Jazz Guitar Corner http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/2262/all en Jazz Guitar Corner: Channel Allan Holdsworth with Four-Note-Per-String Scales http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-channel-allan-holdsworth-four-note-string-scales <!--paging_filter--><p>I often get asked about two topics: How to play in a modern style and how to break out of box patterns. Though these are two separate ideas, I often start by giving one answer: Check out four-note-per-string scales.</p> <p>Used by modern players such as Allan Holdsworth, whose playing inspired me to check out these fingerings, four-note-per-string scales can help bring a more modern flavor to your lines, expand your knowledge of the neck and allow you to cover a large amount of fretboard real estate with just one scale shape, all of which are beneficial to players looking to explore non-traditional scale fingerings in their playing. </p> <p>In this week’s article, we’ll be looking at how to play and practice four-note-per-string scales, as well as how to add slurs into the mix in order to get a bit of that “slippery” Holdsworth legato sound into your lines. </p> <p><strong>4 Note Per String Scales</strong></p> <p>These scales are built exactly as their name suggests, by playing four notes on each string as you climb up the neck, then simply reversing this approach on the way down. </p> <p>While these scales lie nicely under the fingers once you get them down, there are two roadblocks many players face when exploring these scales for the first time, finding the notes and finding a fingering that works for you.</p> <p>When first digging into a new four-note-per-string scale, such as the F major scale below, you will need to figure out the notes on the scale and build your fingering up from there. </p> <p>Here is the process I used to work out the notes in the example below. </p> <p>• Pick a scale, in this case F major<br /> • Write out the notes of that scale, F G A Bb C D E<br /> • Start on the tonic, F, and play the first four notes of the scale on the 6th string, F G A Bb<br /> • Then, move to the next note in the scale, C, on the 5th string and play the next four notes, C D E F<br /> • Repeat this process up all 6 strings</p> <p>So the process for learning the fingering for this scale is different from a typical box pattern or in-position two-octave scale, which can make it a bit tricky at first. But it does have the added side effect of shoring up your knowledge of the notes on the neck at the same time that you learn the scale, so it’s a worthwhile exercise for both of these reasons. </p> <p>As far as the fingering is concerned, it will depend on your hand and finger size and dexterity. I play these scales with one finger per note, 1-2-3-4 across each string, but not everyone will feel comfortable with this fingering. </p> <p>If you find that the 1-2-3-4 fingering on each string is uncomfortable, you also can try 1-1-2-4, 1-2-4-4 or other combinations of these fingers that sit well with your hands on the guitar. </p> <p>Check out this scale below, and then take it to as many keys as you can across the neck before moving on to the slur exercises that follow. Depending on how many frets you have, you may be able to get it up to the key of C, if you have 24 or Bb if you have 22. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%201%20JPG_1.jpg" width="620" height="158" alt="Example 1 JPG_1.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Adding 1 Slur To 4NPS Scales</strong></p> <p>Now that you’ve checked out a four-note-per-string fingering on the guitar, we’ll begin to add in slurs, hammers and pull-offs in order to give these scales that “slippery” sound you hear when they’re used by players such as Holdsworth. </p> <p>All of the exercises below are also great for building fretting-hand technique, but they can also be very tiring on the fingers and fretting hand. So go slow with these exercises, and if your hand begins to feel sore or overtired, just take a break, go have a cup of coffee or take the dog for a walk, then come back to this exercise when your hands are fresh. </p> <p>We’ll being the slur exercises with three different ways to add one hammer on the way up the scale and one pull-off on the way down. In the first example you will see a slur added between the first and second notes on each string. </p> <p>When you are coming down the scale, keep that same approach, putting a slur between the first and second notes on each string, but just use a pull-off when descending the scale fingering. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%202%20JPG_1.jpg" width="620" height="158" alt="Example 2 JPG_1.jpg" /></p> <p>The next variation will feature a slur between the second and third notes on each string. Again, use a hammer going up the scale and a pull-off on the way back down. To get the most out of these exercises, make sure to use a metronome, starting at a slow tempo and slowly increasing the speed as you work these scale and slur variations in different keys across the neck. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%203%20JPG_2.jpg" width="620" height="161" alt="Example 3 JPG_2.jpg" /></p> <p>The last one-slur example we’ll check out features a slur between the third and fourth notes. Once you have any/all of these slurs under your fingers, put on a backing track, maybe a static Fmaj7 chord or a ii-V-I progression in the key of F major, then improvise using this scale fingering and slur variations. </p> <p>The best way to see if you have really learned a new concept is to take it out and make some music with it. So, don’t feel like you have to get all of these ideas down before you begin to solo with them, just learn one slur option then go blow with it for a bit over a backing track. Then when that’s comfortable move on to the next slur and repeat the technique-improv loop. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%204%20JPG_1.jpg" width="620" height="163" alt="Example 4 JPG_1.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Adding 2 Slurs to 4 NPS Scales</strong></p> <p>Since there are four notes on every string when using these fingerings, you can also practice adding two slurs in a row on each string of the scale. The concept is the same as when you added one slur, use hammers on the way up and pull-offs on the way down to complete the exercise. </p> <p>In the first example you will be adding a slur between the first, second and third notes on each string. </p> <p>If you are using the 1-1-2-4 fingering instead of 1-2-3-4, you can use a slide between the first two notes so that the slur becomes a slide plus a hammer on the way up and a slide plus a pull-off on the way down. This will allow you to work these slurs into the scale if you use an alternate fingering. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%205%20JPG_0.jpg" width="620" height="161" alt="Example 5 JPG_0.jpg" /></p> <p>You can also add two slurs to the back end of each string but placing a slur between the second, third and fourth notes on each string in the scale. Again, if you are using the 1-2-4-4 fingering for each string, then you could do a hammer plus a slide going up and a pull-off plus a slide going down to achieve the same effect. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%206%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="163" alt="Example 6 JPG.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Adding 3 Slurs to 4 NPS Scales</strong></p> <p>Lastly, you can use slurs on all of the notes on each string, so only picking the first note and then slurring for the rest of the notes on each string in the scale. This type of legato approach is indicative of the Holdsworth style, so if you are going for that sound, this is a variation that you will want to check out and get under your fingers. </p> <p>Since there are more slides than picks, many players tend to lose focus on the time and rhythm with this exercise. A good way to avoid this is to set the metronome to 8th notes and then play one note per click to make sure each note is accurately placed within the bar. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%207%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="163" alt="Example 7 JPG.jpg" /></p> <p>Though not as common as in-position, the CAGED system or three-note-per-string scales, using four notes on each string can help you learn the notes of the neck, add more legato to your lines and break you out of box patterns at the same time. </p> <p>Do you use four-note-per-string scales in your playing or have a favorite way to practice them in the woodshed? Please share your thoughts in the comment section below. </p> <p><em>Photo: Matt Warnock</em></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PvEs8KvcBmY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a senior lecturer at the Leeds College of Music and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-channel-allan-holdsworth-four-note-string-scales#comments Allan Holdsworth Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Thu, 23 Jul 2015 15:09:28 +0000 Matt Warnock 15867 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: Using Two-Note Chords to Play the Blues, Part 1 http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-using-two-note-chords-play-blues-part-1 <!--paging_filter--><p>When learning how to play jazz guitar, one of the main items we need to tackle is playing effective, jazzy-sounding chords that properly outline the chord changes all at the same time. </p> <p>While this may seem like a tall order, there are some easy-to-play and effective shapes we can learn in order to quickly and effectively outline any tune or progression we are jamming on in the woodshed or on the bandstand. </p> <p>In today’s lesson, we’ll be looking at some of my favorite chord shapes, 3rds and 7ths, as applied to the third and fourth strings of the guitar, and then played over an A blues chord progression. We will be exploring these shapes further in this series of articles, so make sure to check back for more articles that dig further into two-note chords as applied to various jazz-guitar situations. </p> <p><strong>What Are 3rd and 7th Chords?</strong></p> <p>Before we learn how to apply these shapes to the third and fourth string set on the guitar, let’s take a look at exactly what 3rd and 7th, two-note shapes are and why they work so well when used in a harmonic situation on the guitar. </p> <p>The biggest reason these shapes work so well on the guitar? They are small, easy-to-play shapes—but they still outline the underlying chords and progression at the same time. </p> <p>Here's an example of an A7 chord broken up into an arpeggio and then laid out as a chord, with the 3rd and 7th from each of those shapes extracted in the bar next to the arp and chord. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/3rds%20and%207ths%20A%20Blues%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="156" alt="3rds and 7ths A Blues JPG.jpg" /></p> <p>As you can see, the 3rd and 7th are found in both the A7 arpeggio and chord. You are simply removing the root and 5th of both of those shapes, leaving you with a two-note chord grip on the fretboard. </p> <p>You may be asking yourself, “But if we remove the root, how can we hear the underlying chord?” That’s a good question and something we should address before moving on. </p> <p>Even though there is no root in these shapes, you can still hear the underlying chord and progression when applying it to a tune for the following reasons: </p> <p>01. The 3rd of any chord tells you whether it’s a major- or minor-based chord. </p> <p>02. The 7th of any chord tells you whether a major based chord is a maj7 or 7th chord—and whether a minor based chord is a m7 or mMaj7 chord. </p> <p>So, as you can see, even though the root isn’t in the chord, these two notes can still outline the given harmony very effectively when applied to any tune you know or are working on. </p> <p>There are some situations where you would need another note to fully outline a chord, such as m7b5 or dim7 chord, but for now, we’ll just be looking at m7 and 7th chords over a blues chord progression. We will deal with those shapes in future articles in this series. </p> <p><strong>3rds and 7ths Over A Blues Chords</strong></p> <p>Now that you have an idea of what 3rd and 7th, two-note chord shapes are and how they are built, let’s take a look at how you can apply these fun and cool-sounding chords to an A blues chord progression. </p> <p>Start by playing these chords on your own, with no backing track, so that you can hear how they can sound the harmony of the tune without needing any more accompaniment. </p> <p>From there, try putting on a backing track and using these chords to comp along over an A blues progression to hear how they sound when applied to the underlying harmony. </p> <p>Here's an example of applying 3rd and 7th chords on the third and fourth strings beginning with the notes G and C# for the A7 chord in bar one of the form. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/3rds%20and%207ths%20A%20Blues%202%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="493" alt="3rds and 7ths A Blues 2 JPG.jpg" /></p> <p>And here's an example of applying those same 3rds and 7ths, on the same string set, but this time with C# and G being the starting notes for the A7 chord in bar one of the form.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/3rds%20and%207ths%20A%20Blues%203%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="493" alt="3rds and 7ths A Blues 3 JPG.jpg" /> </p> <p>Though you are only using two notes per chord, when you play through the above examples, you can still hear the harmonic movement and chord progression for the underlying A blues form. </p> <p>This is one of the reasons two-note chords are so important to learn. They perfectly outline a chord progression and they also are very easy to play on the guitar, freeing up your fingers to add extensions and other colors on top of these shapes as you take them further. </p> <p><strong>Practicing 3rds and 7ths Over Blues</strong></p> <p>After sampling the two-note chords in the above examples, here are five exercises you can try in order to take these shapes further in the practice room: </p> <p>01. Sing the root of each chord in an A blues while playing the 3rds and 7ths from the first example on the guitar. </p> <p>02. Sing the root of each chord in an A blues while playing the 3rds and 7ths from the second example on the guitar. </p> <p>03. Comp through an A blues with the shapes from Example 1, varying the rhythms as you move through the changes. </p> <p>04. Comp through an A blues with the shapes from Example 2, varying the rhythms as you move through the changes. </p> <p>05. Repeat the above four exercises in 12 keys and at various tempos on the metronome. </p> <p>There you have it—a brief introduction to using two-note chords to play an A blues on the guitar. Simple, fun to play shapes that are highly effective and sound great when applied to a solo, duo or combo situation. </p> <p>Do you have a question about these two-note chords? Post your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-using-two-note-chords-play-blues-part-1#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Wed, 22 Jul 2015 17:49:50 +0000 Matt Warnock 18921 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: Melodic Minor Modes Made Easy http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-melodic-minor-modes-made-easy <!--paging_filter--><p>When learning how to play jazz, and other improvisational genres of music, learning how to play the seven modes of melodic minor is an essential skill any guitarist should have in their soloing tool belt. </p> <p>While we know that learning the seven modes of melodic minor is important, sometimes it can seem like a tough task, and we feel we have to start from scratch when learning these seven modes. </p> <p>But that doesn’t have to be the case. </p> <p>In this lesson, you will learn how to simply change one note of each major mode in order to quickly learn all seven modes of the melodic minor scale. </p> <p>If you are new to the major modes, check out my previous lesson, <e href="http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-learn-all-seven-major-modes-easy-way">Major Modes Made Easy, for a refresher on these important melodic devices. </e></p> <p><strong>Melodic Minor Mode 1</strong></p> <p>To begin, let’s take a look at how you can alter one note from the Ionian mode to create the first mode of melodic minor, otherwise known as the melodic minor scale itself. </p> <p>In order to do this, you play an Ionian mode but lower the third note of the fingering to form the first mode of melodic minor. Because of this alteration, you can think of the MM 1 fingering as being an Ionian b3 shape. </p> <p>Here is how those two interval patterns compare. </p> <p><strong>Ionian</strong>: R 2 3 4 5 6 7<br /> <strong>MM 1</strong>: R 2 b3 4 5 6 7</p> <p>Here's how that interval pattern looks on the fretboard, with one note difference between the two being indicated by the blue highlight in the MM 1 shape. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Melodic%20Minor%201.png" width="620" height="467" alt="Melodic Minor 1.png" /></p> <p>Once you have learned the MM 1 shape, you can practice applying it to a minor family chord, such as m7, m6, m9, or mMaj7, in order to bring this shape to your improvisational practice as well as technical. </p> <p><strong>Melodic Minor Mode 2</strong></p> <p>Let’s now take a look at how you can alter one note from the Dorian mode to create the second mode of melodic minor. In order to do this, you play a Dorian mode but lower the 2nd note of the fingering to form the second mode of melodic minor. </p> <p>Because of this alteration, you can think of the MM 2 fingering as being a Dorian b2 shape. </p> <p>Here is how those two interval patterns compare. </p> <p><strong>Dorian</strong>: R 2 b3 4 5 6 b7<br /> <strong>MM 2</strong>: R b2 b3 4 5 6 b7</p> <p>Here's how that interval pattern looks on the fretboard, with one note difference between the two being indicated by the blue highlight in the MM 2 shape. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Melodic%20Minor%202.png" width="620" height="451" alt="Melodic Minor 2.png" /></p> <p>Once you've learned the MM 2 shape, you can practice soloing with this mode over a 7th chord, bringing out a 13susb9 sound, in order to apply this shape to your improvisational practice as well as technical. </p> <p><strong>Melodic Minor Mode 3</strong></p> <p>We’ll now move on to altering one note from the Phrygian mode to create the third mode of melodic minor, otherwise known as the Lydian augmented scale. </p> <p>In order to do this, you play a Phrygian mode but lower the root note of the fingering to form the third mode of melodic minor. Because of this alteration, you can think of the MM 3 fingering as being a Phrygian b1 shape. </p> <p>This may seem funny, lowering the root note, but it makes it very easy to turn a Phrygian mode into the third mode of melodic minor on the fretboard from a fingering standpoint. </p> <p>Here's how those two interval patterns compare. </p> <p><strong>Phrygian</strong>: R b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7<br /> <strong>MM 3</strong>: R 2 3 #4 #5 6 7 (or bR b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 when compard to Phrygian)</p> <p>Here's how that interval pattern looks on the fretboard, with one note difference between the two being indicated by the blue highlight in the MM 3 shape. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Melodic%20Minor%203.png" width="620" height="451" alt="Melodic Minor 3.png" /></p> <p>Once you have learned the MM 3 shape you can practice soloing with this mode over a maj7th chord, bringing out a maj7#5 sound, in order to apply this shape to your improvisational practice as well as technical. </p> <p><strong>Melodic Minor Mode 4</strong></p> <p>Let’s now alter one note from the Lydian Mode to create the fourth mode of Melodic Minor, otherwise known as the Lydian dominant scale. </p> <p>In order to do this, you play a Lydian mode but lower the seventh note of the fingering to form the fourth mode of melodic minor.<br /> Because of this alteration, you can think of the MM 4 fingering as being a Lydian b7 shape. </p> <p>Here's how those two interval patterns compare. </p> <p><strong>Lydian</strong>: R 2 3 #4 5 6 7<br /> <strong>MM 4</strong>: R 2 3 #4 5 6 b7</p> <p>Here's how that interval pattern looks on the fretboard, with one note difference between the two being indicated by the blue highlight in the MM 4 shape. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Melodic%20Minor%204.png" width="620" height="460" alt="Melodic Minor 4.png" /></p> <p>Once you've learned the MM 4 shape you can practice soloing with this mode over a dominant family chord such as 7th, 9th or 13th, bringing out a #11 sound, in order to apply this shape to your improvisational practice as well as technical. </p> <p><strong>Melodic Minor Mode 5</strong></p> <p>Moving on, you can now alter one note from the Mixolydian mode to create the fifth mode of melodic minor. In order to do this, you play a Mixolydian mode but lower the sixth note of the fingering to form the fifth mode of melodic minor. </p> <p>Because of this alteration, you can think of the MM 5 fingering as being a Mixolydian b6 shape. Here's how those two interval patterns compare. </p> <p><strong>Mixolydian</strong>: R 2 3 4 5 6 b7<br /> <strong>MM 5</strong>: R 2 3 4 5 b6 b7</p> <p>Here's how that interval pattern looks on the fretboard, with one note difference between the two being indicated by the blue highlight in the MM 5 shape. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Melodic%20Minor%205.png" width="620" height="474" alt="Melodic Minor 5.png" /></p> <p>Once you've learned the MM 5 shape, you can practice soloing with this mode over a dominant family chord such as 7th, 9th or 13th, bringing out a b13 sound, in order to apply this shape to your improvisational practice as well as technical. </p> <p><strong>Melodic Minor Mode 6</strong></p> <p>Let’s now alter one note from the Aeolian mode to create the sixth mode of melodic minor, otherwise known as the Locrian Natural 2 scale. In order to do this, you play an Aeolian mode but lower the fifth note of the fingering to form the sixth mode of melodic minor. </p> <p>Because of this alteration, you can think of the MM 6 fingering as being an Aeolian b5 shape. </p> <p>Here's how those two interval patterns compare. </p> <p><strong>Aeolian</strong>: R 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7<br /> <strong>MM 6</strong>: R 2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7</p> <p>Here's how that interval pattern looks on the fretboard, with one note difference between the two being indicated by the blue highlight in the MM 6 shape. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Melodic%20Minor%206.png" width="620" height="429" alt="Melodic Minor 6.png" /></p> <p>Once you've learned the MM 6 shape, you can practice soloing with this mode over a m7b5 chord in order to apply this shape to your improvisational practice as well as technical. </p> <p><strong>Melodic Minor Mode 7</strong></p> <p>Lastly, you can alter one note from the Locrian mode to create the seventh mode of melodic minor, otherwise known as the altered scale. In order to do this, you play a Locrian mode but lower the 4th note of the fingering to form the seventh mode of melodic minor. </p> <p>Because of this alteration, you can think of the MM 7 fingering as being a Locrian b4 shape. </p> <p>Here's how those two interval patterns compare. </p> <p><strong>Locrian</strong>: R b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7<br /> <strong>MM 7</strong>: R b3 b3 b4 b5 b5 b7</p> <p>Here's how that interval pattern looks on the fretboard, with one note difference between the two being indicated by the blue highlight in the MM 7 shape. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Melodic%20Minor%207.png" width="620" height="435" alt="Melodic Minor 7.png" /></p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the U.K., where he teaches Skype guitar students all over the world, and is an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-melodic-minor-modes-made-easy#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Wed, 08 Jul 2015 20:03:51 +0000 Matt Warnock 23155 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: 9th Chords Made Easy http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-9th-chords-made-easy <!--paging_filter--><p>As many of you readers begin to dig deeper into learning jazz guitar harmony and voicings, you'll undoubtedly come across various 9th chords, Maj9, m9, 9 etc., in your jazz-guitar explorations. </p> <p>Since these chords pop up time and again, it is important to have a variety of 9th chords under your fingers so that you can bring them into your comping, chord melody and chord soloing ideas when needed. But this doesn’t mean you have to learn a bunch of new chords. You can use previous knowledge to build great-sounding and authentic jazzy 9th chords. </p> <p>In today’s lesson, we’ll be looking at how you can use “rootless” 9th chords to expand your jazz-guitar chord vocabulary without having to learn any new shapes, simply adapting four-note chords you already have under your fingers to a new musical situation. </p> <p><strong>Building 9th Chords With Common Voicings</strong></p> <p>To begin, let’s take a look at four common jazz chords with their 1357 and rootless 9th-chord voicings. </p> <p>Notice that each chord pair shares three notes in common: the 3-5-7 of each chord, but that in the second voicing the 9th has replaced the root, which is why we call them “rootless” 9th chords, as they contain no root in the voicing. </p> <p>To get you started, here's a quick reference for the four chords used below. </p> <p>• Maj7 - m7 from the 3rd<br /> • 7 - m7b5 from the 3rd<br /> • m7 - Maj7 from the 3rd<br /> • mMaj7 - Maj7#5 from the 3rd</p> <p>This means that if you see a Dm7 and you want to make it Dm9, you simply play Fmaj7, a Maj7 chord starting on the 3rd of Dm7. Try this out with each of the following chords, Maj7-7-m7-mMaj7, using the quick guide above as a reference, through all 12 keys and with as many voicings for each 9th as you can come up with. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Jazz%20Guitar%209th%20Chords%201%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="169" alt="Jazz Guitar 9th Chords 1 JPG.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Major ii V I With 9th Chords</strong></p> <p>Here are two examples of how you can apply rootless 9th chords to a Major Key ii V I progression, one using Drop 2 and one using Drop 3 chord voicings. As a quick reference, here are the three normal chords, 1357, next to the related rootless 9th chords. If you can memorize these formulas, you will be able to quickly and easily use these chords in any jam or gig you’re on. </p> <p>• m7 - Maj7 from 3rd<br /> • 7 - m7b5 from 3rd<br /> • Maj7 - m7 from 3rd</p> <p>Try these chords out in all 12 keys, both all Drop 2 and Drop 3, then come up with your own rootless 9th chords and bring them into your Major ii V I progressions as you explore this concept further in the woodshed. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F91114182%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-Rfitv"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Jazz%20Guitar%209th%20Chords%202%20JPg.jpg" width="620" height="169" alt="Jazz Guitar 9th Chords 2 JPg.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Minor ii V I With 9th Chords</strong></p> <p>To help get you started in the minor-key area, here is an example of a minor ii-V-I chord progression using both Drop 2 and Drop 3 rootless 9th chords. </p> <p>For the m7b5, we don’t normally include a 9th with that voicing, and so you will notice that I used a plain, 1357 chord in those instances. For the other two chords, G7b9 and CmMaj7, I used a Bdim7 over G7b9, producing a rootless 7b9 chord, and an Ebmaj7#5 over CmMaj7, producing a rootless mMaj9 chord. </p> <p>As a quick guide, here are the three chords and their related 9th versions: </p> <p>• m7b5 - stays as is<br /> • 7b9 - dim7 from the 3rd<br /> • mMaj7 - Maj7#5 from the 3rd</p> <p>Check out the example below, taking it to all 12 keys if possible, and then build your own 9th voicings for minor ii V I progressions using the rules given above. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F91114223%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-i88UT"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Jazz%20Guitar%209th%20Chords%203%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="182" alt="Jazz Guitar 9th Chords 3 JPG.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>9th Chord Practice Guide</strong></p> <p>After you have checked out the different examples above, here are a number of ways that you can explore 9th chords further in your jazz guitar practicing schedule. </p> <p>01. Play any/all of the above examples in all 12 keys at various tempos.<br /> 02. Play the rootless 9th chord for any voicing you are working on and sing the root below the chord.<br /> 03. Take a tune you are working on and learn all of the chords as rootless 9th voicings, using the above lesson as a guide to find each 9th chord in the tune.<br /> 04. Practice any 9th chord that you learn with a number of different jazz guitar chords such as Drop 2 Chords, Drop 3 Chords and Drop 2 and 4 Chords.<br /> 05. Practice arpeggiating each of the rootless 9th chords in the above examples and begin to bring this concept into your soloing ideas as well. </p> <p>Playing 9th chords, and especially rootless 9ths, is an important skill for any jazz guitarist to have under their fingers. </p> <p>Check out the above examples and exercises to get started in your exploration of these handy and cool-sounding jazz guitar chords. If you have any questions about these chords, or anything jazz-guitar related, feel free to post it in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a senior lecturer at the Leeds College of Music and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-9th-chords-made-easy#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Tue, 23 Jun 2015 14:27:16 +0000 Matt Warnock 18316 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: An Introduction to the Tritone Scale http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-introduction-tritone-scale <!--paging_filter--><p>Guitarists who've starting exploring the different possibilities for soloing over dominant 7th chords have probably quickly realized there are a lot of different scales and modes you can use to bring color to this common chord in your solos. </p> <p>While mixolydian, diminished, Lydian dominant and the altered scale are all fairly common choices when playing over 7th chords in various situations, there is one scale that is often overlooked, but that can add a freshness to your lines and take your playing in new directions at the same time. </p> <p>This is the tritone scale. </p> <p>Built by pairing two major triads a tritone apart, and then placing those notes in scale order, the tritone scale brings a nice level of tension to your lines that you can use to build energy when soloing over 7th chords in a jazz or fusion context. </p> <p>Let’s explore this scale as we check out a short introduction to the tritone scale, its construction, how to use it and some basic fingerings for this scale on the guitar. </p> <p><strong>What is the Tritone Scale?</strong></p> <p>To begin our exploration of this uncommon but cool-sounding scale, let’s look at how the scale is built. Basically, the tritone scale is built by taking the notes of a 7b9#11 chord and turning it into a scale. Here's what I mean on paper. Then we’ll dig deeper after you’ve had an initial look at this comparison over a C tritone scale. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Tritone%20Scale%201%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="158" alt="Tritone Scale 1 JPG.jpg" /></p> <p>As you can see, the C7b9#11 chord has the notes C E F#(Gb) Bb and Db. There is also a G in this chord, but we don’t usually have enough fingers to play it, so it gets left out. </p> <p>In the second bar of the example, you can see these notes divided into two major triads, one from the root and one from the tritone note (Gb in this case). </p> <p>These are the notes of the C7b9#11 chord, C E G + Gb Bb Db, and when placed in note order, C Db E Gb G Bb, they become the C Tritone Scale, as shown in the third bar of the example. </p> <p>Because of this relationship, between the tritone scale and the 7b9#11 chord, the tritone scale is often used over a 7alt chord to produce the b9 and #11 alterations, or over a dominant 7th chord where you want to create tension you can later resolve over the same chord, or over the next chord in the progression. </p> <p>The tritone scale has the intervals, Root-b2-3-b5-5-b7, so all of those juicy notes we saw in the C7b9#11 chord in the first bar of the example. Now that you know how to build a tritone scale, R-b2-3-b5-5-b7, let’s take a look at a few common fingerings for this scale on the guitar. </p> <p><strong>Tritone Scale Fingerings</strong></p> <p>There are a number of ways to play the tritone scale on the guitar, but here are two of my favorites. </p> <p>Check out these fingerings, one off of the sixth string and one from the fifth-string root, and see how they lay under your fingers and if they sit comfortably for you as well. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Tritone%20Scale%202%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="144" alt="Tritone Scale 2 JPG.jpg" /></p> <p>Once you've learned these two fingerings in the key of C, take them to all of the other 11 keys around the neck to build a full understanding of these scale shapes across the entire fretboard. </p> <p>If you feel ready, you also can put on a 7b9#11 or 7th-chord vamp and practice using the tritone scale to solo over those chord changes before bringing it to ii V I chord changes as well as tunes you’re working on, or already know, in the practice room. </p> <p><strong>Tritone Scale Licks</strong></p> <p>To help get you started with the tritone scale, here's a fun little lick I came up with using the C tritone scale over the C7 chord in this ii-V-I-vi chord progression in F major. </p> <p>Learn the lick and work it in a few keys around the neck, and at different tempos if possible. Then try coming up with a few tritone scale licks of your own to add to your jazz-guitar soloing vocabulary. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F81798688"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Tritone%20Scale%203%20JPG_0.jpg" width="620" height="146" alt="Tritone Scale 3 JPG_0.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Practicing the Tritone Scale</strong></p> <p>In order to further your exploration and understanding of the tritone scale, here are five exercises I like to do with this scale, and you can add them to your practice routine this week. </p> <p>01. Sing the note C and play the tritone scale from that root. Repeat in 12 keys.<br /> 02. Play a C7b9#11 chord and sing the tritone scale from that root. Repeat in 12 keys.<br /> 03. Jam on a C7 vamp using only the C tritone scale to build your solo lines. Repeat in 12 keys.<br /> 04. Play a ii V I in the key of C major and use the tritone scale to build your solo lines over the V7 chord in that progression. Repeat in 12 keys<br /> 05. Put on a blues backing track and solo over each 7th chord using the tritone scale to build your lines and phrases. </p> <p>Though it is not a commonly used scale, the tritone scale is worth exploring in your practice routine as it can add a welcome freshness to any 7th-chord soloing line, taking your jazz-guitar playing in new directions at the same time. </p> <p>What do you think of this scale? Share your thoughts!</p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a senior lecturer at the Leeds College of Music and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em> </p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-introduction-tritone-scale#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Tue, 23 Jun 2015 14:18:47 +0000 Matt Warnock 17919 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: Three Essential Jazz Guitar Chord Soloing Lines — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-three-essential-jazz-guitar-chord-soloing-lines-video <!--paging_filter--><p>One of the most common roadblocks many jazz guitarists face is that after learning your essential chord shapes, how do you take those inversions and make them into cool-sounding jazz chord lines?</p> <p>While learning chord shapes is important—since it builds an understanding of jazz harmony and the fretboard in your studies—studying classic jazz guitar chord lines is the next step in turning these chord shapes into music. </p> <p>In this lesson you’ll study three essential jazz guitar chord soloing lines that will bridge the gap between your study of chord shapes and applying those shapes to a real, musical situation. </p> <p>The lines are written out in one key, so make sure to transpose them in your practice routine as well as work them at different tempos in your practice routine. </p> <p>Once you can play these three lines from memory, in a number of keys, try writing out three chord lines of your own over the same progressions as you begin to create your own jazz guitar chord soloing phrases in the woodshed.<br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Jazz Guitar Chord Soloing Line 1</strong></p> <p>To begin your study of these three chord soloing lines, here is a phrase that is used to outline a turnaround progression in the key of G major. The line itself is pretty straight forward, but notice how the G#dim7 chord uses a few diatonic notes to run up the fretboard over that part of the tune. </p> <p>When playing dim7 chords on the guitar, you can take any note in that chord shape and raise it by 2 frets to reach the next diatonic note over that chord. You can see this in action as the Ab moves to Bb and B moves to Db(C#) over the second half of the first bar in the line. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hyW3ljvmpaY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Jazz Guitar Chord Soloing Line 2</strong></p> <p>In this minor ii-V-I chord soloing line you will be using a number of different E7alt shapes as you navigate the chord changes. Notice how the E7 chord is in the second bar of the progression, but that the chord soloing line begins to outline that chord three beats earlier, in beat 2 of the first bar. </p> <p>This is a common technique used in jazz guitar lines, where you are anticipating the next chord as you apply it to the previous chord in the progression. </p> <p>Lastly, there is an F7#9 chord at the end of the first bar that adds a bit of tension as you move up and back by a half step from E7-F7-E7 in that part of the line. This type of chord line is often used to create tension, as the F7 is tense over the E7, which you then resolve when you bring the line back to the original chord, in this case E7alt. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9RYFSUjwxbI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Jazz Guitar Chord Soloing Line 3</strong></p> <p>Here's a ii-V-I chord line that move up and down the fretboard as you navigate the changes, Gm7-C7-Fmaj7. Notice the use of a triad pair over the Gm7 chord, where you are playing Bb and C triads over that chord. </p> <p>When playing over m7 chords, you can use major triads from the bIII and IV of that underlying chord, which highlight the intervals b3-5-b7 and 11-6-R respectively. There's also a b9 used over the C7 chord that creates a bit of tension before resolving it down to an Fmaj7 chord to end the phrase in bar 3 of the line. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Hj8FZfmad3A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>What do you think about these jazz guitar chord soloing lines? Share your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a senior lecturer at the Leeds College of Music and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-three-essential-jazz-guitar-chord-soloing-lines-video#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Videos Blogs Lessons Fri, 19 Jun 2015 20:48:20 +0000 Matt Warnock 24780 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: An Introduction to Symmetrical Scales for Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-introduction-symmetrical-scales-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p>When learning how to play jazz guitar, or any style of guitar for that matter, we often spend a lot of time working on pentatonic, blues, major and melodic minor scales and patterns on the guitar and then practice bringing these sounds into our solos.</p> <p>While learning the aforementioned scales is essential for any improvising guitarist, there is also another group of scales that are worth spending time on in the woodshed and bringing into our solos on the bandstand: symmetrical scales. </p> <p>Symmetrical scales are so named because they are built using one or more repeated interval patterns, and often contain six to eight notes, one more or less than what you would find in the Major and Melodic Minor Scale modes. </p> <p>In this short primer on these important sounds, we’ll explore five different symmetrical scales, learn how they are constructed, how you can use them in your solos and check out sample fingerings for further practice. </p> <p>To explore these and many other scales further, check out my <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/complete-guide-to-jazz-guitar-scales">Essential Jazz Guitar Scales</a> page for more information about fingerings, usage and improvisational techniques. </p> <p><strong>Whole Tone Scale</strong></p> <p>The whole tone scale is made up of six notes, which is smaller than the major scale modes but is bigger than the pentatonic scale, and it actually fits fairly easily under the fingers on the fretboard. The scale is built by using one interval, a tone, between each note.</p> <p>So to build any whole tone scale, you simply start on the root and go up in tones until you hit the top of the octave. The whole tone scale is made up of the following intervals when you run from the root to the root, and is normally used to solo over a 7#5 chord, which will also have a #11 in it as you can see below. </p> <p>Intervals – R 2 3 #4(#11) #5 b7 R<br /> Key of C – C D E F# G# A#(Bb) C</p> <p>Try out the fingering below to get a sense of how this scale sits on the neck and sounds on the guitar. Then put on a 7th chord vamp or backing track and use this scale to create your soloing ideas to hear how it sounds in a musical situation. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Whole%20Tone%20Scale%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="185" alt="Whole Tone Scale JPG.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Half Whole Diminished Scale</strong></p> <p>This is the first of two diminished scales we will explore in this article, and as the name suggests, it is built by alternating half steps and whole steps. </p> <p>To build any half whole diminished scale, you start on the root and then move up by a half step, then a whole step, then a half step, then a whole step etc. until you reach the top of the octave. This scale is used to improvise over a 13b9 chord, which will also bring the #9 and #11 colors to the table as you can see below. </p> <p>Here is how the half whole diminished scale looks from an intervallic standpoint as well as in the key of C.</p> <p>Intervals – R b2(b9) b3(#9) 3 #4(#11) 5 6 b7 R<br /> Key of C – C Db Eb E F# G A Bb C</p> <p>Run through the example fingering below to get started with this scale on the guitar. Then put on a 7 chord vamp or backing track and solo using the half whole diminished scale in order to get a sense for how it sounds in a musical situation. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Half%20Whole%20Diminished%20Scale%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="180" alt="Half Whole Diminished Scale JPG.jpg" /> </p> <p><strong>Whole Half Diminished Scale</strong></p> <p>The second diminished scale we’ll look at is the whole half diminished scale, and as the name suggests, it is built by alternating whole steps and half steps as you build the scale up from the root. As you can see, both of the diminished scales contain eight notes, so one more than any major scale mode. </p> <p>This makes the scale stand out against the modes, but it can also make it a bit tricky to finger on the guitar. Try the example below and then work on finding other easy to play fingerings that feel comfortable for you and your hands with this scale.</p> <p>This scale is used to solo over a Dim or Dim7 chord, and here is how it looks from an intervallic standpoint as well as what the notes are for this scale in the key of C.</p> <p>Intervals – R 2 b3 4 #4 #5 6 7 R<br /> Key of C – C D Eb F F# G# A B C</p> <p>After you’ve gotten this scale under your fingers and have an idea of how it sounds on the guitar as well as how it sounds compared to the half whole diminished scale, put on a dim7 chord vamp or backing track and take this sound to a musical situation as you build your solo with the whole half diminished scale over that chord. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Whole%20Half%20Diminished%20Scale%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="179" alt="Whole Half Diminished Scale JPG.jpg" /> </p> <p><strong>Augmented Scale</strong></p> <p>A lesser used scale as compared to the previous three symmetrical scales, the augmented scale is built by combining two augmented triads a minor 3rd apart.