensity of his eight-string guitar work with Animals as Leaders weren’t enough of an athletic accomplishment. </p> <p>Thin, wiry and slumped in a leather chair across from Abasi, Guthrie Govan is sporting a rumpled Pac-Man T-shirt that looks as if he’s slept in it. His abundant nut-brown hair and scraggly beard appear not to have known the benefit of comb, brush or even shampoo in quite some time. He’s just off the plane from London, but looks as if he might just as well have tumbled out of a time machine, transported from some grotty, early-Seventies Jethro Tull lineup into the 21st Century technopolis that is San Francisco. </p> <p>But the quietly understated wit and careful creativity with which he chooses his words belie his bedraggled appearance. The same strange mixture of offhand nonchalance, well-crafted mastery, retro rock references and fast-forward futurism distinguishes Govan’s exemplary guitar work with the Aristocrats, not to mention his solo discs and sideman work with Steven Wilson, Asia and others. </p> <p>Mahogany versus wenge has become the conversation’s focal point when Joe Satriani enters the room. Like Abasi, he’s all in black, albeit in a more casual way—the timeless rock and roll uniform of T-shirt, jeans and leather jacket. Satch pulls a black watch cap off his clean shaven cranium and takes a seat alongside his fellow guitar titans. His quiet humility and air of mature reserve contrast benignly with the youthful exuberance of his cohorts. </p> <p>Tosin Abasi and Guthrie Govan are both very much the children of Joe Satriani. Wildly disparate as they are in their musical and personal styles, Animals as Leaders and the Aristocrats could never have come into existence, let alone find a dedicated and enthusiastic audience, had Satriani not blazed a bold new trail in rock guitar playing in the Eighties—raising the bar for fretboard technique and making the world safe for shred. </p> <p>And now Satriani, Abasi and Govan are joining forces with fellow guitarist Mike Keneally (Frank Zappa, Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Henry Kaiser) and <a href="http://g4experience.com/">Dreamcatcher Events</a> to present the second annual <a href="http://g4experience.com/">G4 Experience,</a> a four-day, immersive guitar camp held in the idyllic environs of the <a href="http://www.cambriapineslodge.com/">Cambria Pines Lodge</a> in California, June 28 to July 2. </p> <p>Satch, Tosin, Guthrie and Mike will be joined by Govan’s fellow Aristocrats who also serve, conveniently enough, as Satriani’s current rhythm section. And, along with performances by Animals as Leaders, auxiliary instructors include bassist Stu Hamm and <em>Guitar World’s</em> own Andy Aledort as well as other special guests. The four-day musical retreat will include both concert performances and ad hoc jams as well as up-close and personal instruction from the four guitar stars and their guests.</p> <p>The camp concept is very much Satriani’s brainchild, an offshoot of his much beloved G3 and G4 road tours. </p> <p>“I thought it would be nice if there were some way to get away from the folding chair and PowerPoint presentation vibe behind most clinics,” Satriani says. </p> <p>“Rather than just playing and teaching licks, I wanted to do something that mirrors my experience with the G3 tours. That’s where I see more rapt attention and people getting involved passionately, as concertgoers tend to do. I don’t really see that at clinics. So I was looking for a way to get the juicy fun of a live performance into a clinic situation. And that’s basically what I put to the <a href="http://g4experience.com/">Dreamcatcher Events</a> guys who came to me with this idea of doing some kind of clinic over a period of days.”</p> <p><strong>For more about the 2015 G4 Experience, visit <a href="http://g4experience.com/">g4experience.com.</a> </strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/scMF0b3BbUo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>The first question is for Guthrie and Tosin. What was your initial reaction like when you were approached to take part in this instructional camp?</strong></p> <p><strong>GUTHRIE GOVAN</strong> The logical thing to do when approached by Joe Satriani and asked to do something like this is to say yes. In no way was it a difficult decision. Based on my experience with guitar camps, it always turns out to be an extension of the personality of the guy who dreamed it up in the first place. So I’m really looking forward to this one. It looks like it’s going to be a real musical experience, as opposed to a parade of circus tricks. </p> <p> <strong> JOE SATRIANI </strong>Although we’re not beneath that! [laugher] That’s kind of what we do in a way. Let me just say there’s nothing wrong with that. I’ve often said in clinics that everything is equal. All scales are equal. All chords are equal. It’s really all the same. It’s just a question of when and how to use them.</p> <p><strong>TOSIN ABASI</strong> I’ve done clinics myself. My band did something similar to this—a camp setting where we had multiple days with the students. And while the instruction sessions are really cool, what can be even cooler is what happens outside the formal clinics: Students getting together with other students and sharing the ideas they just learned. There’s this really cool “behind the scenes” element. Bands form. Musical relationships are formed. Just having like-minded musicians all together in the same place, sharing the same information—it will be cool to facilitate that kind of interaction.</p> <p><strong>So what can people who take part in the camp expect to experience? </strong></p> <p><strong>SATRIANI</strong> I’m gonna play, I’m gonna talk and just take questions. I’m not going to make people pick up the guitar and say, “Put the third finger on the third fret.” It’s not gonna be like that. People will have a chance to observe me up close and ask questions. I think that’s the best way. There’s nothing like watching a guy do it. And this is one of the few times I won’t have to perform. I’m not gonna jump around. I’m gonna sit there and actually look at my guitar, and I can stand near my amp, which is cool! So that way, you can watch what I do. And if you see something weird, you can ask me about it and I’ll explain it in an honest way. </p> <p><strong>GOVAN</strong> That approach gets my vote as well. The people who are attending will get a more personal experience. We can listen to them and bounce back on whatever they turn out to be looking for…rather than turning up with a prescribed list of what we think they need to know. It’s better to be flexible. </p> <p><strong>ABASI</strong> I go with that too. It allows for an organic process that keeps unfolding, as opposed to predetermining which way it’s gonna go. And I think what Joe said about just watching is huge. There’s a cognitive level of understanding you get from watching people who have been playing guitar professionally for decades and have gotten to this high level of artistry. If you were to verbalize it, it wouldn’t be the same. To watch a guy like Guthrie, it’s not the same as watching a two-dimensional video screen. I can actually get close enough to see and hear how hard he’s picking! I think that level of instruction is invaluable.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wUoi8jg1Z_w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>In Carlos Santana’s autobiography, <em>The Universal Tone</em>, he talks about how players he admired in Mexico when he was coming up never showed him anything, “They showed me their back,” he says, and that this a tradition he and others still really respect. “I have my chops, go find yours.” So the question becomes, does a learning situation like a clinic compromise a player’s originality? Is there any value in finding your own chops? </strong></p> <p><strong>GOVAN</strong> I think that was more showmanship than anything else. You can create a mystique for yourself by pretending that a lick you do is so special that you have to hide it from people. Now more than ever people are going to figure out what you’re doing, whether you’re going to share it with them or not. </p> <p><strong>SATRIANI</strong> When I was growing up you had to find somebody to show you how to play the way you wanted to play. There weren’t instructional videocassettes, let alone YouTube. But yeah, that’s a funny attitude, “I have my chops, go find yours.” I never understood that. That’s not the reality of the modern world. I don’t think people even worry about that. </p> <p><strong>ABASI</strong> I agree, it does seem a little fear based. I think inspiration is what drove all of us to pick up a guitar. And inspiration comes from other guitarists, usually. There’s a fine line between emulation and originality. I might try real hard to emulate something and fail, but all of a sudden I’ve got something that’s my own version of it. There are so many ways to approach it.</p> <p><strong>Okay, so now the question becomes, what has the viral availability of information on technique and things like that done for the art of guitar playing?</strong></p> <p><strong>SATRIANI</strong> It’s definitely elevated it to an incredible level, and here’s the proof right here. Look at these guys! When I started playing, most people played the same, I would say. Six strings. Fenders and Gibsons. Really. There weren’t that many artists. How many pedals were there? Some of the music may have been complicated, but the tools weren’t so great. So people weren’t trying to do much with the guitar. But now the art of guitar playing has been elevated to an incredible level. Look at Tosin and Guthrie here—or someone like Charlie Hunter—and you think, Oh my God, what happened? The future is here. And all that other music is still available too. You can go on YouTube and see a 14-year-old kid who sounds like one of the blues artists from back then.