Dave Mustaine http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/263/all en Video: Megadeth's Dave Mustaine Performs with San Diego Symphony http://www.guitarworld.com/video-megadeths-dave-mustaine-performs-san-diego-symphony <!--paging_filter--><p>This past Saturday, April 12, Megadeth's Dave Mustaine performed with the San Diego Symphony at San Diego's Copley Symphony Hall.</p> <p>You can check out a bit of fan-filmed video from the event, which was titled "Symphony Interrupted," below.</p> <p>"I love the challenge," Mustaine said in a press release last month. "I really admire this genre of music because of the level of skill required and there are great dark undertones in these incredible pieces. </p> <p>"The marriage of two such distinctly different genres is one thing, but cross-pollinating different societies is a whole new level of badass! I'm used to them being before me, but it's a bit unnerving to know so many talented eyes will be on my back. It's a bit intimidating, and to be given the opportunity to interpret these melodies — to meld what I am best at with what they incredibly present, it is a great honor."</p> <p>Starting at 8 p.m., Mustaine and the Symphony performed renditions of the "Summer" and "Winter" movements from Vivaldi's "The Four Seasons" and Bach's "Air" (on the G string). Richard Wagner’s "Ride of the Valkyries" and Antonin Dvorak's "New World Symphony" also were performed by the symphony during the show. </p> <p>For more information, visit <a href="http://sandiegosymphony.org/">SanDiegoSymphony.org.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/fr31_iX_6tA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-megadeths-dave-mustaine-performs-san-diego-symphony#comments Dave Mustaine Videos News Mon, 14 Apr 2014 16:04:55 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21005 The Art of Shredding with Megadeth, Lamb of God, Trivium, Arch Enemy and More http://www.guitarworld.com/art-shredding-megadeth-lamb-god-trivium-arch-enemy-and-more <!--paging_filter--><p>In this <em>Guitar World</em> exclusive, we’ve gathered together Mustaine and his Megadeth coguitarist, Glen Drover, Lamb of God’s Mark Morton and Willie Adler, Arch Enemy’s Michael Amott and Fredrik Akesson, and Trivium’s Matt Heafy and Corey Beaulieu to teach you the essential skills of modern shred. </p> <p>Using their own examples, we’ll show you everything from rhythm and lead playing to speed picking and sweep arpeggios. So grab your guitar and get ready for the ultimate lesson in shredding—21st century style. </p> <p>[Note: Due to an unforeseen issue, there are gaps in the figure numbers in the following lesson. Rest assured, however, no content is missing!] </p> <p><strong>CHAPTER 1 “Sport Metal”: Modern Rhythm Methods</strong></p> <p>All the guitarists involved in this lesson have one thing in common: they are passionate and dedicated players who write great riffs, many of which are quite challenging to play. In fact, Arch Enemy’s Michael Amott described this type of playing as “sport metal.” </p> <p>“Michael’s right: it is sport metal,” says Willie Adler. “There’s a real finesse to a lot of the riffs, and they’re physically challenging every time you play them. With the new songs we’re playing from <em>Sacrament</em>, I’ve got to warm up for at least an hour before we go onstage.” </p> <p>We asked Adler’s co-axman, the always eloquent Mark Morton, to explain some of the rhythm playing differences between metal’s “old-school” and “nu-school.” Despite a brutal hangover, Morton not only stepped up to the plate but also came up with “the hangover riff” to illustrate his point.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding1.jpg" /></p> <p>“Here’s an example of what I would consider more of a late-Eighties, Bay Area–thrash take on the riff. And here’s a more contemporary style of doing the same riff,” Morton says as he performs FIGURE 1:1 then FIGURE 1:2. “As you can see, they’re the same pattern, the same note choices, but with a different and faster right-hand cadence, giving it a more modern, ‘deathy’ feel.”</p> <p>As you can see and hear, the “right hand cadences” Morton is referring to involve “gallop” and “reverse gallop” picking patterns plus double picking a lot of the notes.</p> <p>We asked all our guest teachers to name a few albums that they consider vital references to great metal rhythm work. In addition to Metallica’s seminal <em>Master of Puppets</em> and Pantera’s <em>Vulgar Display of Power</em>, Megadeth’s classic <em>Rust in Peace</em> topped the tally. Says Amott, “That album definitely set the bar pretty high for music like this. It’s full of ‘Hall of Fame’ riffs.” </p> <p>Glen Drover, Megadeth’s lead guitarist, has a pretty challenging role—not only does he have to perform leads by his virtuoso predecessors Chris Poland and Marty Friedman; he also has to double Mustaine’s vast repertoire of “Hall of Fame” riffs. “Some of the rhythm patterns are equally demanding to play as the solos,” says Drover. “Take a song like ‘Holy Wars’—it’s incredibly busy, and there’s so much stuff in there that you’ve really got to be on top of your game.”</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding2.jpg" /></p> <p>In addition to his ultraprecise picking and knack for writing riffs, Mustaine is the master of rhythmic nuance. “One thing I’ll often do with my rhythm playing is slide into a chord,” says Mustaine as he plays FIGURE 1:4. “That makes the chords really growl, like in ‘Ashes in My Mouth.” Another must-know Mustaine technique is his “spider finger” chord-grabbing technique, which he demonstrates in FIGURE 1:5 and PHOTOS A and B. “Alternating pairs of fingers like this is definitely easier than having to move your entire hand back and forth [see the “regular” fingering under the tablature]. If you have to move your hand, your timing is gonna be off and there will be string noise. Plus, you’ll be relying too much on guesswork.”</p> <p>Like all metal masters, Mustaine uses palm muting (p.m.) to great effect. Palm muting is the technique of rolling the fleshy part of your palm [PHOTO C] forward from the bridge to dampen the strings. But as Mustaine points out, there is another way to stop notes from ringing, and you can do it with your pick. “So many people think picking is just about moving the pick up and down,” he says. “But you’ve also got to think about how to kill the string’s vibration to give the line articulation. On a riff like the one from ‘Hanger 18,’ I’m not really palm-muting the D string with my right hand; I do it all with pick articulation.”</p> <p>Mustaine explains that this involves playing in a strict staccato fashion. “The note dies when the pick touches the string again,” he says. Furthermore, it requires using less of the guitar pick’s point. “When I’m really pedaling, the amount of pick sticking out from my fingers is minute [PHOTO D],” says Mustaine. “But when I’m doing percussive stuff, like ‘Train of Consequences,' I slide my fingers away from the tip of the pick [PHOTO E].”</p> <p>In conclusion, Mustaine offers this advice: “I think the secret to accurate picking is slowly speeding up. It’s really easy to play rhythm super fast, but with most guitarists, if you slow down their recordings you’ll see that they aren’t very accurate at all. Most of the time they’re terrible. If you want to be fast and accurate, learn your rhythm parts by playing them slow and then gradually bring them up to speed, concentrating the whole time on being accurate. There is no other way.”</p> <p><strong>CHAPTER II “No Pain, No Gain”: Warming Up</strong></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding3.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding4.jpg" /></p> <p>As Lamb of God’s Willie Adler has already stated, warming up for an hour or more is vital for “Sport Metal” participants. “We’ve got some riffs similar to this that are hard as shit,” he says while playing FIGURE 2:1. “So I have to warm up for an hour or more before every show, mainly by playing the riffs in our set that I find the most demanding. I work on my picking speed and stamina by doing simple, quick chugs with triplets [gallops] thrown in [FIGURES 2:2a and b], repeating them over and over and speeding them up as fast as I can. I’ll also do string jumping and wide-stretch riffs [PHOTO F and FIGURE 2:3].”</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding5.jpg" /></p> <p>Michael Amott has a similar and equally lengthy pre-gig warm up. Two Arch Enemy riffs he often uses in this ritual are from “I Am Legend” (FIGURE 2:5) and “Nemesis” (FIGURE 2:6). </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding6.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding6cont.jpg" /></p> <p>FIGURE 2:7 is a cool, off-kilter offering from Trivium’s Matt Heafy that uses all six strings, “gets all your fingers working and also gets a gallop pick going.”