Jazz Guitar Corner http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/2262/all en Jazz Guitar Corner: "Summertime" — Time to Use Your New Jazz Chords http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-summertime-time-use-your-new-jazz-chords <!--paging_filter--><p>One of the most common questions I get from students and readers is, “I've learned tons of jazz chords, but how do I make them sound like music?” </p> <p>Alongside your study of chord voicings on their own, one of the best ways to learn how to apply those chords to your comping and chord soloing is to learn sample chord studies based on the changes to popular jazz tunes. </p> <p>In this jazz guitar lesson, you will expand your knowledge of jazz chords in a practical, musical situation, as well as learn how to play a chord study based on the chord changes to the classic jazz tune, “Summertime.“</p> <p><strong>Chord Shapes in This Study</strong></p> <p>Before you dig into the chord study below, or after you have learned the study and are looking for a reference for those chords, here are the general chord shapes used to create the comping etude in this lesson. </p> <p>Because a lot of these chords are “rootless voicings,” which mean they don't have a root in their construction, or are chord inversions, where the root isn't the lowest note of the chord, working through these shapes outside of the study can be a helpful way to expand your knowledge and understand how the comping etude below was built. </p> <p>Each of the chords in the charts below is written in the order that they appear in the study below, and the name of each chord is written above each shape on the fretboard. As well, the intervals for each chord are labelled on each shape in order to understand the construction and colors used in each shape in the study. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/chords%201.png" width="620" height="911" alt="chords 1.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/chords%202.png" width="620" height="936" alt="chords 2.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/chords%203.png" width="620" height="920" alt="chords 3.png" /></p> <p><strong>Jazz Guitar Chord Study</strong></p> <p>Now that you've looked into the chord shapes used in this study, here's the study itself that you can learn and apply to your own playing. </p> <p>When first working on this chord etude, try learning one phrase at a time, four bars each. This will make it easier to digest the material and memorize the chord shapes in your studies. From there, you can piece the four, four-bar, phrases together to play the study as a whole. </p> <p>Also, a great exercise when working on studies such as this one is to play the study along with a backing track, and then in the second chorus you improvise the comping with your own chords. </p> <p>From there you keep alternating, one chorus of the study and one chorus of your own playing, which will help you integrate the material in this etude into your playing in a very natural and flowing manner. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/189644028&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/summertime%20new.jpg" width="620" height="750" alt="summertime new.jpg" /></p> <p>Do you have a question about this "Summertime" chord study? Share your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-summertime-time-use-your-new-jazz-chords#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Thu, 05 Feb 2015 18:06:17 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23444 Jazz Guitar Corner: Jazz Guitar Chord Exercises — with Tab and Audio http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-jazz-guitar-chord-exercises-tab-and-audio <!--paging_filter--><p>One of the most common questions I get from my students and readers is, “I know what jazz chords to study, but how to I practice them in a practical, musical way?” </p> <p>To help answer this question, I’ve put together an exercise that uses all the inversions of any chords you are learning, while playing them in a common chord progression at the same time. </p> <p>In this lesson, you will learn how to practice Drop 2 and Drop 3 chords in all inversions, applied to a major ii-V-I chord progression to keep these shapes practical and musical in your woodshedding. </p> <p>I’ve provided examples for one string set of each chord shape, Drop 2 and 3, but feel free to apply this exercise to any string set your are working on in your jazz guitar studies. </p> <p>I’ve also written out each example in the key of C, so to take this exercise further, make sure to work these shapes together in all 12 keys around the fretboard in order to get an in-depth understanding of how they lay on the neck of the guitar. </p> <p><strong>The Jazz Guitar Chord Exercise</strong></p> <p>The exercise is a fairly straightforward concept, but applying it to the fretboard can take some time and effort in the practice room. </p> <p>Here is the exercise:</p> <p>01. Pick a chord shape such as Drop 2<br /> 02. Pick a string set, top four strings for example<br /> 03. Play the root position iim7 chord, such as Dm7<br /> 04. Move to the closest V7 chord, G7 in this case, without moving your hand if possible<br /> 05. From there, move to the closest Cmaj7 chord without moving your hand<br /> 06. Repeat but start on the next inversion of iim7, Dm7 in this key<br /> 07. Repeat until you’ve covered all four inversions of the iim7 chord and the closest V7 and Imaj7 chords from those four shapes.</p> <p>That’s it. Pretty simple, but playing and memorizing these shapes in four areas on the neck can take some time in the woodshed. So, let’s take this exercise and see how it lays on the fretboard in the next section of this lesson. </p> <p><strong>Drop 2 Chord Exercises</strong></p> <p>Now that you understand what the exercise is, let’s take it to the fretboard, beginning with Drop 2 chords on the top four strings. You will begin with a root position Dm7 chord, moving to the closest G7 chord, and finally landing on the closest Cmaj7 chord from there. </p> <p>I’ve written the inversion under each chord so you can memorize that movement as well, which will make it easier to transfer this exercise to other string sets and keys in your practicing. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/185893658&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/chord%20exercises%201.jpg" width="620" height="183" alt="chord exercises 1.jpg" /></p> <p>Now, you’ll move on to the first inversion Dm7 chord, with the other chords being as close to that initial chord as possible. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/185893659&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/chord%20exercises%202.jpg" width="620" height="166" alt="chord exercises 2.jpg" /></p> <p>Next, you are playing a second inversion Dm7 chord and following on to the closest G7 and Cmaj7 chords from that initial shape on the fretboard. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/185893661&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/chord%20exercises%203.jpg" width="620" height="171" alt="chord exercises 3.jpg" /></p> <p>Lastly, here is a third inversion Dm7 chord that then leads to the closest G7 and Cmaj7 chords from there. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/185893662&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/chord%20exercises%204.jpg" width="620" height="172" alt="chord exercises 4.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Drop 3 Chord Exercises</strong></p> <p>To help you take this exercise to another common jazz chord shape, here are four examples of applying this idea to Drop 3 chords on the 6th-string root groupings. </p> <p>Again, you can take these shapes to other keys on the sixth-string root, as well as apply them to other string sets for Drop 3 chords as you expand on them in your studies. </p> <p>To begin, here is a root-position Dm7 chord that then moves to the closest G7 and Cmaj7 chords from there. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/185893663&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/chord%20exercises%205.jpg" width="620" height="166" alt="chord exercises 5.jpg" /></p> <p>Then, you can move on to a first inversion Dm7 chord, which moves to the closest G7 and Cmaj7 from that initial shape. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/185893664&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/chord%20exercises%206.jpg" width="620" height="172" alt="chord exercises 6.jpg" /></p> <p>Following our pattern, the next example uses a second inversion Drop 3 Dm7 chord, which moves to the closest G7 and Cmaj7 chords from there. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/185893666&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/chord%20exercises%207.jpg" width="620" height="172" alt="chord exercises 7.jpg" /></p> <p>And finally, you can start with a third inversion Dm7 chord that moves to the closest G7 and Cmaj7 shapes from that starting point. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/185893667&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/chord%20exercises%208.jpg" width="620" height="172" alt="chord exercises 8.jpg" /></p> <p>Do you have a question or comment about these chord exercises? Share your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-jazz-guitar-chord-exercises-tab-and-audio#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Tue, 13 Jan 2015 20:36:09 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23277 Jazz Guitar Corner: Soloing with the Mixed Blues Scale http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-soloing-mixed-blues-scale <!