</p> <p>You can see this in the example below, in the key of C, where the scale is built by combining C and Eb augmented triads to build the scale over two octaves. Here is how the scale looks from an intervallic standpoint as well as all the notes for this scale in the key of C. </p> <p>Intervals – R b3(#9) 3 5 #5 7 R<br /> Key of C – C Eb E G G# B C</p> <p>Since the scale has all the notes of a maj#5 arpeggio, it can be used to create tension in your solos over a maj7 chord as you bring this scale into your playing.</p> <p>After you’ve explored the fingering below, put on a Maj7 or Maj7#5 vamp and then solo over those chords using the augmented scale to hear how it sounds when applied to a soloing situation. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Augmented%20Scale%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="180" alt="Augmented Scale JPG.jpg" /> </p> <p><strong>Tritone Scale</strong></p> <p>The last scale that we’ll check out in this short primer on symmetrical scales is the tritone scale. As the name suggests, this scale is built by combing the notes from the root triad and the triad a tritone away from the root. </p> <p>You can see this in the example below where the scale is built by combining the C and Gb triads, the tonic triad and the triad a tritone away from the root. Here is how the scale looks from an intervallic standpoint as well as when written out in the key of C. </p> <p>Intervals – R b2(b9) 3 b5(#11) 5 b7 R<br /> Key of C – C Db E Gb G Bb C</p> <p>As you can see, this chord produces a 7(#11,b9) sound you can use when soloing over 7th chords to bring some tension to your lines. </p> <p>After you’ve explored the fingering below, put on a 7th chord or 7(#11,b9) chord vamp, and practice soloing over those sounds using the Tritone Scale to hear how it fits over these chords in a musical situation. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Tritone%20Scale%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="185" alt="Tritone Scale JPG.jpg" /></p> <p>There you have it, a short primer and introduction to five symmetrical scales on the guitar. After you’ve played through each scale and improvised with it a bit, pick one or two to focus on this week in the practice room and then learn more fingerings for those scales, take them to common chord progressions as well as tunes you are working on in order to dig deeper into these sounds in the woodshed. </p> <p>What do you think of these scales, and how do you use them in your solos? Share your thoughts in the Comments section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a senior lecturer at the Leeds College of Music and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-introduction-symmetrical-scales-guitar#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Mon, 15 Jun 2015 18:59:07 +0000 Matt Warnock 16724 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: How to Play Jazzy Jimi Hendrix Chords http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-how-play-jazzy-jimi-hendrix-chords <!--paging_filter--><p>As guitarists, many of us are fans of the late, great Jimi Hendrix, who has influenced players in all genres of music, including jazz. </p> <p>While Hendrix left a legacy as one of the greatest rock improvisers of all time, he also left his stamp on the harmonic side of the instrument, including a chord that bears his name. </p> <p>Taken from the song “Purple Haze,” and spelling out an E7#9 voicing, this chord has become synonymous with Hendrix’s playing and is even referred to simply as the “Hendrix Chord” by many players. </p> <p>In this lesson, we’ll be taking a look at how you can take the Hendrix Chord and apply it to your jazz guitar comping phrases, slightly altering this classic shape to give it a jazzy feel along the way. </p> <p><strong>Jazzy Jimmy Hendrix Chords</strong></p> <p>Here are four chord shapes to check out on your guitar, the first being the classic “Hendrix Chord,” E7#9, with the next three being jazzy variations of this important voicing. The first jazzy shape simply takes off the root, creating the commonly used “rootless” voicing for this chord. </p> <p>The second shape keeps the root off and adds the 5th on the first string to produce a four-note rootless chord. Finally, the third shape uses the b13 note on top of the chord, producing an E7#9b13 rootless chord based on the original Hendrix Chord shape. </p> <p>Try working these shapes out on the guitar first, to get your fingers around them, and then move on to the comping examples below where these shapes are applied to practical, musical situations. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/hendrix%20chord%201.jpg" width="620" height="877" alt="hendrix chord 1.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Jazzy Hendrix Chord Example 1</strong></p> <p>To help you take these shapes off the page and onto the fretboard, here are three examples of minor ii-V-I progressions with the Hendrix chord used to outline the V7alt chord in each progression. The first example uses a common chord riff that works between the rootless 7#9 and 7b9 chords based off of the original Hendrix chord shape. </p> <p>As well, there is an AmMaj7 shape, G#-C-E, used over Am7, another common jazz choice in this type of progression. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/172003308&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/hendrix%20chord%202.jpg" width="620" height="179" alt="hendrix chord 2.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Jazzy Hendrix Chord Example 2</strong></p> <p>The next example brings the four-note shape to the same progression, with the 5th on top of the chord, using a common jazz rhythm pattern to solidify the changes. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/172003306&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/hendrix%20chord%203.jpg" width="620" height="179" alt="hendrix chord 3.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Jazzy Hendrix Chord Example 3</strong></p> <p>Lastly, here is a cool sounding comping pattern that mixes both the four-note 7#9b13 and 7#9 shapes together, which provides movement to the line as you move from the V7alt to the Im7 chord in this minor ii-V-I progression. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/172003305&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/hendrix%20chord%204.jpg" width="620" height="185" alt="hendrix chord 4.jpg" /></p> <p>Once you've worked out these three comping examples, try to come up with three or more examples of your own using the Hendrix chord and its variations as the basis for your V7alt chords. </p> <p>From there, try comping over your favorite jazz tune and use the Hendrix chord and its variations every time you see a V7 chord in the changes, allowing you to bring these chord shapes to a jam situation in your studies. </p> <p>What do you think of these jazzy Hendrix chords? Share your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the U.K., where he teaches Skype guitar students all over the world, and is an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-how-play-jazzy-jimi-hendrix-chords#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Jimi Hendrix Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Wed, 10 Jun 2015 20:31:01 +0000 Matt Warnock 22573 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: Learn the Fretboard Like Joe Pass http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-learn-fretboard-joe-pass <!--paging_filter--><p>One of the biggest hurdles many jazz guitarists face early in their development is being able to connect chords, scales and arpeggios in their playing without having to jump all over the fretboard between shapes. </p> <p>When I was first learning how to play jazz, one of the best lessons I ever learned came from a comment I read from Joe Pass. </p> <p>To paraphrase Joe, he said, “Always know the possible soloing notes around any chord you’re playing so that you can quickly move between chords and single notes in your playing.”</p> <p>After reading Joe talk about this concept, I began working on always having a scale and arpeggio under any chord shape I knew on the guitar, which greatly opened up my fretboard knowledge and helped me always have a harmonic and melodic device close by when playing over jazz tunes. </p> <p>In this lesson, you will dig into this concept of applying scales and arpeggios to chord shapes, as well as learn how to practice this concept, explore sample shapes and learn a sample blues solo based on this Joe Pass fretboard concept. </p> <p><strong>Chord Scale Arpeggio Fingerings</strong></p> <p>The Joe Pass system of always having a scale and arpeggio under your fingers for every chord shape you use is a great way to learn the fretboard, providing you with soloing material at the same time. </p> <p>To help you get started with this system, here are a few examples of how to learn chords, scales, and arpeggios in one position on the guitar. </p> <p>From here, you can apply this system to any chord type, maj7, m7, 7, m7b5, etc., and to any chord position as you expand upon this exercise in the woodshed. </p> <p>This first example shows a common Gmaj7 chord shape with the scale and arpeggio directly underneath that chord shape. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/195057866&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Chord%20Scale%20Arpeggio%201.png" width="620" height="363" alt="Chord Scale Arpeggio 1.png" /> </p> <p>You can apply the chord, scale, arpeggio concept to any string set, such as the top four-string chord you see and hear in the next example. Here, you will fill out the scale and arpeggio based on the area surrounding the Gmaj7 chord at the start of the example. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/195058070&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Chord%20Scale%20Arpeggio%202.png" width="620" height="369" alt="Chord Scale Arpeggio 2.png" /> </p> <p>The final example shows a Gmaj9 chord, followed by the G major scale and Gmaj9 arpeggio. As well as applying this technique to maj7, m7, 7th, etc. chords, you can also apply them to 9th, maj9, maj6, 13th, 7#11 and any other chord extension you can think of on the guitar. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/195058211&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Chord%20Scale%20Arpeggio%203.png" width="620" height="347" alt="Chord Scale Arpeggio 3.png" /></p> <p><strong>Chord Scale Arpeggio Exercises</strong></p> <p>Now that you know about the theory behind the "Joe Pass Chord, Scale, Arpeggio" approach and have checked out a few examples, here are a few exercises you can do in order to bring this technique into your practice routine. </p> <p>1. Pick a chord shape you know, such as C7, in any position on the fretboard<br /> 2. Play that chord, and then work out the scale notes surrounding that shape on the guitar, so for C7 you would play C Mixolydian<br /> 3. Work out the arpeggio based around that chord shape, so for C7 you would play a C7 arpeggio<br /> 4. Once you have all three shapes, chord, scale, arpeggio, then you can move this to all 12 keys around the neck<br /> 5. Put on a C7 backing track and solo over that chord using the chord, scale and arpeggio you have worked out<br /> 6. Take the above five exercises to other chord types, shapes, string sets and keys, as you expand on this idea in the woodshed.