</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding7.jpg" /></p> <p>FIGURE 2:8 is from Heafy’s bandmate, Corey Beaulieu, and is a great F# minor example of “getting a picking pattern going and then throwing in a same-key, scale-type run to make it more interesting,” a ploy endorsed by Dragonforce.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding8.jpg" /></p> <p>This section closes with a riff offered by Fredrik Akesson of Arch Enemy. “This is a rhythm riff I came up with [FIGURE 2:9]. It’s got gallops in the first part and 16th notes and octaves in the second part. I also use my second finger to fret the bass notes on the bottom string [PHOTO K].”</p> <p><strong>CHAPTER 3 Lead Workout I: Speed Picking</strong></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding9.jpg" /></p> <p>There’s only one way to master this: “Practice…a lot of fucking practice,” says Megadeth’s Glen Drover. “It takes dedication and a sense that you’re never totally comfortable with your skill level. That’s absolutely a healthy attitude for growth as a guitarist.” Drover then proceeds to show us three simple “start out slowly and build up speed sensibly” alternate (down-up) picking exercises in E minor, FIGURE 3:4 a–c , that enable you to focus on your picking technique and “really get the blood pumping.” </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding10.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding10cont.jpg" /></p> <p>Once you’ve paid your dues practicing these essential chop builders, you’re ready for the big leagues and FIGURE 3:5, a blistering, exotic-sounding E minor based workout from Akesson that involves the “Hungarian scale [FIGURE 3:6] combined with some chromatic stuff and alternate picking all the way.” FIGURE 3:7 is a simpler but equally effective E minor, Hungarian-spiced lick.</p> <p><strong>CHAPTER 4 Lead Workout II: Sweep Picking Arpeggios</strong></p> <p>Sweep picking is probably the most famous shred technique out there. Yngwie Malmsteen is its undisputed master and the guy who put it on the metal map. But as he explains, most players don’t know or employ the necessary rules. </p> <p>“Most guitarists have a general idea of how to approximate the technique, but only a few do it correctly,” he says. “The rest of them let the notes ring too long or try to play too fast and sacrifice precision and clarity. Either way, it sounds like shit.” As he explains, the only way to correct these errors is to separate the right- and left-hand components of sweep picking, master them separately and then coordinate them with one another. Of course, it’s not easy. You’ll have to put in a lot of practice time to get it right. </p> <p>To get a feel for the right-hand picking technique, says Yngwie, “You have to let the pick ‘fall’ from string to string, as if you were strumming a chord. It’s important that you don’t separate the pick strokes. When executing an upward sweep, drag the pick upward over the strings in one fluid motion. Again, it’s imperative that you don’t use individual upstrokes.”</p> <p>The fret-hand component is equally important. “You need to mute each string with the fret-hand immediately after picking it by lightly lifting or ‘rolling’ your fretting finger to keep the notes from ‘bleeding’ into one another and sounding like a strummed chord.” </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding11.jpg" /></p> <p>Heeding Yngwie’s words, work on FIGURE 4:4, a three-string A minor arpeggio from Trivium’s Matt Heafy. Once you’ve mastered that, check out the more challenging five-string version he offers in FIGURE 4:5. As Heafy says, “It’s all a matter of starting them off really slow and working your way up.” When you have those under your belt, try FIGURE 4:10, Fredrik Akesson’s slippery Bm7f5 diminished arpeggio (B D F A) that continually goes back on itself and repeats.</p> <p><strong>CHAPTER 5 Lead Workout III: Legato Leads</strong></p> <p>“Legato” is a fancy Italian musical term for “smooth.” For shred guitarists, playing legato requires using numerous hammer-on and pull-off combinations to make lines sound as smooth as possible. Once again, there is no magic shortcut. Mastering this way of playing will take practice, and lots of it. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding12.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding13.jpg" /></p> <p>When pulling off, pull the string slightly in toward the palm. This will help keep the string vibrating and prevent the note from dying. When you’re ready, check out the molten-lava example from Glen Drover in the key of F# minor shown in FIGURE 5:5 and the demented, diminished-flavored FIGURE 5:7, a lick inspired by what Glen calls the “Randy Rhoads diminished run” (FIGURE 5:6) And don’t be afraid to break these phrases into “bite-size chunks” and chew them slowly. </p> <p><strong>CHAPTER 6 Lead Workout IV: Pentatonic Power</strong></p> <p>With sweep arpeggios, diminished licks and Hungarian scales being tossed about, let’s not forget the almighty minor pentatonic and blues scales. Sure, they’re simple and ubiquitous, but these five- and six-note scales are responsible for more great metal riffs and leads than all other scales combined. Sometimes, the best way to break up all the sweep-picking, legato and speed-picked madness is with a burst of pentatonic purity or ballsy blues. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding14.jpg" /></p> <p>Check out Michael Amott’s simple but effective E minor blues scale (E G A Bb B D) wide-stretch burst in FIGURE 6:5a. As he correctly points out, it’s merely an extension of the more common E minor pentatonic (E G A B D) cliché shown in the first half of FIGURE 6:5b, but it definitely makes a mark.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding15.jpg" /></p> <p>The undeniable impact of pentatonic and blues scales is illustrated perfectly in FIGURE 6:6, a brilliant blast from Dave Mustaine. Similar to a lead he plays in “Holy Wars,” this is a textbook example of “less is more.” As he points out, his wide-stretch, six-bar chromatic climb is made even more climactic by the fact that there’s an “almost subliminal overtone from the high E string because that string is also fretted while I’m fretting the G and B strings.”</p> <p><strong>CONCLUSION: The Journey Never Ends</strong></p> <p>For every serious guitarist, playing the guitar is a lifetime achievement. As Mark Morton wisely notes, “There’s no time spent playing guitar that’s wasted time."</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/art-shredding-megadeth-lamb-god-trivium-arch-enemy-and-more#comments Arch Enemy Dave Mustaine December 2010 GW Archive Lamb of God Megadeth Opeth Trivium Blogs News Features Lessons Magazine Mon, 17 Mar 2014 15:30:57 +0000 Nick Bowcott, Photo by Angela Boatwright http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17137 Megadeth Launch 2014 World Tour, Announce Dave Mustaine Performance with San Diego Symphony http://www.guitarworld.com/megadeth-launch-2014-world-tour-announce-dave-mustaine-performance-san-diego-symphony <!--paging_filter--><p>Megadeth are set to embark on a world tour in more than 25 countries across four continents starting in April. </p> <p>The tour follows a first-ever performance at Copley Symphony Hall on April 12, where guitarist Dave Mustaine will collaborate with the San Diego Symphony on "Symphony Interrupted."</p> <p>Beginning at 8 p.m., Mustaine and the Symphony will perform renditions of the "Summer" and "Winter" movements from Vivaldi's "The Four Seasons" and Bach's "Air" (on the G string). Richard Wagner’s "Ride of the Valkyries" and Antonin Dvorak's "New World Symphony" also will be performed by the symphony during the show. </p> <p>For more information, visit <a href="http://sandiegosymphony.org/">SanDiegoSymphony.org.</a></p> <p>"I love the challenge," Mustaine said in a press release. "I really admire this genre of music because of the level of skill required and there are great dark undertones in these incredible pieces. </p> <p>"The marriage of two such distinctly different genres is one thing, but cross-pollinating different societies is a whole new level of badass! I'm used to them being before me, but it's a bit unnerving to know so many talented eyes will be on my back. It's a bit intimidating, and to be given the opportunity to interpret these melodies — to meld what I am best at with what they incredibly present, it is a great honor."