Brad Tolinski http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/223/all en Joan Jett Talks Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Lou Reed and "I Love Rock ’N’ Roll" http://www.guitarworld.com/joan-jett-talks-rock-and-roll-hall-fame-lou-reed-and-i-love-rock-n-roll <!--paging_filter--><p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-15-joan-jett?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=JoanExcerpt">This is an excerpt from the all-new May 2015 issue of Guitar World. For the rest of the story—and all of the May 2015 issue—head here.</a></strong></p> <p><strong>Girl’s Got Rhythm: <em>Joan Jett has been banging out some of rock’s greatest power chords since the age of 15. With her induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, there’s only one thing you need to know—she still loves rock and roll.</em></strong></p> <p>Joan Jett looks perfect. In other words, she looks exactly the way you want Joan Jett to look.</p> <p>With her iconic black shag and eyeliner, she saunters into the <em>Guitar World</em> photo studio wearing a variation on a rock and roll uniform she had worn almost her entire life: a tight black sleeveless shirt, black jeans and black motorcycle boots, all of it topped with a kick-ass leather jacket.</p> <p>And if you have to ask about the color of her jacket, you clearly haven’t been paying much attention.</p> <p>The last few years have been pretty supersonic for Jett and her band the Blackhearts. Since releasing the critically acclaimed <em>Unvarnished</em> album in late 2013, which featured the hit “Any Weather,” co-written with Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl, she has been touring up a storm while snagging honors right and left, like the Revolver Golden God award and the Alternative Press Icon Award.</p> <p>To complete the trifecta, this month she is being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, long considered music’s ultimate validation. Not bad for a veteran celebrating her fourth decade in the biz.</p> <p>Truth is, Joan Jett’s entire career is nothing short of miraculous, especially when you consider just how difficult it was for her to simply get out of the starting gate.</p> <p>“My parents got me a guitar for Christmas when I was 13 and I went to take lessons,” Jett says in her distinctive sandpapery voice. “I told the teacher I wanted to learn how to play rock and roll, and because I was just a naïve kid, I thought he was going to be able to show me in one lesson! I didn’t know that you had to learn the ropes. If he would’ve explained that to me, it would’ve been fine, but instead he said something far worse. He told me, ‘Girls don’t play rock and roll,’ and then tried to teach me ‘On Top of Old Smokey.’ ”</p> <p>In response, Joan grabbed her guitar and stormed out never to return. A mere two years later, at the age of 15, Jett proved her teacher—and every other sexist naysayer—wrong when she formed the Runaways, a groundbreaking all-female rock band, best known for their 1976 hit “Cherry Bomb.” The band didn’t last very long, but their music and exploits became legendary to multiple generations, partly due to <em>The Runaways</em>, a successful movie biopic about the band released in 2010 starring Kristen Stewart as Jett.</p> <p>While the Runaways were crucial to Joan’s development, it was her solo career that made her a household name. A succession of Top 40 hits including “Bad Reputation,” “Crimson &amp; Clover,” “Do You Wanna Touch Me (Oh Yeah)” and the 1981 monster smash “I Love Rock ’N’ Roll” cemented her status as the quintessential queen of noise. And the accompanying MTV videos didn’t hurt either.</p> <p>If you had to design a woman rocker from the ground up, it would probably look a helluva lot like Joan in videos like 1988’s “I Hate Myself for Loving You.” With her white Gibson Melody Maker slung low, she was sleek, tough and sexy—the living embodiment of the ultimate badass girl with a guitar.</p> <p>Image aside, as a musician, she’s no slouch either. One former Blackheart bandmate recently commented, “You could build a fortress on the foundation of Joan’s rhythm hand.” True, that. Her power chords detonate with the shattering force and clarity of a nail bomb going off at Tiffany’s, and outside of AC/DC’s Malcolm Young or Keith Richards, it’s hard to think of anybody that can lay down a groove like Joan. What’s her secret? That’s partly what we’re here to find out.</p> <p>It’s interesting to note that Joan rarely uses the word “rock” to describe her favorite music. Instead, she almost always refers to it by its somewhat antiquated and more formal name, “rock and roll.” Maybe it’s just out of habit, but perhaps it’s out of respect. It’s clear from our conversation Joan has a deep reverence for rock and roll. One thing is very certain: she clearly loves it.</p> <p><strong>How do you feel about being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame?</strong></p> <p>It’s awesome and an honor. The Hall has inducted so many people that I look up to, so it’s incredible to be counted among them. That said, it’s not something I ever aspired to. When I write songs or play music it’s not something I really think about. You just want to tour and get your songs out. I mean this in the best way, but the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is just an aside. The part that I think is really positive about the Hall of Fame is that rock isn’t being acknowledged at the Grammy’s and other music awards shows, so it’s cool that we have our own moment. And I really hope it stays focused on rock, because all other music already gets acknowledged on all the other shows.</p> <p><strong>You are being inducted with two other musicians that are cut from the same cloth. Both Lou Reed and Billie Joe Armstrong of Green Day are great singer/rhythm guitarists. Did you ever hang with Lou and his legendarily decadent crew in the Seventies?</strong></p> <p><strong></strong> No, unfortunately. In the early days, I was based on the West Coast and he was in New York City. However, I remember buying Transformer with “Walk on the Wild Side” as a kid and I was really impressed with how it freaked people out! People would say he couldn’t carry a tune, but that wasn’t the point. He was a storyteller and singing about things nobody else was talking about at the time. I finally met Lou at a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ceremony a few years ago. We were sitting at different tables near each other, and that particular year there were a few acts being inducted that weren’t really rock and roll. We just kept looking at each other, making faces. It was a special moment between the two of us, because no one else saw what we were doing. [laughs]</p> <p><strong>When you were in the Runaways, you actually covered Lou Reed’s song “Rock and Roll,” but you did it more in the style of Mitch Ryder’s great 1971 version of the song.</strong> Yeah, the weird thing is, we weren’t even aware of Lou Reed’s version at that time. We had heard Mitch Ryder’s version and fell in love with the great guitar riff that kicks off the song so we focused on that. A couple years later I started listening to Lou’s original recording, and as a rhythm guitar player I started liking it more, because it had a weird rhythm to it. It has an extra bar tucked in, which is something I always find intriguing.</p> <p><strong>“I Love Rock ’N’ Roll,” your biggest hit, actually has that extra bar in it.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/A4cFIzr85cU"></iframe></p> <p><strong></strong> The two songs are connected in a funny way. I first heard “I Love Rock and Roll” in England while the Runaways were touring. It was the B-side of a single by a group called the Arrows and I immediately thought it sounded like a hit. I played it for the band, but they didn’t want to do it because we had just recorded “Rock ’N’ Roll” and they didn’t think it was a good idea to have two songs on the same album with the words “rock ’n’ roll” in the title, so we didn’t do it. I thought to myself, I’ll just stick it in my back pocket, and maybe we’ll revisit in another album or two. Anyway, the band broke up, I ended up recording it for my solo album and the rest is history.</p> <p><strong>You were only 15 when you formed the Runaways and had been playing guitar for just a couple of years, yet your rhythm playing was already rock-solid. Was that just something that came naturally?</strong></p> <p><strong></strong> After my first guitar teacher tried to discourage me from playing rock and roll, I went out and bought one of those teach yourself how to play guitar books and learned all the basic open chords and barre chords and started playing along with records. The first songs I was able to figure out were things like “Smoke on the Water” by Deep Purple, Black Sabbath songs like “Iron Man” and “Sweet Leaf” and “Bang A Gong” by T. Rex.</p> <p>I immediately gravitated to power chords because I found I could be more rhythmically accurate with them and they sounded closer to the music I was listening to. But to answer your question, I never really thought about whether I was any good or could keep a beat, I just played along to albums. My bigger problem was that I was alone—I couldn’t find other kids to rock out with.</p> <p>Eventually my family moved from Rockville, Maryland, to California, which was really great because I knew there had to be other girls in Los Angeles that could play music and maybe I could form a band. That idea really motivated me. Not long after, I met Sandy West, who would eventually be the drummer for the Runaways. She was a big, strong girl and her idol was Led Zeppelin’s John Bonham and she played like him. We set up in the rec room of her house and just started to jam, and the sound was so powerful we knew we were on to something. We said, “We gotta go find some other girls.” I knew pretty quickly that I was a rhythm guitar player and not a lead player—I just wasn’t interested in that.</p> <p><em><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-15-joan-jett?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=JoanExcerpt">This is an excerpt from the all-new May 2015 issue of Guitar World. For the rest of the story, head here.</a> <em>Photo: Jimmy Hubbard</em> </em></p> <p><em><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-04-17%20at%2012.03.07%20PM.png" alt="Screen Shot 2015-04-17 at 12.03.07 PM.png" width="620" height="807" /></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joan-jett">Joan Jett</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/joan-jett-talks-rock-and-roll-hall-fame-lou-reed-and-i-love-rock-n-roll#comments Brad Tolinski Joan Jett May 2015 Interviews News Features Magazine Fri, 17 Apr 2015 16:11:31 +0000 Brad Tolinski 24313 at http://www.guitarworld.com Five Headphone Songs Guaranteed to Blow Your Mind http://www.guitarworld.com/five-songs-made-better-through-advancements-headphones <!--paging_filter--><p>Headphone technology seems to be getting better every day. </p> <p>Recently, Ceekars <a href="http://ceek.com/ceekars">(pronounced “seekers”)</a> developed what it's calling the world’s first 4D headphones, and the aural experience is <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PZdxCGorls">trippy, to say the least.</a> </p> <p>The company recently reached out to <em>Guitar World</em> and asked us to suggest some music that would put their radically new concept to the test. We responded with the following five tracks. </p> <p>While these sound amazing using <a href="http://ceek.com/ceekars">Ceekars</a> 4D technology, they also sound great even using the most modest ear buds. Enjoy!<br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Grateful Dead, “Unbroken Chain”</strong></p> <p>This epic tune on the Dead’s <em>From The Mars Hotel</em> was so difficult for the band to play that it had to be recorded in carefully orchestrated sections. </p> <p>Filled with cascading piano licks, jazzy guitar runs that dance in both sides of the stereo spectrum and weird synth burbles that tease the top of the brain, it’s the perfect headphone experience—especially when you’re “Truckin’” where it’s legal. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6WycvYhKW08" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Mastodon, “The Czar”</strong></p> <p>This is one case where a song not only sounds great under headphones, but the sprawling arrangement almost makes more sense. In fact, that description applies to almost every track on Mastodon’s underrated 2009 progressive metal masterpiece, <em>Crack the Skye.</em> </p> <p>Richly detailed, “The Czar” is virtual feast of brilliantly layered guitar tones that demands the deep dive you can only get through some fab ‘phones.