Effects http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/23/all en Pigtronix Releases Echolution 2 Version 2.0 Firmware and New Application http://www.guitarworld.com/pigtronix-releases-echolution-2-version-20-firmware-and-new-application <!--paging_filter--><p>The world's most sophisticated delay pedal has just become even more powerful. The Pigtronix Echolution 2, launched at the 2014 Winter NAMM show in January, instantly became a top-seller, earning rave reviews and awards worldwide. </p> <p>But now, with the just-released 2.0 Firmware and App update, the pedal has just become capable of even more magic.</p> <p>This new application and firmware allows expression pedal and envelope control of all knobs, simultaneously, with user-definable heel and toe settings as well as independent envelope inversion, strength and decay time parameters for every preset.</p> <p>The five main parameters (Repeats, Delay Time, Delay Mix, Modulation Speed, and Modulation Depth) now support independent mapping from the expression pedal and envelope detection circuitry. </p> <p>The expression and envelope mapping can apply to multiple parameters, with each parameter having independent settings for Expression range/direction and Envelope strength/direction/release time. When a parameter has any of these advanced mapping features enabled the LED for that parameter dimly illuminates to indicate the expression or envelope control. The previous Single Expression/Envelope Mapping now serves as an Advanced Mapping Override allowing E2D users to quickly override or experiment without the use of a computer. </p> <p>This functionality is easily accessed in the newly updated Echolution 2 application using the advanced options controls. When a parameter is assigned expression pedal control, pointers for the heel and toe become visible around that parameter's associated control knob; moving these pointers sets the range of control. Controls in the advanced options menu set the direction of the expression pedal mapping. </p> <p>Envelope control is also accessed through the advanced options controls. Here envelope control of the individual parameters can be enabled, along with the strength of the mapping, the direction, and the release time of each. </p> <p>This unprecedented level of control and tweak-ability is pushed to its limit with the application's inclusion of Preset Blending. Users can select two similar presets and have the application automatically set the expression pedal ranges and directions so that the expression pedal blends between the parameter settings. </p> <p>To round out this paradigm shifting addition, we've added separate global settings for the Sensitivity and Release Time of Ducking, a host of improvements to Preset Management and Switching as well as access to Global Parameters (such as MIDI Channel).</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.pigtronix.com/blogs/echolution2/">These updates are available as a free download right here.</a></strong></p> <p><strong>Full specs on the Echolution 2 suite can be found here:</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.pigtronix.com/products/echolution-2/">pigtronix.com/products/echolution-2</a><br /> <a href="http://www.pigtronix.com/products/echolution-2-deluxe/">pigtronix.com/products/echolution-2-deluxe</a><br /> <a href="http://www.pigtronix.com/products/echolution-2-remote/">pigtronix.com/products/echolution-2-remote</a></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/pigtronix-releases-echolution-2-version-20-firmware-and-new-application#comments Pigtronix Effects News Gear Thu, 17 Jul 2014 21:28:23 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21852 Boss Introduces Waza Craft Effect Pedals — Super Overdrive, Blues Driver and Delay — Demo Video http://www.guitarworld.com/boss-introduces-waza-craft-effect-pedals-super-overdrive-blues-driver-and-delay-demo-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Boss has announced its Waza Craft series, a new line of special edition compact pedals that offers players the ultimate Boss tone experience. </p> <p>The debut of the Waza Craft series includes the SD-1W Super Overdrive, BD-2W Blues Driver, and DM-2W Delay. </p> <p>From the company: </p> <p>All three pedals provide the classic sound signatures of the past and present Boss pedals they’re based on, plus switchable modes for customized tones sought after by discerning guitarists.</p> <p>Designed with a passion for premium sound by the master engineers at Boss in Japan, the Waza Craft series introduces a new chapter in the company’s legacy of exceptional tone. Through meticulously-selected analog components, refined circuitry, and careful attention to the finest design details, Waza Craft embodies the essence of Boss engineering and the spirit of generations of technical and musical wisdom.</p> <p>“Waza” is the Japanese term for art and technique, and each of these special edition pedals proudly carries the Waza symbol to represent the artful wisdom and tech-savvy spirit flowing within Boss design and craftsmanship.</p> <p>In continuous production for over 30 years, the Boss SD-1 Super Overdrive is one of the best-loved stomps ever created. The Waza Craft SD-1W hot rods this players’ favorite with a revised circuit design, all-discrete analog components, and switchable Standard and Custom sound modes.</p> <p>The Boss BD-2 Blues Driver is also one of the most popular overdrive pedals in the world, and the Waza Craft BD-2W takes this classic’s signature creamy grit to a new level. Like the SD-1W, the BD-2W is built with all-discrete analog components and a revised circuit, and features Standard and Custom sound modes. </p> <p>Highly sought after since being discontinued in 1984, the Boss DM-2 Delay is universally revered by tone aficionados for its warm, “bucket brigade” analog delay sound. With the Waza Craft DM-2W, the coveted stomp has been reborn with greater versatility for today’s music styles. Using all-analog circuitry and an authentic BBD delay line, the DM-2W’s Standard mode captures the lush sound and 20-300 ms delay range of the original DM-2. Custom mode instantly changes the sound to a cleaner analog tone with over twice the delay time. </p> <p>The DM-2W also includes a jack for controlling delay time with an optional expression pedal. Two output jacks allow for separate output of delay and direct sounds if desired. </p> <p>For more information on the Waza Craft series, visit <a href="http://www.bossus.com/">BossUS.com</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/SaLh_IfBbbw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/y3KF5rcxHbg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/BINFsEPuQKE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/boss-introduces-waza-craft-effect-pedals-super-overdrive-blues-driver-and-delay-demo-video#comments Boss Roland Summer NAMM 2014 Videos Effects News Gear Thu, 17 Jul 2014 18:19:49 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21850 Korg Introduces SDD-3000 Delay Pedal — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/korg-introduces-sdd-3000-delay-pedal-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Korg has introduced its SDD-3000 Delay pedal.