</p> <p><strong>2014 Megadeth Tour Dates</strong></p> <p>4/12 San Diego, CA – Copley Symphony Hall<br /> 4/17 Las Vegas, NV – Pearl Concert Theater<br /> 4/19 Tuscon, AZ – Pima County Fair<br /> 4/22 Quito, Ecuador – Agros Casa de Cultura<br /> 4/24 Montevideo, Uruguay – Teatro de Verano<br /> 4/26 Santiago, Chile – Movistar Arena<br /> 4/29 Córdoba, Argentina – Plaza de la Música<br /> 5/01 Buenos Aires, Argentina – Estadio Cubierto Malvinas<br /> 5/04 Sao Paulo, Brazil – Espaco Das Americas<br /> 5/06 Bogota, Colombia – Royal Center<br /> 6/06 Solvesborg, Sweden – Sweden Rock Festival<br /> 6/10 Paris, France – Le Palais Des Sports<br /> 6/11 Utrecht, Netherlands – TivoliVredenburg<br /> 6/13 Copenhagen, Denmark – Copenhell Festival<br /> 6/15 Nickelsdorf, Austria – Nova Rock<br /> 6/16 Budapest, Hungary – Aerodrome Festival<br /> 6/17 Prague, Czech Republic – Aerodrome Festival<br /> 6/22 Clisson, France – Hellfest<br /> 6/23 Luxembourg, Luxembourg – Rockhal<br /> 6/26 Rome, Italy – Rock In Roma @ Ippodromo Capannelle<br /> 6/27 Milan, Italy – City Sound @ Ippodromo Del Galoppo<br /> 6/28 Winterthur, Switzerland – Eishalle Deutweg<br /> 7/24 Tolmin, Slovenia – Metaldays Festival<br /> 7/26 Oulu, Finland – Qstock<br /> 8/01 Rejmyre, Sweden – Skogsrojet Festival<br /> 8/02 Wacken, Germany – Wacken Open Air Festival<br /> 8/04 Istanbul, Turkey – Rock Off Festival<br /> 8/09 Leeuwarden, Netherlands – Into The Grave<br /> 8/10 Derbyshire, England – Catton Park </p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dave-mustaine">Dave Mustaine</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/megadeth-launch-2014-world-tour-announce-dave-mustaine-performance-san-diego-symphony#comments Dave Mustaine Megadeth News Wed, 05 Mar 2014 17:15:49 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20650 NAMM 2014 Video: Dean Guitars Interviews Megadeth's Dave Mustaine http://www.guitarworld.com/namm-2014-video-dean-guitars-interviews-megadeths-dave-mustaine <!--paging_filter--><p>We're not gonna lie: The Dean scene at NAMM is always pretty damn cool. </p> <p>All the latest guitars and basses are there (Hopefully you caught GW's Twitter coverage of NAMM; if not, we'll have our photo galleries and videos posted very soon), and a heaping helping of Dean Guitars endorsees can be spotted in the general area.</p> <p>Along those lines, here's a brand-new video — posted today — featuring Megadeth's Dave Mustaine, a Dean artist. In the clip, he's interviewed by Metal Sanaz at the Dean booth. At the NAMM Show, Dean Guitars unveiled its limited-edition Dave Mustaine VMNT Limited series of guitars. </p> <p>You can check out some of the details of the new axes <a href="http://www.deanguitars.com/davemustaine_seriesVMNT.php#vmntltd">right here.</a></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/namm-2014">[[ <em>Guitar World</em> at NAMM 2014: Gear updates, photo galleries, videos and more! ]]</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/t15akvl4FV8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dave-mustaine">Dave Mustaine</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/namm-2014-video-dean-guitars-interviews-megadeths-dave-mustaine#comments Dave Mustaine Megadeth NAMM 2014 Videos News Mon, 27 Jan 2014 16:24:31 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20290 The Record that Changed My Life: Dave Mustaine Discusses AC/DC's 'Let There Be Rock' http://www.guitarworld.com/album-changed-my-life-dave-mustaine-discusses-acdcs-let-there-be-rock <!--paging_filter--><p><em>FROM THE ARCHIVE: Megadeth mainman Dave Mustaine chooses (and discusses) the record that changed his life.</em></p> <p><strong>AC/DC</strong><br /> <em>Let There Be Rock</em> (1977)</p> <p>I was 16 or 17 when I got this album. I remember taking it home, putting it on my cheap turntable and dropping the needle down on the vinyl. The first couple of notes of "Overdose" just blew my mind. </p> <p>The sound of the guitar was so untamed, and it lit a fire inside me to approach the guitar like a weapon. The lore behind <em>Let There Be Rock</em> is that Angus and Malcolm Young would face a Marshall against the wall and crank the sucker all the way up. You can tell the amp was turned up unbelievably loud: you can practically feel Angus' fingerprints rubbing against the strings.</p> <p>[Singer] Bon Scott instantly became a hero of mine, too, because of the words he was using. I was a teenager and here was this guy singing about blowjobs, overdosing and dating fat chicks! I'm thinking to myself, Well, I haven't had the misfortune of dating fat women yet, but I sure do relate to the rest of it. Bon was singing my song!</p> <p>The more I got into AC/DC, the more I started to develop as a musician. When I was a really young kind and learning music, I was very influenced by the British Invasion: the Beatles, the Who and the Stones. But when it came to developing my own guitar playing style, it was all about the New Wave of British Heavy Metal. </p> <p>Some people will argue whether or not AC/DC were a part of this new wave, but I do know there was a void between the British Invasion and the New Wave of British Heavy Metal, and that AC/DC fell into it. When I think of how my style evolved, it was certainly influenced by bands like AC/DC, Diamond Head and Iron Maiden. If you listen to my style — even though it's sloppier — it contains essences of Jimmy Page, Michael Schenker and Angus Young. </p> <p>But while Angus was always a hero of mine, I identified more with Malcolm. Rhythm is really important in rock and metal, and taking a percussive approach to the guitar is an art that's vital to the sound of that music. That's what Malcolm brings, and that's why AC/DC is his band.</p> <p>To this day, I listen to <em>Let There Be Rock</em> and it motivates me. That album marked the defining moment in my life when I made my mind up that I was gonna do this, no matter what.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/D8CTHAiomNo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dave-mustaine">Dave Mustaine</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/acdc">AC/DC</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/album-changed-my-life-dave-mustaine-discusses-acdcs-let-there-be-rock#comments ACDC Articles Dave Mustaine GW Archive Megadeth The Record that Changed My Life Interviews News Features Tue, 14 Jan 2014 16:47:47 +0000 Dave Mustaine http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19087 Atomic Punks: Dave Mustaine and Chris Broderick Reminisce About Megadeth’s History and Talk 'Super Collider' http://www.guitarworld.com/atomic-punks-dave-mustaine-and-chris-broderick-reminisce-about-megadeth-s-history-and-talk-super-collider <!--paging_filter--><p>If you count yourself among those music fans that never thought a band as volatile as Megadeth would still be around to celebrate turning 30, you’ll find yourself in good company. Dave Mustaine didn’t imagine they’d make it either, back when they formed, in 1983.</p> <p>“To be totally frank, I didn’t even think I’d live this long, let alone have a career this long,” the singer and guitarist admits. “I remember Junior [bassist Dave “Junior” Ellefson] and I had this crazy pact back then that if the band didn’t make it, we’d go out in a blaze of glory together. It was childish at the time, but it’s weird when you look back and think, 30 years, man! Wow! Did we really do all that?”</p> <p>In fact, Megadeth did do all that, from helping to spawn thrash metal to creating landmark genre albums like <em>Peace Sells… But Who’s Buying?</em> and <em>Rust in Peace</em> to joining their fellow founding fathers on the triumphant Big 4 festival jaunt a couple of years back. They’ve also continued to churn out top-notch new material, and at a healthy clip, too. The band’s newest, 14th studio album is <em>Super Collider</em>, their first release on Mustaine’s own label, Tradecraft, which is distributed by Universal. </p> <p>It’s another strong addition to Megadeth’s catalog and might also be their most diverse. Some of its songs, like “King Maker” and “Built for War,” are the type of knotty speed-metal workouts at which the band has long excelled. But the new album also veers into more melodic territory on tracks like “Forget to Remember” and even flirts with country-inflected rock on “Blackest Crow,” which features banjo-style licks from lead guitarist Chris Broderick and, for the first time on a Megadeth record, slide guitar playing from Mustaine. </p> <p>Then there are the album’s two standout tracks. One is the multipart “Dance in the Rain,” which begins in the midtempo style the band has explored in more recent years, and then moves into a pummeling second half that recalls the ferociously caustic Megadeth of <em>Killing Is My Business… and Business is Good!</em> </p> <p>The other is “Super Collider,” which is perhaps the most bright-hued song in the Megadeth canon, with an uncharacteristically optimistic lyric and a chorus built on open, ringing major chords. “It’s one of those songs that makes people happy, like ‘A Tout Le Monde,’ ” Mustaine says, referencing the 1994 <em>Youthanasia</em> track. </p> <p>“You’ve gotta have some songs like that that everybody can come together on.” But, he’s quick to stress, not too many. “I’d be lying,” he admits with a slight laugh, “if I said I would dig having a whole set of songs like that.”