</p> <p><strong>ABASI</strong> The prevalence of all this information has brought a real cool evolution in guitar playing, but it also creates a sense of overload. Like for me, I would get one instructional video, devour it and then I’d have to go to the music store physically, pick out another and take that home. Now it’s like you can Google “melodic minor” and it’s this tremendous rabbit hole that, for me personally, can get a little overwhelming. The information is so accessible and so vast. But that’s why things like this camp are so important. Yes, all this information is now available, but what you’re going to get from us is more of a specialized, individual actual representation of all this information. How we express ourselves on the guitar. And I think that will help channel out all the distractions that can come from all the information out there. </p> <p><em>This is an excerpt from the April 2015 issue of Guitar World. For the complete interview, plus new-album previews from Joe Satriani, Guthrie Govan, Dream Theater, Megadeth, Warren Haynes and more, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-april-15-abasi-satriani-govan?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=G4Excerpt">check out the April issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <p><em>Photo: Justin Borucki</em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-02-24%20at%2011.11.01%20AM_0.png" width="620" height="806" alt="Screen Shot 2015-02-24 at 11.11.01 AM_0.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-tosin-abasi-and-guthrie-govan-join-forces-2015-g4-experience-video#comments April 2015 Guthrie Govan Joe Satriani Tosin Abasi Videos Interviews News Features Magazine Tue, 24 Mar 2015 10:39:23 +0000 Alan Di Perna 23779 at http://www.guitarworld.com Joe Satriani, Steve Vai and Animals As Leaders Announce "Benefit for Cliff III" Concert in Los Angeles http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-steve-vai-and-animals-leaders-announce-benefit-cliff-iii-concert-los-angeles <!--paging_filter--><p>Joe Satriani and Steve Vai have announced a benefit concert in support of their good friend, music-industry veteran <a href="http://www.allmusic.com/artist/cliff-cultreri-mn0002289593/credits">Cliff Cultreri.</a></p> <p>The show, “A Benefit for Cliff III,” will take place 8 p.m. June 12 at the <a href="http://www.wiltern.com/">Wiltern Theatre in Los Angeles</a>. It will feature performances by Satriani, Vai and Animals As Leaders.</p> <p>Satriani and Vai have hosted benefit shows for Cultreri in 2006 and 2011. </p> <p>Both guitarists, along with several other artists, have donated items to be auctioned at the event. These include autographed guitars and a chance to join Satriani’s <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-tosin-abasi-and-guthrie-govan-join-forces-2015-g4-experience-video">G4 Experience,</a> which takes place June 28 to July 2 in Cambria, California (and features Guthrie Govan and Animals As Leaders' Tosin Abasi), and a package to attend Vai’s camp, <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/steve-vai-announces-vai-academy-2015-all-about-guitar">Vai Academy 2015: All About the Guitar,</a> in Vail, Colorado, August 2 to 6 (which also features Eric Johnson and Sonny Landreth).</p> <p>"I'm looking forward to sharing the stage with my good friends Steve Vai and Animals as Leaders for a night of unforgettable music,” Satriani said. </p> <p>Vai added, “It’s a great privilege to take to the stage with my friends Joe and Tosin [Abasi] in support of our dear buddy Cliff. It’s a great cause and will be a magical evening of guitar extravaganza."</p> <p>Cultreri is the A&amp;R executive who "discovered" Satriani, Vai and many other artists while working at Relativity Records and Koch Entertainment. Cultreri is suffering from a host of auto-immune and connective-tissue disorders that are simultaneously attacking his immune system, a 1-in-100 million occurrence that causes severe pain and physical debilitations. </p> <p>He served as A&amp;R for Allan Holdsworth, Billy Sheehan and Talas, Peter Frampton, Megadeth, Corrosion Of Conformity, Exodus, Anthrax, Death, Venom, Slash's Snakepit, My Bloody Valentine, the Cure, Modern English, Gene Loves Jezebel, Fat Joe, Common, Bone-Thugs-N-Harmony, 3-6 Mafia, KRS1, Beatnuts, C Murder, Kurupt, Soulja Slim, RZA and many more.</p> <p><strong>Reserved tickets start at $45 and are on sale starting Friday, March 27, through <a href="http://www.ticketmaster.com/">ticketmaster.com.</a> A limited number of VIP packages, including a meet-and-greet with Satriani and Vai, also are available. Doors open at 7 p.m.; showtime is 8 p.m.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6SyaEp4_yqs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/steve-vai">Steve Vai</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-steve-vai-and-animals-leaders-announce-benefit-cliff-iii-concert-los-angeles#comments Joe Satriani Steve Vai News Tue, 24 Mar 2015 10:34:56 +0000 Guitar World Staff 23782 at http://www.guitarworld.com Need for Speed: The 50 Fastest Guitarists of All Time http://www.guitarworld.com/50-fastest-guitarists-all-time <!--paging_filter--><p>From Les Paul to Paul Gilbert, Johnny Winter to Johnny Hiland, and Paco De Lucia to Al Di Meola, fleet-fingered guitarists have made their mark in every genre throughout the modern history of the guitar. </p> <p><em>Guitar World</em> exceeds the legal limit with this roundup—in alphabetical order—of the 50 fastest masters of the fretboard.</p> <p><strong>Trey Azagthoth</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Summoning Redemption”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Gateways to Annihilation</em> (MORBID ANGEL)</p> <p>When a guitarist cites Jimi Hendrix, Eddie Van Halen and Mozart as influences, you could probably bet your life savings he’s a shredder.</p> <p>But guitarist Trey Azagthoth is not the typical fret burner, preferring the brute force and bludgeoning energy of death metal over the more rarified air of instrumental rock. </p> <p>Azagthoth’s rough and raw solos sound completely spontaneous, eschewing the technical precision of a prewritten solo for sheer emotion that comes directly from the gut.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/IKmo4mX5QBQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Mick Barr</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Part 1”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Annwn</em> (OCRILIM) <p>He may look like some geek from a Tolkien fest who has an unhealthy obsession with Gollum, but precious few players can match Mick Barr’s intensity and speed, which has reportedly been clocked at up to 24 notes per second. </p> <p>The music that Barr records under the pseudonyms Octis, Ocrilim, Or:12r3 and Orthrelm is challenging, to say the least, for its avant-garde atonal melodies. But although it may sound like noodling to the untrained ear, Barr’s bizarre scales and lack of repetition prove that he’s working on another level altogether. </p> <p>It’s rock, Jim, but not as we know it.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/v44VxSnwG8k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Michael Angelo Batio</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Full Force”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Lucid Intervals and Moments of Clarity</em> <p>Michael Angelo Batio encompasses everything a shred guitar hero should be. </p> <p>Renaissance-inspired name? Check. Insanely fast, overthe- top (literally) ambidextrous technique? Check. Wacky, unconventional dual- and quad-neck instruments? Check and check.</p> <p>Casual music fans may consider Batio little more than an oddity or cult figure (allmusic.com didn’t even bother writing a bio for him or rating any of his seven albums), but real guitar fans know and appreciate him as the shred god he truly is. As generous as he is gifted, Batio has revealed the secrets of his incredible technique to players like Tom Morello and Mark Tremonti as well as to readers of his old <em>Guitar World</em> columns. </p> <p>Even with his help, we still can’t figure out how he plays so friggin’ fast.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/RyeZxX-tEMw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Jason Becker</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Seranna”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Perspective</em> <p>A titan of neoclassical shredding, Jason Becker’s astounding arpeggios made him a youthful champion of the Shrapnel Records stable in the late Eighties. </p> <p>He went on to play with David Lee Roth but was stricken with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s Disease) while working on Roth’s 1991 album, <em>A Little Ain’t Enough</em>. The condition has left him almost completely paralyzed and unable to speak, but he continues to compose music via a computer program that can track the movements of his eyes and head. </p> <p>His courage, determination and continued creativity in the face of extreme difficulty are every bit as inspiring as the dazzling virtuosity of his youthful guitar work.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/87Iz3RHZNDQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Jimmy Bryant</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “China Boy”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Swingin’ on the Strings</em> (JIMMY BRYANT &amp; SPEEDY WEST) <p>Jazz legend Barney Kessel once called Jimmy Bryant “the fastest and the cleanest guitar player I have known.” </p> <p>Listening to Bryant’s timeless instrumental duos with pedal steel guitarist Speedy West, one instantly realizes that Kessel wasn’t complimenting Bryant’s punctuality and hygiene. </p> <p>Bryant played a wild fusion of country and jazz equally influenced by Django Reinhardt’s gypsy jazz and Bob Wills’ Texas Playboys western swing, and he became an important figure on the West Coast studio scene, accompanying country artists like Tennessee Ernie Ford and Tex Williams as well as pop artists like Bing Crosby and Spike Jones. </p> <p>Bryant’s work with Speedy West recorded in the Fifties showcases his talents at their unrestrained peak.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/XuUWM9r7Irc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Buckethead</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Nottingham Lace”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Enter the Chicken</em> <p>He may wear a KFC bucket on his noggin, but that ain’t no chicken pickin’ emanating from Buckethead’s amps. </p> <p>The guitarist known to his parents as Brian Carroll is one of the most eccentric players to ever master the six-string, one whose playing can shift in a 32nd-note triplet from downright weird computer meltdown noises to hauntingly beautiful arpeggios. </p> <p>While he’s become known to the general public through his soundtrack work on major films like <em>Saw II</em> and his collaborations with Guns N’ Roses and actor Viggo Mortensen, Bucket’s three dozen or so solo albums remain the best source for experiencing his mad genius.