--paging_filter--><p>Learning to play the blues in a jazzy style means stepping outside the minor blues scale and exploring other melodic options in your solos. </p> <p>But you don’t need to go very far to find a cool-sounding scale that can jazz up your blues solos in no time. </p> <p>In today’s lesson, we’ll be looking into the mixed blues scale, which combines the notes from the minor and major blues scales to outline the underlying blues chord changes, while retaining a healthy dose of the blues at the same time. </p> <p><strong>Major and Minor Blues Scales</strong></p> <p>To begin, here's a quick review of the minor and major blues scales, written over an A7 chord in the example below. </p> <p>The minor blues scale contains the notes R-b3-4-#4-5-b7, and the major blues scale contains the notes R-2-b3-3-5-6, so they share a few notes and have a few different notes between them. </p> <p>The notes they share are the root, b3 and 5th, while the other notes are different between the two scales; minor blues has the 4, #4 and b7; while the major blues scale has 2, 3 and 6.</p> <p>Try playing both of these scales back to back over an A7 chord, with a backing track if possible, in order to hear how they both sound when applied to a chord such as A7. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Jazz%20Blues%20Scale%201.jpg" width="620" height="154" alt="Jazz Blues Scale 1.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Mixed Blues Scale</strong></p> <p>Now that you've looked at both of these scales separately, we’re going to combine the major and minor blues scales in order to build what I like to call the mixed blues scale. </p> <p>This scale contains all of the notes from both scales, R-2-b3-3-4-#4-5-6-b7, and has a sound that outlines the chord, since it has the R-3-5-b7 arpeggio built into it, and remains bluesy with the b3 and #4 at the same time. </p> <p>While you could play all of these notes in order, as I wrote out in the previous paragraph, you’ll see in the example below that I leave out certain notes along the way, notes that get added in later in the scale. </p> <p>This is mostly due to the fact that many famous players who use this scale tend to use certain notes in specific octaves, so I’ve written it out in that way to get you into that style quickly and accurately when adding this scale to your soloing repertoire. </p> <p>Try putting on an A7 backing track and play up and down this scale to hear how it sounds over that chord, and then begin to improvise over an A7 harmony using only the A mixed blues scale as the basis for your lines to hear how it sounds in a soloing situation. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Jazz%20Blues%20Scale%202.jpg" width="620" height="154" alt="Jazz Blues Scale 2.jpg" /> </p> <p><strong>Mixed Blues Scale Lick</strong></p> <p>Lastly, here’s an example of a lick over A7 built with the notes from the A mixed blues scale. </p> <p>Since this scale contains the notes of the A7 arpeggio, you need to treat it more like an arpeggio than a blues scale, meaning that if you have an A7 chord, you play the A mixed blues scale. If you have a D7 chord, you play a D7 mixed blues scale and so on. </p> <p>Try this lick out and see how it sounds over an A7 chord, before transposing it to other keys, adding it to your solo vocabulary and writing/learning a number of mixed blues scale licks of your own as you explore this concept further in the woodshed. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/118098721"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Jazz%20Blues%20Scale%203.jpg" width="620" height="162" alt="Jazz Blues Scale 3.jpg" /></p> <p>Do you have a question about this mixed blues scale lesson? Share your comments and questions in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-soloing-mixed-blues-scale#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Thu, 08 Jan 2015 19:33:35 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19640 Jazz Guitar Corner: Melodic Minor Modes Made Easy http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-melodic-minor-modes-made-easy <!--paging_filter--><p>When learning how to play jazz, and other improvisational genres of music, learning how to play the seven modes of melodic minor is an essential skill any guitarist should have in their soloing tool belt. </p> <p>While we know that learning the seven modes of melodic minor is important, sometimes it can seem like a tough task, and we feel we have to start from scratch when learning these seven modes. </p> <p>But that doesn’t have to be the case. </p> <p>In this lesson, you will learn how to simply change one note of each major mode in order to quickly learn all seven modes of the melodic minor scale. </p> <p>If you are new to the major modes, check out my previous lesson, <e href="http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-learn-all-seven-major-modes-easy-way">Major Modes Made Easy, for a refresher on these important melodic devices. </e></p> <p><strong>Melodic Minor Mode 1</strong></p> <p>To begin, let’s take a look at how you can alter one note from the Ionian mode to create the first mode of melodic minor, otherwise known as the melodic minor scale itself. </p> <p>In order to do this, you play an Ionian mode but lower the third note of the fingering to form the first mode of melodic minor. Because of this alteration, you can think of the MM 1 fingering as being an Ionian b3 shape. </p> <p>Here is how those two interval patterns compare. </p> <p><strong>Ionian</strong>: R 2 3 4 5 6 7<br /> <strong>MM 1</strong>: R 2 b3 4 5 6 7</p> <p>Here's how that interval pattern looks on the fretboard, with one note difference between the two being indicated by the blue highlight in the MM 1 shape. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Melodic%20Minor%201.png" width="620" height="467" alt="Melodic Minor 1.png" /></p> <p>Once you have learned the MM 1 shape, you can practice applying it to a minor family chord, such as m7, m6, m9, or mMaj7, in order to bring this shape to your improvisational practice as well as technical. </p> <p><strong>Melodic Minor Mode 2</strong></p> <p>Let’s now take a look at how you can alter one note from the Dorian mode to create the second mode of melodic minor. In order to do this, you play a Dorian mode but lower the 2nd note of the fingering to form the second mode of melodic minor. </p> <p>Because of this alteration, you can think of the MM 2 fingering as being a Dorian b2 shape. </p> <p>Here is how those two interval patterns compare. </p> <p><strong>Dorian</strong>: R 2 b3 4 5 6 b7<br /> <strong>MM 2</strong>: R b2 b3 4 5 6 b7</p> <p>Here's how that interval pattern looks on the fretboard, with one note difference between the two being indicated by the blue highlight in the MM 2 shape. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Melodic%20Minor%202.png" width="620" height="451" alt="Melodic Minor 2.png" /></p> <p>Once you've learned the MM 2 shape, you can practice soloing with this mode over a 7th chord, bringing out a 13susb9 sound, in order to apply this shape to your improvisational practice as well as technical. </p> <p><strong>Melodic Minor Mode 3</strong></p> <p>We’ll now move on to altering one note from the Phrygian mode to create the third mode of melodic minor, otherwise known as the Lydian augmented scale. </p> <p>In order to do this, you play a Phrygian mode but lower the root note of the fingering to form the third mode of melodic minor. Because of this alteration, you can think of the MM 3 fingering as being a Phrygian b1 shape. </p> <p>This may seem funny, lowering the root note, but it makes it very easy to turn a Phrygian mode into the third mode of melodic minor on the fretboard from a fingering standpoint. </p> <p>Here's how those two interval patterns compare. </p> <p><strong>Phrygian</strong>: R b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7<br /> <strong>MM 3</strong>: R 2 3 #4 #5 6 7 (or bR b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 when compard to Phrygian)</p> <p>Here's how that interval pattern looks on the fretboard, with one note difference between the two being indicated by the blue highlight in the MM 3 shape. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Melodic%20Minor%203.png" width="620" height="451" alt="Melodic Minor 3.png" /></p> <p>Once you have learned the MM 3 shape you can practice soloing with this mode over a maj7th chord, bringing out a maj7#5 sound, in order to apply this shape to your improvisational practice as well as technical. </p> <p><strong>Melodic Minor Mode 4</strong></p> <p>Let’s now alter one note from the Lydian Mode to create the fourth mode of Melodic Minor, otherwise known as the Lydian dominant scale. </p> <p>In order to do this, you play a Lydian mode but lower the seventh note of the fingering to form the fourth mode of melodic minor.<br /> Because of this alteration, you can think of the MM 4 fingering as being a Lydian b7 shape. </p> <p>Here's how those two interval patterns compare. </p> <p><strong>Lydian</strong>: R 2 3 #4 5 6 7<br /> <strong>MM 4</strong>: R 2 3 #4 5 6 b7</p> <p>Here's how that interval pattern looks on the fretboard, with one note difference between the two being indicated by the blue highlight in the MM 4 shape. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Melodic%20Minor%204.png" width="620" height="460" alt="Melodic Minor 4.png" /></p> <p>Once you've learned the MM 4 shape you can practice soloing with this mode over a dominant family chord such as 7th, 9th or 13th, bringing out a #11 sound, in order to apply this shape to your improvisational practice as well as technical. </p> <p><strong>Melodic Minor Mode 5</strong></p> <p>Moving on, you can now alter one note from the Mixolydian mode to create the fifth mode of melodic minor. In order to do this, you play a Mixolydian mode but lower the sixth note of the fingering to form the fifth mode of melodic minor. </p> <p>Because of this alteration, you can think of the MM 5 fingering as being a Mixolydian b6 shape. Here's how those two interval patterns compare. </p> <p><strong>Mixolydian</strong>: R 2 3 4 5 6 b7<br /> <strong>MM 5</strong>: R 2 3 4 5 b6 b7</p> <p>Here's how that interval pattern looks on the fretboard, with one note difference between the two being indicated by the blue highlight in the MM 5 shape. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Melodic%20Minor%205.png" width="620" height="474" alt="Melodic Minor 5.png" /></p> <p>Once you've learned the MM 5 shape, you can practice soloing with this mode over a dominant family chord such as 7th, 9th or 13th, bringing out a b13 sound, in order to apply this shape to your improvisational practice as well as technical. </p> <p><strong>Melodic Minor Mode 6</strong></p> <p>Let’s now alter one note from the Aeolian mode to create the sixth mode of melodic minor, otherwise known as the Locrian Natural 2 scale. In order to do this, you play an Aeolian mode but lower the fifth note of the fingering to form the sixth mode of melodic minor. </p> <p>Because of this alteration, you can think of the MM 6 fingering as being an Aeolian b5 shape. </p> <p>Here's how those two interval patterns compare. </p> <p><strong>Aeolian</strong>: R 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7<br /> <strong>MM 6</strong>: R 2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7</p> <p>Here's how that interval pattern looks on the fretboard, with one note difference between the two being indicated by the blue highlight in the MM 6 shape. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Melodic%20Minor%206.png" width="620" height="429" alt="Melodic Minor 6.png" /></p> <p>Once you've learned the MM 6 shape, you can practice soloing with this mode over a m7b5 chord in order to apply this shape to your improvisational practice as well as technical. </p> <p><strong>Melodic Minor Mode 7</strong></p> <p>Lastly, you can alter one note from the Locrian mode to create the seventh mode of melodic minor, otherwise known as the altered scale. In order to do this, you play a Locrian mode but lower the 4th note of the fingering to form the seventh mode of melodic minor. </p> <p>Because of this alteration, you can think of the MM 7 fingering as being a Locrian b4 shape. </p> <p>Here's how those two interval patterns compare. </p> <p><strong>Locrian</strong>: R b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7<br /> <strong>MM 7</strong>: R b3 b3 b4 b5 b5 b7</p> <p>Here's how that interval pattern looks on the fretboard, with one note difference between the two being indicated by the blue highlight in the MM 7 shape. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Melodic%20Minor%207.png" width="620" height="435" alt="Melodic Minor 7.png" /></p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the U.K., where he teaches Skype guitar students all over the world, and is an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-melodic-minor-modes-made-easy#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Fri, 19 Dec 2014 19:18:31 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23155 Jazz Guitar Corner: Learn All Seven Major Modes the Easy Way http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-learn-all-seven-major-modes-easy-way <!--paging_filter--><p>When learning how to play the seven major modes on the guitar, most of us begin with the Ionian mode then move on to Dorian and progress up the fretboard in this way until we’ve learned all seven positions of the major scale. </p> <p>While this can be an effective way of learning modes, in this lesson you will learn a shortcut that will allow you to quickly and easily learn all seven modes by starting with Lydian and simply lowering one note at a time until you can play all seven modes on the fretboard. </p> <p>When learning the modes in this way, by changing one note between each subsequent mode, you will practice them out of the normal order. </p> <p>Here is the normal order of the major modes for review. </p> <p>• Ionian<br /> • Dorian<br /> • Phrygian<br /> • Lydian<br /> • Mixolydian<br /> • Aeolian<br /> • Locrian</p> <p>When working them from the one-note changing perspective, you wind up with this order of modes. </p> <p>• Lydian<br /> • Ionian<br /> • Mixolydian<br /> • Dorian<br /> • Aeolian<br /> • Phrygian<br /> • Locrian</p> <p>Start by learning the modes, memorizing them in the new order so you can use the one-note changing method. From there, you can go back and play them in the original order when putting them together in one key on the fretboard. </p> <p>Doing things this way will allow you to quickly learn the modes and then bring them back into normal order, rather than learning them as seven distinct fingerings in normal order from the beginning. </p> <p>A quick note about the chord grids below. There are three colors on each grid, here is the legend for those colors. </p> <p><strong>Red</strong>: Root note for that mode<br /> <strong>Black</strong>: Static notes between the last mode and this mode<br /> <strong>Blue</strong>: The one note that has been moved from the previous mode to form the new mode you are playing.</p> <p>So, now that you know a bit about the concept we're exploring today, let’s take it to the fretboard. </p> <p><strong>Lydian Mode</strong></p> <p>To begin, you are going to learn the Lydian mode, which contains one sharp in its construction, the #4. This is going to be the base mode for all seven shapes, so make sure to get this shape down comfortably before moving on to the next mode in the system. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%201.png" width="620" height="331" alt="major modes 1.png" /></p> <p><strong>Ionian Mode</strong></p> <p>Now you will take the Lydian mode you just learned and alter one note to form the Ionian mode. In this case, you will lower the 4th note of Lydian to produce the Ionian fingering. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%202.png" width="620" height="315" alt="major modes 2.png" /></p> <p><strong>Mixolydian Mode</strong></p> <p>Continuing on to the final major-based mode, you will now alter the Ionian mode by one note to form a Mixolydian mode fingering. When doing so, you lower the 7th of Ionian to form the Mixolydian mode. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%203.png" width="620" height="312" alt="major modes 3.png" /></p> <p><strong>Dorian Mode</strong></p> <p>We can progress to the minor modes now as you alter one note of Mixolydian to form the Dorian mode. Here, you will lower the 3rd of Mixolydian to form the Dorian mode fingering. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%204.png" width="620" height="320" alt="major modes 4.png" /> </p> <p><strong>Aeolian Mode</strong></p> <p>To form the second minor mode, you will lower one note of Dorian to produce the Aeolian mode on the fretboard. To do so, you will lower the 6th of Dorian to form the Aeolian fingering. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%205.png" width="620" height="323" alt="major modes 5.png" /> </p> <p><strong>Phrygian Mode</strong></p> <p>Next, you will lower one note of Aeolian to form the Phrygian mode. When doing so, you lower the 2nd of Aeolian to form the Phrygian fingering on the fretboard. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%206.png" width="620" height="299" alt="major modes 6.png" /> </p> <p><strong>Locrian Mode</strong></p> <p>Lastly, you will take the Phrygian mode and lower one note to produce the Locrian mode. Here, you lower the 5th note of Phrygian to produce the Locrian fingering. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%207.png" width="620" height="320" alt="major modes 7.png" /></p> <p>As you can see, by starting on Lydian and lowering one note at a time, you can quickly and easily build and memorize all seven modes of the major scale on the guitar. Also, you will be able to see and hear how closely related these modes are, which isn’t always apparent when learning all seven fingerings on their own in the more traditional manner. </p> <p><strong>Learning Modes Exercises</strong></p> <p>Once you've worked out each of these seven major modes on the note G, you can try out the following exercises to help you solidify these shapes further in your studies. </p> <p>01. Play through all three major modes: Lydian-Ionian-Mixolydian from one root note. Repeat in 12 keys.<br /> 02. Play through all four minor-based modes: Dorian-Aeolian-Phrygian-Locrian from one root note. Repeat in 12 keys.<br /> 03. Play all seven major modes in the order presented at the start of this lesson from one root note. Repeat in all 12 keys.<br /> 04. Put on a major chord backing-track, such as G, and solo over this chord moving between Lydian, Ionian and Mixolydian to hear how these modes color a major chord in a soloing situation.<br /> 05. Repeat this soloing exercise but put on an Am backing track and solo between A Dorian, Aeolian, Phrygian and Locrian.