</p> <p>Fresh off recording <em>Super Collider</em>, and with additional mixing and mastering still to be done, Mustaine and Broderick sat down with <em>Guitar World</em> to discuss the new album, their gear and how they work together as musicians and bandmates. Mustaine, now 51, also took time to reflect back on 30 years of metal madness with Megadeth. Regrets? He’s had a few …</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: <em>Super Collider</em> is a fairly diverse record. The title track, in particular, signals a new sound for the band. How did that one come together?</strong></p> <p><strong>DAVE MUSTAINE</strong> That song kind of came from that “Symphony of Destruction” corner of my mind. You can’t always play aggressive, thrashy stuff. Sometimes those aren’t even songs; they’re like musical rams. But because I’m not a pop guy, I’m also not really comfortable playing sing-along songs. To me, “Super Collider” made sense like a normal song—a verse-chorus-verse-chorus kind of thing. It’s written the way a real songwriter would write the song, instead of just taking all these musical twists and turns. </p> <p><strong>CHRIS BRODERICK</strong> Typically, Megadeth is a guitar-driven band, and we’re super fast and tight. But it was obvious from the get-go that this song was going to be a variation of that. It’s not like I probed into Dave’s mind when he wrote it, but I really get the distinct impression that the song is based on the huge influence AC/DC had on him. I think he wanted just a big, open thing that sounded colossal. So to a large extent with that one, we wanted to keep it not so busy. I definitely had to put the reigns on some of the soloing. </p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> The funny thing is, when we started working on this record, I didn’t have any songs at all. I was just digging through demos I had made over time. And “Super Collider” was one that was just sort of hanging around.</p> <p><strong>From how long ago?</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> It was kind of old. Parts of it were very old. I think I had just done the MD.45 record [in 1996]. The majority of it—that kind of “Baba O’Riley,” “Highway to Hell” kind of thing—is from that era. </p> <p><strong>It’s an upbeat song musically as well as lyrically.</strong> </p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> I tried to do that. It’s kind of like a “come with me on this ride” sort of thing, which could have all these spiritual connotations to some people. And a lot of that comes from the fact that I’ve been through so much stuff. Even more recently, from when all the reconciliation and everything started. That stuff was hard, too. The hardest part is sticking your toe in the water. But you have to do it. If you’re not willing to reconcile, you’d better be digging two graves—because you wanna kill that person, and the jealousy and hatred is gonna get you too.</p> <p><strong>Are you talking about musical or personal relationships here?</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> I’m talking about everything with Junior and having him come back; I’m talking about becoming friends with the guys in Metallica and Slayer again…this whole process for me that really started after Darrell Abbott [Pantera’s Dimebag Darrell] was shot. That changed a really big part of me. It made me realize, Wait a minute, man, these are my brothers. The competitive thing that goes on…anybody who says they don’t compete is just bullshitting you. We all want to be the best. That’s why we do this. We want to be as good as our heroes. And at some point, the bravado clicks in and you realize you’ve become really good and the only thing that’s keeping you from going further is you. And why wouldn’t you want to keep getting better?</p> <p><strong>Speaking of getting better, you’ve stated publicly that you feel Chris is the best guitarist you’ve ever played with. </strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> He’s such an enigma. What Chris is capable of doing and what he does are two totally different things. He could do a mind-blowing, over-the-fretboard seven-string solo for six minutes. But he can also play something incredibly melodic. You need to be able to play what fits the song. And that’s the cool thing about the journey we’ve been on together: we’ve learned a lot about each other as people and learned a lot from each other as players. And when it comes to solos, especially for a band like this, you gotta think about it. You gotta really think about where you’re going. You can’t just do scales and sweeps. That said, the guy can do 800 notes in four bars if he wants to. </p> <p><strong>Chris, how does it feel to hear Dave say things like that?</strong></p> <p><strong>BRODERICK</strong> It’s always very humbling, because he’s worked with a lot of incredible guitarists. Every past player in Megadeth has brought something great to the table, and I think I’m lucky to be counted among them. But as far as how I work with Dave, in a way he makes it easy. The type of personality I am, I like to have a direction and a path and to know what I’m doing. And Dave has such a clear idea of what he wants that I don’t have to deal with a lot of decisions. I just pick up my guitar, put it on and play the songs.</p> <p><strong>Dave, is there any spot on the record where you feel Chris really shines?</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> There’s one thing that totally made me do a double take. It’s in “King Maker.” It’s one of the little fills—a quick thing that ends with a dive bomb and then passes off to a solo of mine. And it’s just a fucking great lead. I was in the other room and I heard it, and I went, “Oh, my god. That’s the greatest thing I’ve heard you do in a long time.” Chris knows how to use his tremolo bar subtly. There are guys that excel at that—Adrian Belew, Allan Holdsworth—but not a lot of people in our world can really use the bar in a subtle way.</p> <p><strong>Chris, how did that part come about?</strong></p> <p><strong>BRODERICK</strong> It’s really just like a 10-to-15-second thing. But I think what actually worked about that solo was that the musical intent matched the song so well. Some of the tonalities I tried to put in there were a little more off base than what someone would typically use over an E minor progression. And, actually, “King Maker” is one of my favorite tracks overall. I’m proud of some of the solo work in it, but I also love the rhythm part. It’s really driving, but it also has this laid-back triplet feel. That’s really unique to me. It’s very “Mustaine.”</p> <p><strong>Another moment of departure on the record is the song “Blackest Crow.”</strong></p> <p><strong>BRODERICK</strong> The part at the beginning is me playing a “ganjo,” which is basically a guitar with a banjo body, and it’s strung up like a guitar. And it’s funny: if we had had a banjo in the studio, I probably would have just strung it up like a guitar anyway, to make it conducive to what I know. I think when you start working with a song, it’s almost like the song begins to develop itself. And “Blackest Crow” has an old country sound to it, so it called for that tonality. Then you just look for instrumentation to fit that tonality. </p> <p><strong>Dave is that you playing the slide parts?</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> It is. I used my Dean VMNT, but it was on my lap. </p> <p><strong>Like a lap steel?</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> Yes, sort of like what David Lindley does. </p> <p><strong>Lindley is a great slide player. Were you thinking of guys like that when you composed your lines?</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> Not really. When I think of slide guitar, I think of guys like Dave Peverett from Foghat and Joe Walsh. Or Ronnie Montrose on “Bad Motor Scooter.” Learning that song was the first time I ever tried doing a slide thing. Before this record, I hadn’t used a slide in years. A lot of years—since I was in Panic [Mustaine’s first band before he joined Metallica in 1982]. I remember we played at this biker party out in the middle of a national forest, and everything went terribly wrong. That was the last time I tried it.</p> <p><strong>What gear did each of you use on the album?</strong></p> <p><strong>BRODERICK</strong> I used my Signature Series Jacksons, which were great for not only for your typical metal moments but also for some of the mellower stuff, where I was able to get them to sound very Fender Strat-ish. My main amp was an EVH 5150 III. It has a nice grind to it, and it sits in the pocket so well. It never gets buried, but it doesn’t sound overly harsh either. Effects were pretty much all added in the box, though live I’m a total Fractal geek. I use the Fractal Axe-Fx II with a Matrix power amp. I love Fractal stuff. To me, it’s all you need. </p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> I played my VMNTs—a Silverburst one on the rhythms and a Korina on the leads. Both have my signature Seymour Duncan Live Wires. For amps, I used a Marshall JVM 410 and a white Randy Rhoads head [the Marshall 1959RR]. I played through that one wide open for the slide solo in “Blackest Crow.” My effects were pretty minimal, just my signature Zoom [the G2.1DM], an MXR Phase 90 and a Cry Baby wah.