</p> <p>From the company:</p> <p>The original Korg SDD-3000 rack-mount digital delay from 1982 has been meticulously reproduced and is now available as the SDD-3000 Pedal. </p> <p>It offers the distinctive delay tones of the original that have been sought after for decades, in a sturdy, stompbox design. This new version offers the acclaimed sound of the classic model along with all the functionality of a modern, boutique delay effect unit with rich and detailed tone that complements every genre and playing style.</p> <p>The SDD-3000 Pedal was developed in collaboration with veteran guitar tech Dallas Schoo of U2 to help reclaim the most coveted tone of the original unit, add some modern stage-ready enhancements, and appeal to the digital delay enthusiast. It features:</p> <p>• Eight distinct delay types (SSD-3000, Analog, Tape, Modern, Kosmic, Reverse, Pitch and Panning), with delay times ranging from 1 to 4,000 milliseconds.<br /> • 80 programmable preset options<br /> • Stereo in/out<br /> • MIDI operation<br /> • Interactive controls that include tap-tempo, a modulation waveform selector, and selectable filters for delay repeats</p> <p>Two bypass modes are included—true bypass and analog—to suit different needs. Analog mode offers direct sound that has been routed through the preamp circuit and adjusted by the gain setting to an appropriate level. True bypass will not affect the sound in any way.</p> <p>The preamp circuit featured in the SDD-3000 Pedal stays true to the unmistakable, original “SDD sound,” offering a natural reaction to individual playing styles, as well as slightly saturated and compressed tone. It can be removed from the signal chain (via true bypass) to allow players to keep their sound intact without the delay.</p> <p>The SDD-3000 Pedal is also equipped with a highly interactive modulation section. This feature allows players to experience five different Waveforms, intensity and frequency controls, and the ability to create custom sounds that combine two different types of Waveforms. Players can produce a variety of modulation effects, including chorus, flanging, pitch bending, doubling and Doppler effects, then save sounds to one of the 80 programmable banks.</p> <p>Additional features include input and output attenuators, built-in filters, expression pedal compatibility, and a headroom indicator.</p> <p>Check out the video below, which features U2 guitar tech Dallas Schoo.</p> <p>The KORG SDD-3000 Pedal will be available in late July 2014 for a U.S. street price of $399.99. For more info, visit <a href="http://www.korg.com/us/">korg.com</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/b0bkPZHHVrA?list=UUms9PJGpBiNJd8e1CJ37zWQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/korg-introduces-sdd-3000-delay-pedal-video#comments Korg Videos Effects News Gear Thu, 10 Jul 2014 15:01:23 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21781 Review: ToneConcepts Distillery Overdrive Pedal http://www.guitarworld.com/review-toneconcepts-distillery-overdrive-pedal <!--paging_filter--><p>When ToneConcepts set out to make a new stomp box, it did the unthinkable by asking guitarists what they wanted that was missing from the plethora of pedals already on the market. </p> <p>The result is the Distillery pedal, which, despite its name, does not make vodka or whiskey but rather is a clean boost/overdrive pedal that allows guitarists to brew up their own signature tones. </p> <p>Observant readers may note that a bajillion clean boost/overdrive pedals are out there already, but the Tone Concepts Distillery is truly different, from the way that it virtually becomes an integrated part of an amp to the incredible variety of natural-sounding tones it delivers.</p> <p><strong>FEATURES</strong><br /> The Distillery pedal functions as a transparent preamp that provides up to 20dB of adjustable volume boost. It also has controls labeled “guts” and “bleed” that provide an extra gain stage and passive tone control, respectively. The shape circuit—which can be added to the boost function via the shape footswitch—is a versatile filter EQ. </p> <p>It includes a contour knob that rolls off high frequencies and emphasizes mids as it is turned clockwise, and an edge knob that adjusts the filter’s Q, making the EQ curve’s shape wider as the knob is turned clockwise. Other features include bright-red LEDs that illuminate when the boost and shape sections are engaged, true-bypass switching, mono 1/4-inch input and output jacks, and nine-volt power via either a battery or optional power adapter.</p> <p><strong>PERFORMANCE</strong><br /> The Distillery’s preamp performs like an extra power amp hitting your amp’s front end, delivering impressive dynamics, crunch and definition without compression or fizz. The Shape section provides an impressive variety of natural tones that can make your guitar sound fatter and warmer or even make humbuckers sound like single-coils. Although the shape section functions differently than most EQ sections and is not immediately intuitive, it encourages guitarists to use their ears rather than their eyes to dial in the tones they want.</p> <p><strong>STREET PRICE</strong> $179</p> <p><strong>MANUFACTURER</strong> Tone Concepts Inc., <a href="http://www.toneconcepts.com/">toneconcepts.com</a></p> <p><strong>THE BOTTOM LINE</strong><br /> The Tone Concepts Distillery pedal greatly expands the distortion textures and tonal versatility of a guitar and amp setup while preserving your rig’s basic character and personality.