<br /> 06. Repeat exercises 4 and 5 in all 12 keys. Then, begin to move between two chords, so G-C or Am-Dm, and work all seven modes over both of those chord progressions. </p> <p>Do you have a question about how to learn all seven major modes the easy way? Post your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below.</p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the U.K., where he teaches Skype guitar students all over the world, and is an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-learn-all-seven-major-modes-easy-way#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Mon, 01 Dec 2014 16:10:15 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22989 Jazz Guitar Corner: Five Introductory Jazz Guitar Tunes http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-five-introductory-jazz-guitar-tunes <!--paging_filter--><p>When learning how to play jazz guitar, many of us know we need to learn scales, arpeggios and chords, but we are sometimes stuck when looking for jazz tunes to learn that are appropriate for our level of development. </p> <p>In this lesson, you will check out five introductory jazz tunes, each focusing on specific concepts that will help you develop strong jazz-guitar fundamentals while expanding your repertoire at the same time. </p> <p>Check out these five tunes as you begin to develop your jazz-tune list and build your jazz-soloing vocabulary on the fretboard. </p> <p><strong>"Summertime"</strong></p> <p>One of the most recognizable jazz tunes, "Summertime" is a great intro to jazz guitar as the melody (apart from one note) comes from the minor pentatonic scale, and you can use this same minor pent scale to solo over the whole tune when first exploring jazz soloing. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/TKndXzvOfVQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Maiden Voyage"</strong></p> <p>Learning how to solo in a jazz style means learning how to change keys on a regular basis during your improvisations, which can be a big hurdle for guitarists when first exploring the jazz genre. </p> <p>"Maiden Voyage" provides four minor keys to work with, which you can use the Dorian mode to solo over each key, providing a challenge for beginner jazz guitarists, while keeping things focused on one mode at the same time, Dorian. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/cMWHNY292F0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Cantaloupe Island"</strong></p> <p>In order to progress as a jazz soloist, you will also need to work on switching chord qualities as well as keys in your soloing, and "Cantaloupe Island" provides both of these challenges at a reasonable tempo in its construction. </p> <p>The tune features both m7 and 7th chords, has a short 16-bar form and maintains a reasonable tempo, allowing you to challenge yourself in the practice room without providing too much frustration at this stage in your development. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/uabdCVrs1C8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Autumn Leaves"</strong></p> <p>Moving on to another famous jazz standard, featuring the most famous jazz chord progression, "Autumn Leaves" features major and minor ii-V-I chord changes to explore in your soloing. </p> <p>When learning to play "Autumn Leaves," it would be advised to pull these two progressions out of the tune and work on them individually, major and minor ii-V-I, before attempting to solo over the tune as a whole. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zDuee6blvj8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong"Sunny"</strong></strong"sunny"</strong></p> <p>The last tune on our list of intro jazz songs, "Sunny" has major and minor ii-V-I’s in its makeup, but this time they are short, two-bar phrases compared to the longer, four-bar phrases in "Autumn Leaves."</p> <p>Again, soloing over major and minor ii-V-I’s is an essential skill for any jazz guitar to possess, and so working on both short and long versions of theses progressions can go a long way in the practice room. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/syercy760YQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> This is by no means a complete list of introductory jazz tunes, but the five songs cover the basics and allow for a well-balanced introduction to the genre. </p> <p>What is your favorite jazz guitar tune to jam on? Share it in the COMMENTS section below!</p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the U.K., where he teaches Skype guitar students all over the world, and is an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-five-introductory-jazz-guitar-tunes#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Mon, 03 Nov 2014 22:03:04 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22759 Jazz Guitar Corner: How to Play Jazzy Jimi Hendrix Chords http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-how-play-jazzy-jimi-hendrix-chords <!--paging_filter--><p>As guitarists, many of us are fans of the late, great Jimi Hendrix, who has influenced players in all genres of music, including jazz. </p> <p>While Hendrix left a legacy as one of the greatest rock improvisers of all time, he also left his stamp on the harmonic side of the instrument, including a chord that bears his name. </p> <p>Taken from the song “Purple Haze,” and spelling out an E7#9 voicing, this chord has become synonymous with Hendrix’s playing and is even referred to simply as the “Hendrix Chord” by many players. </p> <p>In this lesson, we’ll be taking a look at how you can take the Hendrix Chord and apply it to your jazz guitar comping phrases, slightly altering this classic shape to give it a jazzy feel along the way. </p> <p><strong>Jazzy Jimmy Hendrix Chords</strong></p> <p>Here are four chord shapes to check out on your guitar, the first being the classic “Hendrix Chord,” E7#9, with the next three being jazzy variations of this important voicing. The first jazzy shape simply takes off the root, creating the commonly used “rootless” voicing for this chord. </p> <p>The second shape keeps the root off and adds the 5th on the first string to produce a four-note rootless chord. Finally, the third shape uses the b13 note on top of the chord, producing an E7#9b13 rootless chord based on the original Hendrix Chord shape. </p> <p>Try working these shapes out on the guitar first, to get your fingers around them, and then move on to the comping examples below where these shapes are applied to practical, musical situations. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/hendrix%20chord%201.jpg" width="620" height="877" alt="hendrix chord 1.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Jazzy Hendrix Chord Example 1</strong></p> <p>To help you take these shapes off the page and onto the fretboard, here are three examples of minor ii-V-I progressions with the Hendrix chord used to outline the V7alt chord in each progression. The first example uses a common chord riff that works between the rootless 7#9 and 7b9 chords based off of the original Hendrix chord shape. </p> <p>As well, there is an AmMaj7 shape, G#-C-E, used over Am7, another common jazz choice in this type of progression. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/172003308&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/hendrix%20chord%202.jpg" width="620" height="179" alt="hendrix chord 2.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Jazzy Hendrix Chord Example 2</strong></p> <p>The next example brings the four-note shape to the same progression, with the 5th on top of the chord, using a common jazz rhythm pattern to solidify the changes. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/172003306&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/hendrix%20chord%203.jpg" width="620" height="179" alt="hendrix chord 3.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Jazzy Hendrix Chord Example 3</strong></p> <p>Lastly, here is a cool sounding comping pattern that mixes both the four-note 7#9b13 and 7#9 shapes together, which provides movement to the line as you move from the V7alt to the Im7 chord in this minor ii-V-I progression. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/172003305&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/hendrix%20chord%204.jpg" width="620" height="185" alt="hendrix chord 4.jpg" /></p> <p>Once you've worked out these three comping examples, try to come up with three or more examples of your own using the Hendrix chord and its variations as the basis for your V7alt chords. </p> <p>From there, try comping over your favorite jazz tune and use the Hendrix chord and its variations every time you see a V7 chord in the changes, allowing you to bring these chord shapes to a jam situation in your studies. </p> <p>What do you think of these jazzy Hendrix chords? Share your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the U.K., where he teaches Skype guitar students all over the world, and is an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-how-play-jazzy-jimi-hendrix-chords#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Jimi Hendrix Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Mon, 13 Oct 2014 21:43:05 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22573 Jazz Guitar Corner: Introduction to the Lydian Pentatonic Concept http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-introduction-lydian-pentatonic-concept <!--paging_filter--><p>One of the most common ways to expand your soloing ideas over maj7 chords is to explore the Lydian sound, which produces a maj7#11 chord.