</p> <p><strong>As much as the band explores new territory on <em>Super Collider</em>, there are also some vintage Megadeth moments. Dave Ellefson has said that parts of the new record reminded him of <em>Killing Is My Business… and Business Is Good</em>!, and you can certainly hear that on something like the second half of “Dance in the Rain.” </strong></p> <p><strong>BRODERICK</strong> Definitely. When I hear a rhythm like the one at the end of “Dance in the Rain,” I start thinking about songs like “Rattlehead” [from <em>Killing Is My Business…</em>] and all of that older stuff that has so much angst to it. I definitely draw from that. I think there’s a direct line to those parts. They have that same mood. That same aggression.</p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> But you know, when I’m writing stuff, I don’t think, This sounds like it’s from this era. I don’t have the ability to think like that. I wish I could. God, I’d go back to <em>Rust in Peace</em> and write another one! Because I was listening to it the other day and I thought, Man, what the fuck was I thinking when I wrote that? Because I know my limitations and shit, and I listen to the title track and I think, That was a lucky day!</p> <p><strong>Along those lines, you’ve been doing some of the old albums onstage for a few years now, first with the <em>Rust in Peace</em> 20th anniversary tour and more recently for a similar celebration for <em>Countdown to Extinction.</em></strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> It’s like a big giant circle. We were actually mixing the <em>Countdown</em> live DVD at the same time we were doing <em>Super Collider</em>. And the interesting thing is, I was listening to those songs and thinking they’re just as relevant today. Take “Psychotron,” and think about all the stuff that’s going on now with drones [unmanned combat vehicles]. So I don’t feel that there’s such a big stretch between then and now with this band. The only time I experience the passage of time is when I try to sing some of those songs. My voice doesn’t go that high anymore!</p> <p><strong>Chris, did the process of learning Megadeth’s back catalog for those anniversary tours inform how you approach the new material?</strong></p> <p><strong>BRODERICK</strong> I think so. Everything that I’ve learned from the past repertoire gives me more insight into the sound, the mood and how to phrase my parts within Megadeth. I think once a band is in the public eye, it’s almost like the music becomes the property of the public. And in some ways, you don’t want to stray too much from that sound. So every chance I get to listen to an old song that I haven’t played yet, or to work on something like the full-album tours, is an opportunity to understand more about this band.</p> <p><strong>In preparing for the Rust in Peace and Countdown tours, was there anything that you found particularly difficult to play?</strong></p> <p><strong>BRODERICK</strong> Some of the material on Rust was a little more technically demanding, but the vibe of some of the stuff on Countdown was sometimes more of a challenge. The clean solo on “High Speed Dirt,” for example, has a really interesting feel to it. And matching that feel took a little bit of work. </p> <p><strong>Most people would automatically assume that Rust in Peace would prove the more challenging of the two.</strong></p> <p><strong>BRODERICK</strong> Well, definitely I would say Rust is a more technical record. But there’s just something about the feel and the way Marty phrased those solos on Countdown. It’s a little different.</p> <p><strong>Speaking of the Nineties-era Megadeth, this is the first time since the <em>Cryptic Writings</em> album in 1997 that the same lineup has appeared on two consecutive records.</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> Wise guy! [laughs] Really, though, it’s cool the way Dave, Chris and [drummer] Shawn [Drover] have assimilated into the group. It’s all working now. One of the things I love about playing with Chris is watching him go from being in that category of mind-blowing guitar players to developing into a songwriter as well. And with Shawn, it’s watching him learn to do things like play with brushes on “Blackest Crow” and doing things on the drums that he’s never done before. </p> <p>I remember when Junior was gone, it was just kind of weird. It never really bothered me when we were swapping out drummers and guitar players, but something just felt out of balance without him there. You know, sometimes I think, Man, the times that we were with [former bassists] James MacDonough and James LoMenzo, it was like the lost years, like with Maiden when they had that Blaze [Bayley] guy or Priest when they had Ripper [Owens]. There was something that was just a little off. </p> <p><strong>Considering what’s gone on in the band over the years, is there anything that you regret?</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> I do regret some stuff. I regret a lot of the pain that I caused people. I very much regret that. I regret a lot of the good times I missed out on because of the various feuds that we all had. I regret that Gar [Samuelson, Megadeth drummer from 1984 to 1987] died and I didn’t get to say goodbye to him. He was a friend of mine. Sadly, we met in addiction, and our relationship was destined to last as long as it did. And it ended the way it did. But I always felt it ended wrong. </p> <p><strong>His work on those first two records [<em>Killing Is My Business…</em> and <em>Peace Sells…</em>] was phenomenal. </strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> He had a really cool style. And I think it helped Megadeth sink its teeth into this big old elephant and just hang on. We had that really aggressive, peculiar jazz element to us because of him. He really understood music. Of course, playing live with that lineup, with Gar, Junior and [guitarist] Chris [Poland], was a crapshoot. [laughs] Because we were all really heavily under the influence, and it always depended on everyone’s blood-alcohol level or drug count at the moment.<br /> I remember one time we played in McAllen, Texas, and one of the guys had gone down to Mexico and gotten some Mandrakes [Quaaludes], which were illegal in the States. </p> <p>I had just gotten done telling Gar that we bought a bomb to light off at the show. And of course, being broke and on the road, he only had one set of sticks left. When the bomb went off, he freaked out and threw his drumsticks and the music stopped. It was as if you could hear his sticks hit the ground. That was the same show that Poland fell through the stage. He jumped back up and his arm was gushing blood, and he smiled at me. And you know, as much as I had my issues with the man, he’s got this smile that’s like a Dennis the Menace kind of thing; you can never stay mad at him. I think that’s probably why we had so much fun. But we also got in a lot of trouble.</p> <p><strong>It’s now been 30 years since you formed Megadeth. Given everything you’ve gone through to get to <em>Super Collider</em>, are you where you thought you’d be in your career?</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> Really, I’m just so grateful that I’m still working and I still have fans. Because it’s a dog-eat-dog business, and it isn’t easy to survive. But I think the cool thing about people is that when you do something wrong and you apologize for it, they’re really forgiving. I’ve done some things wrong, but I’ve also done some things right. And we’ve managed to get through it. I’ve managed to get through it. [laughs] I don’t know, maybe it’s the redhead in me. </p> <p><em>Photo: Travis Shinn</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dave-mustaine">Dave Mustaine</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/chris-broderick">Chris Broderick</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/atomic-punks-dave-mustaine-and-chris-broderick-reminisce-about-megadeth-s-history-and-talk-super-collider#comments Chris Broderick Dave Mustaine Excerpt June 2013 Megadeth Travis Shinn Galleries Interviews News Features Magazine Fri, 13 Sep 2013 14:42:19 +0000 Richard Bienstock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18225 Dave Mustaine's Daughter Covers Megadeth's "A Tout le Monde" on TV http://www.guitarworld.com/dave-mustaines-daughter-covers-megadeths-tout-le-monde-tv <!