Talkin&#039; Blues http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/2075/all en Talkin’ Blues with Keith Wyatt: A Tribute to Cliff Gallup’s Legendary Flash http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-keith-wyatt-tribute-cliff-gallup-s-legendary-flash <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the September 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-september-2014-the-black-keys/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=SeptemberVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Gene Vincent and the Blue Caps epitomized rockabilly’s iconic image, with their leather jackets, ducktail hairstyles and kick-ass-and-take-names personae. The band also introduced one of the most adept, versatile and influential electric guitarists of his generation: Cliff Gallup. </p> <p>Born in 1930, Gallup was 26 when he joined up with Vincent, a wild young singer from Norfolk, Virginia. In May 1956, as the brief but volcanic rockabilly craze was peaking, Vincent was invited to record in Nashville under the guidance of veteran producer Ken Nelson. </p> <p>Nelson had session pros (including studio guitar phenomenon Grady Martin) standing by, in case the energetic but green Blue Caps failed to deliver. But from the moment Gallup launched into “Race with the Devil” it was clear that he was an extraordinary guitarist and unique stylist in his own right. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/43615372&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-keith-wyatt-tribute-cliff-gallup-s-legendary-flash#comments August 2014 Cliff Gallup Gene Vincent Keith Wyatt Talkin' Blues Mon, 14 Jul 2014 19:29:39 +0000 Keith Wyatt http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21826 Talkin' Blues: Little Walter's Exciting Up-Tempo Jump-Blues Soloing Style http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-little-walters-exciting-tempo-jump-blues-soloing-style <!--paging_filter--><p>Last month, we saw how harmonica legend Little Walter applied his improvisational genius to slow blues. This month, we’ll see what Walter can teach guitar players about up-tempo soloing.</p> <p>Walter served his musical apprenticeship in Delta roadhouses during the early Forties and intently studied the style and techniques of down-home blues harmonica masters such as John Lee “Sonny Boy” Williamson, but he also took the instrument into new territory by emulating the jazz-tinged phrasing of jump-blues saxophonists. </p> <p>Jump was an offshoot of big-band swing that featured fast 12-bar boogie-woogie grooves and full horn sections, and saxophonists were the instrumental stars of the day. With his amplified harp backed by only electric guitars and drums, Walter proved that he could swing with the best of the big bands.</p> <p>But he also created a unique instrumental voice by fusing wind-driven reeds with electric power and grit. A prime example of Walter’s jump style was captured on his best-selling 1955 single “My Babe” (<strong>FIGURE 1</strong> adapts similar phrases to the guitar). </p> <p>Walter compensates for the harp’s relatively limited melodic range by exploiting rhythm, dynamics and its unique tone, particularly the natural overtones that make every note sound bigger than the equivalent picked string. Guitarists need to crank up the distortion and reverb in order to narrow the gap. More challenging to emulate is Walter’s masterful breath control, which he uses to add subtle swing and dynamic variations to every phrase. </p> <p>We guitarists can approximate some of the same qualities with ghost notes—fretting certain notes (indicated by Xs in the tablature, as in bar 2)—without fully depressing the string. On individual notes, enhancethe effect with hybrid picking (pick-andfingers technique). Pick the ghost note with a downstroke and pluck the following regular note with a bare finger. </p> <p>For arpeggios (as in bar 6), sweep pick with consecutive upstrokes and quickly mute the fretted notes immediately after you pick them by relaxing your finger pressure against the strings so that they break contact with the fretboard and cease to ring.</p> <p>Walter also frequently thickens his sound with double-stop trills, as in bar 1, going into bar 2. On guitar, fret the double-stop with your index finger at the 13th fret and hammer-on/pull-off repeatedly with your middle finger.<br /> Attempting to capture the qualities of another instrument can be a slippery task because it challenges guitar-centric assumptions about technique and phrasing. Aspiring to evoke the spirit of Little Walter shows us just how much there is yet to discover right under our own fingers.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="350" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F6902229"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-05-01%20at%202.58.04%20PM.png" width="620" height="706" alt="Screen Shot 2014-05-01 at 2.58.04 PM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-05-01%20at%202.58.15%20PM.png" width="620" height="230" alt="Screen Shot 2014-05-01 at 2.58.15 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-little-walters-exciting-tempo-jump-blues-soloing-style#comments August 2013 Keith Wyatt Little Walter Talkin' Blues Blogs News Lessons Magazine Thu, 01 May 2014 19:00:58 +0000 Keith Wyatt http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18611 Talkin’ Blues with Keith Wyatt: Slim Harpo’s Grooving, Down-Home Rhythm Guitar Style http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-keith-wyatt-slim-harpo-s-grooving-down-home-rhythm-guitar-style <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These audio files are bonus content related to the May 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-14-zakk-wylde-joe-satriani/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=MayVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>“Swamp blues” aptly describes the steamy blend of down-home blues, New Orleans R&amp;B and Cajun styles that emanated from the Louisiana back country in the Fifties and Sixties. </p> <p>The epicenter of swamp blues was the Crowley, Louisiana studio of producer-songwriter J.D. “Jay” Miller, whose recordings of local African-American artists for Nashville’s Excello label defined the genre. </p> <p>Among such colorful names as Lightnin’ Slim, Lazy Lester, Lonesome Sundown and Whispering Smith, Miller’s most commercially successful artist was James Moore, a singer, guitarist and harp player better known as Slim Harpo. Harpo’s mix of traditional blues and popular dance rhythms had a particularly powerful impact on the early Sixties British pop scene, with the Rolling Stones and other bands widely covering his songs and using them to inspire their own writing. </p> <p>At the same time, Miller’s quirky production style turned swamp into a recognized musical adjective. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/28027223&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-keith-wyatt-slim-harpo-s-grooving-down-home-rhythm-guitar-style#comments Keith Wyatt May 2014 Slim Harpo Talkin' Blues Tue, 25 Mar 2014 18:28:15 +0000 Keith Wyatt http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20791 Talkin’ Blues with Keith Wyatt: Massive Attack — Slapping and Raking http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-keith-wyatt-massive-attack-slapping-and-raking <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This video is bonus content related to the March 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-march-14-eric-clapton/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=JanuaryVideosPage">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>For guitarists accustomed to channel switching and distortion pedals, the thought of being forced to plug straight into a clean amp can be a nightmare. But the big, bad guitar sounds of classic blues are all “straight in,” so how do players turn this apparent handicap to an advantage? The secret is to attack. </p> <p>Your sound begins at the point of impact between the pick and the string. Modern rock technique, particularly shred, minimizes the range of pick motion to maximize speed. The initial sound is small, but electronic effects, such as distortion and compression, magnify the result after the fact. </p> <p>In blues, the idea is to shape your tone before it leaves the guitar. A big sound requires a big attack, so you don’t pick the strings—you slap them. Since this means hitting several strings at once, you must also train your fretting hand to mute the strings on either side of the desired note. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/21655708&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-keith-wyatt-massive-attack-slapping-and-raking#comments Keith Wyatt March 2014 Talkin' Blues Wed, 29 Jan 2014 17:37:42 +0000 Keith Wyatt http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20328 Talkin' Blues with Keith Wyatt: Grady Martin and the Roots of Rock http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-keith-wyatt-grady-martin-and-roots-rock <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos are bonus content related to the February 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-february-14-van-halen/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=JanuaryVideosPage">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>Last month, we looked at Nashville guitarist Grady Martin’s graceful, acoustic Tejano melodies on Marty Robbins’ cowboy classic “El Paso.” This month we’ll go to the opposite musical extreme and examine Martin’s contribution to electric rock and roll.</p> <p>In the wake of Elvis’ massive breakthrough, 1956 was a year of opportunity for new rock and roll talent, but record companies often called on Nashville session players to replace inexperienced young band members with professional backing. </p> <p>Among these artists was the Memphis-based Rock &amp; Roll Trio—singer Johnny Burnette, his brother Dorsey on bass and electric guitarist Paul Burlison—who checked into Nashville’s Quonset Hut studio in early July and emerged four days later with a string of rock and roll classics. </p> <p>Burlison was a raw, energetic player, but the tracks featured highly original and technically sophisticated guitar parts that—as evidence clearly indicates—were performed by studio veteran Martin. His thick, driving sound and the rhythm section’s hard-hitting even, or “straight,” eighth notes point directly to the future of rock.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/18878002&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-keith-wyatt-grady-martin-and-roots-rock#comments February 2014 Grady Martin Keith Wyatt Talkin' Blues Thu, 02 Jan 2014 19:34:56 +0000 Keith Wyatt http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20111 Talkin' Blues: Tennessee Tejano — Grady Martin and “El Paso” http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-tennessee-tejano-grady-martin-and-el-paso <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos are bonus content related to the January 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-january-14-the-beatles/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=JanuaryVideosPage">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>Viewers of the series finale of the hit TV drama <em>Breaking Bad</em> may have recognized Marty Robbins’ haunting ballad “El Paso” running through the soundtrack. </p> <p>The song describes a parallel tale of doomed obsession on the wild southwest border, but it is the evocative melodies of guitarist Grady Martin—rather than television cameras—that establish the location and mood.