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2979780243001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2979780243001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-toneconcepts-distillery-overdrive-pedal#comments February 2014 ToneConcepts Effects News Gear Magazine Tue, 08 Jul 2014 19:32:00 +0000 Chris Gill, Video by Paul Riario http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20102 Review: EarthQuaker Devices Terminal Fuzz Pedal — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/review-earthquaker-devices-terminal-fuzz-pedal-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the August 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-2014-kirk-hammett/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=MayVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>If pedal effects were colors on a painter’s palette, I’d describe overdrive as black or white, distortion as red or blue, and fuzz as purple, mainly because fuzz is typically best used sparingly. </p> <p>Describing the EarthQuaker Devices Terminal, which is a fuzz pedal, I’d go even further by comparing it to a glossy, metal-flake hue of heliotrope, but one that you’d want to use in excess, such as to paint a hot rod. </p> <p>Far from a mild-mannered effect, the Terminal is raunchy and ratty and has practically nothing in common with classic fuzz.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3628269863001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3628269863001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-earthquaker-devices-terminal-fuzz-pedal-video#comments August 2014 EarthQuaker Devices Videos Effects News Gear Tue, 24 Jun 2014 15:36:39 +0000 Chris Gill, Video by Paul Riario http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21592 Review: Dunlop EP101 Echoplex Preamp — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/review-dunlop-ep101-echoplex-preamp-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the August 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-2014-kirk-hammett/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=MayVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>The original Maestro EP-3 Echoplex is best known for its warm tape-echo effects, but many players—most notably Eric Johnson, Jimmy Page and Eddie Van Halen—discovered that the EP-3 has a sweet-sounding preamp that does wonderful things to a guitar’s tone, even when the tape echo effect is bypassed. </p> <p>While some have compared the EP-3 preamp to a clean boost, it’s much more than that. In addition to providing a few dB of gain, it affects the phase response of different frequencies to make a guitar sound bolder and more focused.</p> <p>The Dunlop EP101 Echoplex Preamp is a faithful reproduction of the FET (Field-Effect Transistor) preamp used in the original EP-3. It features only a gain control (with the same style knob found on an Echoplex) that provides up to 11dB of boost and operates either with a nine-volt battery or optional adapter. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3628368654001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3628368654001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-dunlop-ep101-echoplex-preamp-video#comments August 2014 Dunlop Manufacturing Jim Dunlop Videos Effects News Gear Magazine Thu, 19 Jun 2014 21:15:10 +0000 Chris Gill, Photo by Paul Riario http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21616 Review: Ibanez ES2 Echo Shifter — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/review-ibanez-es2-echo-shifter-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the August 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-2014-kirk-hammett/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=MayVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>When it comes to echo and delay pedals, guitarists have a choice of analog or digital, each of which has its pros and cons. </p> <p>While analog units typically create the most natural-sounding repeats, they dull the fidelity of the source signal and don’t provide precise control over the timing of the repeated signal. Digital units, on the other hand, offer more finite control and pristine sound processing but lack warmth and are known to inject digital artifacts. </p> <p>Ibanez’s ES2 Echo Shifter combines the best of both worlds by mating a superb, no-compromises, all-analog audio path to a digital control circuit. Better still, the Echo Shifter features unique oscillation and modulation circuits that add greater versatility, letting you create everything from subtle to extreme sonic weirdness. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3628279451001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3628279451001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-ibanez-es2-echo-shifter-video#comments August 2014 Ibanez Videos Effects News Gear Thu, 19 Jun 2014 14:09:25 +0000 Eric Kirkland, Video by Paul Riario http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21589 Electro-Harmonix Unveils B9 Organ Machine Pedal — Demo Video http://www.guitarworld.com/electro-harmonix-unveils-b9-organ-machine-pedal-demo-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Electro-Harmonix has introduced the B9 Organ Machine.</p> <p>From the company:</p> <p>With nine finely tuned presets emulating the legendary organs of the Sixties and beyond, the B9 Organ Machine delivers definitive tonewheel and combo organ sounds. </p> <p>The B9’s layout is straight-forward and intuitive. A nine-position switch allows the player to select among different popular organ types. The Organ volume knob controls the overall volume of the Organ preset while Dry volume controls the volume of the untreated instrument level at the Organ Output jack. This enables a player to mix the sound of their original instrument with the organ to create lush layers, or mute it entirely. </p> <p>A Mod control adjusts the modulation speed. The type of modulation provided is contingent on the preset and matched to it. A Click control was designed to simulate the harmonic percussion effect that is a sonic signature of many classic organs. For maximum authenticity, the click is added to the very first note or chord played and only re-triggers when current notes have been released and their amplitude falls below a threshold.</p> <p>With the B9 Organ Machine, EHX’s goal was to create an affordable, rugged and easy-to-use pedal that would put undeniable organ sounds at a musician’s fingertips. Check out the demo to hear it for yourself. </p> <p><strong>The new B9 Organ Machine comes standard with an EHX 9.6-Volt/DC200mA AC adapter and carries a U.S. list price of $293.73.</strong></p> <p>For more info, check out <a href="http://www.ehx.com/">ehx.com</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/98u-MDTKAWU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/electro-harmonix-unveils-b9-organ-machine-pedal-demo-video#comments EHX Electro-Harmonix Videos Effects News Gear Wed, 18 Jun 2014 20:31:33 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21602 Session Guitar Review: EJC Custom Pedals and Guitarworks '41 Willys Distortion Pedal — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/session-guitar-review-ejc-custom-pedals-and-guitarworks-41-willys-distortion-pedal-video <!