--paging_filter--><p>Electra Mustaine, daughter of Megadeth mainman Dave Mustaine, recently appeared on a TV show to perform one of her father's tunes, "A Tout le Monde" off 1994's <em>Youthanasia</em>. </p> <p>The story, which can be found on the <a href="http://www.king5.com/new-day-northwest/Jason-Kertson-and-Electra-Mustaine-perform-220357051.html" target="_blank">King 5 website</a>, describes the performance:</p> <p>"Electra and Jason have teamed up for a special concert to benefit <a href="http://www.operationward57.org/" target="_blank">Operation Ward 57</a>, a nonprofit organization that helps wounded service members and their families. Electra and Jason performed their version of the Megadeth song, 'A Tout le Monde,"' then joined Margaret to talk about their families' respective musical legacies and why it's important for them to respect and support the military. Brittney Hamilton, founder of Operation Ward 57, shared more about the work the group does and praised Electra, Jason and other young people who take such an active role to salute and support the military."</p> <p>Watch the performance below and let us know what you think in the comments.</p> <script type="text/javascript" src="http://www.king5.com/templates/belo_embedWrapper.js?storyid=220357051&amp;pos=top&amp;swfw=$swfw"></script><object id="_fp_0.3661442678421736" width="620" height="360" classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0"><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="wmode" value="transparent" /><param name="quality" value="high" /><param name="flashvars" value="config=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.king5.com%2F%3Fj%3Dembed_220357051%26ref%3Dhttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.king5.com%2Fnew-day-northwest%2FJason-Kertson-and-Electra-Mustaine-perform-220357051.html" /><param name="src" value="http://player.bimvid.com/swfs/main" /><embed id="_fp_0.3661442678421736" width="620" height="360" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http://player.bimvid.com/swfs/main" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" wmode="transparent" quality="high" flashvars="config=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.king5.com%2F%3Fj%3Dembed_220357051%26ref%3Dhttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.king5.com%2Fnew-day-northwest%2FJason-Kertson-and-Electra-Mustaine-perform-220357051.html" /></embed></object><script type="text/javascript" src="http://www.king5.com/templates/belo_embedWrapper.js?storyid=220357051&amp;pos=bottom&amp;ref=$bimPlayerPageUrl"></script><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dave-mustaine">Dave Mustaine</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/dave-mustaines-daughter-covers-megadeths-tout-le-monde-tv#comments Dave Mustaine Megadeth News Wed, 21 Aug 2013 16:34:41 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19064 Video: Megadeth and Jason Newsted Perform Metallica's "Phantom Lord" http://www.guitarworld.com/video-megadeth-and-jason-newsted-perform-metallicas-phantom-lord <!--paging_filter--><p>Two former members of Metallica were part of this year's Gigantour 2013 — Megadeth‘s Dave Mustaine and Newsted's Jason Newsted.</p> <p>As a result, fans of both musicians were hoping the guys would — at some point — take the stage together to run through one or two Metallica tunes.</p> <p>It finally happened August 11 in Toronto, when Newsted joined Mustaine and the rest of Megadeth to perform Metallica's "Phantom Lord." You can check out a fan-filmed video of the performance below (fan-filmed, as in, we apologize for the quality).</p> <p>Not long before the live collaboration, it looked like it might not even happen at all. </p> <p>"We’ve traded lyric sheets,” Newsted told <a href="http://www.breadpro.com/oven?id=44474190&amp;targetUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.teamrockradio.com%2Fnews%2Ftime-running-out-for-mustaine-newsted-jam">Team Rock Radio</a>. “We’ve traded down-tuned versions of ‘Phantom Lord’ and ‘Metal Militia’ to try to figure out what song we’re gonna play. But it has never come to fruition, and we only have a few shows left. So I’m not sure if it actually ever is.”</p> <p>Although Gigantour wrapped up over the weekend, Megadeth will appear with Iron Maiden September 3 in Raleigh, North Carolina.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zArl0PZFW8w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dave-mustaine">Dave Mustaine</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-megadeth-and-jason-newsted-perform-metallicas-phantom-lord#comments Dave Mustaine Gigantour Jason Newsted Megadeth Metallica News Wed, 14 Aug 2013 15:22:10 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19020 Cleartone Introduces Dave Mustaine Signature “Monster" Guitar Strings http://www.guitarworld.com/cleartone-introduces-dave-mustaine-signature-monster-guitar-strings <!--paging_filter--><p>California-based Cleartone has announced it will release Dave Mustaine Signature “Monster" guitar strings, a set of strings that pays tribute to the Megadeth frontman. The strings come as a .010-to-.052-gauge set.</p> <p>"The first time I played Cleartone strings, I noticed a ton more volume," Mustaine said. "They were bright, felt solid and durable, but really loud. I really feel Cleartone strings are amazing. They are the best-sounding strings out there, which is why I use them exclusively on all my guitars." </p> <p>From a Cleartone press release:</p> <p>All Cleartone strings, including the heavy metal-centric Monster series, employ VolumeBOOST. According to an independent sound lab, VolumeBOOST gives Cleartone strings up to 36 percent more loudness compared to uncoated strings.</p> <p>In addition to VolumeBOOST, all Cleartone strings also include ToneLOCK technology. With ToneLOCK, Mustaine's strings last three to five times longer than other non-coated strings. Because the coating is less than one micron thin, Cleartone Monster strings don’t shred or peel or suffer from the “feel” issues associated with other coated strings. </p> <p>“I didn't even know they were treated until I realized how long they were on the guitar," Mustaine added. "They last much longer than other strings I’ve used.” And unlike other coated strings, the Cleartone treatment is applied to all six strings, including the unwound ones.</p> <p>Mustaine used Cleartone Monster strings exclusively on Megadeth’s newest album, <em>Super Collider</em>. He’s using them throughout the Gigantour heavy metal music fest, which Megadeth headlines. It also features Black Label Society and Death Division. </p> <p>The Cleartone Monster Mustaine .010-to-.052 set will have a US MSRP of $19 and a US street price of around $12.99 per set.</p> <p>Cleartone Monster strings are owned by Phil Everly of the Everly Brothers, and the company is run by his son, Jason Everly. Cleartone manufactures strings in its Burbank, California, production facility. In addition to Cleartone and Monster, Everly owns the B-52s brand of un-coated alloy-52 strings, Red copper-bronze acoustic guitar strings and Sevilla classical guitar strings.</p> <p>For more about Cleartone, visit <a href="http://www.cleartonestrings.com/">cleartonestrings.com</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/78IfXd7YNIQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dave-mustaine">Dave Mustaine</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/cleartone-introduces-dave-mustaine-signature-monster-guitar-strings#comments Cleartone Dave Mustaine Megadeth Accessories News Gear Thu, 08 Aug 2013 01:37:52 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18977 Review: Dean Dave Mustaine Zero Angel of Deth II http://www.guitarworld.com/review-dean-dave-mustaine-zero-angel-deth-ii <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the July 2012 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-july-12-slash/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=loudproud">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>In the following video, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Paul Riario looks at the Dean Dave Mustaine Zero Angel of Deth II, the latest signature model from Megadeth's iconic guitarist.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1644814586001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1644814586001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dave-mustaine">Dave Mustaine</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-dean-dave-mustaine-zero-angel-deth-ii#comments Dave Mustaine Dean Dean Guitars July 2012 Megadeth 2012 Electric Guitars News Gear Magazine Fri, 07 Jun 2013 14:33:17 +0000 Paul Riario http://www.guitarworld.com/article/15833 Video: Megadeth's Dave Mustaine Discusses Gigantour 2013 Artist Lineup http://www.guitarworld.com/video-megadeths-dave-mustaine-discusses-gigantour-2013-artist-lineup <!--paging_filter--><p>In this Revolver TV video, Megadeth's Dave Mustaine discusses the entire band lineup for Gigantour 2013, which kicks off July 3 in New Hampshire and ends August 11 in Toronto. </p> <p>Besides Megadeth (the current <em>Guitar World</em> cover stars), the tour features Zakk Wylde's Black Label Society, Device, Hellyeah, Newsted and Death Division.