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Jx2fp-kKOIw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Muddy Waters, “Feel Like Going Home”</strong></p> <p>If you’ve ever wanted to know what it would be like to stand in the same room with Muddy Waters while he played the greatest blues the world has ever heard, just get a copy of the <em>Folk Singer</em> album recorded in 1964 and listen to this haunting studio performance. You will feel the very earth shake underneath your shoes. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3sjzp6nGw-w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Queen, “Killer Queen”</strong></p> <p>Everybody knows Queen are the masters of layering and overdubbing, but how do you get all those sounds to speak properly in the mix? </p> <p>“Killer Queen” from the 1974 album <em>Sheer Heat Attack</em> is a great mini-lesson in how to place all those elements in an entertaining stereo field, and it can only be appreciated with a great set of earphones. Guaranteed to blow your mind. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BAf2S6ij2gk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Pantera, “5 Minutes Alone”</strong></p> <p>When most people think of headphone jams, they usually flash on something ethereal like Pink Floyd or Jimi Hendrix. But sometimes it’s great to just get a swift kick in the head, especially when you’re hitting the gym or getting psyched up for great night out. </p> <p>Almost anything off Pantera’s <em>Far Beyond Driven</em> does the trick, but “5 Minutes Alone” always works for me.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7m7njvwB-Ks" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8PZdxCGorls" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Brad Tolinski is the editor-in-chief at </em>Guitar World.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/grateful-dead">Grateful Dead</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/queen">Queen</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/mastodon">Mastodon</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/pantera">Pantera</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/five-songs-made-better-through-advancements-headphones#comments Brad Tolinski Ceek Ceekars Grateful Dead Mastodon Muddy Waters Pantera News Features Thu, 26 Mar 2015 19:22:49 +0000 Brad Tolinski 23774 at http://www.guitarworld.com Five Great Guitar Jams You Need to Hear — Now! http://www.guitarworld.com/five-great-guitar-jams-you-need-hear-now <!--paging_filter--><p>Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Eddie Van Halen, blah, blah, blah … </p> <p>We know those guys can play, but what about Speedy Haworth, who dazzled audiences in the Fifties with his appearances on ABC-TV’s <em>Ozark Jubilee</em>? </p> <p>Or how about the underrated, mustachioed Canadian guitar hero Frank Marino of Mahogany Rush? </p> <p>Never heard of them? Well, you’re in for a treat.</p> <p><em>Guitar World</em> handpicked a handful of amazing players you might have missed, and even found video evidence of their genius. Some of these performances take a minute or two to develop, so be a little patient. And for god's sake, whatever you do, don’t miss the last few minutes of Shawn Lane’s far-out improv—it’s a mind blower.</p> <p><strong>Speedy Haworth, "Speedin’ West"</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8Yp7zCu4VTw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Junior Brown chicken pickin’ on Jimi Hendrix and the "Sugar Foot Rag"</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rtvT_hOC80A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Frank Marino, “I’m a King Bee”</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gj0P_DRMFsk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Rory Gallagher, “Shin Kicker”</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CL80jFkLzQ0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Shawn Lane, 2002 Earth Day Celebration</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xpzLTJ_9twc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Brad Tolinski is the editor-in-chief at </em>Guitar World.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/five-great-guitar-jams-you-need-hear-now#comments Brad Tolinski Frank Marino Junior Brown Mahogany Rush Shawn Lane Speedy Haworth Blogs News Mon, 23 Mar 2015 21:56:11 +0000 Brad Tolinski 23780 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jimmy Page Revisits Two of Led Zeppelin’s Most God-like Albums, 'IV' and 'Houses of the Holy' http://www.guitarworld.com/jimmy-page-revisits-two-led-zeppelin-s-most-god-albums-iv-and-houses-holy <!--paging_filter--><p>It’s a beautiful Indian Summer day, and I’m standing on Queens Gate Road in London, England, a stone’s throw from the legendary Royal Albert Hall, where Led Zeppelin played in 1970, a performance immortalized on 2003’s <em>Led Zeppelin</em> DVD. </p> <p>It’s a fitting landmark, considering that I’ve just finished a productive hour chatting with the band’s guitarist and producer, Jimmy Page, about the new deluxe editions of 1971’s <em>Led Zeppelin IV</em> (the third best-selling album in U.S. history) and its 1973 follow-up, <em>Houses of the Holy. </em></p> <p>I’m searching in vain for a taxi when, suddenly, a middle-aged man holding a sizable video camera on his shoulder walks up and politely introduces himself to me. In tentative English, he explains he’s with a Dutch television station that is producing a segment on the lasting importance of Zep’s classic “Stairway to Heaven.” At least, that’s what I think he says.</p> <p> “So, vat is da meaning of dis song?” he asks.</p> <p> Good question. I’ve written an entire book on Jimmy Page and have had a good three or four decades to think about it, so I should be able to say something relatively intelligent on the matter. But the truth is, it isn’t an easy task. There’s an elusive quality to the song that defies a simple explanation, which probably explains its extraordinary durability. </p> <p>I surprise myself by speaking quite passionately about the song’s theme of spiritual yearning and redemption. I concede that the lyrics are pretty vague, filled with lines like “sometimes words have two meanings,” “there are two paths you can go by” and “there walks a lady we all know/who shines white light and wants to show/how everything still turns to gold.” But, like any other mystical text, the song’s virtue is in its ambiguity—it’s designed to draw you in and “make you wonder."</p> <p> I conclude by telling him that the enduring popularity of the entire <em>Led Zeppelin IV</em> album is probably due to the strange timelessness buried within its musical DNA. Songs like “Battle of Evermore,” “When the Levee Breaks,” “Rock and Roll” and “Stairway” are profound in their ability to shift between the pagan rituals of Stonehenge and some unspecified space age where “all is one and one is all.” </p> <p> “It’s not an album—it’s a work of comparative mythology,” I sputter.</p> <p> The Dutch cameraman smiles and seems satisfied, if not a little puzzled, by my response. After he leaves, I’m a little mad at myself for not bringing up these ideas to Page during our interview an hour earlier, but as a guitar journalist, I was on a different mission. </p> <p>Last June, Led Zeppelin launched an ambitious campaign to reissue their catalog, releasing remastered versions of their first three albums, each accompanied by a second disc of entirely unreleased music related to that album. As the holidays approach, a second round begins with special editions of their fourth and fifth albums, <em>IV</em> and <em>Houses of the Holy.</em></p> <p> The <em>Led Zeppelin IV</em> deluxe edition includes unreleased versions of every song on the original album, including alternate mixes of “Misty Mountain Hop” and “Four Sticks,” stripped-down guitar/mandolin instrumental versions of “Battle of Evermore” and “Going to California” and the much-speculated original Sunset Sound Studios mix of “Stairway to Heaven.”</p> <p> The Houses of the Holy companion disc offers rough and working mixes of “The Ocean” and “Dancing Days” as well as revealing guitar-heavy mixes of “Over the Hills and Far Away,” “The Rain Song” and a cool alternate take of “The Song Remains the Same.”</p> <p> It’s a ridiculous amount of ground to cover in 60 minutes, but Page seems game. Well…pretty game. As an interview, Jimmy is as dynamic and quirky as his music. He’s a highly original thinker who can dazzle with his clarity and insight, but when he wants, he can be as secretive and mysterious as King Solomon. Just the mention of a song title will have him enthusiastically holding forth in great detail, while seemingly innocent questions about guitars or effects can be met with a succinct, “I’m not going to answer that.” </p> <p> But, hey, it’s all cool. Just like “Stairway to Heaven,” a little bit of mystery always makes you wonder.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: One of the biggest bits of news is that you’ve included some of the original Los Angeles mixes of <em>IV</em> on one of the bonus discs. The story has always been that, aside from “When the Levee Breaks,” the mixes done at Sunset Sound Studios were a disaster. However both “Stairway to Heaven” and “Misty Mountain Hop,” both included in the companion disc, sound pretty damn good.</strong></p> <p>After we completed most of our work on the fourth album at Island Studios and Headley Grange [a remote three-story stone farmhouse that Zeppelin used as a recording facility], [engineer] Andy Johns and I went to Sunset Sound in Los Angeles to mix. The tapes included most of the music that would end up on <em>IV,</em> including “Stairway,” “Going to California,” and even a few things that ended up on <em>Physical Graffiti,</em> like “Down By the Seaside” and “Boogie with Stu”—but not “Battle of Evermore” which wasn’t finished yet. </p> <p> We did some great work there, and I was particularly impressed with their wonderful echo and reverb facilities. The only problem was, they also had a rather “colorful” studio monitoring system. While we were mixing, everything sounded huge and the low end sounded especially massive. But when we returned to England and played our work back, the sound was nothing like what we had heard in Los Angeles. It was deflated…a pale echo of what we’d heard in L.A. </p> <p> Around that period of time, there were alarming stories of tapes that had been damaged or slightly erased or interfered with by magnets used by airport security. We all wondered whether anything had happened to them. In actual fact, nothing had happened to them. Regardless, the band was not particularly enamored with the way things sounded, so I agreed to remix everything. </p> <p> There were exceptions. The Sunset Sound mix of “When the Levee Breaks” had a density that we could not be replicated when we remixed it in England. It didn’t have that space—that black hole. So we put that one on the original album. We’ve included the remix on the companion disc so you can decide for yourself. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/4m2FhRv8xF0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>You also included the Sunset mix of “Stairway,” which also sounds pretty good. </strong></p> <p>Yeah, it’s also pretty superb. </p> <p><strong>When you were putting together the companion disc, did you have any second thoughts? Did you think any of the alternatives would’ve been better to put on the original albums?</strong></p> <p><em>Weeeeeellll,</em> I don’t know about that. I think it is what it is. I suppose you could look at it this way: you wouldn’t have the versions that you know, and you wouldn’t have had the possibility to use these wonderful versions for the bonus disc! [laughs] It might’ve took 30 or 40 years to manifest, but Zeppelin runs on sidereal time—or time you can stretch—within the music and in the general ambience of the band.</p> <p><strong>On the original version of “Rock and Roll,” the beginning of the solo is almost buried, and then slowly emerges as it unfolds. On the companion disc, the alternative mix offers more clarity, but it begs the question: why did you bury it in the first place?</strong></p> <p>It makes you listen harder! I didn’t want it to be vulgar and punch the listener in the nose, I wanted to play with them a little bit and draw them in. It’s actually pretty interesting what’s being played.</p> <p><strong>The new version of “Four Sticks” also offers more clarity in certain areas, particularly in John Bonham’s drums. There is so much going on in that song. Was it difficult to achieve a final mix?