--paging_filter--><p>What is cooler than a hot rod? How about a distortion box built into a hot rod? </p> <p>Well, that's exactly what EJC Custom Pedals and Guitarworks has been doing. I created a video review on YouTube you should watch, but I'd like to get a bit more specific on a few points not covered in the video.</p> <p>The car looks fantastic. I chose a '41 Willys in the same color as the car I drive, metallic orange (I like Halloween). The car doesn't simply sit there and do nothing. To add to the cool factor, the engine lights up on either side when the pedal is engaged, along with the headlights. When the three-position voicing switch is in the front position, the blower lights up in direct intensity to your playing! When the switch is in the back position, the rear tail lights come on and off in direct intensity to your playing!</p> <p>All this would be simply "cute" if the pedal did not sound amazing. It does. It has a boutique, mature quality to it. The pedal does not alter the tone that you begin with on your amp. It only morphs it into a distortion that feels like an old friend. I wouldn't call it an over-the-top distortion, like some that cascade two distortions into each other. It simply turns a clean sound into any variable of a great tube amp. Articulate, solid, warm and beefsteak tomatoey! But trust me, there's plenty of juice in this box.</p> <p>Before you ask the next questions, Eric Clarke, the designer at EJC, has answered them for you. Who wants to step on a car? Can it take a crushing foot on stage? Well EJC has included a True Bypass Loop Pedal! This loop pedal can stay on the floor or on your pedal board, while the car/distortion box can stay on your amp for all to see! And easily adjust settings on the distortion box/car itself. The visual alone is worth the price of admission.</p> <p>The pedal has volume, tone and drive knobs. They all work clean and even. The voicing switch gives different clipping settings to voice your distortion type to your liking. The voicing switch in the up/front gives asymmetrical clipping, or what you might consider a modern distortion. In the rear position it gives symmetrical clipping. This is more of a vintage voicing. The middle position produces a tighter bottom and bumped mid-range. </p> <p>I am in love with the quality of the distortion tone produced with this pedal. The way it handles dynamics when I adjust my volume knob makes it a joy to use in the studio. It will be a secret weapon. One of my most difficult sounds to be happiest with in the studio is the semi-distorted sound. Not sure why, but none of my amps have given me what I was looking for in that regard. This pedal does. It cleans up so nicely when I lower my knob, even on the most radical settings. The most important thing I can say about this pedal is: It is musical.</p> <p>After you watch the video, checkout <a href="http://www.ejccustompedalsandguitarworks.com/">EJC's website</a> to view some other models and effects. You won't be sorry!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wXG8E2OJRis?list=UUyNr3wp88CzV-5ButXCYKtg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em><a href="http://www.ronzabrocki.com/fr_home.cfm">Ron Zabrocki</a> is a session guitarist from New York, now living in Connecticut. Says Ron: "I started playing at age 6, sight reading right off the bat. That’s how I was taught, so I just thought everyone started that way. I could sight read anything within a few years, and that helped me become a session guy later in life. I took lessons from anyone I could find and had some wonderful instructors, including John Scofield, Joe Pass and Alan DeMausse. I’ve played several jingle sessions (and have written a few along the way). I’ve “ghosted” for a few people who shall remain nameless, but they get the credit and I get the money! I’ve played sessions in every style, from pop to jazz.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/session-guitar-review-ejc-custom-pedals-and-guitarworks-41-willys-distortion-pedal-video#comments EJC Custom Pedals and Guitarworks Ron Zabrocki Session Guitar Videos Effects Blogs Gear Tue, 17 Jun 2014 16:42:59 +0000 Ron Zabrocki http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21574 DigiTech Reissues DOD Envelope Filter 440 http://www.guitarworld.com/digitech-reissues-dod-envelope-filter-440 <!--paging_filter--><p>Harman's DigiTech has announced the introduction of its Envelope Filter 440, the classic “auto-wah” effect that makes your guitar “speak” with vowel-like sounds. </p> <p>The new Envelope Filter retains the unmistakable voice and touch sensitivity of the sought-after original while adding improvements like true bypass, a 9-volt power adapter jack and a choice of Up or Down effect settings.</p> <p>“An envelope filter is one of the funkiest and most expressive sounds ever created for guitar, bass or even keyboards and our Envelope Filter 440 delivers all the ‘quack’ and swept filter tones of the original and then some. There’s really nothing else like it and once you’ve tried one, it’s hard not to resist the way it makes solos and rhythm guitar parts stand out and groove,” said Tom Cram, marketing coordinator, DigiTech. </p> <p>The DOD Envelope Filter 440’s Up setting delivers that classic quacking envelope filter “wah” effect, while the new Down setting emphasizes the lower frequency range — great for bassists who want to rock a room with huge, thundering dub bass. The Level knob adjusts the sensitivity of the envelope to tailor the response of the pedal based on pick or finger attack. With a higher sensitivity, a player won’t have to hit the strings as hard to trigger the effect and vice versa. </p> <p>The Range knob controls the frequency range of the envelope’s sweep — turning it counter-clockwise sweeps more low frequencies and turning the knob clockwise sweeps more of the high frequencies. The Voice switch toggles between the Up and Down settings to choose which part of the frequency spectrum the player wants to emphasize.</p> <p>The new Envelope Filter 440 features true bypass operation, which keeps the tone of the instrument pristine when the effect is not in use — unlike the original, which would color the tone even with the effect switched off. The 9-volt DC power supply input makes the Envelope Filter 440 far more pedalboard-friendly and its bright blue LED indicator is easy to see even on outdoor stages in bright sunlight. And along with its singular sound, there’s no mistaking the pedal’s retro-cool graphics and bright green paint job.</p> <p>The DOD Envelope Filter will be available in June at a suggested retail price of $149.95.</p> <p>For more information, visit <a href="http://digitech.com/en-US">digitech.com</a> and <a href="http://www.harman.com/EN-US/Pages/Home.aspx">harman.com</a>.