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/vYxrdrzmuUw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Dimebag Darrell</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Cowboys from Hell”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Cowboys from Hell</em> (PANTERA) <p>Dimebag grabbed the baton from players like Eddie Van Halen and Randy Rhoads and proceeded to shove it up the ass of pretentious neoclassical guitarists with his incredibly heavy, unapologetically raw pentatonic shredding. </p> <p>The solos Dimebag recorded with Pantera and Damageplan are impressive, but his true talents exploded on the concert stage, where he could let loose with wild abandon, inspired by hell-raising crowds and shirt-raising hotties. </p> <p>While most thrash bands did away with solos during the Nineties, Dimebag kept the shred flag flying like the stars and bars over the South Carolina State House.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/2DfYLar2QGI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Paco de Lucia</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Rio Ancho”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Almoraima</em> <p>Born into a family of Spanish flamenco performers, the late Paco de Lucia came to the international guitar arena with a background rich in colorful history, artistic passion and centuries of mesmerizing guitar technique. </p> <p>A traditional flamenco performer from the mid Sixties to the late Seventies, he crossed over to fusion, jazz and world music audiences via virtuoso collaborations with Al Di Meola, John McLaughlin and Larry Coryell. </p> <p>What De Lucia brought to the party was the rhythmic fire of flamenco, a stunning five-finger picking style and a dizzying repertoire of rasgueados, picados and other flamenco techniques. His forays into jazz, classical and other genres have also enriched his expressiveness within the flamenco idiom. </p> <p>In any genre, Paco de Lucia made those nylon strings burn like molten lava.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/jxodluTaz4g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Al Di Meola</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG “Race with Devil on Spanish Highway”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Elegant Gypsy</em> <p>A blizzard of dotted 32nd notes in the shape of an Italian-American guy from New Jersey, Al Di Meola was one of the premier guitar architects of the jazz rock fusion genre that started in the Seventies. He’s responsible for bringing the rich guitar heritage of Spain and Latin America into the fusion arena. </p> <p>His lightning-fast left hand is complemented by distinctive right-hand palmmuting techniques that some Seventies wags were fond of describing as “that rubberband sound.” </p> <p>Di Meola’s work with Chick Corea’s Return to Forever, his solo efforts and collaborations with fellow guitar legends John McLaughlin and Paco de Lucia have considerably raised the standard of excellence for both acoustic and electric guitar performance.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vGWfDkx4zyY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Marty Friedman</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Hangar 18”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Rust in Peace</em> (MEGADETH) <p>Marty Friedman played dueling neoclassical leads with Jason Becker in Cacophony before going on to make thrash metal history as the lead guitarist for Megadeth on their classic albums <em>Rust in Peace, Countdown to Extinction, Youthanasia</em> and <em>Risk</em>. </p> <p>His shredded arpeggios, hyperactive sweep picking and winning way with exotic scales have stood him in good stead, both in his Megadeth work and his current incarnation as an American expatriate who is definitely big in Japan.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/B-oU2xlViRQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Cliff Gallup</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Race with the Devil”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Capitol Collectors Series</em> (GENE VINCENT) <p>Cliff Gallup recorded only 35 songs as a member of Gene Vincent’s Blue Caps before he quit the band to focus on life as a family man, but that was enough to leave an indelible impression on players like Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page. </p> <p>With a jazzy style that fused the influence of Chet Atkins and Les Paul, Gallup developed a sophisticated sound that made most blues-influenced rock and rollers sound downright primitive in comparison. </p> <p>Gallup’s cascading triplets and chromatic lines still inspire the same awe as when listeners first heard his solos more than 50 years ago. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/RmXmYlSIGs0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Frank Gambale</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “6 .8 Shaker”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Passages</em> <p>In the Eighties Gambale proved that sweep picking wasn’t just for neoclassical rockers, using the technique to great effect on his progressive jazz fusion solo recordings and performances with jazz violinist Jean-Luc Ponty and keyboardist Chick Corea. </p> <p>A graduate of GIT, Gambale returned there to teach for four years, sharing the secrets of his speed-picking technique with students. </p> <p>His unique approach to sweep picking along with his aggressive tone has helped him gain an audience beyond jazz fusion fans. Gambale remains an innovator, having recently developed an alternate tuning he calls “Gambale tuning,” which he says gives him greater liberty to voice any chord, including closevoiced chords.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/TAMEQ3N2pLw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Synyster Gates</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Eternal Rest”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Waking the Fallen</em> (AVENGED SEVENFOLD) <p>It’s easy for critics to dismiss Avenged Sevenfold because they look like a bunch of emo-punk kids who raided Axl Rose’s wardrobe, but no other band has done as much to introduce Generation Y to the shock and awe of a brilliant guitar solo. </p> <p>Justin Timberlake may be bringing sexy back, but Synyster Gates brought almighty shred to the forefront with his numerous extended no-holds-barred solos on A7X’s albums. </p> <p>A GIT graduate, Gates is a surprisingly versatile guitarist influenced by players ranging from Django to Dimebag.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-P4HCkngfiM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Danny Gatton</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Elmira Street Boogie”<br /> ALBUM: <em>88 Elmira Street</em> <p>It was always a treat to watch the late Danny Gatton’s stubby fingers dance like fire on the maple fretboard of his battered Telecaster. </p> <p>The “Telemaster” fused country, blues, rockabilly and jazz into a blue-collar virtuoso style that the man himself once called “Redneck Jazz.” </p> <p>His unique combination-picking technique (plectrum plus fingerstyle) propelled chicken-pickin’ riffs, muscular jazz chords, blue notes and open-string banjo runs, all of which he made dance gracefully side by side. Gatton took his own life in 1994, opting out of a world where instrumental prowess is no guarantee of commercial success. </p> <p>His legend and legacy live on.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/MoeNOuaKBhQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Paul Gilbert</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Scarified”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Second Heat</em> (RACER X) <p>Paul Gilbert has always been a reluctant guitar hero. He’s humble, good humored, polite and obliging, but when he straps on that guitar, he becomes the biggest, baddest monster in the entire shred forest. </p> <p>Gilbert’s Eighties work with Racer X and Mr. Big paved the way for a varied and compelling solo career. </p> <p>His fleet and flawless fretwork has always been tempered by highly developed harmonic sensibilities born of his abiding love for pop music.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/k8ZcPpnAHYY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Maestro Alex Gregory</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Heavy Metal Mandolin Boogie”<br /> ALBUM: <em>12 Jokes for Heavy Metal Mandolin</em> <p>Maestro Alex Gregory probably earned more enemies than fans in his time. </p> <p>He sued Ibanez over the seven-string guitar (he patented and developed a seven-string Strat with Fender in 1987, three years before the Ibanez Universe hit the market), took the title of “Maestro” (allegedly bestowed upon him by Queen Elizabeth in 1983) and released an album depicting himself pissing on the graves of Yngwie Malmsteen and Steve Vai. </p> <p>Even so, he’s earned the respect of many heavy friends, including drummer Matt Bissonette, bass player Dave LaRue and guitarist Albert Lee, all of whom have participated in musical projects with the Maestro. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/l2jW5vHTwl4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Johnny Hiland</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Orange Blossom Special”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Johnny Hiland</em> <p>Ten years after the untimely death of Danny Gatton, Johnny Hiland emerged with an album released by Steve Vai’s Favored Nations label chock full of impressive country/rockabilly/blues/jazz/rock performances that rivaled those of the Telemaster himself. </p> <p>Hiland has since broken into the extremely competitive Nashville studio scene, playing on sessions for high profile A-list artists like Toby Keith, Ricky Skaggs and Randy Travis. </p> <p>Like Gatton, Hiland’s playing is as tasteful as it is flashy, displaying an uncanny knack for melody even as he burns up the fretboard at light speed.