</strong></p> <p>There were a number of attempts to get that song right. I know, because I just reviewed them all! You’d get to the point where you could hear all the textures…and then realize there wasn’t enough bass. [laughs] Back in those days, it was all manual mixing, so every mix is different, which is really rather good. Getting a great mix was a kind of performance itself. We didn’t start having automated mixes until <em>In Through the Out Door. </em></p> <p>I suppose you could argue which one is better, but on both versions of “Four Sticks”—the original and the alternate version—you really get the feel of the ride of the mix and how we’re trying to get all the textures to organically move throughout the song. I’ve always felt that “Four Sticks” was very abstract, so it was particularly important to get the soundscape right. In some ways, the textures are the song.</p> <p>But regarding hearing John’s performance, or some of the other nuances, I was very diligent during this whole process to release things that had real musical value. A lot of thought went into what we were going to use to compliment the original tracks. </p> <p><strong>Going back over both of these albums, it’s striking how much electric 12-string you used. What was the primary guitar?</strong></p> <p>Well, on “Stairway” I used both my Vox Phantom that I used on “Thank You” and my Fender Electric XII.</p> <p><strong>Did you use them for tonal differences?</strong></p> <p>Not really. They both sort of sounded the same. It was more about how they played. They felt different. On “Song Remains the Same,” it’s just the Fender. </p> <hr /> <p><strong>Listening to the dramatic, stripped-down version of “Battle of Evermore” on the companion disc, something occurred to me. What came first, the mandolin or the guitar part?</strong></p> <p>The mandolin part. I was at Headley Grange one evening and started playing John Paul Jones’ mandolin. I had never really played a violin or a ukulele or any instruments with those kinds of tunings, but before I knew it I had written the whole thing—the verses, the chorus and the breakdown. The rhythm guitar was created later because I had to work out what the chords were and the correct inversions—because I didn’t know what chords I was playing on the mandolin.</p> <p><strong>Why fade the track halfway through?</strong></p> <p>It’s a vignette. It’s similar to how I handled “The Song Remains the Same” on the companion disc. I wanted to give the listener a sense of how the track evolved, but didn’t feel the need to belabor the point. Same with “Going to California”—that’s not the full-length version, either. It’s about illustrating the texture and vibe. </p> <p><strong>I think you’ve said each album is essentially a reflection of what you were feeling at that particular time and space. <em>Houses of the Holy</em> is the most celebratory album in your catalog. It’s the only album without a blues. </strong></p> <p>Well, I’m not sure I’ve ever said it was a summing up of where we were at that point in time; it’s more about what we’re managing to achieve musically under the roof of a recording facility. I think it’s more about how we’ve managed to push things, and we’d been pushing all the way through. </p> <p> Here’s the interesting thing: if we had been forced by the record company to make singles, we would’ve never been able to explore like we did or make albums like <em>IV</em> or <em>Houses of the Holy.</em> Because we created each album as an independent production, we could actually dictate that there would be no singles. And when you look at the whole of the catalog, my god, you realize what a saving grace that was not to have to comply with commercial radio. </p> <p>Our attitude was, “Here’s the album, and if you want to give something to radio, then fair enough, but don’t bother asking us to follow it up with something similar.” </p> <p><strong><em>Houses</em> features some of your most layered and complex guitar arrangements. Around this time you had installed a home multitrack studio. Did that influence the material on <em>Houses</em>?</strong></p> <p>Yes, I did have a home multitrack recorder, and I was experimenting quite a bit, and certainly some of it was done with Zeppelin in mind. “The Rain Song” was one of the tracks that I had developed at home. My demo features a Mellotron and everything—I didn’t play it as well as John Paul Jones, of course—but the whole idea, with all the various movements, was done at home. </p> <p><strong>What about “Over the Hills and Far Away”?</strong></p> <p>No, because that was easy to convey to the band with just a guitar. What I wanted to achieve with “The Rain Song” I felt was less evident from just performing the guitar part, so creating a demo was important.</p> <p> To be honest, I just usually taped things to remind myself. One of the most important things to remember is that musicians of our generation—before there were cassette recorders—had to remember everything. Most of the time I didn’t really need to record demos because I had already committed the idea to memory.</p> <p><strong>“The Song Remains The Same” is genuinely unusual. It’s almost a compendium of folk and country guitar techniques presented in a completely different context—the opening solo features straight flat-picking, the bends behind the vocals are reminiscent of country guitarist <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/white-lightning-ode-original-b-bender-clarence-white-byrds">Clarence White,</a> and there’s a healthy amount of hybrid picking on your Fender XII.</strong></p> <p>That’s fair enough. It wasn’t intentionally any one of those things. It was just the result of me listening to all these alternative six-string things at the time and summing them up…or perhaps reprogramming them. [laughs] But it’s all a question of taste—of what you put in or leave out to make the most of your technique relative to the song. </p> <p>I was so OCD then that, by the time it came for me to record my guitar parts, I was completely absorbed by what I was doing and the right parts just seem to come out. And most of the solos were pretty spontaneous. I’d warm up and then immediately record, and then I’d do the next one. I never wanted to labor the point of anything. </p> <hr /> <strong>Continuing with the uplifting theme of <em>Houses,</em> I’d like to talk about “Dancing Days.” </strong> <p>Yes, that whole song is like a celebration—it’s jubilant. </p> <p>But I would say <em>Houses of the Holy</em> is an album of many moods. Each song captures an essence of a feeling, an emotion or sensitivity, and you can hear the band maturing as we play all these different styles. I feel there’s a logical progress from each album. You can see the expansion and risks we were taking. Or should I say, the new territory that is there to be civilized and conquered. [laughs]</p> <p> “Dancing Days” is interesting because I remember exactly where I was when I laid down those slide guitar parts. I was at Olympic in Studio One, and I stationed myself in the control room and fed my lead out to an amp in the studio. I wanted it really loud, and you could get the ambience of the whole room. I just roared. I hadn’t even worked out what the part was going to be. But I guess I was so on top of my playing that I could just sort of do that. </p> <p> It sounds like the arrangement to that song was all sort of meticulously worked out, but it all just came out, and all I had to do was a few little drop-ins and the song was done. And then I double-tracked it as well. It was pretty spontaneous. When the rest of the band came in later, I said, “I hope you’re gonna like this.” They were like, “Wow!” </p> <p><strong><em>Houses of the Holy</em> sounds different than any of your other albums. Your guitar sounds brighter, and the drums are a more refined version of the groundbreaking sound you created on <em>IV.</em></strong></p> <p>I thought it was important to make each Led Zeppelin album sound radically different than the one before. All the changes were intentional. That’s why we used different engineers and different locations.</p> <p> I don’t want to go into detail, but I used a lot of different guitars on Houses, which might account for some of what you are hearing. And although we used some of the same techniques to record John’s drums that we developed at Headley on <em>IV,</em> most of <em>Houses</em> was done in a traditional studio, which is why it sounds brighter. You wouldn’t have the same expansion and headroom that we had with the high ceilings in Headley. </p> <p><strong>Why isn’t the song “Houses of the Holy” on <em>Houses of the Holy</em>?</strong></p> <p>Because it comes out on the next album. [laughs] It’s meant to be a little mischievous.</p> <p><strong>This hiss is quite audible on the version of “No Quarter” on the companion disc. Did you hesitate to use it, or did you try to eliminate it using modern technology? </strong></p> <p>It was such a great take by John Paul Jones, I wasn’t about to let a little hiss stop me from using it. In some ways, it adds to the ambience of the time and place. </p> <p><strong>The guitar solo on the original version of “No Quarter” is one of your more unusual statements. It’s jazzy without being jazz.<br /> With the piano being the way it is, the last thing I wanted to do was play a jazz homage. It would’ve been too obvious. I wanted to show the guitarist hasn’t gone to sleep—he’s thinking about presenting the composition in a different way, using different colors and tones and figures that are…spritely. It’s like water nymphs or something coming through.</strong></p> <p><strong>While the music on Houses is primarily upbeat, your use of dissonance on the opening riff of “Dancing Days,” and the rather sour use of seven chords on sections of “The Ocean,” undercuts the happy subject matter and keeps them from sounding too…</strong></p> <p>…cozy. I never really wanted to take the easy way out. Those harmonies you are talking about are stretching and pushing those songs and making them a bit angular. You’re not in a comfort zone when you are listening to the opening riff of “Dancing Days,” but I think it feels natural in a dark way.</p> <p><strong>It’s “Dancing Days,” but it’s not disco!</strong></p> <p>It’s not the norm. It’s not a chug-along thing. It’s got intent in its attitude. It’s an attack. Although it’s not as extreme, that idea also appears on the solo to “Misty Mountain Hop.” I was pushing myself to explore new areas of harmony. I wanted to investigate those outside edges—maybe push myself over the edge! I’m surprised, really, that I’m here to tell the tale.</p> <p><em>Photo: Atlas Icons/Jeffrey Mayer</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/jimmy-page-revisits-two-led-zeppelin-s-most-god-albums-iv-and-houses-holy#comments Brad Tolinski Holiday 2014 Jimmy Page Led Zeppelin Interviews News Features Magazine Fri, 09 Jan 2015 13:19:43 +0000 Brad Tolinski 23245 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jimmy Page and Chris Cornell Talk Led Zeppelin on Stage at Guitar World Event http://www.guitarworld.com/jimmy-page-and-chris-cornell-talk-led-zeppelin-stage-guitar-world-event <!--paging_filter--><p>To celebrate the release of Jimmy Page’s lavish new photo book, <em>Jimmy Page by Jimmy Page</em>, the guitar legend appeared with Chris Cornell, guitarist and singer for Soundgarden, at the Theater at Ace Hotel in downtown Los Angeles for a relaxed question-and-answer session that spanned the entirety of Page’s 50-year career.</p> <p>Sponsored by Genesis Publications, Gibson Custom, <em>Guitar World</em> and <em>Guitar Aficionado</em>, the hour-and-a-half event enthralled a packed house of 1,400 fans as Cornell quizzed Page about the rare photos and memorabilia—many drawn from Page’s personal archives—which were projected on an enormous screen hovering above both men.</p> <p>The 70-year-old Page, with his silver hair, scarf and black leather jacket, looked as sharp as a James Bond super villain, while Cornell, in thick-rimmed glasses, evoked a hipster newsman. The subject matter ran the gamut from extremely light and frothy to the serious matter of drummer John Bonham’s untimely death, of which Page commented, “when we lost 25 percent of the band, we really lost the whole thing.”</p> <p>Among the more humorous moments was when Cornell took note of a photo of Page wearing a bright—but very tight—red sweater emblazoned with his “Zoso” symbol. Page explained that a friend’s girlfriend had knit it for him, but when he sweated onstage, it immediately started to shrink. </p> <p>During another point in the conversation, as a July 1986 cover of <em>Guitar World</em> featuring Page on the cover (See the photo gallery below) was projected on the screen, Cornell flat-out declared Page to be the greatest guitarist in rock history, eliciting an extended standing ovation from the audience. In response, Page buried his head in his hands and declared his embarrassment, but a smile betrayed his appreciation.</p> <p>Talking about future plans, Page expressed hope to be touring within the next year. </p> <p>“The most important part is to be seen playing,” he told the delighted audience, which included such special guests as Metallica’s Kirk Hammett, Zakk Wylde and Edgar Winter. “It doesn’t matter what I do at home!”