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/digitech-reissues-dod-envelope-filter-440#comments DigiTech Effects News Gear Wed, 11 Jun 2014 17:17:38 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21523 Custom Willys Distortion Pedal by EJC Custom Pedals and Guitarworks — Demo Video http://www.guitarworld.com/custom-willys-distortion-pedal-ejc-custom-pedals-and-guitarworks-demo-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Below, check out a video demo for a new custom distortion pedal built by EJC Custom Pedals and Guitarworks.</p> <p>The pedal, which was built for guitarist Ron Zabrocki (<a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/session-guitar">who writes the Session Guitar column for GuitarWorld.com</a>), <a href="http://www.rodandcustommagazine.com/eventcoverage/0912rc_36th_msra_car_show/photo_19.html">resembles a vintage, Forties-era Willys automobile.</a> (<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willys">Learn more about Willys here.</a>) </p> <p>The pedal was hand wired with a three-way voicing switch that changes the characteristics of the distortion. The guitar used in the demo video is a Fender Lone Star Strat through a Fender Blues Jr. amp.</p> <p>For more about EJC Custom Pedals and Guitarworks, visit <a href="http://ejccustompedalsandguitarworks.com/pedals.php">ejccustompedalsandguitarworks.com</a> or follow the company on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/EjcCustomPedalsAndGuitarworks">Facebook.</a></p> <p>Ron says he'll be writing a review of the pedal soon, so stick around!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/DFB7xASYE8A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/custom-willys-distortion-pedal-ejc-custom-pedals-and-guitarworks-demo-video#comments EJC Custom Pedals and Guitarworks Ron Zabrocki Videos Effects News Gear Wed, 04 Jun 2014 14:22:16 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21452 Video: Guitar World's Guide to Building a Pedal Board http://www.guitarworld.com/video-guitar-worlds-guide-building-pedal-board <!--paging_filter--><p>Are you a pedal-board dunce? Fear not! In this illustrated tutorial, Guitar World shows you everything you need to know, from choosing a board to powering up and laying out your pedals.</p> <p>The more effect pedals you use, the more you need a pedal board. Even the most basic unpowered board can provide a useful platform to hold your pedals securely, provide cable management and keep everything from sliding around onstage. </p> <p>Powered boards have the added function of supplying electrical connections to all your pedals, thereby eliminating the need for power strips and multiple wall warts that can take up space and create a nest of dangerous wires around your performance area. For more complex or specialized rigs, a custom pedal board can meet your specific switching requirements and make performance headaches a thing of the past. </p> <p>Unfortunately for those who have never had a pedal board, the prospect of building or buying one can be overwhelming. You have to determine not only what size you’ll need for your set-up but also make sure it matches the power requirements of your pedals, some of which might take require, 12, 16, 18 or 24 volts. There’s also the matter of cables, of which you’ll need many, each cut to the minimum length to ensure signal integrity and keep your layout tidy. The confusion only gets worse once you go online and see the plethora of pedal board models and options available to you. </p> <p>We wrote up this guide to make selecting and setting up a pedal board easier. In this tutorial, we’ll walk you through every step of the process, from choosing the pedal board, power supply and cables to laying out your pedals in the order that works for you and making it all work to meet your needs.</p> <p><strong>What Size?</strong></p> <p>The choice of a small, medium or large pedal board comes down to one thing: the number and size of the pedals you’ll need to use. If you use five or fewer standard-size pedals and don’t plan to add to your setup, a small pedal board should suit your long-term needs. If you have more than five pedals but fewer than 10, you’ll want to consider a medium board. More than 10 and you should choose a large board. And if you have only five pedals now but plan to add another two or three in the near future, it’s better to plan ahead and go for a larger board today. </p> <p>Remember, too, that pedals with large footprints take up more real estate, and even a small set-up consisting of a few oversized pedals may require a larger pedal board to prevent overcrowding. When planning, remember to leave enough space between the pedals to facilitate cabling and create a clean, uncluttered and easily accessible layout.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3373512771001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3373512771001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>Which Pedal Board?</strong></p> <p>Pedal boards can be purchased off the shelf, custom-built to your specs, or even built at home using readily available building materials, cables and power supplies. Music stores carry a range of boards, including bare unpowered platforms and boards with built-in power supplies and power strips. Other possible features include cable compartments, wheels, cases, heavy-duty corners and raised or pitched surfaces that make it easier to reach the pedals furthest away from you. </p> <p>Need something special? Many companies are available to build custom pedal boards to your specs, using the materials, power supply, hardware, wire and cables of your choice. If you have specialized switching, looping or MIDI requirements, a custom pedal board can meet your specific needs, though at a greater cost than an off-the-shelf unit.</p> <p>For this demonstration, I’m using medium and large Pedaltrain boards: the Pedaltrain 2 and Pedaltrain Pro, respectively. I like Pedaltrain boards for their lightweight frames and strong construction. The boards are slotted for easy management of cables and power supplies, all of which can fit under the board and out of sight. </p> <p>Slotted boards are especially nice in clubs, where spilled drinks can make a mess of your pedal board; with a slotted board, spilled liquids drip off, unlike a solid board, which will allow liquids to pool. The Pedaltrain boards are also angled, which makes it easy to reach pedals that are furthest away from you without accidentally stepping on other pedals or knocking their control settings with your foot. </p> <hr /> <p><strong>What Power Supply?