</p> <p>In its diversity of influences, “El Paso” is as American as they come. Its three-beat waltz rhythm was introduced, along with the two-beat polka, to Mexico and south Texas by 19th century German, Polish and Czech immigrants. Adapted to Spanish guitars by Mexican troubadours, the various rhythms, melodies and lyric themes blended into the border-straddling style known as Tejano, or Tex-Mex, the ideal musical setting for “El Paso.” </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/16305562&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-tennessee-tejano-grady-martin-and-el-paso#comments Grady Martin January 2014 Talkin' Blues Wed, 04 Dec 2013 20:28:04 +0000 Keith Wyatt http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19926 Talkin' Blues: The Guitar Work of Earl Hooker, Part 2 http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-guitar-work-earl-hooker-part-2 <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos are bonus content related to the Holiday 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-holiday-13-roger-waters/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=HolidayVideosPage">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>Last month we looked at the legacy of Chicago guitar legend Earl Hooker, a player regarded by many of his peers as the greatest in a city overflowing with talent. But while Hooker’s mastery of standard electric blues was unquestionable, his renown as a slide guitarist was even greater. </p> <p>As a teenager, Hooker studied with electric slide pioneer Robert Nighthawk, himself a disciple of Chicago acoustic guitar kingpin Tampa Red, renowned for his delicate, single-note melodies and wide, expressive vibrato. Nighthawk’s 1949 take on Tampa Red’s “Sweet Black Angel” was an electric slide masterpiece, and Hooker’s own version (“Sweet Angel”) in 1953 proved that by 24 years of age he was already in a league with his mentor. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/13951719"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-guitar-work-earl-hooker-part-2#comments Earl Hooker Holiday 2013 Keith Wyatt Talkin' Blues Lessons Magazine Mon, 18 Nov 2013 17:53:35 +0000 Keith Wyatt http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19524 Talkin' Blues: The Guitar Work of Earl Hooker, Part 1 http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-guitar-work-earl-hooker-part-1 <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos are bonus content related to the December 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-december-13-nirvana/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=DecemberVideosPage">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>For guitar players in the Fifties, Chicago was both heaven and hell. Legendary players performed in neighborhood dives every weekend for the price of a beer, but the competition was also cutthroat. To even be considered good, one had to be great; to be called the best, one had to be Earl Hooker.</p> <p>Born in 1929, Hooker grew up in Chicago and started playing at age 10. Mainly self-taught, he learned quickly by emulating the styles of T-Bone Walker and electric slide pioneer Robert Nighthawk and became equally adept at both standard and slide techniques (he played slide in standard tuning so he could easily switch between them). </p> <p>Hooker began performing professionally in his mid-teens, and within a few years he launched a prolific recording career backing other artists as well as recording under his own name. His eclectic musical tastes and quirky imagination were demonstrated by his early releases, which ranged from deep, Nighthawk-style slide blues (“Sweet Angel”) to guitar instrumentals featuring razor-sharp tone and phrasing (“Frog Hop,” “Guitar Mambo,” “The Hucklebuck”). </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F11835449"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-guitar-work-earl-hooker-part-1#comments December 2013 Earl Hooker Keith Wyatt Talkin' Blues News Lessons Magazine Tue, 29 Oct 2013 16:42:59 +0000 Keith Wyatt http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19409 Talkin' Blues: Chicago’s Best-Kept Secret — The Underexposed Talents of Blues-Rock Pioneer Jody Williams http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-chicago-s-best-kept-secret-underexposed-talents-blues-rock-pioneer-jody-williams <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the November 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-november-13-dream-theater/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=NovemberVideosPage">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>In the Fifties, Chicago was the center of the blues universe. Muddy Waters, Little Walter, and Howlin’ Wolf were at their creative and commercial peak, and Buddy Guy, Otis Rush, Magic Sam and Freddie King were all earning their bones. But alongside these now-legendary names are others who but for various twists of fate might be equally well known. One of these is Jody Williams.