</p> <p>The entire evening was professionally video taped by <em>Guitar World</em>, so stay tuned for highlights on guitarworld.com!</p> <p><em>Photo: Jeremy Danger</em></p> <p><strong>Page appears on the cover of the all-new Holiday 2014 issue of <em>Guitar World</em> magazine. This time around, Page discusses the new versions of <em>Led Zeppelin IV</em> and <em>Houses of the Holy</em>, both of which were released late last month and are climbing the charts. <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-holiday-14-led-zeppelin?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=Holiday2014VideosPage">You can check out the new issue of GW right here.</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/chris-cornell">Chris Cornell</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/jimmy-page-and-chris-cornell-talk-led-zeppelin-stage-guitar-world-event#comments Brad Tolinski Chris Cornell Jeremy Danger Jimmy Page Led Zeppelin News Fri, 14 Nov 2014 14:23:03 +0000 Brad Tolinski 22863 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jimmy Page Revisits 'Led Zeppelin IV' and 'Houses of the Holy' — Five Questions http://www.guitarworld.com/jimmy-page-revisits-led-zeppelin-IV-houses-holy-interview-guitar-world-brad-tolinski <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This is an excerpt from the all-new Holiday 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the rest of Brad Tolinski's interview with Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page, plus features on the Kinks' Dave Davies, St. Vincent, Mike Stern and Eric Johnson, Primus, Alex Skolnick, Maroon 5 and Machine Head; reviews of new gear from PRS Guitars, Ernie Ball/Music Man, ESP USA, Mesa/Boogie and Vibramate, not to mention columns by Steel Panther's Satchel, Revocation's Dave Davidson, our own Andy Aledort and more, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-holiday-14-led-zeppelin?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=PageExcerpt">pick up the Holiday 2014 issue of GW at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <p><strong>Holy Spirited:<em> Guitarist and producer Jimmy Page revisits two of Led Zeppelin’s most god-like albums, <em>IV</em> and <em>Houses of the Holy.</em></em></strong></p> <p>In this excerpt from our Holiday 2014 cover story, Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page responds to five points posed by <em>Guitar World's</em> Brad Tolinski.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: One of the biggest bits of news is that you’ve included some of the original Los Angeles mixes of <em>IV</em> on one of the bonus discs. The story has always been that, aside from “When the Levee Breaks,” the mixes done at Sunset Sound Studios were a disaster. However “Stairway to Heaven” and “Misty Mountain Hop,” both included in the companion disc, sound pretty damn good.</strong></p> <p>After we completed most of our work on the fourth album at Island Studios and Headley Grange [a remote three-story stone farmhouse that Zeppelin used as a recording facility], [engineer] Andy Johns and I went to Sunset Sound in Los Angeles to mix. The tapes included most of the music that would end up on <em>IV</em>, including “Stairway,” “Going to California,” and even a few things that ended up on <em>Physical Graffiti</em>, like “Down By the Seaside” and “Boogie with Stu”—but not “Battle of Evermore,” which wasn’t finished yet. </p> <p>We did some great work there, and I was particularly impressed with their wonderful echo and reverb facilities. The only problem was, they also had a rather “colorful” studio monitoring system. While we were mixing, everything sounded huge and the low end sounded especially massive. But when we returned to England and played our work back, the sound was nothing like what we had heard in Los Angeles. It was deflated…a pale echo of what we’d heard in L.A. </p> <p>Around that period of time, there were alarming stories of tapes that had been damaged or slightly erased or interfered with by magnets used by airport security. We all wondered whether anything had happened to them. In actual fact, nothing had happened to them. Regardless, the band was not particularly enamored with the way things sounded, so I agreed to remix everything. </p> <p>There were exceptions. The Sunset Sound mix of “When the Levee Breaks” had a density that we could not be replicated when we remixed it in England. It didn’t have that space—that black hole. So we put that one on the original album. We’ve included the remix on the companion disc so you can decide for yourself. </p> <p><strong>I think you’ve said each album is essentially a reflection of what you were feeling at that particular time and space. Houses of the Holy is the most celebratory album in your catalog. It’s the only album without a blues. </strong></p> <p>Well, I’m not sure I’ve ever said it was a summing up of where we were at that point in time; it’s more about what we’re managing to achieve musically under the roof of a recording facility. I think it’s more about how we’ve managed to push things, and we’d been pushing all the way through. </p> <p> Here’s the interesting thing: if we had been forced by the record company to make singles, we would’ve never been able to explore like we did or make albums like <em>IV</em> or <em>Houses of the Holy</em>. Because we created each album as an independent production, we could actually dictate that there would be no singles. And when you look at the whole of the catalog, my god, you realize what a saving grace that was not to have to comply with commercial radio. Our attitude was, “Here’s the album, and if you want to give something to radio, then fair enough, but don’t bother asking us to follow it up with something similar.” </p> <p><strong>“The Song Remains The Same” is genuinely unusual. It’s almost a compendium of folk and country guitar techniques presented in a completely different context—the opening solo features straight flat-picking, the bends behind the vocals are reminiscent of country guitarist <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/white-lightning-ode-original-b-bender-clarence-white-byrds">Clarence White</a>, and there’s a healthy amount of hybrid picking on your Fender XII.</strong></p> <p>That’s fair enough. It wasn’t intentionally any one of those things. It was just the result of me listening to all these alternative six-string things at the time and summing them up…or perhaps reprogramming them. [laughs] But it’s all a question of taste—of what you put in or leave out to make the most of your technique relative to the song. </p> <p>I was so OCD then that, by the time it came for me to record my guitar parts, I was completely absorbed by what I was doing and the right parts just seem to come out. And most of the solos were pretty spontaneous. I’d warm up and then immediately record, and then I’d do the next one. I never wanted to labor the point of anything. </p> <p><strong>Why isn’t the song “Houses of the Holy” on <em>Houses of the Holy</em>?</strong></p> <p>Because it comes out on the next album. [laughs] It’s meant to be a little mischievous.</p> <p><strong>The guitar solo on the original version of “No Quarter” is one of your more unusual statements. It’s jazzy without being jazz.</strong></p> <p>With the piano being the way it is, the last thing I wanted to do was play a jazz homage. It would’ve been too obvious. I wanted to show the guitarist hasn’t gone to sleep—he’s thinking about presenting the composition in a different way, using different colors and tones and figures that are…spritely. It’s like water nymphs or something coming through.</p> <p><strong><em>For the rest of Brad Tolinski's interview with Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page, plus features on the Kinks' Dave Davies, St. Vincent, Mike Stern and Eric Johnson, Primus, Alex Skolnick, Maroon 5 and Machine Head; reviews of new gear from PRS Guitars, Ernie Ball/Music Man, ESP USA, Mesa/Boogie and Vibramate, not to mention columns by Steel Panther's Satchel, Revocation's Dave Davidson, our own Andy Aledort and more, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-holiday-14-led-zeppelin?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=PageExcerpt">pick up the Holiday 2014 issue of GW at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></strong></p> <p><em>Photo: MirrorPix/Courtesy of Everett Collection</em></p> <p><em>Tonight, November 12, Jimmy Page will appear at the Theatre at Ace Hotel in Los Angeles for "An Evening with Jimmy Page In Conversation with Chris Cornell." If you'd like to try your hand at snagging tickets, <a href="http://www.ticketmaster.com/event/09004D369E044555">step right this way.</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-11-04%20at%2010.06.09%20AM.png" width="620" height="807" alt="Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 10.06.09 AM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/jimmy-page-revisits-led-zeppelin-IV-houses-holy-interview-guitar-world-brad-tolinski#comments Brad Tolinski Holiday 2014 Jimmy Page Led Zeppelin Interviews News Features Magazine Thu, 13 Nov 2014 14:09:38 +0000 Brad Tolinski 22838 at http://www.guitarworld.com Guitar World Presents Girl Rockers at CBGB Music Festival in New York City http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-world-presents-girl-rockers-cbgb-festival-new-york-city <!--paging_filter--><p>The third annual <a href="http://www.cbgbfest.com/">CBGB Music &amp; Film Festival</a> will take over Manhattan October 8 to 12 — providing five days of incredible concerts, art exhibitions, movies and entertainment-industry shoptalk. </p> <p>And <em>Guitar World</em> will be right in the thick of things. </p> <p>On Saturday night (October 11), we're hosting a kick-ass evening of music featuring four of the most exciting up-and-coming female-fronted alternative and punk rock bands in New York City at Manhattan’s legendary R Bar on 218 Bowery (right across from where CBGB used to be).</p> <p>C’mon out and join <em>Guitar World</em> Editor-in-Chief Brad Tolinski, have some beers and watch these women work it!</p> <p>The bill includes:</p> <p><strong>9:45 p.m. Wise Girl</strong><br /> With a sound somewhere between Nineties alternative and riot grrrl, Wise Girl is a sharp, power pop foursome that draws from the past but produces something wholly modern. 2013 marked the release of the band’s first, full-length, debut, <em>You’ll Just Have To Wait</em>. The album is a 10-track LP filled with power chords, driving beats and fabulously quirky lyrics.</p> <p><strong>9 p.m. Izzy Zay &amp; The Inmates</strong><br /> Vocalist/guitarist Izzy Zay is a very strange and mysterious girl. She speaks fluent English, French, Portuguese and Spanish, so it’s often difficult to pin down where she’s from or where she’s been. With her beautifully resonant voice and evocative lyrics, she explores the same subconscious landscapes and symbolic terrain as the Doors or perhaps Syd Barrett’s Pink Floyd. The band features <em>Guitar World</em>’s Brad Tolinski on guitar and violin.</p> <p><strong>8:15 p.m. Sharkmuffin</strong><br /> Sharkmuffin's name fits. The Brooklyn three-piece outfit crafts adorable pop music with jagged, garage-aged fangs. With lyrical subjects including incest, mythical bestiality and homicidal heroin using femebots, girl group-esque hooks are paired with heavy Seventies-inspired guitar riffs to create the raw sound of these punk-rocking debutants. With these guys, it's no secret the end goal is fun</p> <p><strong>7 p.m. Party Lights</strong><br /> Party Lights unabashedly wears their power pop hearts on their sleeve. The bastard child of Cheap Trick and the Go-Go's, the Brooklyn quartet doesn't see a problem with worshiping at the altar of the Knack and the Real Kids every now and again (and again and again). Songs about revenge, heartbreak and bad choices might be bad for real life but are songwriting gold, and luckily — depending on who you ask — Party Lights has been through it all, surviving by the skin of their teeth. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/VP1rPm-N05A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-world-presents-girl-rockers-cbgb-festival-new-york-city#comments Brad Tolinski CBGB Izzy Zay Party Lights News Wed, 01 Oct 2014 15:16:46 +0000 Guitar World Staff 22478 at http://www.guitarworld.com King Crimson Return, Play First Gigs in Six Years http://www.guitarworld.com/king-crimson-return-play-first-gigs-six-years <!