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/RUKXoUfDBmQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Allan Holdsworth</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Fred”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Believe It</em> (TONY WILLIAMS LIFETIME) <p>Allan Holdsworth developed a cult following of jazz fusion and progressive rock fans for his work with Tony Williams Lifetime and Bill Bruford’s side project U.K., but his name became a household word in the guitar community in the early Eighties when Eddie Van Halen cited him as one of his main influences. </p> <p>Holdsworth’s flowing legato lines are inspired by the sound of the saxophone and violin, and in his quest for the perfect tone he’s experimented frequently with guitar synthesis systems like the SynthAxe. </p> <p>The blinding speed of Holdsworth’s left hand is truly mind boggling, but even more impressive is his ability to perfectly improvise over incredibly complex and unorthodox chord changes.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/G1-b7r9Dpa8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Chris Impellitteri</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “17th Century Chicken Pickin’ ”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Screaming Symphony</em> <p>It’s easy to dismiss Chris Impellitteri as another in a long line of Yngwie clones, especially since he plays neoclassical metal on a Stratocaster with a scalloped fretboard and he hired former Alcatrazz singer Graham Bonnet to front his band. </p> <p>But anyone who looks past Impellitteri’s hyperspeed sweeppicked harmonic minor scales will notice incendiary chromatic lines rivaling the precision and intensity of Steve Morse and bluesy phrasing that gives his playing distinct character. </p> <p>Impellitteri enjoys an impressive devoted following in Japan, where he still appears on the cover of guitar magazines.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/MLZj681UBLI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>John 5</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “The Washing Away of Wrong”<br /> ALBUM: <em>The Devil Knows My Name</em> <p>It takes a sick and twisted mind to be able to play guitar with Marilyn Manson, David Lee Roth and country singer k.d. lang. </p> <p>But John 5 has exhibited more than enough warped imagination and dazzling dexterity to shine in all these wildly diverse musical settings.</p> <p>Whether it’s a barn dance or a ritual virgin sacrifice to the Lord of Darkness, count on Mr. 5 to turn up with all the right licks, and the clothes to match.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/OhnUtEGg58k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>The Great Kat</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “The Flight of the Bumble Bee”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Beethoven on Speed</em> <p>It’s hard to know whether the Great Kat’s thrash metal interpretations of classical music compositions are meant to be taken seriously—especially when her albums have titles like <em>Beethoven on Speed, Bloody Vivaldi</em> and <em>Rossini’s Rape</em>—but when this Juilliard-trained virtuoso plays it’s certainly no joke. </p> <p>With a heavy leather dominatrix persona so over the top that she makes Yngwie Malmsteen seem like Tony Randall, the Great Kat would make a fine role model for young ladies who want to shred if she didn’t scare the living shit out of them.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/kSZigGuw3F8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Richie Kotzen</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “You Can’t Save Me”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Into the Black</em> <p>Richie Kotzen made his debut at the tender age of 19, quickly establishing himself as one of the fastest young guns in the whole Shrapnel Records corral. </p> <p>From the start, his style has been admirably fluid, incorporating techniques like tapping and sweeping to create extended legato passages of daunting complexity. </p> <p>Kotzen has lent these skills to Poison and Mr. Big. In recent years, he’s emerged as an all-around classic rock talent, adding a soulful Paul Rodgers/Rod Stewart/Steve Marriott–influenced vocal style to his considerable resources as the Winery Dogs' guitarist.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/DAW-C9XV894" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Alexi Laiho</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Needled 24/7”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Hate Crew Deathroll</em> (CHILDREN OF BODOM) <p>An incredibly prolific guitarist who is the member of several bands—Children of Bodom, Sinergy and Kylähullut—as well as a frequent guest performer with bands like Annihilator, Godsplague and Pain, Alexi Laiho has probably recorded more notes than Bach ever wrote down on paper over his entire lifetime. </p> <p>Laiho has mastered the same sweep, tapping and precision picking techniques and neoclassical scales that placed his Scandinavian predecessors on the map, but unlike his cohorts he’s never shown any ambition to record a guitar concerto or metal opera.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/hjZXUyvFQDA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Shawn Lane</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Savitri”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Good People in Times of Evil</em> (HELLBORG, LANE AND SELVAGANESH) <p>Many guitarists pursue speed for its sheer ability to impress others. </p> <p>For Shawn Lane, it was merely one of numerous avenues of expression that he discovered on a strange and twisted path to musical enlightenment that started when he joined southern rockers Black Oak Arkansas at 14 and culminated in his mastery of Indian music in the years before he passed away at age 40. </p> <p>Few, if any, guitarists can play faster than Lane could, and his arpeggio sweeps and precision-picked lines blasted more rapid-fire notes than the average human mind could comprehend, blending into a hypnotic blur that leaves listeners feeling intoxicated and disoriented.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Ax02a5q-hNE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Albert Lee</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Country Boy”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Heads, Hands and Feet</em> <p>One of the all-time greatest country guitar pickers comes not from America’s sunny deep South but from rainy, gray England. </p> <p>Albert Lee developed his own greased-lightning combinationpicking technique (plectrum plus third, fourth and fifth fingers) and a masterful command of country licks, open-string runs, B-bender gymnastics and all things that go twang in the night. </p> <p>He can unleash cascades of crystalline notes that fall on the ear like a gentle country rain and execute tear-jerking string bends that slither and slide like a moonshiner’s wagon down an icy stretch of road. Lee has played with everyone from Emmy Lou Harris to Eric Clapton to the Everly Brothers. Now 70-ish, he shows no sign of slowing down.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/kGU63KqXuZk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Alvin Lee</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “I’m Going Home”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Woodstock</em> <p>Circa 1969, Alvin Lee was the fastest gun in all of guitardom. </p> <p>He wowed Woodstock with 11 minutes of fretboard frenzy called “I’m Going Home” and was duly rewarded with a large watermelon—presumably an organic hippie tribute to the unmitigated ballsiness of Lee’s playing. </p> <p>Lee and his band, Ten Years After, were among the cream of the mid-Sixties British blues boom—contemporaries and, some would say, co-equals of groups that featured Clapton, Beck and Page. </p> <p>More than just 10 itchy-fast fingers, the late Lee always balanced his six-string mastery with a strong singing voice, charismatic center stage presence and solid songwriting skills, making him not just another speed demon but an all-around classic rock contender.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bW5M5xljdCI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Jeff Loomis</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Born”<br /> ALBUM: <em>This Godless Endeavor</em> (NEVERMORE) <p>Leave it to Dave Mustaine to light a fire under a guitarist’s ass. </p> <p>When Jeff Loomis auditioned for Megadeth at the tender young age of 16, Mustaine told him that he’d become a great guitarist one day but he was too inexperienced for Megadeth. Instead of giving up, Loomis persevered, and six years later he formed the band Nevermore with two ex-members of Sanctuary, with whom he had briefly played as well. </p> <p>Loomis’ trick bag is deep and diverse, including sweep arpeggios, atonal tapping, whammy pedal effects and tremolo picking, and his solos are like mini compositions within the songs. </p> <p>He may never find a spot in Megadeth’s ever-rotating second guitar spot, but he’s already established himself as a worthy player.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/impRqn44OCA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Yngwie Malmsteen</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: "Far Beyond the Sun"<br /> ALBUM: <em>Rising Force</em> <p>When Yngwie Malmsteen released his debut solo album, <em>Rising Force</em>, in 1984, he unleashed the fookin' fury of guitarists, who were already having enough trouble keeping up with Eddie Van Halen. </p> <p>Malmsteen's all-encompassing mastery of speed techniques like sweep-picked arpeggios, tremolo picking, legato, string skipping, tapping and more inspired guitarists to either woodshed or use their guitars as firewood. </p> <p>Although countless imitators have challenged Yngwie's speed-king crown, none can match the impeccable precision with which he plays each note and how he makes absolutely every one count from a melodic perspective. </p> <p>Even more frustrating is how easy he makes everything look when he plays onstage, performing kung-fu kicks and acrobatically flinging his guitar without ever missing a note. Bastard.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/eK0rvReE-4c" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Guy Mann-Dude</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Legend of the Loch Ness”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Sleight of Hand</em> <p>Mann-Dude was the ultimate big-hair Hollywood Eighties shredder, but unlike the bulk of preening poodle boys who clogged the classrooms at GIT, he always seemed to have his tongue planted firmly in his cheeks (instead of sucking them in to highlight his cheekbones). </p> <p>Mann-Dude certainly had the pedigree to prove he wasn’t just a joke. </p> <p>He had previously played drums on a post-Zappa Steve Vai project and was one of only a handful of guitarists who released instrumental shred albums on a major record label (MCA). Ever since stonewashed jeans and K-Swiss high-tops went out of style, Mann-Dude has been missing in action. Dude!