</p> <p>For more about the tour, including all the dates and info on tickets and VIP packages, visit <a href="http://www.gigantour.com/tour">gigantour.com.</a> </p> <p>For our recent interview with Jason Newsted, whose band is part of Gigantour 2013, <a href="http://www.st-origin.guitarworld.com/interview-jason-newsted-talks-new-ep-metal-and-reconnecting-metallica">head here.</a> For an excerpt of our current Megadeth cover story, <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/atomic-punks-dave-mustaine-and-chris-broderick-reminisce-about-megadeth-s-history-and-talk-super-collider">step right this way.</a></p> <p>Enjoy the video!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/bLWJN7HLNzk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dave-mustaine">Dave Mustaine</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-megadeths-dave-mustaine-discusses-gigantour-2013-artist-lineup#comments Dave Mustaine Gigantour Megadeth News Tue, 07 May 2013 11:17:31 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18312 Video: Megadeth Post Behind-the-Scenes 'Super Collider' Studio Clip http://www.guitarworld.com/video-megadeth-post-behind-scenes-super-collider-studio-clip <!--paging_filter--><p>Over the weekend, Megadeth posted another behind-the-scenes clip from their <em>Super Collider</em> recording sessions.</p> <p>The video below, which was filmed in February, features David Ellefson (clad in an attractive <em>Guitar World</em> logo T-shirt), Dave Mustaine and Chris Broderick recording tracks at Vic's Garage studio in San Marcos, California, which is in northern San Diego County. For those of you keeping count, this is <em>Super Collider</em> studio update No. 11.</p> <p><em>Super Collider</em> will be released in June on Mustaine's new label, Tradecraft.</p> <p>Stay tuned for more <em>Super Collider</em> updates!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/XM4Eoi7BFok" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-megadeth-post-behind-scenes-super-collider-studio-clip#comments Chris Broderick Dave Mustaine David Ellefson Megadeth Videos News Mon, 25 Mar 2013 14:28:04 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18067 Megadeth to Release New Studio Album, ‘Super Collider,’ in June http://www.guitarworld.com/megadeth-release-new-studio-album-super-collider-june <!--paging_filter--><p>Megadeth have unveiled the title of their next studio album, which will hit stores in June.</p> <p>The album, the band's 14th, will be called <em>Super Collider</em> and will be released through Dave Mustaine's own label, Tradecraft, which is distributed by Universal.</p> <p>“It was a real thrill for us to learn there was an opportunity to join Universal,” Mustaine said in a press release. “It seems like every time you see a great band or music video, it comes from a Universal label … Being with Universal is by far the most exciting and prestigious home for Megadeth ever! We are electrified with what the future holds and the possibilities such a powerhouse like Universal will bring for us all.</p> <p>“We have worked with some great people over the years, and it is amazing to see so many of them on the Universal team for our new record, <em>Super Collider.</em> If Megadeth being here isn’t satiating enough, having Tradecraft as my own label is going to be really amazing for metal bands around the world.”</p> <p>Mustaine adds that the split with Roadrunner, which released the last three Megadeth albums, was amicable. </p> <p>“We completed our contract with [Roadrunner], which not a lot of many metal bands have the luxury to have been able to complete contracts. They usually either break up or quit or give up and stuff like that, but we were honorable and finished our contract with them and we moved on. And we’ve actually got a fantastic relationship with a brand new label. We have eleven songs already recorded. We wanna give them thirteen, ’cause, you know, the B-sides and Japanese releases and all that kind of crazy stuff.”</p> <p>We'll keep you posted with more <em>Super Collider</em> details as they become available. In the meantime, check out this studio update video recently released by the band.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/btvufovT5G4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dave-mustaine">Dave Mustaine</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/megadeth-release-new-studio-album-super-collider-june#comments Dave Mustaine Megadeth News Tue, 12 Feb 2013 15:44:34 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17773 NAMM 2013 Video: Dean Guitars Dave Mustaine Series http://www.guitarworld.com/namm-2013-video-dean-guitars-dave-mustaine-series <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's a <em>Guitar World</em> video from the 2013 Winter NAMM Show, which took place January 24 to 27 in Anaheim, California.</p> <p>During the gear-filled weekend, we paid a visit to the gang at the Dean Guitars booth to check out the company's Dave Mustaine series of electric guitars. For more about the Mustaine models, head to <a href="http://www.deanguitars.com/home.php">deanguitars.com.</a></p> <p>Thanks for following along with our continuous NAMM 2013 coverage on Twitter during the NAMM Show! Even though the NAMM Show is over, be sure to follow <em>Guitar World</em> on <a href="https://twitter.com/GuitarWorld">Twitter right here.</a></p> <p>For more GuitarWorld.com NAMM 2013 gear news, <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/namm-2013">visit and bookmark our dedicated NAMM 2013 page here.</a></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/namm-2013">[[ <em>Guitar World</em> at NAMM 2013: Gear updates, photo galleries, videos and more! ]]</a></strong></p> <p><em>Photo: Damian Fanelli</em></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/vljxZc3CPhE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dave-mustaine">Dave Mustaine</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/namm-2013-video-dean-guitars-dave-mustaine-series#comments Dave Mustaine Dean Dean Guitars Megadeth NAMM 2013 Electric Guitars News Gear Fri, 01 Feb 2013 13:00:00 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17712 Interview: Megadeth Guitarist Dave Mustaine on 2009's 'Endgame' http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-megadeth-guitarist-dave-mustaine-2009s-endgame <!--paging_filter--><p>"You know,” says Dave Mustaine, “the other day I was trying to explain to a friend the story of King Midas, and how terribly lonely that must have been for him to have everything he touched turn to gold. </p> <p>"After a while that’s gotta suck, don’t you think? Especially if you touched your loved one…” The Megadeth singer and guitarist lets out a big laugh. “Although given some of the people I’ve had in my life, I’d probably be better off.”</p> <p>While it’s safe to say Mustaine’s career hasn’t been exactly 100 percent golden — he’s experienced his fair share of lineup changes, lawsuits, personality clashes, drug addictions, less-than-stellar records, career-ending injuries, breakups and reunions, for starters—he has been blessed with something of a Midas touch. </p> <p>In the more than 25 years he’s fronted Megadeth, Mustaine has crafted a body of work practically unparalleled in the world of heavy music. Several of his group’s early albums — 1986’s <em>Peace Sells…But Who’s Buying?</em>, 1990’s <em>Rust in Peace</em> and 1992’s blockbuster <em>Countdown to Extinction</em> — continue to have a great influence on metal bands. </p> <p>Which is not to say that Mustaine’s best moments are behind him. By his own estimation, they’re staring him square in the face. The Megadeth leader recently put the finishing touches on <em>Endgame</em>, his band’s 12th studio album and, in his opinion, one of the strongest of his career. </p> <p>“I don’t know that I could make a better record than this one,” Mustaine says proudly. “I know I have another record in me, and probably a few more good songs. But this one’ll be hard to top.” </p> <p>He’s also energized about the current Megadeth lineup: <em>Endgame</em> was recorded with drummer Shawn Drover and bassist James LoMenzo, both of whom played on 2007’s <em>United Abominations</em>, and new guitarist Chris Broderick, who stepped in for departed lead player Glen Drover during the 2007-2008 Tour of Duty road jaunt.</p> <p><em>Endgame</em> marks Broderick’s first recorded appearance with Megadeth, and the former Jag Panzer and Nevermore guitarist not only holds his own alongside Mustaine but also against the impressive players who preceded him in the band. “Chris is an absolutely incredibly talented musician,” says Mustaine. “And I honestly gotta tell ya, if I compared the guys I have now to any of the ones from the past, it’d be really hard not to say that this lineup isn’t the best I’ve had.”