</strong></p> <p>Whether you’re buying a pedal board with a power supply or choosing a power supply for an existing board, be sure that it meets your voltage requirements. Most pedals operate on nine volts of power, but many require 12, 16, 18 and even 24 volts. </p> <p>Before purchasing a power supply, check the power requirements of every pedal you’ll be using. Then, choose a power supply robust enough to deliver the voltages you require and a sufficient number of outputs for as many pedals as you’ll use. Also be sure to choose a supply that has isolated output sections to eliminate ground loops, hum and undesirable interactions between your pedals. </p> <p>Some examples of power supplies include Voodoo Lab’s Pedal Power series, T-Rex Engineering’s Fuel Tank offerings, the MXR DC Brick power supply, the Modtone Power plant, and the Pedaltrain Powertrain 1250 multi-output power supply. </p> <p>For this example, I’m using Visual Sound’s 1 Spot power supply. The 1 Spot is a nine-volt adaptor that takes up just one power strip outlet, yet it can accommodate up to 20 guitar pedals. It works with more than 90 percent of the effect pedals on the market, including those that use popular adapters from Boss, Danelectro, Dunlop, Korg and others. </p> <p>In addition, as you add more pedals to any setup, it’s possible to introduce noise and hum by having too many effects on the same power source. The 1 Spot makes it easy and affordable to expand your system and isolate noisier effects by placing them on their own separate power supply. </p> <p><strong>What Cables?</strong></p> <p>Two rules here: always use cables with right-angle plugs, which are more compact than straight plugs, and keep your cable lengths to a minimum in order to cut down on clutter and ensure the shortest and quietest signal path.</p> <p>For these reasons, I prefer to make my own cables, as this lets me choose the exact hardware and lengths that I need. Planet Waves’ Cable Station pedal board kit is ideally suited for this. It features 10 feet of low-capacitance cable for signal transparency and 10 24k gold-plated right-angle plugs—pretty much everything you need for the average pedal board setup. The plugs are solderless, so you can create a cable in seconds, anywhere, to the exact length, and the kit even includes a cable cutter. </p> <p><strong>Layout</strong></p> <p>Before you start Velcro-ing pedals to your pedal board, take some time to think about the most efficient and easy-to-navigate way in which to arrange them. As a rule, you should lay them out left to right in order of how they connect together (more on this below). But pedal boards are typically deep enough, from front to back, to accommodate two and sometimes three rows of pedals, giving you yet another dimension to consider when planning your layout. </p> <p>It’s best to keep your most-used pedals nearest to you, where they’ll be easiest to adjust and reach with your foot. Staggering the pedals between the front and back edges of the pedal board will also make it easier to navigate your set up and avoid confusion in the heat of performance. </p> <p><strong>What Order?</strong></p> <p>There’s an ideal way to lay out effect pedals, and then there’s an individual way to do it. The ideal way is based on practical considerations, like placing a reverb pedal last in the chain rather than in front of the distortion pedal, where it will muddy up your sound. The individual way is all about how you make things work for you. </p> <p>Some guitarists like to place their wah before the distortion, while others put it after for a more pronounced and dirty tone. While there is no right or wrong way to order your pedals, it helps to understand the basic guidelines. In this section, I’ll show you the most logical, efficient and least noisy way to chain together your pedals.</p> <p>In the most general sense, pedals that amplify should go near the front of the signal chain. This includes filters (which can boost and cut frequencies), compressors (which reduce dynamic levels but can also boost the overall signal), and all types of distortion and overdrive pedals. Tone modifiers such as chorus, phase and flangers go next, followed by ambience effects, such as reverb, delay and echo. The effects in a signal chain can be arranged and grouped into four general categories:</p> <p>• First: Filters, pitch shifters, harmonizers and dynamic pedals (such as compressors)<br /> • Second: Distortion, overdrive, fuzz, boost and EQ pedals<br /> • Third: Modulation pedals (phaser, chorus and flangers)<br /> • Fourth: Time-based effects (echo, delay, tremolo and reverb)</p> <p>For example, if your pedal board consists of a distortion, a wah, a compressor and a reverb pedal, you would probably connect them as follows:</p> <p>Wah > Compressor > Distortion > Reverb</p> <p>In the next section, I’ll explain the rationale behind the ordering of these categories to help guide you along. </p> <hr /> <p><strong>Filters, Pitch Shifters, Harmonizers and Dynamic Pedals</strong></p> <p>These pedals typically work best at the front of the signal chain, where they act upon the pure signal from your guitar. Filters include pedals such as wahs and low-pass filters. Pitch shifters and harmonizers also include the ever-popular Whammy Pedal, all of which benefit from having a strong and unaffected signal from your guitar so that they can track your notes cleanly and accurately. </p> <p>Dynamic pedals include compressors, which “squeeze” a signal’s dynamic range—its quietest to loudest values—by reducing signal peaks as they occur. Compressors typically feature volume or make-up gain controls that let you boost the overall signal to compensate for the lower volume that results from compressing. For that matter, auto wahs/envelope filters are actually dynamic filters that allow a filter’s frequency cutoff to respond to changes in signal response due to variances in pick attack and volume. </p> <p>Bear in mind that you should be careful of the effect order within these categories. For example, a compressor placed after an EQ pedal will be more responsive to the frequencies that the EQ is boosting, because the compressor seeks out the loudest part of the signal and reduces its volume. It’s probably better to place the compressor before the EQ, where it can respond to your guitar’s signal rather than the frequencies boosted by the EQ pedal. </p> <p>Conversely, placing a compressor before an auto wah will reduce the guitar signal’s dynamic range of the and thereby impede the auto wah’s expressiveness (auto wahs thrive on dynamics). On the other hand, placing a compressor before a wah pedal can help you control some of the guitar signal’s inherent brightness that can make some wahs sound shrill and piercing at the top end of their range. Of course, some of these considerations change if you raise your compressor’s make-up gain to the point that it’s actually increasing the signal like a gain boost (see the next section on distortion and overdrive). </p> <p>On the subject of wah pedals, it’s worth noting that some guitarists prefer to place wahs after distortion pedals, where they can be driven hard for a funkier sound. Again, none of this is carved in stone. Set up your effects as they work best for you, but try to be aware of the interactions that result from the order of pedal placement.