--paging_filter--><p>Fans of progressive rock had reason to rejoice this past summer when Robert Fripp, the guitarist and bandleader of the legendary progressive rock band King Crimson, dramatically announced he was coming out of retirement and the group was “returning to active service.” </p> <p>True to his word, after a six-year hiatus, the U.K. band returned to the U.S. in September for a sold-out tour featuring a new lineup. </p> <p>At seven members, it is the largest configuration of the group ever assembled, featuring three drummers, along with veteran bassist Tony Levin, saxophonist Mel Collins, new vocalist/guitarist Jakko Jakszyk and, of course, Fripp.</p> <p>Last week in New York City, the unit played an intense and swinging set featuring songs from several different eras of the band’s 40-year history, including knockout versions of “Starless,” “Larks’ Tongue In Aspic, Parts One &amp; Two” and “21st Century Schizoid Man.” </p> <p><em>Guitar World</em> recently caught up with Jakszyk to discuss his role the reconstituted group. A veteran prog rocker, who at one time played in the King Crimson cover band called the 21st Century Schizoid Band, is obviously thrilled to play in the real deal. So much so, he commissioned a special guitar made by Paul Reed Smith to commemorate the event…but more on that later.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: Fans of the band were a little surprised when it was announced that King Crimson was touring. We were under the impression Robert Fripp had retired.</strong></p> <p>The band was also surprised when we got the call! I think it might’ve had to do with a record he and I worked on together called <em>A Scarcity of Miracles</em> back in 2011. It wasn’t a Crimson album, but Robert referred to it as a "Crimson ProjeKct." Five of the current seven members are on that album, and I think he enjoyed it. Also, I think he had to just resolve an ongoing litigation with Universal Music, which went on for ages and used to trouble him on a daily basis. I can’t speak for him, but those are my observations. </p> <p><strong>Why have three drummers in the band?</strong></p> <p>Why, indeed! I have to admit, when Robert first started talking about using a drum trio, I thought he was mad. I couldn’t see how it was going to work. Then he explained he wanted the drums to be in front and the band on risers behind them! That made me even more concerned. I had all kinds of worries about how we would monitor the sound. But when we set up for the first time, and we saw how cool it looked, we all got excited. It took a little time, but eventually we figured out how to monitor the band using in-ear headphones. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/N1JapuD0ikk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Isn’t it odd for the singer to be behind the drummers?</strong></p> <p>Exactly! But there is something very egalitarian about the arrangement. Usually the singer is the frontman—he’s the guy that’s the focus of attention. By putting him and featured soloists in the back, suddenly the audience’s attention shifts to the music and all of the musicians rather than one guy. In a way, the current version of Crimson feels more like an orchestra. It’s a real group.</p> <p><strong>How were you able to coordinate the drum parts?</strong></p> <p>A lot of credit has to go to Gavin Harrison, who really worked hard on arranging and writing out the parts. But all three have done a great job. They actually spent a lot of time rehearsing separately from the band. </p> <p><strong>So Fripp wasn’t so crazy after all.</strong></p> <p>He sees things in a way no one else can.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/qOk1PNv8LLA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Tell us about your cool <em>In The Court of the Crimson King</em> PRS guitar.</strong></p> <p>When I was asked to join Crimson, I really wanted to make a statement of intent. So, I asked the guys at PRS if they were up for making me a guitar that looked as special as it played. Together, we took the iconic artwork of Crimson’s first album and created a version that would fit on the PRS shape. <a href="http://www.prsguitars.com/index.php/artists/story/king_crimsons_jakko_jakszyk_discusses_his_new_custom_built_p24_guitar">The photos don’t do the guitar justice—the finish looks like porcelain.</a></p> <p><strong>What amp are you using? It’s clear that under this unique stage setup, a 100-watt 4x12 amp would be overpowering and pretty impractical.</strong></p> <p>I use a Kemper Profiling Amp. One of the editors at <em>Guitarist</em> magazine in the U.K. turned me on to them. They're really flexible, easy to use and they allow me model the variety of sounds I need to compliment all the different eras of Crimson. </p> <p>But I have to tell you this funny story that happened while we were first putting the show together. I’m required to perform some of the parts Robert played on the original albums, so I need to mimic his sound. One day while we were rehearsing, we were playing a song and Robert stopped me and complimented my sound. He asked me what I was using and I told him it was a preset on the Kemper—it was called “Early Fripp”!</p> <p><em>Brad Tolinski is the editor-in-chief at </em>Guitar World.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/king-crimson-return-play-first-gigs-six-years#comments Brad Tolinski Jakko Jakszyk King Crimson PRS Guitars Interviews News Features Fri, 26 Sep 2014 18:39:00 +0000 Brad Tolinski 22450 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jeff Beck and ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons Discuss the Rocking Relationship Between Guitars, Cars and Everything in Between http://www.guitarworld.com/jeff-beck-and-zz-top-s-billy-gibbons-discuss-rocking-relationship-between-guitars-cars-and-everything-between <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This is an excerpt from the all-new November 2014 issue of Guitar World. For the rest of this story, plus new Gibbons/Beck photos by Ross Halfin, not to mention features on Weezer, George Thorogood, MXR &amp; Eddie Van Halen, the guitar pick revolution, Nita Strauss and Black Veil Brides, plus gear reviews (Epiphone, Zoom, Gretsch, TC-Helicon, Mesa and more) and lessons by Marty Friedman and Steel Panther's Satchel, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/guitar-world-november-14-billy-gibbons-and-jeff-beck/?&amp;utm_source=email&amp;utm_medium=daily_enews&amp;utm_campaign=GWNOV14">check out the November 2014 issue of Guitar World!</a></em></p> <p><strong>The Surreal Thing: As they prepare to hit the road together for a summer tour, Jeff Beck and ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons wax philosophical on the rock and roll relationship between guitars, cars and everything in between.</strong></p> <p>It’s a hot, sunny California day as Jeff Beck and ZZ Top’s Billy F. Gibbons stroll through the lush courtyard of Hollywood’s swanky Sunset Marquis Hotel. </p> <p>Ripe for caricature, they are perhaps two of the most distinctive-looking performers in rock history. Beck, with his much-imitated rooster shag haircut, and Gibbons, dressed in full hipster Wild West drag, look almost disconcertingly the same as they have for the past three or four decades. </p> <p>If we hadn’t invited them ourselves on the eve of their first tour together, it would be easy to mistake them for a mirage from one of those surreal ZZ Top videos that dominated MTV in the Eighties. </p> <p><em>Surreal</em> is actually a word that pops up quite often in conversations with both musicians over the next few days. It’s certainly a fitting adjective to describe aspects of their music. </p> <p>Since Beck’s stunning 1965 debut with the Yardbirds, he has thrilled and confounded guitarists with his exciting and often avant-garde approach to the instrument. His playful and imaginative take on Willie Dixon’s “Ain’t Superstitious” from <em>Truth</em>, his 1968 album with Rod Stewart on vocals and Ronnie Wood on bass, certainly rivaled anything Jimi Hendrix was creating at the time. </p> <p>And his consistently innovative work on tracks like “Going Down” (1972), “Blue Wind” (1976),” “Where Were You” (1989) and “Hammerhead” (2010), which won a Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance, continues to push the limits of what can be done on a Fender Stratocaster without getting arrested.</p> <p>And anyone with even a passing knowledge of ZZ Top knows how strange they can be. Comprised of Gibbons, bassist Dusty Hill and drummer Frank Beard, the Little Ol’ Band from Texas has defied any civilized notion of what traditional rock musicians should look and sound like. Yet, their wonderfully skewed take on the blues has helped them sell somewhere in the neighborhood of 50 million albums, and they continue to play the world’s biggest concert halls.</p> <p> Gibbons, in his inimitable deep Texas drawl, concurs that surreal is indeed the word of the day. “One of the highest compliments that ever came my way was sent from [guitarist] Jimmie Vaughan,” he says, chuckling. “He said, ‘Oh yeah, Gibbons is out there.’ But if there’s actually an ‘out there,’ guess what? We’ll go out there and find Jeff Beck!”</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-november-14-billy-gibbons-and-jeff-beck/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=GibbonsBeckExcerpt">Enjoy this excerpt from our interview with Gibbons and Beck. For the entire story, pick up the November 2014 issue of Guitar World.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/6qr1Lc9Gm7k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: Billy, what does Jeff Beck mean to you? What is his importance as an artist?</strong></p> <p><strong>BILLY GIBBONS</strong> Before Jeff and ZZ Top embarked on this tour, I received a phone call from the production office asking about design preferences for our backstage passes. The reply was simple: “Well, there’s a juicy guitar image fitting to go on the ZZ side of the pass, and there awaits a superb geetar view for Jeff’s side as well.”</p> <p>On one side, we chose a view of the infamous, Pearly Gates, my fine ’59 Les Paul ’Burst, and on the other side, we landed an image of Jeff’s magnificently battle-scarred 1954 Fender Esquire used with the Yardbirds. When you’re using the word importance, one can easily find it in the guitars that Jeff Beck and I pounded the sides off long ago. Jeff’s guitar certainly stands as a pivotal piece, marking the point where bravery stepped in with a willingness to experiment, moving the six-string expression far outside any previously proven lines. The visual impact of that beat-up war club is still meaningful and forceful to the extreme. </p> <p><strong>Jeff, what do you find cool about Billy and ZZ Top? </strong></p> <p><strong>JEFF BECK</strong> Just think about how people went for Billy’s sound and the band’s image. ZZ Top went completely against the grain of all one would expect iconic rock to be. That’s what I love about them—they are this wonderful quirky backfire. Billy’s tone is great, and so are his songs. You wouldn’t really expect these bearded guys to write all these great tunes about cars and girls. </p> <p><strong>Both you and Jeff introduced a surrealistic element into the blues. In Jeff’s case, his versions of “I Ain’t Superstitious” and “Going Down” wink at traditionalism. ZZ Top often references the blues, but they also have a little irreverent fun with the genre. How important is it for you to let your audience know that you are self-aware? You know: “I’m not from the Delta, but I still love this music and there’s a way to modernize it.”</strong></p> <p><strong>BECK</strong> When you are taken with any music with inner gusto, you don’t think too much about it—you just have to have it! </p> <p>For example, I was playing in a blues band before I joined the Yardbirds, and I was really into Bo Diddley, who made the best use imaginable out of playing one chord. His outrageous jungle rhythms were so powerful and hypnotic, he didn’t have to change keys. We basically took his idea of the one-chord vamp, and while the band played, I would just slack all my strings and then really pull on them to make the most ridiculous and surreal sounds with slap echo so that people would just look up.<br /> It wasn’t premeditated. </p> <p>I just wanted the audience to look at me and listen! I did all kinds of outrageous things like that at the time, like taking two guitars and have them feedback against each other, and it was that kind of attitude that eventually got me the job with the Yardbirds. They didn’t want someone to play a beautiful slide guitar solo, or someone that sounded like Earl Hooker. </p> <p>They wanted someone that would hold an audience. I had something no one else had, and however crude or outrageous it was at the time, it worked. It wasn’t all that calculated. It was just my way of saying, Here I am. Ultimately, I had to tone some of it down when I joined the Yardbirds, because we were going on television playing pop singles. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/i9OJB_AEePQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Billy, how important is it for you to add a little touch of the “untraditional” to your traditional blues?</strong></p> <p><strong>GIBBONS</strong> This position was being prodded in a discussion in Memphis, Tennessee, with a dear friend, Waltaire Baldwin. We came up together in Houston and kept our friendship for a long time. Waltaire is a poet. Gave me a John Lee Hooker disc when we were 12 and then showed me how to draw blues harmonica. </p> <p>Waltaire and I were in deep contemplation at 89 Union Street Saloon, sitting atop a table right near the corner window, overlooking the Mississippi. We both agreed that although we never picked cotton, didn’t grow up on plantation, it did not necessarily prevent creating an honest attempt making the truth of the blues a backbone of interpretation. The one ZZ tune that really captures this thought is, “My Head’s in Mississippi.” </p> <p>Although it ain’t the Thirties, all that hard-rhythm shuffle boogie coupled with a surrealistic Howlin’ Wolf’s delivery creates a subdued assembly of visual pictures. The great Memphis guitarist and producer Jim Dickinson once remarked, “Oh yeah, you guys are doing what I like. You’ve become a Salvador Dali—the Dali of the Delta.” Once you get that far along, the point’s made!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/pN69GC2amTg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>What is the cosmic connection between the appreciation of an automobile and a guitar?</strong></p> <p><strong>GIBBONS</strong> It’s a big question, but a good one! What’s really the wicked connection is that they can be loud and fast; yet, they can also be quite elegant. While I was in Spain visiting Nacho Baños, the noted authority on early Fifties blackguard Fenders, we spent more than a day and a night—make it days and nights—talking about automotive elegance and the connection with the unchanged beauty of that original Fender. Call it the Telecaster, the Esquire, the Broadcaster or call it the No-caster—it’s become one of those timeless things.</p> <p><strong>BECK</strong> Guitars and cars offer experiences that are both quite amazing. The other day I was thinking, Why are there so many people in cars? It’s because it’s such a pleasure to have that experience, regardless of where you are going. It’s almost habit forming. You want to control your movement, but at the same time your brain is going at an unnatural speed and you’re putting yourself in danger. </p> <p>There’s that element of excitement every time you turn the ignition. It’s not that you’re just driving from point A to B—you’re enjoying every second of being in control of your life…or avoiding death! Listening to great rock and roll music also gives you this exhilarating sense of awareness similar to what you have when you are driving. </p> <p>There are other more obvious connections. Hot rods are cool looking and rock and roll is cool looking, and they both came of age at the same time in the Fifties. If America never created anything else, thank you very much for the hot rods and rock and roll!</p> <p><em>This is an excerpt from the all-new November 2014 issue of Guitar World. For the rest of this story, plus new Gibbons/Beck photos by Ross Halfin, not to mention features on Weezer, George Thorogood, MXR &amp; Eddie Van Halen, the guitar pick revolution, Nita Strauss and Black Veil Brides, plus gear reviews (Epiphone, Zoom, Gretsch, TC-Helicon, Mesa and more) and lessons by Marty Friedman and Steel Panther's Satchel, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-november-14-billy-gibbons-and-jeff-beck/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=GibbonsBeckExcerpt">check out the November 2014 issue of Guitar World!</a></em></p> <p><em>Photo: Ross Halfin</em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/1114_Gib%26Beck.jpg" width="620" height="805" alt="1114_Gib&amp;Beck.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/zz-top">ZZ Top</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/billy-gibbons">Billy Gibbons</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jeff-beck">Jeff Beck</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/jeff-beck-and-zz-top-s-billy-gibbons-discuss-rocking-relationship-between-guitars-cars-and-everything-between#comments Billy Gibbons Brad Tolinski Jeff Beck November 2014 ZZ Top Interviews News Features Magazine Mon, 15 Sep 2014 15:34:29 +0000 Brad Tolinski 22338 at http://www.guitarworld.com Essential Listening: 10 Stellar Headphone Albums http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-albums-headphone-listening <!--paging_filter--><p>What, exactly, is a headphone album? Well, the definition changes depending on who you are. </p> <p>For audiophiles, a headphone album is a work that is so exquisitely recorded that it demands you listen to each beautifully recorded note under a sonic microscope. Miles Davis’ <em>Kind of Blue</em> fits that bill. </p> <p>For others, a great headphone album is one that makes an intimate album more intimate (such as Bob Dylan’s original mono recordings), or a loud album louder (Rage Against the Machine’s debut album).</p> <p>We’re an unsubtle and hyperactive bunch at <em>Guitar World</em>, so our favorite headphone albums are those that have a lot of activity in the stereo field. As dumb as it sounds, we love it every time a guitar solo takes a shortcut through our skulls as it zooms from one ear to the other. </p> <p>If you don’t know what we’re talking about or you’ve never experienced any of these great albums under the influence of some high-end ear buds, we suggest you go home, put on your best set of ‘phones, turn out the lights, turn up the volume and prepare to have your mind blown sky high.</p> <p><strong>The Jimi Hendrix Experience, <em>Electric Ladyland</em> (1968)</strong></p> <p>If you haven't taken LSD, the good news is you don’t have to. Save your brain cells and listen to this masterpiece under a good set of headphones to get the complete psychedelic picture. On <em>Electric Ladyland</em>, Jimi Hendrix and his brilliant engineer, Eddie Kramer, create a wonderful, three-dimensional sonic world and invite you to step in. This album is not necessarily stoned, but it certainly is beautiful. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/TLV4_xaYynY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Pink Floyd, <em>The Dark Side of the Moon</em> (1973)</strong></p> <p>TICK TOCK, TICK TOCK. DING DONG! BRRRRRRRANG!!!! WIIRRRRRRRRLLLLLLYYYYYY WHIRL…HA HA HA HA! I mean, what else can you say about the <em>Citizen Kane</em> of headphone albums? </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/nDbeqj-1XOo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>The Edgar Winter Group, <em>They Only Come Out At Night</em> (1972)</strong></p> <p>This is a little on the obscure side, but it ranks right up there with <em>Dark Side</em> as an essential Seventies listening experience. The star of the show is the extended version of the hit instrumental “Frankenstein,” but almost every song on the album is a sonic thrill ride.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/kbr4qNnffi8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Santana, <em>Caravanserai</em> (1972)</strong></p> <p>This album was originally mixed and released in both stereo and quadrophonic. Designed to be an all-encompassing, complex and exotic listening experience, the percussion surrounds you while the soaring guitars lift you to the heavens. This is the best-recorded album of Carlos Santana’s career, and probably his best album overall. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/XdmevPWZTRg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Dukes of the Stratosphear, <em>Psonic Psunspot</em> (1987)</strong></p> <p>The Dukes of the Stratosphear was a pseudonym used by the British rock band XTC in the mid-to-late Eighties, and their <em>Psonic Psunspot</em> album was a brilliant homage to the Sixties psychedelic pop of the Beatles, Pink Floyd and the Zombies. While the project was a bit of a joke, the songs are brilliant and, due to advancements in recording technology, the sound of the album eclipses anything actually recorded in London in 1967.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/0bbqezgfqD8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>The Cure, <em>Disintegration</em> (1989)</strong></p> <p>They say that guitarist Robert Smith was using hallucinogenic drugs throughout the coarse of this beautifully textured album. Like Hendrix’s <em>Electric Ladyland</em>, the sound of the album reflects his trippy state of mind. Listening to <em>Disintegration</em> under headphones is like stepping into someone else’s dream—and a rather dark one, at that. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/X8UR2TFUp8w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Radiohead, <em>Kid A</em> (2000)</strong></p> <p>In the late Nineties, Radiohead wanted to shake up their music. Their solution was to work as a collective—one that would make interesting “sounds”—rather than with each person in band playing a prescribed role. The result was an album that sounded unlike anything else before or since. This philosophy extended to the album’s sumptuous mix, which can only truly be truly appreciated with a pair of speakers right next to your ears.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/X3pPvCo-Rt0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Tool, <em>Lateralus</em> (2001)</strong></p> <p>In 2005, four years after its original release, Tool’s <em>Lateralus</em> was released as a limited-edition two-picture-disc vinyl LP in a holographic gatefold package. It took them a while to do it, but they were finally able to create a package that adequately reflected the multi-dimensional music offered inside.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/EDlC7oG_2W4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Dream Theater, <em>A Dramatic Turn of Events</em> (2011)</strong></p> <p>While everything sounds “good” these days, it’s hard to find albums that sound “great.” Everything is engineered so loud and compressed that most modern recorded music lacks the kind of space and depth that allows for a true headphone experience. Dream Theater probably doesn’t really give a damn about what is happening in popular music, which is why this album sounds as good as it does. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zJYcVwOP-Gg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>The Beatles, <em>Abbey Road</em> (1969)</strong></p> <p>Every collection has to have some Beatles, and this is by far their best and most modern-sounding album. Enjoy.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/IrW7dlDHH28" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Brad Tolinski is the editor-in-chief at </em>Guitar World.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/tool">Tool</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beatles">The Beatles</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/carlos-santana">Carlos Santana</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/pink-floyd">Pink Floyd</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/radiohead">Radiohead</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-albums-headphone-listening#comments Brad Tolinski Dream Theater Essential Listening Pink Floyd The Beatles Tool Guitar World Lists News Features Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:43:52 +0000 Brad Tolinski 22195 at http://www.guitarworld.com Barre None: Jethro Tull's 10 Greatest Guitar Moments http://www.guitarworld.com/barre-none-jethro-tulls-10-greatest-guitar-moments <!--paging_filter--><p>Today, <em>Guitar World</em> checks in with Jethro Tull and pinpoints what we feel are the legendary British band's 10 greatest guitar moments. </p> <p>As always, our list digs deep into the band's six-string artistry (a staggering amount of which was provided by the great Martin Barre and, of course, Ian Anderson), while taking historical importance and other factors into account.</p> <p>Barre, the axman behind "Cross-Eyed Mary," "Locomotive Breath" and so many more, holds a special place in <em>Guitar World</em> history; his solo on "Aqualung" comes it at Number 25 on our list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time." </p> <p>"That guitar solo was totally improvised, and I did it in one take," <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/dear-guitar-hero-jethro-tull-guitarist-martin-barre">he told Guitar World.</a> "Luckily for me, that solo turned out well, because if it didn’t there would’ve been a flute solo in its place."</p> <p>For more about Barre, including his recent projects, visit <a href="http://www.martinbarre.com/">martinbarre.com.