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/khvyicV4KS8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Larry Collins and Joe Maphis</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Flying Fingers”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Flying Fingers</em> (JOE MAPHIS) <p>The modern-day shred guitar duos of Dragonforce, Trivium and Avenged Sevenfold have nothing on the furious pace and precision of the performances by Larry Collins and Joe Maphis in the Fifties. </p> <p>Even more impressive is the fact that Collins was only 10 years old at the time, yet he could keep pace with virtuosos like Maphis and Merle Travis without missing a note. </p> <p>Check out the videos of “Flying Fingers” and “Wildwood Flower” from vintage broadcasts of the program <em>Ranch Party</em> to witness some of the craziest playing you’ll ever witness, including Maphis and Collins attacking a single double-neck Mosrite at the same time.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/AXarnqkkpPk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>John McLaughlin</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: "Birds of Fire"<br /> ALBUM: <em>Mahavishnu Orchestra</em> <p>Mahavishnu Orchestra guitarist John McLaughlin was the first guitarist to play jazz riffs with all the fierce intensity and brute volume of rock guitar. </p> <p>The world has never been the same since. McLaughlin's Seventies recordings with Mahavishnu pioneered the jazz fusion genre and rocketed electric guitar instrumental music into the Hot 100. His later acoustic work with Shakti was equally influential in forging the world fusion genre. </p> <p>The clarity, precision, profound conviction and blinding speed of McLaughlin's guitar work has always reflected the emotional depth of his lifelong spiritual devotion and the arduous discipline involved in serious spiritual practice. His dense note clusters propel us toward realms of bliss far beyond this mundane existence.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/gv_bkS5VVaA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Vinnie Moore</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Lifeforce”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Mind’s Eye</em> <p>Vinnie Moore was one of the first contenders to challenge Yngwie Malmsteen for the speed-king throne, releasing the stunning solo effort <em>Mind’s Eye</em> on the Shrapnel label in 1986. </p> <p>While Moore sold respectable amounts of his solo albums, he never reached much of an audience beyond aspiring shred guitarists, who eagerly purchased Moore’s instructional videos in which he revealed the secrets behind his immaculate technique. </p> <p>Moore persevered as a solo artist through the Nineties, but in 2003 he took over the lead guitarist spot in UFO vacated by Michael Schenker.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/a8EC_bwC6Xc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Steve Morse</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: "Cruise Control"<br /> ALBUM: <em>Free Fall</em> (DIXIE DREGS) <p>People laughed back in the Seventies when Steve Morse first sought to combine fusion and Southern boogie with his band, the Dixie Dregs. </p> <p>Fans of the two respective genres here hardly on speaking terms back then, but the last laugh belongs to Morse, who is still going strong today. </p> <p>He has plied his lightning licks and tenacious technique in the service of numerous genres and bands, including latter-day lineups of Deep Purple and Kansas.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/wqjK-0A2yFM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Jimmy Olander</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG “The Ballad of Conley and Billy (The Proof is in the Pickin’)”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Diamond Rio</em> <p>Originally a banjo player, Jimmy Olander quickly shifted his attention to guitar when he realized he’d get more gigs, adapting his advanced five-string banjo playing techniques for the six-string guitar. </p> <p>In addition to mastering rapid flatpicked bluegrass lines and chicken pickin’ Tele twang, Olander performs amazing pedal steel imitations using a guitar equipped with Joe Glaser string-bending devices on the G and B strings. </p> <p>Although Diamond Rio’s radio-ready tunes rarely give him enough room to truly let rip, when the spotlight shines on him he never fails to impress with his taste and technique.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/hT8jKRPJdtw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Cary and Larry Parks</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “You Really Got Me”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Welcome to Howdywood</em> (BOY HOWDY) <p>Even the most diehard country music fan has probably forgotten the band Boy Howdy, which is best known for the hit ballad “She’d Give Everything,” but the sibling dual-guitar team of Cary and Larry Parks recorded several impressive dueling-guitar solos that deserved a much bigger audience. </p> <p>The sons of bluegrass fiddler Ray Parks, Cary and Larry grew up in the crossfire of Los Angeles’ country rock scene and the more traditional sounds they heard at home. </p> <p>As a result, their unique playing styles blend the chickenpickin’ twang of the Bakersfield sound, the clean cross picking of Kentucky bluegrass and the rowdy attitude of Hollywood rock, best heard on their blazing countrified cover of the Kinks’ “You Really Got Me,” which comes across like Van Halen and Bill Monroe jamming at a Buck Owens concert. </p> <p><strong>SORRY: NO VIDEO AVAILABLE!</strong></p> <hr /> <strong>John Petrucci</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: "Pull Me Under"<br /> ALBUM: <em>Images and Words</em> (DREAM THEATER) <p>There are those who swear that prog-metal pioneer John Petrucci has a few extra fingers on both hands that he craftily keeps hidden during photo shoots. </p> <p>How else can one explain the man's ability to make six- and seven-string electric guitars generate quantum-shifted note clusters exceeding the speed oflight? </p> <p>Maybe it's the six daily hours of practice he put in during his formative years, and his rigorous studies at Berklee, where he mastered the intricacies of sweep and alternate picking. Petrucci's guitar work with Dream Theater, Liquid Tension Experiment and as a solo artist exemplify the present-day ideal of extreme guitar discipline.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/mipc-JxrhRk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Les Paul</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Lover (When You’re Near Me)”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Best of Capitol Masters</em> <p>The Wizard of Waukesha’s technological contributions to the electric guitar and multitrack recording are so great that people sometimes overlook his accomplishments as a guitarist. </p> <p>His recordings with the Les Paul Trio in the Thirties and Forties helped establish the jazz guitar lexicon, but he was equally handy with a cornball melody for a Top 40 pop hit. </p> <p>A formidable fretsman and crafty stylist, his highly active brain always seemed to be a little bit ahead of the next chord change, and his nimble fingers knew how to follow. Les’ “New Sound” recordings of the late Forties and early Fifties were the perfect merger of technique and technology.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/c8jEkQ7FB8g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Django Reinhardt</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “After You’ve Gone”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Djangology</em> <p>A dapper Belgian gypsy with a pencil thin mustache and a miraculously nimble left hand, Django set the Twenties and Thirties alight via incendiary guitar performances with the legendary Hot Club of France Quintet and other jazz ensembles. </p> <p>It was a time when the very notion of the guitar solo was just being invented, and Django set a pace that guitarists today are still struggling to match. </p> <p>The astounding thing is that he did all this with just the index and middle fingers of his left hand—his third finger and pinkie had been seriously maimed in a caravan fire. Yet Django did it all: lightning-fast diminished scale runs, frisky double-stop passages and the most lyrical finger vibrato in all of guitardom. </p> <p>There’s a plaintive undertone in even the most jaunty Django passages, and likewise a playful wink lurking just behind his most heartbreakingly romantic playing. </p> <p>Django remains the original and ultimate gypsy king.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/BTH_Nn_TtDI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Randy Rhoads</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Crazy Train”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Blizzard of Ozz</em> (OZZY OSBOURNE) <p>Metal’s martyred boy-child, Randy Rhoads embraced the tapping, divebombing innovations of Edward Van Halen and brought these techniques to a new plateau in the early Eighties. </p> <p>He came out of Quiet Riot and the Hollywood hair-band scene to find fame with Ozzy Osbourne, but his life was cut tragically short before he had time to realize his full potential. </p> <p>During his brief yet stellar career, he played with the blazing intensity of a man who somehow knew he only had a few short years to share his gift with the world.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZcoweoZ6jpM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Uli Jon Roth</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Sails of Charon”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Taken By Force</em> (SCORPIONS) <p>Although Ritchie Blackmore gets most of the credit as a guiding light of the Eighties shred phenomenon, Uli Jon Roth established the blueprint for neoclassical metal through his highly sophisticated guitar playing with the Scorpions and with his own band, Electric Sun. </p> <p>Roth undoubtedly has the playing and compositional skills to dominate as a shred guitar hero, but he pursued loftier goals in the Eighties and Nineties by devoting his ambitions to performing and composing classical music instead. </p> <p>In 2003, Roth recorded an interpretation of Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons,” and since 2005, he has frequently made surprise guest appearances with the Scorpions and Smashing Pumpkins.