</p> <p>While learning the Lydian scale itself is definitely one way to go when adding a maj7#11 sound to your solos, there’s another common and cool-sounding concept you can explore to bring this sound out in your lines. </p> <p>In today’s lesson, we’ll be looking at how you can apply a major pentatonic scale a tone above any maj7 chord to bring out a Lydian vibe in your jazz guitar solos. </p> <p><strong>The Lydian Pentatonic Concept</strong></p> <p>Though it has a big name, the Lydian Pentatonic Concept is a rather easy way to bring out a cool, new sound in your jazz guitar soloing lines and licks. To break it down to its smallest form, the concept is as such:</p> <p>“Playing a major pentatonic scale a tone above the root of any maj7 chord produces a Lydian sound in your solos.”</p> <p>Here’s how that concept looks with a Cmaj7 chord and D scale. When played over a Dmaj7 chord, the D major pentatonic scale produces the intervals:</p> <p>R-2-3-5-6</p> <p>But, when you play this same scale, D major pentatonic, over a Cmaj7 chord, you produce a Lydian sound in your lines. </p> <p>9-3-#11-6-7</p> <p>As you can see, by playing a major pentatonic scale a tone higher than the maj7 chord you are soloing over, you are outlining a maj7#11 sound in your lines. </p> <p>This is a great way to bring out the Lydian sound in your solo, but not just run up and down the normal 7-note Lydian mode in your lines and phrases. </p> <p><strong>Lydian Pentatonic Concept Application</strong></p> <p>Now that you know what the Lydian Pentatonic Concept is, let’s look at how the D major pentatonic scale sounds and looks when played over a Cmaj7 chord. </p> <p>As you will notice, though it is a major pentatonic scale fingering, when played over Cmaj7 the D scale takes on a whole new character, essentially giving you twice as much musical bang for your buck with this fingering. </p> <p>I’ve written out a sample fingering I like to use for this scale, but feel free to use any fingering you like or prefer, as long as you play a major pentatonic scale a tone higher than the root of the maj7 chord you are soloing over the concept will work. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/169199817&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Lydian%20Pentatonic%201.jpg" width="620" height="171" alt="Lydian Pentatonic 1.jpg" /></p> <p>Now that we've checked out the theory background on this concept, let’s explore a sample lick and find out how you can apply this concept to a ii V I chord progression in your jazz guitar solos. </p> <p><strong>Lydian Pentatonic Concept Lick</strong></p> <p>To help you take this concept further in your studies, here is a sample lick that uses the Lydian Pentatonic Concept over the Imaj7 chord, in this case Cmaj7, during the last two bars of the phrase. </p> <p>After you've learned this lick in the given key, try taking it to all 12 keys, and then write a few similar licks of your own that use this concept over the Imaj7 chord. </p> <p>Finally, put on a ii-V-I backing track, in one key to begin then in the other 11 keys from there, and solo over those changes using the Lydian Pentatonic Concept over each Imaj7 chord in your improvised lines and phrases. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/169200537&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Lydian%20Pentatonic%202.jpg" width="620" height="168" alt="Lydian Pentatonic 2.jpg" /></p> <p>Do you have any questions about the Lydian Pentatonic Concept? Share your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below.</p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-introduction-lydian-pentatonic-concept#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Wed, 24 Sep 2014 19:02:11 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22428 Jazz Guitar Corner: Rhythmic Soloing Exercise for the Improvising Guitarist http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-rhythmic-soloing-exercise-improvising-guitarist <!--paging_filter--><p>With so many scales, arpeggios, licks, chords and patterns to learn in the practice room, sometimes we can overlook rhythm when working on our <strong>jazz guitar soloing</strong> concepts. </p> <p>Keeping a focus on rhythms and <strong>rhythmic motives</strong> in your solos can help take your playing to the next level, without having to learn any new concepts, just new approaches to the concepts you already have under your fingers. </p> <p>In this lesson, you’ll learn a fun and <strong>essential jazz guitar rhythm</strong> exercise you can apply to your practice routine and take your playing to the next level of interest and creativity today. </p> <p><strong>Rhythmic Soloing Exercise</strong></p> <p>Here is the exercise in a nutshell so you can get the idea into your head before taking it to the fretboard.</p> <p>01. Pick a short, <strong>one-bar rhythm</strong> to focus on in your solo<br /> 02. Pick a chord progression or tune to solo over with a <strong>backing track</strong><br /> 03. Solo over the tune, using <strong>any notes you want</strong>, but every bar has the same rhythm<br /> 04. Practice these exercises at <strong>various tempos</strong> and with tunes of various lengths such as 8, 12, 16, 24 and 32 bars each</p> <p>Now that you know how to build the exercise, here's a sample motive that you can begin using, as well as a sample solo using that motive to give you an idea of how the exercise could sound in the woodshed. </p> <p><strong>Sample Rhythmic Motive<strong></strong></strong></p> <p>Here's a sample rhythm I might use in my practicing that you can start with when first exploring these concepts in the practice room. The rhythm relies on <strong>three up beats</strong>, 1&amp;, 2&amp;, 3&amp;, as well as a downbeat, 4, to build the one-bar long phrase. </p> <p>As an example, here is this rhythmic motive applied to a <strong>ii V I VI chord progression</strong> in the key of C major. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Open%20String%20Fingerpicking%20Pattern%201.jpg" width="620" height="156" alt="Open String Fingerpicking Pattern 1.jpg" /></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/163727455&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p>Once you have learned the sample lick above, try soloing over the same chord progression but make up your own notes to use with that static rhythm in order to take this motive further in the practice room.</p> <p><strong>Rhythmic Motive Blues Solo</strong></p> <p>To finish off our rhythmic motive study, here is a sample solo over an <strong>F blues progression</strong> that uses the same rhythm from the previous section. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Open%20String%20Fingerpicking%20Pattern%202.jpg" width="620" height="481" alt="Open String Fingerpicking Pattern 2.jpg" /></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/163727547&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p>When you have this short solo under your fingers, try improvising over an F blues using the same rhythm, but changing the notes as you work this idea into your own improvisational studies. </p> <p>As you can see, focusing on rhythms when soloing can bring a new dimension to your soloing ideas. While you won’t play a single rhythm for an entire chorus in a real-life situation, focusing on one rhythm in the woodshed will allow you to keep rhythms in the forefront of your lines and improvised solos. </p> <p>Do you have a questions or comments about this lesson? Share your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-rhythmic-soloing-exercise-improvising-guitarist#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Mon, 18 Aug 2014 21:40:16 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22144 Jazz Guitar Corner: Three Steps to Avoiding Practice Fatigue http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-three-steps-avoiding-practice-fatigue <!--paging_filter--><p>When I asked my Facebook followers what they wanted me to write about this week, I was excited to see a question about maintaining physical and mental health in the practice room. </p> <p>As guitarists, it’s easy for us to put our heads down for hours at a time, only coming up when we’ve gotten hungry or tired enough to eat or sleep, before jumping back on the instrument we love so much. </p> <p>Because it’s easy to get swept away when practicing guitar, it is important to maintain your physical health and mental focus in order to get the most out of any time spent in the practice room. </p> <p>In this column, I’ll lay out some of the concepts I apply to my own routine in order to avoid back, shoulder, leg and arm pain, as well as help me keep focused mentally when working for short or long periods in the woodshed. </p> <p>Check out these items, and then please share (in the comments below the lesson or on Facebook) your tips for maintaining physical and mental strength in the guitar practice room. </p> <p><strong>Step 1: Scheduling Practice Breaks</strong></p> <p>The first issue to address when it comes to maintaining physical health in the practice room is scheduling regular breaks into your routine. </p> <p>Taking a five-minute break every 30 minutes, or a 10-minute break every 60 minutes, will not only give you a chance to stand up and stretch out your muscles, but it allows you to rest your focus for a bit before moving on to the next exercise in your routine.