</a> Also be sure to read our recent <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/dear-guitar-hero-jethro-tull-guitarist-martin-barre">"Dear Guitar Hero" interview with Barre.</a> For more about Jethro Tull and Anderson's recent solo work, visit <a href="http://jethrotull.com/">jethrotull.com.</a></p> <p>Check out our guide to Jethro Tull's 10 greatest guitar moments below! (Just as you have already started doing) Be sure to leave a comment below to recommend other songs. We are NOT OPPOSED to turning this into a Top 20! </p> <p><strong>"With You There To Help Me"</strong></p> <p>This opening track from Jethro Tull’s third album, <em>Benefit</em> (1970), announced that the rock world had a distinctive new guitar hero, and his name was Martin Barre. </p> <p>With Les Paul in hand, Barre sliced through Ian Anderson’s echoing flute like a battle axe through butter, adding bursts of dangerous excitement to this rather fabulous piece of melancholy. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/isQSPQNx4BE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"To Cry You a Song"</strong></p> <p>Another great guitar-driven track from <em>Benefit</em>. The opening harmonized riff is as strong as anything off Black Sabbath’s <em>Paranoid</em>, which was recorded that same year, and the dueling guitar solos scattered throughout the song’s dynamic construction are all knockouts. This is the song Opeth wishes they wrote. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/TNCEIGgyIS4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Aqualung"</strong></p> <p>Who would’ve thought one of the greatest guitar solos in the classic rock era would be the centerpiece in song about a horny British hobo? </p> <p>Guitarist Barre remembers that while he was recording this great guitar track, Jimmy Page stopped by and waved to him through the studio glass. He almost stopped playing his Les Paul Jr. mid-solo to wave back. Damn good thing he didn’t.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/W7-EEGiABBU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Life Is a Long Song"</strong></p> <p>It would definitely be wrong not to acknowledge a guitar contribution or two from front man/flautist Anderson. A masterful acoustic guitarist, his l playing can be heard throughout Jethro Tull’s entire catalog. </p> <p>“Life Is a Long Song” from <em>Living In the Past</em> is just one fine example of his gift, along with favorites like “Mother Goose” from <em>Aqualung</em> or the iconic opening to their classic <em>Thick As a Brick</em> album. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/gCS23lORsSM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Thick As a Brick"</strong></p> <p>Speaking of <em>Thick As a Brick</em>, in 1972 Tull had the unmitigated audacity to release an album comprised of a single 43:46-minute-long song. That was even ballsy by progressive rock standards, so thank god the song was good! </p> <p>The guitar fireworks are subtler than on previous albums, but there are still plenty of pleasures to be had. No, we won’t make you listen to the whole album…the first five minutes will do just fine. The real guitar excitement, however, kicks in at the three-minute mark. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/M9JEPeeohYs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Pibroch (Cap in Hand)"</strong></p> <p>This tune from <em>Songs From the Wood</em> begins with one of the gnarliest, fuzziest, fattest guitar riffs ever committed to tape. Granted, the song takes a number of weird left turns down some disturbingly frilly medieval roads, but they all come back this gargantuan bastard of a guitar line.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/QxiHgm5UEsA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Steel Monkey"</strong></p> <p>Somewhere around 1980, Jethro Tull began to get a little too synthesizer-happy for their own good, and with every album it seemed harder for Barre to bust loose and burn down the house like he did in the early part of the band’s career. But every so often, bandleader Anderson would let the poor boy off his leash and let his guitar roar. </p> <p>This rocker from their 16th album, 1987’s <em>Crest of a Knave</em>, was one of those welcomed occasions. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/HOzDsYPNWQU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Cross-Eyed Mary"</strong></p> <p>This is as funky as Tull gets—a surprisingly lascivious song about a cross-eyed prostitute, featuring an equally dirty guitar riff. Guitarist Barre was often called upon to go toe-to-toe with a flute, and he definitely shows who's boss as he takes control of this edgy classic from the band’s biggest album, <em>Aqualung</em>. This is the song Electric Wizard wishes they wrote.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/M7jLiXeFm_E" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Passion Play (“Magus Perde”)"</strong></p> <p>After having incredible success with the complex 1972 concept album <em>Thick As a Brick</em>, Jethro Tull did what any self-respecting prog band would do: follow it with an even more complicated concept album. </p> <p>Like <em>Brick</em>, the primary focus of 1973’s <em>Passion Play</em> was on the overall arrangement, but if you really listen to the guitar playing throughout, you’ll be amply rewarded. No fancy soloing on this section that comes, oh, about 40 minutes into the title song, but the rhythm work is wonderful and the riff is unlike any other. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ISqVHVjPyu4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Conundrum"</strong></p> <p>This instrumental from the live 1978 <em>Bursting Out</em> demonstrates the deadly precision of Barre's picking and his wicked way with odd time signatures. One wishes he would’ve extended his solo at the two-minute mark, but if you’ve ever wanted to know what the fuss about Barre was all about—without a bunch of flutes buzzing around—this isn’t a bad place to start. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/DTM06dGmrgU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Photo from <a href="http://jethrotull.com/press/">jethrotull.com/press</a></em></p> <p><em>Brad Tolinski is the editor-in-chief at </em>Guitar World.<em> Christopher Thumann contributed to this story.</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jethro-tull">Jethro Tull</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/martin-barre">Martin Barre</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/barre-none-jethro-tulls-10-greatest-guitar-moments#comments Brad Tolinski Christopher Thumann Ian Anderson Jethro Tull Martin Barre Guitar World Lists News Features Mon, 25 Aug 2014 09:53:11 +0000 Brad Tolinski 22154 at http://www.guitarworld.com Gig Review: Richie Sambora Pays Tribute to Les Paul at the Iridium http://www.guitarworld.com/gig-review-richie-sambora-pays-tribute-les-paul-iridium <!--paging_filter--><p>Back in the late Eighties, Bon Jovi’s Richie Sambora was considered to be one of the true guitar heroes of the day. While less flashy than, say, Jake E. Lee or George Lynch, Sambo was generally acknowledged to be one of rock’s most tasteful and melodic players.</p> <p>However, as time went on and Bon Jovi became more of a pop band, his role changed. He became less of a spotlighted soloist and more of a talented colorist, adding just the right notes and textures to the band’s radio-ready songs. While his skill was still undeniable, there was clearly less opportunity for him to solo and strut his stuff. </p> <p>A series of impressive solo albums, including the underrated 2012 <em>Aftermath of the Lowdown</em>, attempted to remedy the situation. But last night’s (July 22) warmup performance at New York City's Iridium—which was filmed for a PBS <em>Front and Center</em> special that will air this fall—was guitarist’s real bid to show he still has the chops to be considered one of the greats. </p> <p>The show started on a dramatic note, with Sambora crooning Leon Russell’s intimate “Song For You,” but soon heated up with a huge riff rocker titled “Burn the Candle Down.” With his hat cocked over one eye and wearing a shirt proclaiming that he was just a “Working Class Hero,” the New Jersey rocker traded lightning-fast licks with talented co-guitarist Orianthi for an ending that brought the audience to its feet. </p> <p>While the show was meant to be mark the late Les Paul’s birthday, who was something of a mentor to Sambora, the 90-minute concert was equally a tribute his other classic rock influences: Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck and Johnny Winter, to name a few. Playing several beautiful Les Pauls, including a white one Paul personally present to the guitarist, through a custom-made Freidman combo amp, Richie summoned the gigantic tones of the Seventies as he performed songs primarily from his solo albums, with a few Bon Jovi classics sprinkled in for good measure. </p> <p>Highlights included an arena-sized version of “Stranger in This Town” and a thundering “Seven Years Gone,” featuring exciting fretwork from Sambora and Orianthi. While Ori gave Richie most of spotlight, she wasn’t shy when it was her turn to solo. Her incredible technique and more trebly, biting tone lit a fire under the ass of the frontman, who clearly enjoyed being challenged. </p> <p>It is rumored that the two guitarists are working on an album together. If it comes to pass, it should be a corker. At one point in the show, Sambora said, “Les Paul is the reason we all have jobs.” I’m sure somewhere Les is smiling and saying in that gruff voice of his, “Hey, Sambora—job well done.”</p> <p><em>Brad Tolinski is the editor-in-chief at </em>Guitar World.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/orianthi">Orianthi</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/gig-review-richie-sambora-pays-tribute-les-paul-iridium#comments Brad Tolinski Iridium Orianthi Review Richie Sambora Blogs News Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:41:07 +0000 Brad Tolinski 21916 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jimmy Page Discusses “Evil Sounds” Heard on New Led Zeppelin Re-Issues http://www.guitarworld.com/jimmy-page-discusses-evil-sounds-heard-new-led-zeppelin-re-issues <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This is an excerpt from the July 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the rest of this story, plus features on Ace Frehley, Albert Lee, "The Album that Changed My Life," the history of Taylor Guitars, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, columns, tabs and reviews of new gear from Fender, ESP/LTD, Vox, Boss, Sterling by Music Man and more, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-july-14-led-zeppelin?utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=JimmyExcerpt">check out the July 2014 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <p>As my cab pulls up to Olympic Studios, located in the quiet West London suburb of Barnes, I’m a bit surprised and amused. With its red brick exterior and modest white archway entrance, the exterior looks more like a quaint American high school than a rock and roll landmark. But a landmark it is. </p> <p>From the mid Sixties through the Nineties, Olympic was one of England’s finest recording facilities and birthplace to some of the greatest music of the 20th century, including Jimi Hendrix's <em>Are You Experienced</em>, the Rolling Stones’ <em>Let It Bleed</em>, Queen’s <em>A Night at the Opera</em> and large portions of <em>Led Zeppelin I, II</em> and <em>III</em>. </p> <p>The recording consoles and microphones are long gone, but fortunately some of the old spirit still remains. Olympic is now an ultra-hip movie theater/café decorated with candid “in studio” photos of rock’s finest musicians and tasteful bric-a-brac that celebrates the building’s past glories.</p> <p>It is here that Led Zeppelin’s producer and guitarist, Jimmy Page, has decided to unveil the band’s latest archival project to a handful of curious journalists. As long rumored, during the course of the next year, deluxe editions of all nine of Zep’s studio albums will be released, three at a time, in chronological order, each re-mastered by Page. </p> <p>But the real news is that the band also will open its vaults to share dozens of unheard studio and live recordings. Each re-mastered studio album will have a second disc of companion material comprised entirely of unreleased music related to that album. </p> <p>Page plays a handful of the never-before-heard tracks over the theater’s state-of-the-art sound system and clearly enjoys the enthusiastic responses from the music press.