</p> <p><strong>Distortion, Overdrive, Fuzz, Boost and EQ</strong></p> <p>Distortion, overdrive and fuzz pedals affect harmonic content by enhancing overtones and compressing peaks in the signal. Their purpose is to simulate the sound of a cranked amp through a speaker cabinet. In the natural order of things, these pedals go after filters and EQ, just like your amp’s output and speakers. They also follow the compression pedal, whose purpose is to flatten peaks and ensure the entire signal is “hotter.” </p> <p>Which brings us to another reason why you shouldn’t put a compressor after a distortion pedal: they can add volume to everything that comes before them, including noise generated by effects like—you guessed it—distortion, overdrive and fuzz pedals.</p> <p>Most modern fuzz pedals work very well after wah pedals, but the same isn’t true of some vintage fuzz units. If you have an older fuzz pedal that doesn’t sound good when placed after the wah, try moving it before the wah and see if it improves things.</p> <p>If you use boost or EQ pedals to give your tone a kick for solos, try placing them after the distortion, overdrive and fuzz pedals. This will help to raise your overall level without having an undue impact on the sound. As always, experiment to see what works best for the pedals in your setup. </p> <p><strong>Modulation Effects</strong></p> <p>These are tone modifiers and sweeteners, and they include effects like chorus, phase, flange and vibrato. Traditionally, these can be noisy effects, and placing them before gain-increasing pedals like distortion or compression will tend to intensify their noise. </p> <p>In addition, chorus, phasing and flanging all introduce time delays and pitch fluctuations that create a sense of spatial movement similar to what happens in the physical world. Placing them after amplification-style effects like distortions and overdrives produces results that are in keeping with naturally occurring sound. Plus, the extra boost a signal gets from an overdrive pedal can help emphasize the oscillation of modulation effects.</p> <p>Of course, plenty of players like to put modulation effects like Uni-Vibes and phasers before distortion. Think Jimi Hendrix (Uni-Vibe) and Eddie Van Halen (MXR Phase 90). Doing this delivers more harmonic content to the distortion box and can result in more dramatic and animated effects. </p> <p><strong>Time-Based Effects</strong></p> <p>This one is pretty obvious. Reverb, delay and echo are ambience effects that imitate how sounds are affected within room environments. Naturally, they go at the end of the chain. Tremolo, for that matter, is amplitude modulation—amp on, amp off—and therefore goes at the end of the signal chain. </p> <p><strong>Tuners</strong></p> <p>Though they’re not effects, tuners are a part of every guitarist’s setup, so it’s important to think about where they’ll go in your signal chain. Some guitarists like to have them at the front of the chain, while others like them last or somewhere in between. If you place your tuner at the head of the chain, activating it will silence your guitar but not your pedals. </p> <p>This is fine if you want to allow time-based effects to continue trailing off while you tune up, but it’s not ideal if you want to silence your rig between songs. For that you’ll need to place the tuner last in the chain, though doing so will require you to turn off your distortions and other effects prior to tuning. As you can see, there are trade-offs to either scenario. Pick the one that works best for you.</p> <p><strong>The Bottom Line</strong></p> <p>The bottom line is that pedal order is subjective and varies from player to player. If you’re trying to nail a certain guitarist’s tone, then it’s useful to know what effects he uses and the order in which they’re placed. But when it comes to your tone, you have to decide what works for you. </p> <p>Experimenting can be fun, so start plugging away. And don’t worry, there is no right or wrong order. Besides, the best part about effect boxes and pedal boards is that you can always move things around as your needs and tone goals change.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-guitar-worlds-guide-building-pedal-board#comments May 2014 Mick Mars Accessories Videos Effects News Gear Magazine Tue, 03 Jun 2014 15:29:29 +0000 Paul Riario, Christopher Scapelliti http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20799 Gear Review: Tone Bakery Creme Brulee Boost/Overdrive Pedal http://www.guitarworld.com/gear-review-tone-bakery-creme-brulee-boostoverdrive-pedal <!--paging_filter--><p>“Boutique tones for guitarists on a fast food budget” is the catch phrase for Tone Bakery’s new line of pedals. </p> <p>With a Klon Centaur going for nearly $3,000 these days, I can understand what Tone Bakery is going for by releasing the Creme Brulee — its take on the iconic Centaur boost/overdrive pedal — for less than $100.</p> <p>Besides, with its similar knob setup of Gain, Treble and Level, I can add my own man/horse centaur graphic! </p> <p>The Creme Brulee pedal offers a buffered bypass, meaning it will work great anywhere in your effects chain without robbing any of your signal.</p> <p>I’m not one to complain to the chef, but if I had to, I’d have asked for the input and output jacks to be labeled. Power options are either 9-volt battery or external power supply. The supplied rubber feet on the bottom kept it from sliding around on my pedalboard.</p> <p><strong>Clip 1:</strong> I dialed everything to about 12 o’clock with a Tele on the bridge pickup for a fat Black Crowes type of overdrive. </p> <p><strong>Clip 2:</strong> Treble and Gain cranked up with a Les Paul for an instant classic rock tone.</p> <p><strong>Clip 3:</strong> With the Gain rolled all the way back, you can use the Creme Brulee as a clean boost. Here’s a before and after clip with a Strat. The Creme Brulee adds a nice little bump in the mids, too.