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/0jCd9vg3BDw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Joe Satriani</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Satch Boogie”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Surfing with the Alien</em> <p>Shred was born in 1987 on the day Joe Satriani released <em>Surfing with the Alien</em>. </p> <p>Satch took all the rock guitar virtuosity that had gone before—Hendrix, Van Halen, Randy Rhoads, etc.—and brought it all a giant step further, adding a few new tricks to the lexicon of hot guitar moves and upping the land speed record for notes-per-nanosecond. </p> <p>But where earlier ax heroes employed techniques like tapping and dive bombing to dazzle and astound, Satriani’s mastery lies in his ability to subsume daunting technical maneuvers into beguiling, seemingly effortless melodic statements that appeal to guitar geeks and the general public alike. </p> <p>His secret? Satch is one guitar virtuoso who never lost touch with his rock and roll heart.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/mlkbT4GDYAQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Chuck Schuldiner</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Pull the Plug”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Leprosy</em> (DEATH) <p>Chuck Schuldiner passed away in 2001, but were he alive, he would almost certainly be amused by the new legion of metal guitarists inspired by him that emerged in his absence. </p> <p>During the rise of his band Death, Schuldiner’s outstanding solos—which featured playing as melodic and precise as that of anyone who put out a record on the Relativity or Shrapnel labels—were often overshadowed by Death’s jackhammer rhythms and dark lyrics. </p> <p>However, anyone taking a look back at his work would instantly realize that Schuldiner could tap as tastefully as Eddie Van Halen and rip up a fretboard as well as anyone else. Eleven other guitarists shared the spotlight with Schuldiner in Death, including James Murphy and Andy LaRocque, but none shined more brightly.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/dYYUR21_G9c" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Alex Skolnick</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Practice What You Preach”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Practice What You Preach</em> (TESTAMENT) <p>You simply have to admire Alex Skolnick’s dedication to the guitar. </p> <p>Right when Testament were ready to hit the big time, Skolnick bailed to pursue his love of jazz, preferring to make music in San Francisco clubs with players like bassist Michael Manring and eventually making his way to New York City to study jazz at the New School. </p> <p>Most players have trouble mastering one style of music, but Skolnick impresses whether he’s blasting out thrash metal solos with Testament (which he has since rejoined) or tearing up the fretboard with his jazz band, the Alex Skolnick Trio.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/AHOJVINZVR0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Timo Tolkki</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG; “Speed of Light”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Episode</em> (STRATOVARIUS) <p>Maybe the harsh Scandinavian winters are the reason why Europe’s northernmost countries boast the most neoclassical shredders per capita. </p> <p>Finland’s Timo Tolkki and his band Stratovarius released their first album in 1989, about the time that shred mania reached its peak, and fortunately for them they established a huge following in—where else—Japan by the time grunge took over in 1992. </p> <p>Like Malmsteen, Tolkki’s ambitions reach far beyond power metal into classical music, and his precision fretwork is inspired more by virtuoso violinists than other guitarists. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/pv1kirNU8n4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Herman Li &amp; Sam Totman</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Through the Fire and Flames”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Inhuman Rampage</em> (DRAGONFORCE) <p>When the first Dragonforce album came out in 2003, critics were convinced that Herman Li and Sam Totman’s outrageously fast guitar solos were the product of studio trickery. </p> <p>However, Li and Totman later proved that they were the real deal both onstage and under the scrutiny of skeptical editors right here at <em>Guitar World</em> headquarters. </p> <p>Individually, Li and Tottman boast jaw-dropping speed and precision, but when they lock horns in tightly synchronized harmonies they can make heads explode from sonic overload. Who needs amphetamines? Just put on a Dragonforce’s <em>Inhuman Rampage</em> to jumpstart your day.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/0jgrCKhxE1s" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Steve Vai</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “For the Love of God”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Passion and Warfare</em> <p>Steve Vai can do things with a sustainer and twang bar that surely ain’t natural and certainly indicate a high tantric mastery of all documented and undocumented alien love secrets. </p> <p>Discovered by Frank Zappa and fostered by David Lee Roth and Whitesnake, Vai emerged in the Nineties as a solo artist and guitar hero of major stature. </p> <p>His astounding technique defies categorization. In his graceful hands, the guitar becomes a cosmic antenna, channeling other dimensions and parallel universes. His best work combines the swagger of a lifelong rock and roller with the romantic soul of a poet. As if this weren’t enough, he’s also a first-rate composer and has great cheekbones.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/9IrWyZ0KZuk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Eddie Van Halen</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “Eruption”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Van Halen</em> <p>Though numerous players have surpassed Eddie Van Halen’s speed and precision, Ed deserves credit for developing and perfecting the techniques that have become essential elements of the shredder’s vocabulary ever since Van Halen’s debut in 1978. </p> <p>Eddie’s tapped triplets helped players with sloppy picking technique double and triple their speed, but his incredibly precise tremolo picking showed that you still needed excellent right- and left-hand coordination if you truly wanted to impress. </p> <p>Although players like Night Ranger’s Jeff Watson took tapping to ludicrous eight-finger extremes, no one ever sounds as good as Eddie when he’s in the groove.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/sI7XiJgt0vY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Ben Weinman</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG: “43% Burnt”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Calculating Infinity</em> (DILLINGER ESCAPE PLAN) <p>Who says that hardcore punks can’t shred? </p> <p>Dillinger Escape Plan guitarist Ben Weinman pioneered a style known as mathcore, which isn’t as nerdy as the name suggests but certainly requires an IQ above 100 to be fully appreciated for its unique blend of punk intensity, technical precision and the anomalous jazz melodicism. </p> <p>Still think punks can’t shred with the best of them? We dare you to try and figure out one of Weinman’s solos. </p> <p>Go ahead, tough guy.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/TbfZOfLaO3Q" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Johnny Winter</strong><br /> SIGNATURE SONG “Rock and Roll, Hoochie Koo”<br /> ALBUM: <em>Johnny Winter And</em> <p>Long before Stevie Ray, Johnny Winter was the original white-guy-from-Texas blues guitar demon. </p> <p>Critics have often remarked on the irony that a pale-skinned, crosseyed albino turned out to be one of the greatest interpreters of America’s seminal black musical idiom. </p> <p>Winter has the hardlivin’ outsider’s perspective that it takes to play the blues for real, but it’s matched with the rockera chops of a guy who came up alongside immortals like Eric Clapton and Mike Bloomfield. </p> <p>The best of Winter’s phenomenal playing is imbued with both fire and fluidity. Flurries of notes crawl all over the 12-bar grid at every conceivable angle, like a hoard of spiders fanning out in search of prey. In the whole vast river that is the blues, nothing quite possesses the eerie intensity of Winter’s best work.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BolsJnW-HHc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>HONORABLE MENTIONS</strong> </p> <p>Our list wouldn’t be complete without mentioning a few other speed demons, most notably Eighties neoclassical shredder Tony MacAlpine, Outworld guitarist and shred instructor Rusty Cooley, Gary Moore ("White Knuckles," anyone?), Extreme’s Nuno Bettencourt, Australia's Tommy Emmanuel and, of course, Zakk Wylde.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/steve-vai">Steve Vai</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/les-paul">Les Paul</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/paul-gilbert">Paul Gilbert</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/50-fastest-guitarists-all-time#comments Albert Lee Alvin Lee Diamond Rio GW Archive Joe Satriani Polls Steve Vai Guitar World Lists News Features Magazine Wed, 11 Mar 2015 16:40:13 +0000 Guitar World Staff 1791 at http://www.guitarworld.com Joe Satriani and Steve Vai Play "Satch Boogie" in 1988 — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-and-steve-vai-play-satch-boogie-1988-video <!--paging_filter--><p>We love when guitar greats get together to play songs with the word "Boogie" in the title.</p> <p>Like the time <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-jeff-beck-and-stevie-ray-vaughan-perform-jeffs-boogie-1984">Stevie Ray Vaughan and Jeff Beck met up in Hawaii to perform "Jeff's Boogie" in 1984.</a></p> <p>And then there's the time Steve Vai and Joe Satriani, Vai's former guitar instructor, shared a stage in 1988 to perform "Satch Boogie." You can check out this full live performance of Satriani's 1987 signature tune in the video below. </p> <p>As always, let us know what you think in the comments or on Facebook!