</p> <p>After doing these exercises with a few chords, you might find you will be able to visualize scales and arpeggios around any chord shape you are playing on the guitar. This is the ultimate goal of the system, to be able to visualize the scales and arpeggios in the moment around any chord shape you are playing on the guitar. </p> <p><strong>Chord Scale Arpeggio Blues Solo</strong></p> <p>To help you see and hear this system as applied to a musical situation, here is a sample blues solo in the key of Bb that brings together chords, scales and arpeggios over each change in the progression. </p> <p>Here are the shapes used in the solo in order to check them out before you learn the entire 12-bar solo below. I’ve only written out the Eb7 shapes, as the F7 shapes are the same, just played two frets higher on the neck. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/195058361&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Chord%20Scale%20Arpeggio%204.png" width="620" height="342" alt="Chord Scale Arpeggio 4.png" /></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/195058509&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Chord%20Scale%20Arpeggio%205.png" width="620" height="348" alt="Chord Scale Arpeggio 5.png" /></p> <p>Once you have these shapes under your fingers, learn the solo below to see how I used these chords, scales and arpeggios to create a 12-bar blues solo in Bb. </p> <p>When you have this sample solo under your fingers, put on a Bb blues backing track and try soloing with these shapes to create your own solos over the blues with this fretboard system. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/195058660&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Chord%20Scale%20Arpeggio%206.jpg" width="620" height="758" alt="Chord Scale Arpeggio 6.jpg" /></p> <p>Do you have any questions about the "Joe Pass Chord, Scale, Arpeggio" approach to learning the fretboard? Please post your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-learn-fretboard-joe-pass#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Joe Pass Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Mon, 08 Jun 2015 14:11:52 +0000 Matt Warnock 23692 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: Learn All Seven Major Modes the Easy Way http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-learn-all-seven-major-modes-easy-way <!--paging_filter--><p>When learning how to play the seven major modes on the guitar, most of us begin with the Ionian mode then move on to Dorian and progress up the fretboard in this way until we’ve learned all seven positions of the major scale. </p> <p>While this can be an effective way of learning modes, in this lesson you will learn a shortcut that will allow you to quickly and easily learn all seven modes by starting with Lydian and simply lowering one note at a time until you can play all seven modes on the fretboard. </p> <p>When learning the modes in this way, by changing one note between each subsequent mode, you will practice them out of the normal order. </p> <p>Here is the normal order of the major modes for review. </p> <p>• Ionian<br /> • Dorian<br /> • Phrygian<br /> • Lydian<br /> • Mixolydian<br /> • Aeolian<br /> • Locrian</p> <p>When working them from the one-note changing perspective, you wind up with this order of modes. </p> <p>• Lydian<br /> • Ionian<br /> • Mixolydian<br /> • Dorian<br /> • Aeolian<br /> • Phrygian<br /> • Locrian</p> <p>Start by learning the modes, memorizing them in the new order so you can use the one-note changing method. From there, you can go back and play them in the original order when putting them together in one key on the fretboard. </p> <p>Doing things this way will allow you to quickly learn the modes and then bring them back into normal order, rather than learning them as seven distinct fingerings in normal order from the beginning. </p> <p>A quick note about the chord grids below. There are three colors on each grid, here is the legend for those colors. </p> <p><strong>Red</strong>: Root note for that mode<br /> <strong>Black</strong>: Static notes between the last mode and this mode<br /> <strong>Blue</strong>: The one note that has been moved from the previous mode to form the new mode you are playing.</p> <p>So, now that you know a bit about the concept we're exploring today, let’s take it to the fretboard. </p> <p><strong>Lydian Mode</strong></p> <p>To begin, you are going to learn the Lydian mode, which contains one sharp in its construction, the #4. This is going to be the base mode for all seven shapes, so make sure to get this shape down comfortably before moving on to the next mode in the system. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%201.png" width="620" height="331" alt="major modes 1.png" /></p> <p><strong>Ionian Mode</strong></p> <p>Now you will take the Lydian mode you just learned and alter one note to form the Ionian mode. In this case, you will lower the 4th note of Lydian to produce the Ionian fingering. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%202.png" width="620" height="315" alt="major modes 2.png" /></p> <p><strong>Mixolydian Mode</strong></p> <p>Continuing on to the final major-based mode, you will now alter the Ionian mode by one note to form a Mixolydian mode fingering. When doing so, you lower the 7th of Ionian to form the Mixolydian mode. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%203.png" width="620" height="312" alt="major modes 3.png" /></p> <p><strong>Dorian Mode</strong></p> <p>We can progress to the minor modes now as you alter one note of Mixolydian to form the Dorian mode. Here, you will lower the 3rd of Mixolydian to form the Dorian mode fingering. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%204.png" width="620" height="320" alt="major modes 4.png" /> </p> <p><strong>Aeolian Mode</strong></p> <p>To form the second minor mode, you will lower one note of Dorian to produce the Aeolian mode on the fretboard. To do so, you will lower the 6th of Dorian to form the Aeolian fingering. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%205.png" width="620" height="323" alt="major modes 5.png" /> </p> <p><strong>Phrygian Mode</strong></p> <p>Next, you will lower one note of Aeolian to form the Phrygian mode. When doing so, you lower the 2nd of Aeolian to form the Phrygian fingering on the fretboard. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%206.png" width="620" height="299" alt="major modes 6.png" /> </p> <p><strong>Locrian Mode</strong></p> <p>Lastly, you will take the Phrygian mode and lower one note to produce the Locrian mode. Here, you lower the 5th note of Phrygian to produce the Locrian fingering. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%207.png" width="620" height="320" alt="major modes 7.png" /></p> <p>As you can see, by starting on Lydian and lowering one note at a time, you can quickly and easily build and memorize all seven modes of the major scale on the guitar. Also, you will be able to see and hear how closely related these modes are, which isn’t always apparent when learning all seven fingerings on their own in the more traditional manner. </p> <p><strong>Learning Modes Exercises</strong></p> <p>Once you've worked out each of these seven major modes on the note G, you can try out the following exercises to help you solidify these shapes further in your studies. </p> <p>01. Play through all three major modes: Lydian-Ionian-Mixolydian from one root note. Repeat in 12 keys.<br /> 02. Play through all four minor-based modes: Dorian-Aeolian-Phrygian-Locrian from one root note. Repeat in 12 keys.<br /> 03. Play all seven major modes in the order presented at the start of this lesson from one root note. Repeat in all 12 keys.<br /> 04. Put on a major chord backing-track, such as G, and solo over this chord moving between Lydian, Ionian and Mixolydian to hear how these modes color a major chord in a soloing situation.<br /> 05. Repeat this soloing exercise but put on an Am backing track and solo between A Dorian, Aeolian, Phrygian and Locrian.<br /> 06. Repeat exercises 4 and 5 in all 12 keys. Then, begin to move between two chords, so G-C or Am-Dm, and work all seven modes over both of those chord progressions. </p> <p>Do you have a question about how to learn all seven major modes the easy way? Post your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below.</p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the U.K., where he teaches Skype guitar students all over the world, and is an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-learn-all-seven-major-modes-easy-way#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Fri, 05 Jun 2015 18:15:48 +0000 Matt Warnock 22989 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: B.B. King Blues Lines for Jazz Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-bb-king-blues-lines-jazz-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p>After learning about B.B. King’s recent passing, I went back and spent some time listening to my old B.B. King records, enjoying spending time with one of my favorite guitarists. </p> <p>While listening to B.B.’s playing for a few hours, I began to hear lines in his vocabulary that were not only great blues ideas, but that could be applied to a jazz guitar solo and fit perfectly in that genre as well. </p> <p>In this lesson, I’ve laid out three classic B.B. King lines that Jazz guitarists can study, break down and apply to their playing in order to translate the vocabulary of this legendary guitarist into their jazz soloing lines and phrases. </p> <p><strong>B.B. King Blues Line 1</strong></p> <p>The first line is a typical B.B. King minor blues lick that you can apply to your jazz blues soloing, here written out in the key of Bb. </p> <p>Once you have this line under your fingers, try playing it in different keys, as well as putting on a Bb jazz blues backing track and inserting this line into your improvised solos over that progression. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/1_12.png" width="620" height="172" alt="1_12.png" /></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207536361&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>B.B. King Blues Line 2</strong></p> <p>We’re moving over to the other side of the blues with a B.B. King major pentatonic scale line in this example. Though he is mostly known for his minor blues phrases, B.B. King also was a master at crafting interesting and creative major sounding lines and using them in just the right moments to create contrast in his solos. </p> <p>If the major pentatonic scale is new to you, it looks similar to the minor pentatonic scale on the fretboard, but you need to treat it as an arpeggio in your soloing. This means that if you have a Bb7 chord, such as you do in this example, you solo over that chord with the major pentatonic scale. </p> <p>When you move to the Eb7 chord, the next chord in the jazz blues in Bb progression, you have to move to an Eb major pentatonic scale. </p> <p>Each chord gets its own major pentatonic scale, as opposed to the minor pentatonic scale, which can be used over the entire blues or jazz blues chord progression. </p> <p>You will also notice a few chromatic notes in the second bar, E-Eb, that connect the 5th of the scale, F, and the third of the scale, D. These chromatic notes will bring a jazzy sound to your major pentatonic lines, and they’re the reason that this B.B. King line in particular works so well in a jazz situation. </p> <p>When you have this lick under your fingers, put on a jazz blues backing tack and practice applying this line to the three 7th chords in that progression, Bb7, Eb7 and F7, using a different major pentatonic scale for each chord in the tune. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/2_10.png" width="620" height="168" alt="2_10.png" /></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207536465&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>B.B. King Blues Line 3</strong></p> <p>The final line mixes the major and minor blues sounds over a Bb7 chord, in a classic B.B. line that you can apply to your jazz blues soloing phrases. </p> <p>Again, because it mixes sounds from both scales, you will need to play this line over just a Bb7 chord, then when you move to Eb7 you need to move this line in order to fit that new chord. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/3_8.png" width="620" height="170" alt="3_8.png" /></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207536578&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>B.B. King Sample Blues Solo</strong></p> <p>To finish of our studies of these B.B. King blues lines for jazz guitar, here's a sample solo over a jazz blues progression in the key of Bb that uses the previous three lines in its construction. Try learning the solo one phrase at a time, and then piece it all together as you play the solo as a whole in your studies. </p> <p>You also can slow it down with a metronome at first, then work up to playing along with the sample audio as you build it up to speed in the woodshed. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-05-27%20at%205.45.32%20PM.png" width="620" height="518" alt="Screen Shot 2015-05-27 at 5.45.32 PM.png" /></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/207536713&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/bb-king">B.B. King</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-bb-king-blues-lines-jazz-guitar#comments B.B. King Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Wed, 27 May 2015 21:52:34 +0000 Matt Warnock 24563 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: Soloing with the Mixed Blues Scale http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-soloing-mixed-blues-scale <!--paging_filter--><p>Learning to play the blues in a jazzy style means stepping outside the minor blues scale and exploring other melodic options in your solos. </p> <p>But you don’t need to go very far to find a cool-sounding scale that can jazz up your blues solos in no time. </p> <p>In today’s lesson, we’ll be looking into the mixed blues scale, which combines the notes from the minor and major blues scales to outline the underlying blues chord changes, while retaining a healthy dose of the blues at the same time. </p> <p><strong>Major and Minor Blues Scales</strong></p> <p>To begin, here's a quick review of the minor and major blues scales, written over an A7 chord in the example below. </p> <p>The minor blues scale contains the notes R-b3-4-#4-5-b7, and the major blues scale contains the notes R-2-b3-3-5-6, so they share a few notes and have a few different notes between them. </p> <p>The notes they share are the root, b3 and 5th, while the other notes are different between the two scales; minor blues has the 4, #4 and b7; while the major blues scale has 2, 3 and 6.</p> <p>Try playing both of these scales back to back over an A7 chord, with a backing track if possible, in order to hear how they both sound when applied to a chord such as A7. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Jazz%20Blues%20Scale%201.jpg" width="620" height="154" alt="Jazz Blues Scale 1.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Mixed Blues Scale</strong></p> <p>Now that you've looked at both of these scales separately, we’re going to combine the major and minor blues scales in order to build what I like to call the mixed blues scale. </p> <p>This scale contains all of the notes from both scales, R-2-b3-3-4-#4-5-6-b7, and has a sound that outlines the chord, since it has the R-3-5-b7 arpeggio built into it, and remains bluesy with the b3 and #4 at the same time. </p> <p>While you could play all of these notes in order, as I wrote out in the previous paragraph, you’ll see in the example below that I leave out certain notes along the way, notes that get added in later in the scale. </p> <p>This is mostly due to the fact that many famous players who use this scale tend to use certain notes in specific octaves, so I’ve written it out in that way to get you into that style quickly and accurately when adding this scale to your soloing repertoire. </p> <p>Try putting on an A7 backing track and play up and down this scale to hear how it sounds over that chord, and then begin to improvise over an A7 harmony using only the A mixed blues scale as the basis for your lines to hear how it sounds in a soloing situation. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Jazz%20Blues%20Scale%202.jpg" width="620" height="154" alt="Jazz Blues Scale 2.jpg" /> </p> <p><strong>Mixed Blues Scale Lick</strong></p> <p>Lastly, here’s an example of a lick over A7 built with the notes from the A mixed blues scale. </p> <p>Since this scale contains the notes of the A7 arpeggio, you need to treat it more like an arpeggio than a blues scale, meaning that if you have an A7 chord, you play the A mixed blues scale. If you have a D7 chord, you play a D7 mixed blues scale and so on. </p> <p>Try this lick out and see how it sounds over an A7 chord, before transposing it to other keys, adding it to your solo vocabulary and writing/learning a number of mixed blues scale licks of your own as you explore this concept further in the woodshed. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/118098721"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Jazz%20Blues%20Scale%203.jpg" width="620" height="162" alt="Jazz Blues Scale 3.jpg" /></p> <p>Do you have a question about this mixed blues scale lesson? Share your comments and questions in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-soloing-mixed-blues-scale#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Wed, 29 Apr 2015 15:14:15 +0000 Matt Warnock 19640 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: Modernize Your Jazz Blues Chords http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-modernize-your-jazz-blues-chords <!--paging_filter--><p>Comping over a jazz blues chord progression is something every jazz guitarist needs to be able to do in order to function in a jam or gig situation. </p> <p>While many of us study traditional chord shapes such as 3rds and 7ths, Drop 2 and Drop 3 chords over a jazz blues, sometimes we want to bring a more modern sound into our chord lines over this common jazz progression. </p> <p>One of the best ways to modernize your jazz blues comping is to use 4th chords in your comping phrases, chords that are built by stacking 4th intervals rather than 3rds, as is the case in more traditional chord shapes. </p> <p>In this lesson, you will learn how to play and apply 4th chords to the I7, IV7 and V7 chords of a blues progression in order to bring a modern vibe to your comping ideas, as well as learn a study that you can use to hear these shapes in a musical situation. </p> <p><strong>Modern Jazz Blues Chords Position 1</strong></p> <p>To begin, here are three 4th-chord shapes you can use over the three chords in a 12-bar G blues, using the I7, IV7 and V7 chords, which are G7-C7-D7 in this key. </p> <p>Notice how each chord is built by starting on a chord tone, 7th, root and 2nd in this case, and then stacking 4th intervals on top of these initial chords. </p> <p>This stacking of 4th intervals, which we call 4th chords, creates that cool, modern sound in your chord voicings, and it is the reason these chords can make a jazz blues tune sound modern when applied to those changes. </p> <p>Once you have these shapes under your fingers, put on a G blues backing track and practice applying them to the I7, IV7 and V7 chords over that tune. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Modern%20Blues%20Chords%201.jpg" width="620" height="191" alt="Modern Blues Chords 1.jpg" /></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202821225&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Modern Jazz Blues Chords Position 2</strong></p> <p>To help you expand upon these chord shapes in your practice routine, here are the same notes, but now in a different position of the fretboard. </p> <p>Notice that the G7 chord now uses the shapes from the C7-D7 chords in the first example, and the C7-D7 chords now use the same shapes as the G7 chord in the previous example. This will allow you to quickly move these shapes around the fretboard as you don’t have to learn new chords, you just have to practice playing them in a second position on the neck. </p> <p>Once these chords are familiar, put on a backing track and comp over those chords using both positions on the fretboard to create your lines and phrases. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Modern%20Blues%20Chords%202.jpg" width="620" height="191" alt="Modern Blues Chords 2.jpg" /></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202821215&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Chromatic Passing Chords</strong></p> <p>Besides playing these three chords over each change in the blues progression, you also can add a passing chord between the 2nd and 3rd shapes to bring a sense of chromaticism to your chord lines. Because the 2nd and 3rd chords have the same shape, and are two frets apart, you can fill in the space between those chords with a chromatic chord, which you can see and hear in the example below. </p> <p>When applying these chromatic chords to your comping and chord soloing ideas, you don’t always have to play these chords in order, such as inside-outside-inside. </p> <p>Instead, just think about the chromatic chords as creating tension, which you then need to resolve in your lines by moving to an inside chord by the end of your phrase. </p> <p>Once you have explored the chord shapes below, put on a G blues backing track and comping over those changes using the following chord shapes to create you lines and phrases. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Modern%20Blues%20Chords%203.jpg" width="620" height="191" alt="Modern Blues Chords 3.jpg" /></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202821210&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Modern Jazz Blues Comping Study</strong></p> <p>To finish your study of these three-note, modern-sounding jazz blues chords, here's a comping study written out over a 12-bar G blues that you can learn and explore in the practice room. Try memorizing this study and playing it along with a backing track, as well as writing out a chord study of your own using the shapes learned in this lesson. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Modern%20Blues%20Chords%204.jpg" width="620" height="525" alt="Modern Blues Chords 4.jpg" /> </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202821207&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> Do you any questions about these modern jazz blues chords? Share your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a senior lecturer at the Leeds College of Music and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-modernize-your-jazz-blues-chords#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Mon, 27 Apr 2015 18:42:29 +0000 Matt Warnock 24394 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: Break Open ii-V’s With This Nine-Note Scale http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-break-open-ii-v-s-nine-note-scale <!