</p> <p>Sometimes we feel we have to press on and do hours at a time in the practice room. But after a while, our minds and bodies will burn out, and at that point you are just wasting energy on exercises that aren’t producing much of a return for your time. </p> <p>It is always better to work in short, highly focused bursts in the practice room than to slog on and become distracted mentally or sore physically. Therefore, scheduling breaks into your routine can help remind you when to take a few minute mental and physical stretch before going back refreshed to the next stage in your practice routine for that day. </p> <p><strong>Step 2: Correct Posture and Using a Strap</strong></p> <p>One of the biggest questions I get asked by guitarists is, “How should I sit when practicing, especially for long periods of time, in the practice room?”</p> <p>The answer to this question differs for each person, but there are some common principals we can all use to ensure that our posture is helping us and not hindering us in the practice room. Depending on your physicality, you might prefer to have both feet flat on the floor and your back straight against the chair you’re sitting in. </p> <p>If this is the case, you might want to use a footstool or guitar cushion support such as the one made by Dynarette to help support your guitar when sitting in this position. Though, if you’re like me, you might be more comfortable with one leg crossed over the other and your back slightly curved over the guitar, but not hunched, as that can cause shoulder and back problems pretty quickly. </p> <p>If you prefer the second type of posture, then resting the guitar on your picking-hand thigh, right for right-handers and left for left-handers, will allow you the closest access to the instrument compared to resting it on the opposite thigh when practicing. </p> <p>Either way can work for you as far as posture is concerned, so try them both out. </p> <p>I used footstools for many years, but having my hips displaced like that caused me back issues, and after switching to the cross-legged position, that went away. But I have had friends with the opposite experience, so test and see for yourself. </p> <p>Sitting in a chair is always preferential to sitting on the corner of a bed or on a couch, especially for long practice sessions, as chairs will provide more support regardless of which posture you choose. </p> <p>Lastly, using a strap in the practice room can help take some of the weight of the guitar off of your arms and move it onto your shoulders and body as a whole. This will prevent you from feeling like you have to hold the guitar in place with your arms as you play, which can cause undo tension and prevent you from being able to play at the best of your ability as you have to expend energy to hold the instrument on your thigh. </p> <p><strong>Step 3: Exercise and Stretching</strong></p> <p>Over the years, I’ve found that exercising and stretching throughout the day is very helpful for preventing strain issues, such as back, leg and arm pain, as well as injury in the practice room. I stretch out my fingers every 10 to 15 minutes and my arms every 30 or so in when practicing. </p> <p>Throughout the day I do exercises to help strengthen my arms, legs and core such as crunches, push-ups, walking and yoga. </p> <p>If you find you have a hard time sitting for a long time practicing, or that you are experiencing sore muscles, especially your arms and back, then exercising and stretching as part of your daily routine might be the thing you need to get over these physical humps in the woodshed. </p> <p>To maintain mental stamina and focus in the practice room, mediation or floating can be excellent ways to boost your mental strength, as well as provide creative influence away from the instrument. </p> <p>Though not music related, thinking about the physical side of practicing, and preparing yourself physically for time in the practice room, can go a long way in ensuring that you avoid injury and are able to get the most out of your time on the instrument. </p> <p>How do you approach maintaining your arm, hand and body health as a guitarist? Share your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-three-steps-avoiding-practice-fatigue#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Fri, 25 Jul 2014 17:28:40 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21944 Jazz Guitar Corner: 10 Steps to Learning Jazz Guitar Standards http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-10-steps-learning-jazz-guitar-standards <!--paging_filter--><p>One of the biggest problems I encounter with jazz guitar students is that they have learned a ton of chords, scales and arpeggios, but they can’t play a tune or jam on a standard with other musicians. </p> <p>When learning how to play jazz guitar, it’s vital to keep a focus on learning tunes, as well as developing technique, in order to avoid an awkward situation when someone invites you to jam and you don’t know any tunes. </p> <p>Most players, if not all, pick up the guitar to play songs and jam with other people, so having a strategy in the practice room for learning standards will be beneficial to help you achieve this goal. </p> <p>In this lesson, I’ve listed my 10-step checklist that I run in the woodshed when I learn a new jazz standard so that you can have a group of exercises that will build your chord, scale and arpeggio vocabulary while allowing you to increase your repertoire at the same time. </p> <p>Check out these 10 exercises, and if you have an essential item you'd add to this list, share it in the comments section below. </p> <p><strong>Learning Jazz Standards Checklist</strong></p> <p>Here is the list of 10 exercises to help you learn any jazz standard on guitar. Depending on where your strengths and weaknesses lie, you might want to focus more time on the melody, chord, scale or arpeggios sections.</p> <p><strong>01. Memorize the melody in two positions on the fretboard.</strong><br /> <strong>02. Sing the melody from memory. </strong><br /> <strong>03. Play the root note of each chord in time to a backing track. </strong><br /> <strong>04. Comp Drop 3 chords from the sixth and fifth-string root notes. </strong><br /> <strong>05. Comp Drop 2 chords from the fifth and fourth-string root notes. </strong><br /> <strong>06. Play one-octave arpeggios for each chord. </strong><br /> <strong>07. Play two-octave arpeggios for each chord. </strong><br /> <strong>08. Play one-octave scales for each chord. </strong><br /> <strong>09. Play two-octave scales for each chord.</strong><br /> <strong>10. Work on a half time and/or walking bass line for the chord changes. </strong></p> <p>Try working out these 10 items the next time you learn a jazz standard on guitar and see how they can help you solidify a tune into your memory and under your fingers from a melody, comping and soloing situation. </p> <p>Do you have an essential learning tool that you would add to this list? Share your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-10-steps-learning-jazz-guitar-standards#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Mon, 23 Jun 2014 20:08:46 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21648 Jazz Guitar Corner: How to Expand Your Jazz Chops with Rhythmic Displacement http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-how-expand-your-jazz-chops-rhythmic-displacement <!--paging_filter--><p>When learning how to play jazz guitar, one of the big concepts many players tackle is learning licks from famous players and classic solos. </p> <p>When doing so, you can learn the lick as played on the recording, but you also can work the lick around the bar rhythmically in order to give you variations that you can apply to your soloing ideas as well as the original lick. </p> <p>In this lesson, you’ll learn a fun and cool technique you can use to take one lick and make it sound like eight licks by displacing it around the bar. </p> <p>Though this approach is associated with sax player Lee Konitz, who taught this to his students, it also fits well on the guitar and is worth spending time in the woodshed to bring into your playing today. </p> <p><strong>Lick 1: On the Beat</strong></p> <p>To begin, let’s take a classic-sounding jazz lick you can learn starting on beat 1 of the bar, then we’ll start to vary this lick in the next two examples. </p> <p>In order to make sure you can quickly grasp those variations, make sure you memorize this lick and get it comfortable under your fingers and in your ears before moving to the next two sections of this lesson. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/153149974&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Phrasing%20Licks%201-png.jpg" width="620" height="169" alt="Phrasing Licks 1-png.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Lick 2: Anticipated</strong></p> <p>The first variation we’ll look at is taking the exact same lick, but starting it on the "and" of 4 on the bar before the progression starts. </p> <p>This creates a sense of anticipation in your line, and gives you a quick and relatively easy variation for the original lick that you can use in your solos without sounding repetitive or monotonous with the same lick. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/153150141&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Phrasing%20Licks%202-png.jpg" width="620" height="169" alt="Phrasing Licks 2-png.