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/1fWtnNVhPko" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/steve-vai">Steve Vai</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-and-steve-vai-play-satch-boogie-1988-video#comments Joe Satriani Steve Vai Videos News Thu, 05 Mar 2015 13:56:26 +0000 Damian Fanelli 22591 at http://www.guitarworld.com Ibanez JS25ART Guitars Offer a Chance to Own Original Joe Satriani Artwork — and Great Instruments http://www.guitarworld.com/ibanez-js25art-guitars-offer-chance-own-original-piece-joe-satriani-artwork-and-great-instrument <!--paging_filter--><p>For longtime Ibanez fan <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-april-15-abasi-satriani-govan?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=SatchArtGuitars">(and current Guitar World cover star)</a> Joe Satriani, sketching and drawing have always been as much of a creative outlet as his game-changing, guitar-driven rock music. </p> <p>These two different hemispheres of his artistry converge beautifully in Ibanez’s new, limited 25th anniversary edition of Joe’s iconic signature JS guitar, the JS25ART. The body of each guitar bears a full color illustration, hand drawn by Satriani himself. </p> <p>Each one is different and there are only 50 of them, 25 of which are slated for sale in the U.S. Offering a unique opportunity to be a guitar collector and art collector all in one, this very special JS edition commemorates the birth of Satriani’s Ibanez signature model 25 years ago. </p> <p>“Ibanez approached me and asked if I’d do something special for the 25th anniversary,” Satriani recalls. </p> <p>“They didn’t know what I was going to do, but I decided to illustrate some guitars myself. The idea took a lot of setup, because I had to figure out, ‘Am I going to paint them or use pens? What would the process be? Could I erase?’ So I wound up using these color pens. I spent about a week down in L.A. late in 2014 doing the illustrations and it was a lot of fun. But it was intense. With the pens, you can’t really put color on color. Nor can you erase. Some of the ones I did are more detailed; others are just line drawings. They’re all signed.” </p> <p>Technically speaking, the JS25ART embodies all the design refinements distilled over Satriani’s quarter century of collaboration with Ibanez. This includes a maple, JS Prestige neck with hand-rolled fret edges, Satriani’s signature DiMarzio pickups (the Satch Track and Mo’ Joe), a hi-pass filter on the volume pot, a coil tap on the tone pot and a low-profile Edge tremolo bridge. </p> <p>Longtime fans of Satriani’s visual art many recognize some of the bizarre faces and characters depicted on some of the guitars. Many of these characters are soon to come to life in an animated sci-series, tentatively titled <em>Crystal Planet,</em> that Satch is working on with fretless guitarist and digital animator Ned Evett.</p> <p><strong><em>Below, be sure to check out our comprehensive photo gallery of all of Ibanez's current signature Satch guitars, including electrics and acoustics!</em></strong></p> <p><strong>For more about Satch's signature Ibanez electric guitars, <a href="http://www.ibanez.co.jp/products/u_eg_sig_series15.php?year=2015&amp;cat_id=1&amp;series_id=27">head here</a>. For more about his acoustic models, <a href="http://www.ibanez.co.jp/products/u_ag_sig_series15.php?year=2015&amp;cat_id=3&amp;series_id=81">head here.</a> For more about Ibanez Guitars, visit <a href="http://www.ibanez.co.jp/usa/index.php">ibanez.co.jp.</a></strong></p> <p><strong><em><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-april-15-abasi-satriani-govan?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=SatchArtGuitars">Remember Satch is on the cover of the new April 2015 issue of GW! It's available now!</a></em></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/ibanez-js25art-guitars-offer-chance-own-original-piece-joe-satriani-artwork-and-great-instrument#comments April 2015 Ibanez Joe Satriani Acoustic Guitars Videos Electric Guitars News Features Gear Magazine Mon, 02 Mar 2015 13:47:37 +0000 Alan Di Perna 23606 at http://www.guitarworld.com Six Hidden Gems Made Magnificent in Headphones http://www.guitarworld.com/six-hidden-gems-made-magnificent-headphones <!--paging_filter--><p>Okay, so you have your headphones out—what do you want to listen to? </p> <p>Something beautiful? Something cool? Something you’ve never heard before? How about all three? </p> <p>The following are six tracks by five of your favorite bands worth putting under the microscope for reasons listed below. Enjoy!</p> <p><strong>Joe Satriani — “Surfing with the Alien”</strong></p> <p>For the lead guitar tone on <em>Surfing with the Alien’s</em> title track, Joe Satriani used a wah-wah pedal and a harmonizer. The former worked perfectly, but the latter was acting a little weird and wonky. </p> <p>Satriani told <em>Guitar World</em>, “The sound that came out of the speakers blew us away so much that we recorded the melody and the solo in about a half-hour and sat back and went, ‘Whoa! This is a song, man!’” Then the harmonizer broke down and couldn’t be fixed. </p> <p>“We couldn’t do anything,” he said. “We lost our tone. When we finally got it working again, we weren’t able to recreate the original effect. It just sounded different. So rather than screw up a wonderful-sounding performance that may have had a couple of glitches, we decided to just leave it, because it was just swinging.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uoERl34Ld00" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><br /><br /> <strong>Metallica — “The Four Horsemen”</strong></p> <p>One of the most unique features of Metallica’s classic track “The Four Horsemen” is its distinctive simultaneous two-headed guitar solo, heard from 4:10 to 4:30. </p> <p>You can hear two Kirk Hammetts, one in each speaker, playing roughly similar but still quite different solos. In 1991 Hammett told <em>Guitar World</em> this cool effect was entirely a fluke. After recording two takes of the solo, Hammett and Co. were trying to decide which one to use. </p> <p>“I listened to both tracks at once, to see if one would stand out,” Hammett said. “But playing both tracks simultaneously sounded great, and we decided to keep it like that on the record. Some of the notes harmonized with each other, and I remember Cliff [Burton, bassist] going, ‘Wow, that’s stylin’—it sounds like Tony Iommi!’”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/C4nCy5CITc8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Led Zeppelin — “Misty Mountain Hop” and “Babe, I’m Gonna Leave You”</strong></p> <p>Led Zeppelin albums are filled with little slips and clams, but none of that really mattered to producer/guitarist Jimmy Page who justifiably valued vibe over perfection. He called it being “tight but loose.” </p> <p>The following are two headphone-worthy accidents that somehow add a touch of funky magick to these Zep classics. If you listen closely to “Misty Mountain Hop” at about 1:15, you can hear Jimmy play the heavy part too soon. He then fumbles and jumps back in. </p> <p>hen, on “Babe I’m Gonna Leave You,” you can hear a ghostly voice at 1:43. Is it a friendly Page poltergeist? Nah, it’s actually the sound of Robert Plant singing along with drummer John Bonham during basic tracking. Whether that’s his actual naked voice leaking through the drum mics, or perhaps being blasted through Bonzo’s headphones, we may never know.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7joxOe76vCE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/iP9xMobANJM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Radiohead — “Creep”</strong></p> <p>One of the most memorable and dramatic guitar moments of the Nineties is the stuttering rhythm part that sets up the chorus of Radiohead’s “Creep.” And if Jonny Greenwood’s attitude-filled flourish (played at 0:58 and again at the two-minute mark) reflects the song’s angst-filled lyrics, there’s a reason. </p> <p>“That’s the sound of Jonny trying to mess the song up,” explained co-guitarist Ed O’Brien. “He really didn’t like it the first time we played it, so he tried spoiling it. And it made the song.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XFkzRNyygfk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>The Kingsmen — “Louie, Louie”</strong></p> <p>This last pick is a strange one. </p> <p>If there was never a song designed for headphones, it’s the poorly recorded garage classic “Louie, Louie.” But there are so many hilarious mistakes in this shambolic mess, with a good set of ear buds the tune becomes a brilliant piece of audio theater. </p> <p>Just close your eyes and you almost see and smell these drunken bozos having the time of their lives as they struggle to play their three chords right. Just dig the drummer yelling “F@#K! in the background because he hit his hand on the edge of one of his drums at 0:57. Or laugh as the singer comes in too early at 1:55 while barging in at the end the songs surprisingly great guitar solo. </p> <p>Truth is, this is actually what headphones were made for!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4V1p1dM3snQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Brad Tolinski is the editor-in-chief at </em>Guitar World.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/radiohead">Radiohead</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/six-hidden-gems-made-magnificent-headphones#comments Joe Satriani Led Zeppelin Metallica Radiohead The Kingsmen News Features Wed, 25 Feb 2015 15:56:07 +0000 Brad Tolinski 23579 at http://www.guitarworld.com Joe Satriani, Guthrie Govan, Tosin Abasi and Andy Aledort Discuss 2015 G4 Experience http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-guthrie-govan-tosin-abasi-and-andy-aledort-discuss-g4-experience <!--paging_filter--><p>In the video below, Joe Satriani, Tosin Abasi (Animals as Leaders) and Guthrie Govan (the Aristocrats) sit down for a video conference with <em>Guitar World</em> Senior Editor Andy Aledort. </p> <p>The topic? Their approach and thoughts about guitar, technique, inspiration and, of course, the upcoming G4 Experience.