--paging_filter--><p>ii-Vs are some of the most commonly used and important chords in the jazz repertoire. It’s a progression you’ll see often as a jazz guitarist, so being able to confidently solo over these chords is an essential skill. </p> <p>When first learning to blow over these chords, we often start with the Dorian and Mixolydian modes over each chord, respectively. But, while playing these modes is correct, they often sound too diatonic, not enough tension to really be “jazzy.”</p> <p>This is where Bebop Scales come into play. In this article, we’ll explore the Minor Bebop Scale, the Dominant Bebop Scale and a hybrid I like to call the Combined Bebop Scale. </p> <p>As a bonus, there’s a video included to show you how these scales sound in an improvisational context. </p> <p>So grab your guitar, crank your amp and get ready to add a little jazziness to your solos. </p> <p><strong>Minor Bebop Scale</strong></p> <p>The first scale we’ll look at is the Minor Bebop Scale. This scale is built by taking the Dorian Mode and adding in a #7 interval. You can use this scale to solo over a m7 chord as it uses the related mode, and the #7 provides that extra “jazziness” the diatonic modes don’t provide on their own. </p> <p>Once you have the Minor Bebop Scale under your fingers in the position below, with the root on the 5th string, put on a Dm7 backing track and practice improvising with this scale. Then, move it to other keys around the neck to really ingrain this fingering in your hands and your ears. </p> <p>As you move on to the next scale in this lesson, you’ll use the Minor Bebop Scale as the foundation for further adaptation. So, having a strong grasp on this fingering and scale is an important step in ensuring that you get the most out of the next sections in this lesson. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%201%20Dorian%20Mode%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="160" alt="Example 1 Dorian Mode JPG.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Dominant Bebop Scale</strong></p> <p>With the Minor Bebop Scale under your fingers you can move on to the V chord in the ii-V progression and learn the Dominant Bebop Scale in this position. Notice that you don’t have to move your hand on the neck to get this next scale under your fingers. It sits right above the Minor Bebop Scale on the fretboard. </p> <p>The Dominant Bebop Scale is built by taking the Mixolydian Mode and adding in one extra note, the #7 interval. This produces an eight-note scale, just like the Minor Bebop Scale, except it’s used to solo over 7th chords. </p> <p>Once you have the fingering down in the example below, put on a G7 backing track and solo over that chord with this scale. Then, take it to the other 11 keys to see how it sits in different areas of the neck. </p> <p>If you are feeling confident with these two scales at this point, you can put on a ii-V backing track, maybe starting with 4-bars per chord, and improvise over each chord using the appropriate scale. For Dm7 you would solo for four bars using the D Minor Bebop scale, then switch over to four bars of the G Dominant Bebop Scale over G7. </p> <p>Once you have a handle on the four-bar phrases, you can shrink it down to two-bars per chord, then one-bar per chord and finally if you’re feeling adventurous, two-beats per chord. The goal is to be able to use each scale to improvise over the appropriate chord in a progression, helping you to inject the Bebop Scale sound into your playing, while thinking about each chord as a separate entity at the same time. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%202%20Mixolydian%20Mode%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="160" alt="Example 2 Mixolydian Mode JPG.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>The “Combined” Bebop Scale</strong></p> <p>One of the cool things I discovered when I was first studying these scales is that not only can you apply them separately to each chord in a ii-V, but you can use them together over both of these chords with a “Combined” Bebop Scale. </p> <p>When doing so, the passing notes from each individual scale create a new tension over the other chord in the progression, which you can see here as a reference. </p> <p>Key of C</p> <p>Dm7 = C# (#7) and F# (M3)<br /> G7 = C# (b5 Blues Note) and F# (#7)</p> <p>Like any chromatic note, you probably don’t want to sit on these passing notes in your lines. It’s cool to start an idea on these notes, or to inject them into the middle of a line, but unless you’re looking to create a high-level of tension in your solo, it’s probably not a great idea to end a line on one of these notes, or pause on them for a long time in your playing. </p> <p>Once you have this fingering down, I added the A B C on the top string to fill out the fingering in this position, put on a Dm7-G7 backing track and solo over both chords using this scale. This gives you an added layer of melodic material to choose from over these chords, on top of the individual scales addressed earlier. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%203%20Combined%20Bebop%20Scale%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="171" alt="Example 3 Combined Bebop Scale JPG.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Accompanying Video Lesson</strong></p> <p>Check out the video lesson below to see this scale explained in detail, hear it played on the guitar and check out this great sounding scale in action in an improvised solo. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/24YV2oNTZt0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Did you check this “combined” bebop scale out in the practice room? What are your thoughts on this nine-note scale?</p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a senior lecturer at the Leeds College of Music and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-break-open-ii-v-s-nine-note-scale#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Wed, 22 Apr 2015 19:51:35 +0000 Matt Warnock 15579 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: Three Easy Steps to Creating Killer Arpeggio Licks http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-three-easy-steps-creating-killer-arpeggio-licks <!--paging_filter--><p>Improvising with arpeggios is a great way to dig into chord changes, bringing out the exact sound of each chord in your lines. </p> <p>While scales and modes are great for outlining keys and creating modal colors, when you want to sound each chord in a progression, arpeggios are the way to go. </p> <p>While they are great for outlining chord changes, arpeggios can often become boring or predictable when you overuse them in a solo. But while they can be bland if played as is, there are plenty of techniques that you can explore in order to create killer licks with these important, four-note groups. </p> <p>One of the easiest ways to expand any arpeggio is to add chromatic approaches above or below each note in the scale. In this article, we will explore this concept, learning it from a technical standpoint and then creating licks that you can take into your solos. </p> <p>Before we start, I have used a G7 arpeggio for each example in the article. If you are new to this fingering, take a minute to check it out below and get it under your fingers before moving to the subsequent exercises. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Arpeggio%20Example%201%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="132" alt="Arpeggio Example 1 JPG.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Step 1: Chromatic Approach From Below</strong></p> <p>Once you have your fingers around the G7 arpeggio, you’re ready to dig into the first chromatic approach technique. </p> <p>This concept is fairly simple. Play the arpeggio while adding one chromatic approach below each note in that fingering. In the case of G7 you would get the following notes:</p> <p>F#-G<br /> A#-B<br /> C#-D<br /> E-F</p> <p>You can see this exercise written out below, with the chromatic approaches labeled “C” below each note. </p> <p>When you have this pattern under your fingers, take it to different keys, different arpeggios (Maj7, m7, m7b5, etc.) as well as to any one or two-octave arpeggio fingering you know or are working on in the practice room. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Arpeggio%20Example%202.jpg" width="620" height="150" alt="Arpeggio Example 2.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Step 2: Chromatic Approach From Above</strong></p> <p>The next step is to add one chromatic note above each of the notes in the arpeggio. When applied to a G7 arpeggio, which you can see in the example below, you get the following interval pattern. </p> <p>Ab-G<br /> C-B<br /> Eb-D<br /> Gb-F</p> <p>You will notice that the C in this example and the E in the previous example are found in the G Mixolydian scale. Though they are not necessarily chromatic to this key, in order to keep this pattern going, it’s better to think of these notes as half-step approach notes to the B and F than as part of the scale. This will make it easier to apply this technique on the fly when you take it to a soloing situation. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Arpeggio%20Example%203.jpg" width="620" height="153" alt="Arpeggio Example 3.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Step 3: Chromatic Approach Licks</strong></p> <p>The third step is to take the previous two exercises and use them to create licks and phrases in order to expand your soloing vocabulary. </p> <p>I have written out a ii-V-I lick in the key of C major below, which you can learn as a starting point to see how these two techniques can come together in a practical, musical situation. Once you’ve checked out this lick in a few different keys, write out a few of your own to see what you can come up with by applying chromatic approach notes to different progressions. </p> <p>Lastly, put on a backing track and practice applying chromatic approach notes to arpeggios on the fly. This is where the rubber really meets the road in the practice room. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/4%20new.jpg" width="620" height="162" alt="4 new.jpg" /></p> <p>Learning to improvise with arpeggios is a great way to outline chord changes throughout a tune, but they can tend to sound boring if we only stick to pure arpeggio in our lines. By learning how to apply chromatic approach notes to basic arpeggios, you can quickly and easily take your chord-tone lines to new and exciting places during your solos. </p> <p>Do you have a favorite way of using chromatic approach notes over arpeggios? If so, please share it in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a senior lecturer at the Leeds College of Music and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em> </p> <p><em>Photo: Leandro Couri</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-three-easy-steps-creating-killer-arpeggio-licks#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Mon, 06 Apr 2015 12:11:47 +0000 Matt Warnock 15313 at http://www.guitarworld.com