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Lick 3: Delayed</strong></p> <p>As well as starting the lick an 8th-note early when playing it over a ii V I progression, you also can start it an 8th note later to add a sense of delayed resolution to your lines. </p> <p>Once you have worked this lick out on the "and" of 4, 1 and the "and" of 1, you can move it around to start on any beat in the bar in order to take it further in the practice room and out on the bandstand. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/153150281&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Phrasing%20Licks%203-png.jpg" width="620" height="169" alt="Phrasing Licks 3-png.jpg" /></p> <p>Now that you have practiced playing the lick starting on three different beats within the bar, you can try moving it around to other beats to see how it sounds when you start on beat 2, the "and" of 2, 3, etc. </p> <p>By working a lick around the bar like this, you are learning eight different variations for the same lick, by starting on the eight 8th-notes in the bar, providing you a ton of improvisational material from just one classic jazz line. </p> <p>Do you have a question or comment about this lick transposition technique? Share your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-how-expand-your-jazz-chops-rhythmic-displacement#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Fri, 06 Jun 2014 18:35:40 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21483 Jazz Guitar Corner: Dominant Double Stops for Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-dominant-double-stops-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p>When learning how to play jazz guitar, we often spend time working out scales, arpeggios and single-note riffs, as well as chord shapes and common progressions. </p> <p>But what about those sounds in the middle of these two sonic poles — double stops? </p> <p>Double stops are a great way to add a new texture to your jazz guitar chord soloing ideas, over Dominant 7th chords as in this lesson, or any harmony you are exploring. Also, they are less demanding technically, so they can juice up your chord-soloing lines at faster tempos when full chord shapes are too tough to grab on the neck. </p> <p>In today’s lesson, we’ll be exploring two of my favorite shapes for playing double stops over dominant 7th chords on guitar, as well as checking out a sample lick you can use as a stepping stone to improvising with these ideas on your own in a jam or gig situation. </p> <p><strong>Dominant Double Stop Shapes 1</strong></p> <p>To begin, let’s take a look at double stops built around an A13 chord, with the root on the fifth fret of the sixth string, or the fifth fret of the first string, depending on how you want to look at it. </p> <p>Since this chord is used a lot in jazz guitar, 13th chords with no root, we’ll use that as our point of reference for these double-stop ideas, killing two birds with one stone as you work on double stops and rootless chords in the woodshed. </p> <p>Try practicing and memorizing these double-stop fingerings in various keys around the fretboard, starting with the key of A and moving on from there. </p> <p>Having a handle on these shapes in various keys will allow you to quickly and comfortably apply them to your improvised solos in ii V I progressions as well as over jazz blues progressions and standards such as “Watermelon Man” and “Killer Joe,” both built around 7th-chord harmonies. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Dominant%20Double%20Stops%201.jpg" width="620" height="168" alt="Dominant Double Stops 1.jpg" /></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/139400450&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p>When you can play these double stops comfortably, try putting on an A13 vamp and soloing over that chord using these double stops to build your lines and phrases. From there, repeat this exercise in the other 11 keys in order to work these shapes in all locations around the fretboard. </p> <p><strong>Dominant Double Stop Shapes 2</strong></p> <p>As well as learning dominant double stops based around the sixth/first string root chord, as you did in the first example, you can also learn them based around a fifth-string root chord. </p> <p>Just like you saw in the first example, here there is no root note in the chord shape that I’m basing my double stops from, but you can think of the note D as being on the fifth string, fifth fret and use that as a reference. </p> <p>Playing rootless chords is something many jazz players do in their comping and chord-soloing ideas, so if this is new to you, check out my lesson <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-9th-chords-made-easy">"9th Chords Made Easy”</a> for more information on the subject. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Dominant%20Double%20Stops%202.jpg" width="620" height="168" alt="Dominant Double Stops 2.jpg" /></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/139400449&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p>Once you have these shapes under your fingers, try jamming over a D7 vamp and soloing using only these double stops to build your lines. From there, you can take these fingerings to all 12 keys and then practice soloing over a jazz blues chord progression using these, and the first set of double-stop shapes to build your improvised lines and phrases.</p> <p><strong>Dominant Double Stop Lick</strong></p> <p>To help you get started with these double-stop fingerings over 7th chords, here's a sample lick you can learn over the first four bars of an A blues. </p> <p>I’ve used an A pedal note, the single-note A that keeps coming back, as this is a common technique used by jazz guitarists when playing double stops, and one you can explore further in your own practicing. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Dominant%20Double%20Stops%203.jpg" width="620" height="154" alt="Dominant Double Stops 3.jpg" /></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/139400446&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p>As you can see, working out these two positions of 7th double stops will give you a cool, organ sound in your jazz blues guitar lines and comping. Check out these shapes this week in the practice room and see where they lead you in the woodshed and out on the bandstand. </p> <p>Do you have a question about dominant double stops? Share your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-dominant-double-stops-guitar#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Thu, 15 May 2014 14:34:40 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20718 Jazz Guitar Corner: Beyond the Octave — Upper Structure Triads for Jazz Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-beyond-octave-upper-structure-triads-jazz-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p>When learning how to play jazz guitar, one of the most commonly asked questions is, “How do I add chord extensions to my soloing ideas?” To help answer this question, in this lesson we’ll be looking at an easy, fun and effective way to bring extension notes into your jazz guitar solos — upper structure triads. </p> <p><strong>What Are Upper Structure Triads?</strong></p> <p>To begin, let’s take a look at what exactly upper structure triads are and how you can apply them to your jazz guitar soloing ideas. Upper structure triads are three-note chords — triads — that use the notes beyond the root-3-5-7 arpeggio structure of any chord. </p> <p>This means they use the 9th, 11th and 13th notes of any chord, which are the 2nd, 4th and 6th notes, but up one octave to be placed above the underlying arpeggio shape. </p> <p>Here is an example of a C major scale written out in scale form, first two bars, followed by the arpeggio and upper structure triad for that chord. When you build upper structure triads, you can label them as you would any triad. </p> <p>This means that in the case of Cmaj7, you can play a Dm triad (D F A or 9 11 13) over a Cmaj7 chord to outline all of those sounds in your playing. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Upper%20Triads%201.jpg" width="620" height="157" alt="Upper Triads 1.jpg" /><br /> You can apply Upper Structure Triads to any chord that you are soloing over in a jazz context, not just the maj7 chord in the first example. </p> <p>In this lesson we’ll be looking at applying upper structure triads to the I VI ii V chord progression. To help you understand the triads that work over each of these chords, here they are in the key of C to study and practice from a technical standpoint before moving on to the licks in the lesson below. </p> <p><strong>Cmaj7</strong> – Dm<br /> <strong>A7b9</strong> – Bbdim<br /> <strong>Dm7</strong> – Em<br /> <strong>G7</strong> – Am</p> <p>Or, to think of it as Roman numerals, in order to make things easily transposable to other keys, here are the numerals for each chord and upper triad. </p> <p><strong>Imaj7</strong> – ii<br /> <strong>VI7b9</strong> – biidim<br /> <strong>iim7</strong> – ii<br /> <strong>V7</strong> – ii</p> <p>A good exercise to get these sounds under your fingers is to play the original arpeggio followed by the upper structure triad for each of these chords in different parts of the fretboard, and in different keys as you solidify this concept in your ears and under your fingers in your practice routine. </p> <p><strong>Upper Structure Lick 1</strong></p> <p>Here's a sample lick that will help you hear and apply the sound of upper structure triads to a I VI ii V chord progression, which is commonly found in countless jazz tunes from the classic repertoire. </p> <p>When you’ve worked this lick out on the neck, try writing out three to five licks of your own that use upper structure triads as the basis for your lines, moving on to applying these ideas to other progressions beyond I VI ii V as well in your woodshedding. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/148709109&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Upper%20Triads%202.jpg" width="620" height="170" alt="Upper Triads 2.jpg" /></p> <p>As is the case with any lick you learn, work this phase in the key of C before moving it around to the other 11 keys on the fretboard. Also, try soloing over a tune you know or are working out in the practice room and use this idea over various sections of that tune where the chords apply. </p> <p><strong>Lydian and Lydian Dominant Triads</strong></p> <p>When soloing in a jazz context, many players prefer the sound of a #11 to a natural 11 when playing over maj7 and 7th chords. This is due to the 3rd and 11th of those chords being a half-step apart, causing a bit of tension when playing the 11th over the 3rd in a soloing context. </p> <p>To avoid this dissonance, you can use upper structure triads to build #11 sounds over both maj7 and 7th chords in your soloing phrases. Here is how you would do that over both a Cmaj7 and G7 chord. </p> <p><strong>Cmaj7</strong> – D<br /> <strong>G7</strong> – A</p> <p>Or, written as Roman numerals, these chords and upper triads would be:</p> <p><strong>Imaj7</strong> – II<br /> <strong>V7</strong> – II</p> <p>Meaning that if you have a Imaj7 chord, you can play a major triad from the second note of that chord to produce the maj7#11 sound. Same goes for the V7 chord, where you play a major triad from the second note of that chord to produce a 7#11 sound. </p> <p>Once you have worked out the theory behind these #11 sounds, try working them out on the fretboard, and then bringing them to your soloing phrases when improvising in order to expand upon them in your jazz guitar practice routine. </p> <p><strong>Upper Structure Lick 2</strong></p> <p>To help you get the maj7#11 and 7#11 sounds into your playing using upper structure triads, here is the same lick that you just learned in the previous section, with the 11ths being raised to #11s over the Cmaj7 and G7 chords. </p> <p>Work this lick out in the woodshed, and then try and write out 3 to 5 licks of your own that use maj7#11 and 7#11 upper structure triads to build your lines. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/148709222&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Upper%20Triads%203.jpg" width="620" height="170" alt="Upper Triads 3.jpg" /></p> <p>Once you have this lick under your fingers in the key of C major, try taking it to other keys and applying it to tunes you know or are working on in the woodshed. </p> <p>Upper structure triads are fairly simple to get under your fingers, as they’re based on three-note shapes, but as you can see, they can expand your soloing chops and provide new colors to your jazz guitar soloing lines and phrases. </p> <p>Do you have a question about upper structure triads? Share your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below! </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-beyond-octave-upper-structure-triads-jazz-guitar#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Fri, 09 May 2014 16:47:24 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21216 Jazz Guitar Corner: One Quick Trick to Solo Over 7b9 Chords http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-one-quick-trick-solo-over-7b9-chords <!--paging_filter--><p>One of the questions I get asked the most is, “How can I spice up my diminished-scale soloing ideas beyond just playing the scale or the arpeggio?”</p> <p>To help answer this question, in this lesson we’ll be looking into one of my favorite ways to expand your 7b9 diminished soloing ideas using various arpeggios built from the underlying harmony of the scale. </p> <p>By looking into the four dim7 and four 7th chords that are built from this scale, you can quickly expand your 7b9 diminished soloing ideas without having to study anything beyond these two common arpeggio shapes. </p> <p>Let’s dig in and check out how you can use harmonic arpeggios to build interesting lines when using a 7b9 diminished scale in your soloing ideas. </p> <p><strong>What is the 7b9 Diminished Scale?</strong></p> <p>To begin, let’s take a quick look at the 7b9 diminished scale, otherwise known as the half whole diminished scale, before moving on to looking at the harmony built from the notes in this scale. </p> <p>This eight-note scale has the following interval pattern:</p> <p>Root-m2-m3-M3-D5-P5-6-b7</p> <p>You can think of some of these notes as several intervals depending on how you see the fretboard, such as seeing the M3 as a D4, or the D5 as an A4, but I find that the above intervals are the easiest way for me to visualize them quickly on the fretboard. </p> <p>This scale, as the name suggests, is used to solo over a 7b9 chords, and you can see a sample two-octave fingering for this scale over an A7b9 chord below. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Diminished%20Harmony%201.jpg" width="620" height="157" alt="Diminished Harmony 1.jpg" /></p> <p>If this scale is new to you, try working it in 12 keys across the fretboard, as well as finding at least two or three fingerings you can use to play this scale in different parts of the fretboard, such as sixth-, fifth- and fourth-string root fingerings. </p> <p><strong>7b9 Diminished Scale Harmony</strong></p> <p>One of the coolest musical concepts that comes from the 7b9 diminished scale, again otherwise known as the half-whole diminished scale, is the arpeggio patterns that are derived from this scale. </p> <p>Along with the four dim7 chords that come from this scale, from the b9, 3, 5 and b7 of the underlying chord, you can also derive four 7th chords from the same scale, built from the root, b3, b5 and dim7 of the scale. </p> <p>When applied to an A7b9 chord, you can build four dim7 and four 7th chords from the underlying diminished scale that you can then use to solo over this chord type in your jazz guitar improvisations. </p> <p>7ths – A7, C7, Eb7, Gb7<br /> dim7 – Bbdim7, Dbdim7, Edim7, Gdim7</p> <p>You can see these arpeggios with a sample fingering below that you can use as a starting point when taking these arpeggios to your jazz guitar practice routine. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Diminished%20Harmony%202-png.jpg" width="620" height="313" alt="Diminished Harmony 2-png.jpg" /></p> <p>When you have worked out this arpeggio pattern over A7b9, make sure to practice it in other positions on the fretboard for this chord, as well as apply this concept to all 12 keys of 7b9 chords around the fretboard as you expand upon these arps in the woodshed. </p> <p>As well, try putting on a 7b9 backing track and play these arpeggios, one at a time or several combined at once, over this track in order to hear how they sound when applied to a harmonic situation. </p> <p><strong>7b9 Diminished Scale Lick</strong></p> <p>To help you take this idea to a musical situation in your practicing, here is a sample lick that uses the arpeggios from the previous section to outline the V7b9 chord in a ii V I progression in the key of D minor. </p> <p>Once you have memorized this lick in the key of D minor, practice running it through all 12 keys at different tempos around the fretboard, as well as apply it to tunes that you are shedding in your practice routine. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/143545608&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Diminished%20Harmony%203.jpg" width="620" height="163" alt="Diminished Harmony 3.jpg" /></p> <p>When this lick is comfortable in your playing, try writing out three to five similar licks of your own that use the concepts from this lesson to create those jazz guitar 7b9 phrases. </p> <p><strong>Practicing 7b9 Diminished Scale Harmony</strong></p> <p>Once you have checked out the arpeggios and lick in the above lesson, you can move forward with this material in your own jazz guitar practice routine. Here are five exercises you can do to expand upon these ideas. </p> <p><strong>01.</strong> Put on an A7b9 backing track and solo over that chord using the A7 half-whole diminished scale as the basis for your lines.<br /> <strong>02.</strong> Solo over the same A7b9 backing track using only the four 7th chords from the HW dim scale to build your lines, A7-C7-Eb7-Gb7.<br /> <strong>03.</strong> Solo over the same A7b9 backing track using only the four dim7 chords from the HW dim scale to build your lines, Bbdim7-Dbdim7-Edim7-Gdim7.<br /> <strong>04.</strong> Repeat exercises 1 to 3 over all 12 keys for 7b9 chords.<br /> <strong>05.</strong> Put on a tune such as "Tune Up" by Miles Davis and treat every 7th chord as a 7b9 chord in order to use the scale and arps from this lesson to build your lines over those changes. </p> <p>From there, try taking this diminished scale harmony material to other tunes that you know or are working on in the woodshed as you take these concepts further in the practice room. </p> <p>Do you have a question about 7b9 diminished scale harmony? Share your thoughts in the comments section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-one-quick-trick-solo-over-7b9-chords#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Mon, 07 Apr 2014 17:29:28 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20951