</p> <p>Immediately after the listening session, I met with the guitarist for an exclusive one-on-one chat for <em>Guitar World</em>. Page recently turned 70, and you can’t help but be in awe of his youthful enthusiasm and the hardcore dedication he brought to this rather gigantic undertaking. </p> <p>“I knew the only way to do this project properly was to leave no stone unturned and to listen to every Led Zeppelin tape and performance,” he says emphatically. “Additionally, I really researched what had been bootlegged and what stolen material had surfaced, and I was determined to offer things people had never heard. People will be genuinely surprised by what we have and what we have in store for these albums. We wanted to give these bootleggers a real fright! I’ve actually read reviews of the new albums by people who think they know already know what the extra material will be based on bits and pieces they’ve heard online. I thought, Oh yeah, you think that’s what I’m gonna do…I’ll scare the pants off you!” </p> <p>Then he pauses for a moment and adds with a laugh, “They’ll probably do bootlegs of what we’ve just done!”</p> <p>The following is a short excerpt from a marathon interview that will appear in the up-coming July 2014 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>, which hits newsstands next week. In this portion of the conversation, we focused on the final, and alternative, take of Led Zeppelin’s iconic signature song, “Whole Lotta Love.”</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: The version of “Whole Lotta Love” on the bonus disc is exciting but is missing some key elements—the guitar solo, the chorus tag, the backwards slide and some of the guitar and Theremin parts in the middle. Why choose this particular take for the bonus disc?</strong></p> <p>At this point in the song’s evolution, I knew in my head how the whole arrangement was going to go, but I wanted people to hear how focused we were on creating a foundation that was intense…and it is intense! We weren’t the Beatles, so you’re not going to hear us sing “whole lotta love” together on the chorus while we were playing. [laughs] But I think Robert’s performance on this track is also a revelation. He’s just singing a guide vocal, but it’s pretty damn good, isn’t it? And even though you only hear some of the drums, little bits of the final Theremin part and some of Robert’s vocal in the middle section, it’s really atmospheric and stands on its own merits.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/7GOBLbQYG4k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>While we’re on the subject, how did you create the otherworldly sounds in the middle section that we hear on the final studio version of “Whole Lotta Love”?</strong></p> <p>I always envisioned the middle to be quite avant-garde. If ultimately I wasn’t able to pull it off, I might’ve had to edit the song down, but I knew what I wanted, and I knew how to go about it. It was just a matter of doing it. I created most of the sounds with a Theremin and my guitar. The Theremin generates most of higher pitches and my Les Paul makes the lower sounds. </p> <p>I de-tuned it radically and just basically pulled on the strings to make an assortment of growling noises—evil sounds that you’re not supposed to hear on commercial radio. [laughs] I might’ve de-tuned it to a chord, but really I’m just pulling on strings and making them howl! And then, during the mix, with the aid of engineer Eddie Kramer, we did all the panning and added the effects, including using Low Frequency Oscillators on the tape machine to really pull the whole thing down and lift it back up so the sound is moving in rhythm. It was something no one had ever done before in that context, let alone in the middle of a song. That’s how forward thinking we were, that’s how avant-garde it was, and that’s how much fun we were having.</p> <p>That was the advantage of having artistic control. None of that might’ve happened if had an outside producer. They might’ve questioned, or not understood, what I was doing, or thought I was just making a bunch of noise. I was able to make sure our ideas were carried out without interference. </p> <p><strong>"Whole Lotta Love” has so many cool touches, how did you go about constructing it?</strong></p> <p>I was always good at hearing complete arrangements in my head. For example, when we rehearsed the first album at my home in Pangbourne, I was able to envision the finished arrangement of “How Many More Times” before we got into the studio. I knew what was going to be overdubbed and how I was going to use the bow as melodic counterpoint. The same is with “Whole Lotta Love.”</p> <p><em>This is an excerpt from the July 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the rest of this story, plus features on Ace Frehley, Albert Lee, "The Album that Changed My Life," the history of Taylor Guitars, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, columns, tabs and reviews of new gear from Fender, ESP/LTD, Vox, Boss, Sterling by Music Man and more, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-july-14-led-zeppelin?utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=JimmyExcerpt">check out the July 2014 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/jimmy-page-discusses-evil-sounds-heard-new-led-zeppelin-re-issues#comments Brad Tolinski Jimmy Page July 2014 Led Zeppelin Interviews News Features Magazine Wed, 21 May 2014 15:35:57 +0000 Brad Tolinski 21264 at http://www.guitarworld.com Brad Tolinski's 'Light & Shade: Conversations with Jimmy Page' a Revelatory Portrait of the Led Zeppelin Guitarist http://www.guitarworld.com/brad-tolinskis-light-shade-conversations-jimmy-page-revelatory-portrait-led-zeppelin-guitarist <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Light &amp; Shade: Conversations with Jimmy Page</em> is <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/light-shade/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=LightShade">available now at the Guitar World Online Store</a>.</p> <p>This “oral autobiography” of Jimmy Page, the intensely private mastermind behind Led Zeppelin — one of the most enduring bands in rock history — is the most complete and revelatory portrait of the legendary guitarist ever published.</p> <p>More than 30 years after disbanding in 1980, Led Zeppelin continues to be celebrated for its artistic achievements, broad musical influence, and commercial success. The band's notorious exploits have been chronicled in bestselling books; yet none of the individual members of the band has penned a memoir nor cooperated to any degree with the press or a biographer. </p> <p>In <em>Light &amp; Shade</em>, Jimmy Page, the band’s most reticent and inscrutable member, opens up to journalist Brad Tolinski, for the first time exploring his remarkable life and musical journey in great depth and intimate detail.</p> <p>Based on extensive interviews conducted with the guitarist/producer over the past 20 years, <em>Light &amp; Shade</em> encompasses Page’s entire career, beginning with his early years as England’s top session guitarist when he worked with artists ranging from Tom Jones, Shirley Bassey, and Burt Bacharach to the Kinks, The Who and Eric Clapton. Page speaks frankly about his decadent yet immensely creative years in Led Zeppelin, his synergistic relationships with band members Robert Plant, John Bonham and John Paul Jones, and his notable post-Zeppelin pursuits. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/excerpt-brad-tolinskis-light-shade-conversations-jimmy-page-recording-led-zeppelin">[[ Click here to read an exclusive excerpt from the book! ]]</a></strong></p> <p>While examining every major track recorded by Zeppelin, including “Stairway to Heaven,” “Whole Lotta Love” and “Kashmir,” Page reflects on the band’s sensational tours, the filming of the concert movie The Song Remains the Same, his fascination with the occult, meeting Elvis Presley, and the making of the rock masterpiece <em>Led Zeppelin IV</em>, about which he offers a complete behind-the-scenes account. Additionally, the book is peppered with “sidebar” chapters that include conversations between Page and other guitar greats, including his childhood friend Jeff Beck and hipster icon Jack White.</p> <p>Through Page’s own words, <em>Light &amp; Shade</em> presents an unprecedented first-person view of one of the most important musicians of our era.</p> <p>Brad Tolinski has been the editor-in-chief of <em>Guitar World</em>, the world’s best-selling magazine for musicians, for more than two decades. He has interviewed and profiled most of popular music’s greatest guitarists, including Eric Clapton, B.B. King, Eddie Van Halen, Jack White and Jeff Beck. He is also the author of the deluxe-edition illustrated books <em>Classic Hendrix: The Ultimate Hendrix Experience</em> and <em>The Faces: 1969–75</em>. </p> <p><strong>For only $10 more you can have this book signed by the author, Brad Tolinski. Just choose "Author Signed" on the store page and add it to your cart. Don't forget to enter the name of the person you would like Brad to personalize the copy for. Just enter the name in the "special instructions" field in your cart!</strong></p> <p><strong><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/light-shade/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=LightShade">Head to the Guitar World Online Store for all the details!</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/brad-tolinskis-light-shade-conversations-jimmy-page-revelatory-portrait-led-zeppelin-guitarist#comments Brad Tolinski Jimmy Page Led Zeppelin News Features Wed, 21 May 2014 14:28:27 +0000 Guitar World Staff 17032 at http://www.guitarworld.com Randy Rhoads Was No Saint, Says New Book by Childhood Friend and Bandmate Kelly Garni http://www.guitarworld.com/randy-rhoads-was-no-saint-says-new-book-childhood-friend-and-bandmate-kelly-garni <!--paging_filter--><p>In his book <em>Angels With Dirty Faces</em>, photographer and bassist Kelly Garni paints a different picture of the late Randy Rhoads than we are accustomed to. And all I can say is thank god! </p> <p>Since Rhoads' death in 1982, after perishing in a freak plane accident while on tour with Ozzy Osbourne, the blonde guitar icon has been portrayed as something of a neutered, Christ-like figure. Tales of his legendary kindness, patience and extreme dedication have made him seem more like a holy man than a rock and roller. </p> <p>But while Rhoads was no doubt a good dude, it’s hard to imagine anyone who grew up in the decadent LA hard rock scene in the Seventies and Eighties being that squeaky clean. </p> <p>Finally, some 30 years later, the truth comes out. Garni, who played with Rhoads in numerous pre-Ozzy bands, delivers a thoughtful, provocative and thoroughly multi-dimensional portrait of the man. While Rhoads is described in a largely positive light, the book doesn’t ignore the cigarette-smoking, school-skipping, alcohol-drinking, skirt-chasing, fist-fighting side of the man. </p> <p>Garni is a natural storyteller, and he recalls their wild days in breezy prose that puts you right in the middle of the surprisingly rowdy action. For example, in one of the book's many outrageous passages, the writer recalls a particularly destructive Rhoads prank: “[Randy] took me aside and informed me that he had gone into the bathroom [of a house owned by friends], locked the door, crawled out the window and then stuck the garden hose into the window and turned it on.”</p> <p>When Garni expresses his disapproval, it ends up in a brawl: “[We were] punching, kicking and rolling around on the ground. The Rhoads family had one of those old phones that weighed about 3 or 4 pounds, or at least that’s what it felt like when he smacked me square in the head with it. Luckily for me, there was a rolled-up extension cord nearby and I grabbed that and whipped him in the face.”</p> <p>I know many Rhoads fans prefer to think of him as being as pure as the driven snow, but great artists are always flawed—that’s what makes them compelling and relatable. Some of what Garni has to say in his book is not pretty, but it puts actual flesh on Randy’s legacy and, in many ways, it makes him far more intriguing and cool. </p> <p>Rhoads dies midway through the book, but fortunately, the author is quite a character in his own right, and his post-Randy exploits are equally strange and entertaining. <em>Angels With Dirty Faces</em> could’ve very easily been exploitive, but Garni’s willingness to examine his own flaws, as well as the flaws of others, makes it a surprisingly satisfying and eye-opening read.</p> <p><em>Brad Tolinksi is the editor-in-chief of </em>Guitar World<em> magazine</em>.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/randy-rhoads">Randy Rhoads</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/randy-rhoads-was-no-saint-says-new-book-childhood-friend-and-bandmate-kelly-garni#comments book review Brad Tolinski Kelly Garni Randy Rhoads Blogs News Features Mon, 19 May 2014 19:51:40 +0000 Brad Tolinski 21291 at http://www.guitarworld.com