</p> <p>More than a show, more than a seminar, more than a backstage pass, the G4 Experience will give you musical inspiration and ideas that will keep you playing for years to come. </p> <p>For the G4 Experience, Satriani, Animals as Leaders (featuring Abasi, Javier Reyes and Matt Garska), the Aristocrats (Govan, Marco Minnemann and Bryan Beller) and Mike Keneally will be performing, teaching and offering attendees a chance to jam. </p> <p>All of these players will be sharing their knowledge and musical insights with the campers and doing unique, close-up performances. The event also will feature Aledort, Doug Doppler, Bruce Bouillet and Stu Hamm.</p> <p>The event takes place June 28 to July 2, 2015. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.g4experience.com">g4experience.com</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/etpOL-liFBQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-guthrie-govan-tosin-abasi-and-andy-aledort-discuss-g4-experience#comments Andy Aledort Guthrie Govan Joe Satriani Tosin Abasi Videos News Wed, 17 Dec 2014 19:03:12 +0000 Damian Fanelli 23133 at http://www.guitarworld.com Joe Satriani Announces 2015 G4 Experience Featuring Guthrie Govan, Tosin Abasi, Mike Keneally and More — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-announces-2015-g4-experience-featuring-guthrie-govan-tosin-abasi-mike-keneally-and-more-video <!--paging_filter--><p>From June 28 to July 2, 2015, musicians of all ages and levels will once again converge in California’s Central Coast for the second annual G4 Experience featuring Joe Satriani; Tosin Abasi and Animals As Leaders; Guthrie Govan and the Aristrocrats; and Mike Keneally. </p> <p>This unique music camp, which combines entertainment, education and a vacation experience, will take place at Cambria Pines Lodge in Cambria, California, halfway between San Francisco and Los Angeles.</p> <p>Satriani announces the G4 Experience in the exclusive video below. Be sure to check it out! For more details, keep reading!</p> <p>Produced by Dreamcatcher Events, the <a href="http://g4experience.com/">G4 Experience</a> is an extension of Satriani’s G3 Tour, which features Satriani alongside two other well-known guitarists. </p> <p>“This year I’m happy to announce an exciting new G4 lineup, with each player selected for their stunning musicianship and original approach to guitar playing,” Satriani said. “Guthrie will be bringing his bandmates from the Aristocrats—Bryan Beller on bass and Marco Minnemann on drums. Tosin will come with Animals As Leaders featuring guitarist Javier Reyes and drummer Matt Garstka.</p> <p>“Mike 'The Wizard' Keneally returns this year bringing his unique multi-instrumental style and approach to the camp giving clinics, playing a solo show as well as being part of my band’s performances. To round out our teaching/performing staff will be good friends and all-around awesome guitarists Doug Doppler, Bruce Bouillet and Andy Aledort along with my friend, Stu Hamm on bass.”</p> <p>For more information, visit <a href="http://g4experience.com/">g4experience.com</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/8Sp-i382_68" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-announces-2015-g4-experience-featuring-guthrie-govan-tosin-abasi-mike-keneally-and-more-video#comments Guthrie Govan Joe Satriani Mike Keneally Tosin Abasi Videos News Tue, 28 Oct 2014 15:46:30 +0000 Damian Fanelli 22691 at http://www.guitarworld.com Joe Satriani Performs "Satch Boogie" at New York City's Iridium — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-performs-satch-boogie-new-york-citys-iridium-video <!--paging_filter--><p>On June 9, Joe Satriani performed an exclusive 99th-birthday commemorative concert for Les Paul at New York City's Iridium. I know it was exclusive because I couldn't get in!</p> <p>The performance was filmed for <em>Front and Center</em>, a public-television music series. Satriani’s performance will begin airing October 21.</p> <p>In the meantime, you can enjoy a sneak peek at Satriani's episode right here, right now. In the pro-shot clip below, you can watch him perform "Satch Boogie," his masterful 1987 instrumental. </p> <p>As always, be sure to tell us what you think in the comments or on Facebook!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/kK1Q8CkB_1M" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-performs-satch-boogie-new-york-citys-iridium-video#comments Iridium Joe Satriani Videos News Thu, 25 Sep 2014 20:09:59 +0000 Damian Fanelli 22437 at http://www.guitarworld.com Joe Satriani Shows You How to Play "Satch Boogie" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-shows-how-play-satch-boogie-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Just like the headline says, here's an official <em>Guitar World</em> video of Joe Satriani showing you how to play his signature 1987 tune, "Satch Boogie."</p> <p>Remember that Satriani—along with Guthrie Govan and Animals As Leaders' Tosin Abasi—is on the cover of the all-new April 2015 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>, which is <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-april-15-abasi-satriani-govan?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=April2015VideosPage">available on newsstands and at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></p> <p>Enjoy one of the complete Satch features from the new issue—<a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/ibanez-js25art-guitars-offer-chance-own-original-piece-joe-satriani-artwork-and-great-instrument">"Ibanez JS25ART Guitars Offer a Chance to Own Original Joe Satriani Artwork—and Great Instruments"—right here.</a></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3769770598001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3769770598001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-shows-how-play-satch-boogie-video#comments April 2006 Joe Satriani Artist Lessons Videos News Lessons Fri, 05 Sep 2014 19:56:05 +0000 Guitar World Staff 22296 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jacky Vincent of Falling In Reverse Discusses Joe Satriani's 'Surfing With the Alien' — The Record That Changed My Life http://www.guitarworld.com/jacky-vincent-falling-reverse-discusses-joe-satrianis-surfing-alien-record-changed-my-life <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Falling In Reverse guitarist Jacky Vincent chooses and discusses the record that changed his life.</em></p> <p><strong>Joe Satriani</strong><br /> <em>Surfing With the Alien</em> (1987)</p> <p>“<em>Surfing with the Alien</em> inspired me to become a musician and want to learn guitar. </p> <p>"My dad had the CD in his collection before I was even born. As a young kid I would pick it out and play it, and I have vivid memories of attempting to learn ‘Crushing Day,’ ‘Midnight,’ ‘Always with Me, Always with You,’ ‘Surfing with the Alien’ and ‘Satch Boogie.’ It meant so much to my development as a player because it was the album that introduced me to the guitar and songwriting techniques I use today. </p> <p>“<em>Surfing with the Alien</em> made it apparent to me early on that you didn’t even have to have a vocalist to create an incredible and enjoyable album. </p> <p>"It’s safe to say I wouldn’t be the player I am now, or probably even be a musician at all, without this album being available to me when it was. The guitar tones, songs and soloing on the record remain some of my favorites to this day.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/lCGCG_N2b30" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/jacky-vincent-falling-reverse-discusses-joe-satrianis-surfing-alien-record-changed-my-life#comments Falling In Reverse Jacky Vincent Joe Satriani July 2014 The Record that Changed My Life Interviews News Features Magazine Wed, 30 Jul 2014 20:32:16 +0000 Jacky Vincent 21929 at http://www.guitarworld.com Book/CD: Joe Satriani's Guitar Secrets — 41 Private Lessons http://www.guitarworld.com/bookcd-joe-satrianis-guitar-secrets-41-private-lessons <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Joe Satriani: Guitar Secrets</em> is available now at the <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/products/joe-satriani-guitar-secrets/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=JoeSatrianiSecrets">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</p> <p>Learn guitar tips, tricks and secrets with this collection of 41 private lessons from Satriani's famous columns from <em>Guitar for the Practicing Musician</em> magazine. </p> <p>Host Dave Celentano covers: chords, scales and modes, tunings, theory, technique, harmonics, soloing and much more!</p> <p><strong><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/products/joe-satriani-guitar-secrets/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=JoeSatrianiSecrets">Check it out now at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/bookcd-joe-satrianis-guitar-secrets-41-private-lessons#comments Joe Satriani News Features Wed, 11 Jun 2014 16:17:01 +0000 Guitar World Staff 21521 at http://www.guitarworld.com DiMarzio Releases Satch Track, Joe Satriani's First Single-Coil-Size Signature Pickup http://www.guitarworld.com/dimarzio-releases-satch-track-joe-satrianis-first-single-coil-size-signature-pickup <!--paging_filter--><p>DiMarzio has announced the release of the Satch Track Neck hum-canceling pickup for electric guitars. </p> <p>The pickup, which was created for Joe Satriani, is available for retail sale from DiMarzio.</p> <p>From the company:</p> <p>Satriani is continually refining and sharpening his sound. Two years in the making, the Satch Track Neck is Joe’s first single-coil size signature pickup. Articulate, vocal and musical, it is the company's most advanced Fast Track-style pickup to date.</p> <p>The Satch Track Neck bridges the gap between classic humbucker and single-coil performance. It tracks pick attack and string vibration quickly and accurately like a single-coil, but the voicing is wider and stronger, like a humbucker. The highs are very warm, and clarity is created by keeping the mids and lows tight and focused.</p> <p>DiMarzio’s Satch Track Neck pickup is made in the U.S. and may now be ordered for immediate delivery. Suggested List Price is $119.99. For more about the Satch Track Neck pickup, visit <a href="http://dimarzio.com/">dimarzio.com.</a></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/DP425_DiMarzio_Satch-Track_Neck_Red.jpg" width="620" height="527" alt="DP425_DiMarzio_Satch-Track_Neck_Red.jpg" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/dimarzio-releases-satch-track-joe-satrianis-first-single-coil-size-signature-pickup#comments DiMarzio Joe Satriani Accessories News Gear Wed, 04 Jun 2014 15:21:49 +0000 Guitar World Staff 21455 at http://www.guitarworld.com