</p> <p><strong>Web: <a href="http://www.tonebakery.com/">tonebakery.com</a><br /> <strong>Street Price</strong>: $99.99</strong></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/37347161&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> <p><em>You can't believe everything you read on the Internet, but Billy Voight is a gear reviewer, bassist and guitarist from Pennsylvania. He has Hartke bass amps and Walden acoustic guitars to thank for supplying some of the finest gear on his musical journey. Need Billy's help in creating noise for your next project? Drop him a line at thisguyonbass@gmail.com.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/gear-review-tone-bakery-creme-brulee-boostoverdrive-pedal#comments Billy Voight Billy's Breakdown Tone Bakery Effects Blogs Gear Fri, 30 May 2014 18:45:24 +0000 Billy Voight http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21405 Paul Gilbert Talks MXR Pedals, His Roots and More — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/paul-gilbert-talks-mxr-pedals-his-roots-and-more-video <!--paging_filter--><p>This year, MXR is celebrating its 40th anniversary with a series of mini-documentary videos covering its history — as well as the personal stories of the lives and music it has affected.</p> <p>In this new episode, which you can watch below, guitarist and instructor Paul Gilbert shares the story of what inspired him to discover MXR and make it a part of his life and music. Gilbert also shares some insights and a few tricks on the use of some of the original series of the pedals showing first hand the timeless and organic sound of MXR.</p> <p>And, of course, there's some nice footage of Gilbert in shred mode!</p> <p>For more about MXR, visit <a href="http://www.jimdunlop.com/products/electronics/mxr">jimdunlop.com/products/electronics/mxr</a> and check out the all-new July 2014 issue of <em><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-july-14-led-zeppelin?utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=GilbertMXRVideo">Guitar World</a></em>, which details MXR's 40 years of innovation.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/za71CpIyBlw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/paul-gilbert">Paul Gilbert</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/paul-gilbert-talks-mxr-pedals-his-roots-and-more-video#comments MXR Paul Gilbert Videos Effects Interviews News Gear Thu, 29 May 2014 15:05:45 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21380 Review: T-Rex Engineering Magnus Effect Board http://www.guitarworld.com/review-t-rex-engineering-magnus-effect-board <!--paging_filter--><p>Pedal boards can be the bane of performing guitarists. </p> <p>They’re complicated and bulky, and if just one connection fails, your rig is rendered silent until you can track down the offending plug or wire. </p> <p>On the other hand, all-in-one pedal-board solutions are most often maligned for relying too heavily on low-cost, low-fidelity digital-chip sets that don’t deliver the sonic goods of a traditional pedal. </p> <p>T-Rex’s new Magnus effect board bridges the gap between these two ideologies, offering four of the company’s boutique-quality effects in an easy-to-use, inexpensive and programmable package. </p> <p><strong>Features</strong> </p> <p>Unlike many multieffect pedal boards, the Magnus’ plug-and-play user interface is easy for any pedal-savvy guitarist to navigate and start to use. There are four pedal sections—overdrive, distortion, delay and reverb—each of which has four control knobs and on/off LED indicators. The overdrive and distortion effects are of the classic British variety, with rich and tube-like tones. </p> <p>The digital delay sounds smooth, and the reverb is offered in spring, room, hall and LFO (low-frequency oscillation) variations; the LFO setting mixes a chorusing effect into the reverb to simulate the Leslie rotary speaker effect. Additionally, there’s a footswitchable boost circuit (adjustable via a back-panel knob) and a dual-function tap-tempo switch—tap it three times to set the delay speed, or hold it to mute the board and activate the onboard tuner. </p> <p>Players can footswitch between Live and Save modes. In Live mode, the Magnus operates like any a traditional pedal board, where each switch turns the assigned effect and boost on or off. Save mode allows the player to activate any of the 10 programmable combinations of effects with the five numbered switches; the second set of five saved combinations is accessed with the bank switch. The unit has a single input and stereo outputs, and power comes from a supplied 12-volt adaptor.</p> <p><strong>Performance</strong> </p> <p>Although the delay and reverb are digital effects, the Magnus’ other effects and overall circuitry are completely analog, maintaining a clean signal path that sounds very similar to a multi-pedal setup. In some cases, the Magnus’ performance is improved over separate pedals because the effects are ideally designed to work as a unit. </p> <p>The overdrive sounds are definitely in the Tube Screamer realm but with a broader midrange band and the ability to mix both dry and overdriven signals via the blend knob. Kicking on the distortion section is like adding a high-gain tube channel to your amp. The effect is crunchy and layered, and it’s possible to create modern metal chunk tones with the presence dialed high. For more pronounced overdrive, simply activate the boost and you’re instantly in ultra-high-gain heaven. The delay and reverbs are noteworthy for their liquid character and absence of noise, sounding much more like ambient, natural-occurring echoes than similar effects at twice the price. </p> <p><strong>List Price</strong> $599 </p> <p><strong>Manufacturer</strong> T-Rex Engineering ApS, <a href="http://www.t-rex-effects.com/">t-rex-effects.com</a></p> <p><strong>Cheat Sheet</strong></p> <p>Using the Live mode allows players to actively engage any of the four effects and the adjustable boost feature, just as they would with separate pedals.</p> <p>Players can save 10 preset combinations of effects and boost for convenient and instant recall. </p> <p><strong>The Bottom Line</strong></p> <p>Whether you are looking to simplify a bloated and difficult-to-control pedal board or just entering the world of outboard effects, the no-nonsense Magnus effect board from T-Rex Engineering delivers world-class tones and portability at an affordable price. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3122305614001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3122305614001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-t-rex-engineering-magnus-effect-board#comments March 2014 T-Rex T-Rex Effects Videos Effects News Gear Magazine Wed, 28 May 2014 18:13:10 +0000 Eric Kirkland, Video by Paul Riario http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20316