</p> <p>Williams was introduced to the guitar by fellow Chicago teenager Bo Diddley and quickly took to the instrument. Before long he began working with elite musicians such as pianist Otis Spann, who introduced Williams to the Chess Records studio scene. </p> <p>Williams proved himself to be remarkably versatile. He backed Howlin’ Wolf on “Evil” and “Forty-Four,” among the heaviest tracks of the era, but he could also swing with the uptown feel of his idol, B.B. King, and solo with blazing excitement. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F109768731"></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F109768745"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-chicago-s-best-kept-secret-underexposed-talents-blues-rock-pioneer-jody-williams#comments Jody Williams Keith Wyatt November 2013 Talkin' Blues News Lessons Magazine Wed, 02 Oct 2013 15:04:40 +0000 Keith Wyatt http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19206 Talkin' Blues: The Brilliance of Jimi Hendrix's Rhythm Guitar Playing http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-brilliance-jimi-hendrixs-rhythm-guitar-playing <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the August 2012 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-aug-12-van-halen/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=talkinblues">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>When Jimi Hendrix first exploded onto the scene, much attention was riveted on his radical reinvention of guitar-soloing vocabulary, technique and sound, inspired by a now-familiar roster of great blues soloists. But Hendrix had another musical asset that set him apart from similarly influenced British blues-rock contemporaries: years of experience as a professional R&amp;B rhythm guitarist.</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1699260092001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1699260092001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1699250087001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1699250087001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-brilliance-jimi-hendrixs-rhythm-guitar-playing#comments August 2012 Jimi Hendrix Keith Wyatt Talkin' Blues 2012 Lessons Magazine Wed, 18 Sep 2013 12:22:55 +0000 Keith Wyatt http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16110 Talkin' Blues: The Aggressively Quirky, Knife-Edged Soloing Style of Pat Hare http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-aggressively-quirky-knife-edged-soloing-style-pat-hare <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the October 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-october-13-avenged-sevenfold/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=OctoberVideosPage">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>With the recent passing of Bobby “Blue” Bland, American music has lost another major voice. While Bland did not play an instrument, his bands featured some of the greatest guitarists in blues, including Roy Gaines, Clarence Holloman, Wayne Bennett, Mel Brown and, briefly, an edgy, idiosyncratic stylist named Auburn “Pat” Hare. </p> <p>Born in Arkansas in 1930, Hare moved to Memphis and joined Howlin’ Wolf’s first band when he was only 18. By the early Fifties, Hare was doing sessions for Sun Records founder Sam Phillips, lending his wild, distorted sound to such classics as Junior Parker’s “The Next Time You See Me” and James Cotton’s “Cotton Crop Blues,” as well as solo tracks, including the ominous “I’m Gonna Murder My Baby.” His recordings with Parker and Cotton displayed a mix of shuffles, country train beats and jump blues that anticipated rockabilly, and his aggressive use of distortion was an early signal of the future of electric guitar–driven music.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F105291449%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-vBPhU"></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F105291419%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-ld201"></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F105291427%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-Vke4T"></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F105291456%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-K8cTs"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-aggressively-quirky-knife-edged-soloing-style-pat-hare#comments Keith Wyatt October 2013 Pat Hare Talkin' Blues News Lessons Tue, 10 Sep 2013 11:58:05 +0000 Keith Wyatt http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19016 Talkin’ Blues: Mr. Jukebox — A Tribute to Louis Jordan, King of the Jump-Blues Sax http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-mr-jukebox-tribute-louis-jordan-king-jump-blues-sax <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the September 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-september-13-prog-rock-roundtable-asking-alexandria/?&amp;utm_source=homepage&amp;utm_medium=website&amp;utm_campaign=SeptemberVideosPage">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>By the late Forties, electric guitar was firmly established as an important instrumental voice in down-home blues, but in the realm of uptown rhythm and blues, with the exception of T-Bone Walker and a few of his disciples, guitar solos were still relatively rare. Saxophone was king, and no saxophonist of the era was more popular than Louis Jordan, a.k.a. “Mr. Jukebox.” </p> <p>In addition to his witty vocals and swinging arrangements on classics like “I’m Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town,” “Let the Good Times Roll,” “Caldonia,” and many others, Jordan’s wailing, bluesy alto solos foreshadowed the dynamic string stretching of a new generation of electric guitar heroes. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F101323744"></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F101323751"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-mr-jukebox-tribute-louis-jordan-king-jump-blues-sax#comments Keith Wyatt Louis Jordan September 2013 Talkin' Blues Tue, 16 Jul 2013 19:41:40 +0000 Keith Wyatt http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18823 Talkin' Blues: A Fresh Approach to Blues Soloing, Courtesy of Harmonica Player Little Walter http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-fresh-approach-blues-soloing-courtesy-harmonica-player-little-walter <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the July 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-july-13-black-sabbath/?&amp;utm_source=homepage&amp;utm_medium=website&amp;utm_campaign=sidebar">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>Guitar players seeking inspiration tend to look exclusively to fellow guitar players, but there’s a lot more to be found beyond the six-string comfort zone. For example, one of the most innovative and influential soloists in blues history made his mark not with the guitar but with the humble blues harp harmonica. His name was Walter Jacobs, also known as Little Walter.</p> <p>Walter made his first recordings with Muddy Waters in Chicago in 1948 at just 18 years of age, having already perfected a technique for creating massive tone by cupping the harp and microphone between his hands and blowing through a cranked-up tube amplifier. Walter’s 1952 instrumental single “Juke” launched his career as one of the most exciting and original performers in blues and at the same time established the amplified harmonica as a solo voice to rival saxophone and guitar.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F5911232%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-TpvLV"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-fresh-approach-blues-soloing-courtesy-harmonica-player-little-walter#comments July 2013 Keith Wyatt Little Walter Talkin' Blues News Lessons Magazine Mon, 03 Jun 2013 11:58:41 +0000 Keith Wyatt http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18433 Talkin' Blues: The Visionary, Pioneering Soloing Style of Johnny "Guitar" Watson http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-visionary-pioneering-soloing-style-johnny-guitar-watson <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the June 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-june-13-megadeth/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=videospage">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>A mere decade after T-Bone Walker established the template for electric blues guitar in the mid Forties, the sound of the instrument was already beginning to evolve into something louder, faster and more out of control. On the cutting edge of guitar mania was a 17-year-old lad from Los Angeles known as Young John Watson, a player whose ferocious, no-boundaries style heralded the coming of age of the first generation of guitarists to be raised on electricity. </p> <p>Watson burst out of the gate in 1954 with “Space Guitar,” an instrumental that was clearly inspired by Gatemouth Brown’s 1953 release “Boogie Uproar,” which we looked at in last month’s column.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F5066204%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-IONmV"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-visionary-pioneering-soloing-style-johnny-guitar-watson#comments Johnny June 2013 Keith Wyatt Talkin' Blues Musicians Institute Video Lessons News Lessons Magazine Fri, 03 May 2013 17:47:32 +0000 Keith Wyatt http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18242 Talkin' Blues: The Signature Up-Tempo Soloing Style of Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-signature-tempo-soloing-style-clarence-gatemouth-brown <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the May 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-13-brad-paisley/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=videospage">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>Sixty years ago, barely a decade into the electric guitar era, Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown unleashed one of the wildest guitar instrumentals ever captured on record. “Boogie Uproar” was just that, a dose of pure, in-your-face electric energy that musically linked the past—the sophistication of swing—to the future: the raw ferocity of rock and roll.</p> <p>Brown launched his career in 1947 on the heels of fellow Texas guitarist T-Bone Walker, the original architect of the electric blues guitar single-note soloing style. While influenced by Walker, Brown favored a far more aggressive barehanded attack through a cranked-up amp, a sound that he further enhanced by ditching his hollowbody Gibson L-5 for the radical new Telecaster. Combined with an impeccable sense of rhythm and a wild imagination, the result was a distinctive, white-knuckled style that inspired players like Guitar Slim, Johnny “Guitar” Watson and Albert Collins.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F4322126%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-JNGFE"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-signature-tempo-soloing-style-clarence-gatemouth-brown#comments Clarence Keith Wyatt May 2013 Talkin' Blues News Lessons Magazine Fri, 29 Mar 2013 10:35:08 +0000 Keith Wyatt http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18093