</p> <p>Which is saying something, given the fact that earlier in the decade it looked as if Megadeth itself had become solidly of the past. After suffering radial nerve damage in his left arm in 2002, Mustaine called it a day, abruptly disbanding the outfit he had led for most of his adult life. </p> <p>He was, however, unprepared for what would come next. “There was a good 17 months there where I would talk to people and be like, ‘Hi, I play guitar…’ And then I’d stop myself and go, ‘Well, I used to play guitar.’ And that hurt,” Mustaine recalls. “Or I’d hear myself say, ‘I used to be in a band called Megadeth,’ and it was like, Oh my God, used to? Really? It felt like shit.” Following a year and a half of intense rehabilitation, Mustaine rebooted Megadeth in 2004 with a fresh lineup and album, <em>The System Has Failed</em>. <em>United Abominations</em> followed three years later, and now comes <em>Endgame</em>. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/HdqyTmfDwk0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>As for what the future holds, if Mustaine gets his way — and he usually does — there’s little doubt more golden moments lie ahead. But if there’s anything to be gleaned from the past, it could be said that the only constant in Megadeth is change. “I have fear about the born-on date on the bottom of my feet, and what that date is,” Mustaine admits. </p> <p>“Like, when does Megadeth’s music actually lose its cool? Did we already go through that period and survive? I mean, I’m nearing the point where I’ll be viable to be a contender for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. What’s gonna happen then? All I know is, every day there’s a new twist in my life that makes me excited to wake up and find out what’s gonna come next.”</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: Since you restarted Megadeth in 2004, it seems that each album comes closer to what many people consider to be the band’s classic sound. In that respect, <em>Endgame</em> sounds more focused than its predecessors.</strong></p> <p>I don’t think focus was ever a problem, but let’s put it this way: Things have become less distracted. <em>The System Has Failed</em> was a heavy record, and in that respect it was a return to form. But we weren’t 100 percent there as a band. That’s because <em>System</em> was basically recorded as a session album. I had left Megadeth; I hurt my arm, and as far as I was concerned, I was done playing guitar. When I got better and came out of retirement, it was with the understanding that I was doing a solo record. </p> <p>But while I was in the studio recording <em>System</em> I got a call from [then record label] EMI. They said, Oh, sorry, we forgot to tell you—you owe us another Megadeth record. So you can go do your little solo project, but until you give us that album, we own you for the rest of your life. Long story short, I changed what was supposed to have been a solo record back to a Megadeth record and put together a band. </p> <p>That’s when I met the Drover brothers. Having those guys in the band got me really excited again, and that’s when I decided I was going to do more than one record. So we did United Abominations, which was even more of a return to form. We just needed to settle in and get comfortable, get back in the saddle. Now, with Shawn, James and Chris on guitar, I feel we’re there. </p> <p><strong>As with almost every album since The System Has Failed, you wrote the majority of <em>Endgame</em> entirely on your own. What’s your process as a songwriter?</strong></p> <p>I can give you any number of answers to that question, and they’d all be correct. Because there really is no set formula for me. I just let the music tell me where it wants to go. For example — and this is a touchy subject for me right now — I wrote the <em>Endgame</em> song “The Hardest Part of Letting Go…Sealed with a Kiss,” after my wife said to me, “We’ve been married 17 years and you’ve never written a song for me.” </p> <p>So I did. And…she doesn’t like it. [laughs] Because the second half of the song talks about me bricking somebody up in a wall. And she’s like, “You better not brick me up in a wall!” So I told her, “Honey, this is no more about you than ‘In My Darkest Hour’ is about [late Metallica bassist] Cliff Burton.” People have always thought that that song is about Cliff because I’ve said that I wrote the music when he died. And the music is about him, but the lyrics are about [Mustaine’s former girlfriend] Diana. It’s a similar thing with “The Hardest Part of Letting Go.” I wrote the music for my wife, but the lyrics were inspired by an Edgar Allan Poe story, because I thought the song called for an interesting twist. </p> <p><strong>I assume that’s the first and last song you’re going to write for her.</strong></p> <p>At least for a while. But the thing is, music is totally for the listener to interpret. It’s understandable that I would write a song and expect her to get it, because she’s a musician’s wife. But as far as my expecting her to like it…well, she’s exercising her rights. She knows she’s safe with me, so she can say she doesn’t like the lyrics, and if she ever sees me with a trowel she’s going to kill me! [laughs]</p> <p><strong>When it comes to songwriting, in general you’re not a particularly collaborative guy.</strong></p> <p>I don’t mind writing with other people. The trick is in figuring out what each person is putting in: Is it like bacon and eggs, where the chicken made a contribution and the pig’s ass is on the plate? Or is it 50/50 and you’re both giving your all? What I’ve experienced over my career is that it can go any number of ways. There have been songs I’ve written with my guys where we’d all contribute. Then there are other songs where the band didn’t really contribute that much, but unfortunately when the credits go down on paper it says “Written by Dave Mustaine and so and so.” So there’s the problem. But would I mind collaborating with other people? No. </p> <p><strong>You seem pretty content with your current bandmates. How did new guitarist Chris Broderick come into the picture?</strong></p> <p>Glen Drover recommended him. When Glen first said he was leaving the band, I thought, let’s call up [Nevermore guitarist] Jeff Loomis or [Annihilator’s] Jeff Waters. Now, I certainly wouldn’t pick Waters anymore, but I did get in touch with Loomis, and he couldn’t commit because he was in the middle of doing a solo record. And I understood that, so I moved on. </p> <p>That’s when I decided to take a look at Chris. I watched some of his stuff online, and I thought, He’s good. He’s really good. So we met, and I found him to be exactly what I needed. He’s really focused on his guitar playing…and his bodybuilding. So I told him, “The only thing you need to understand is that Megadeth fans are pretty particular about who we are. I mean, you’ve got a great physique, and it’s totally cool to be healthy, but let’s be real about it: you’re a guitar player. Instead of squeezing in Megadeth in between workouts, you need to understand you’re squeezing workouts in between being in Megadeth. Weightlifting won’t make you famous!”</p> <p><strong>Physique aside, you’ve stated that Chris is the best guitarist you’ve had in Megadeth. Taking into account the caliber of the guys who have come before him, that’s no small compliment.</strong></p> <p>There’s a difference between being a great guitar player and having that little extra something, that flair. And Chris has it. I’ve been saying that he reminds me of Randy [Rhoads], because finding Chris makes me feel like I know what Ozzy must have felt when he discovered Randy. </p> <p>So we get along great. You know, people have heard me say that I “sang” solos to [former guitarist] Marty [Friedman] in the studio, and I did. I did it to [former guitarists] Jeff [Young], Chris [Poland] and Al [Pitrelli], too. But Chris Broderick? I only did it two times, and there are literally hundreds of thousands of notes on <em>Endgame</em>. Now that is a testimony to a guy who has studied his partner. </p> <p><strong>You’ve always been somewhat humble about your own guitar skills.</strong></p> <p>One thing I will say is that, recently, I’ve noticed myself being voted into so many of these “best-of” guitar columns, and that’s really awkward for me, because I’ve grown accustomed to never being recognized for my playing. I’ve always wanted to be great, but I think I became so used to being number two that I forgot there even was a number one. And the self-deprecating thing became a way for me to not get too caught up in it. I could say I’m not that good before someone else did. </p> <p><strong>A trademark of your guitar sound is the fact that you almost always play in standard tuning. You don’t drop-tune, which is de rigueur for metal acts these days.</strong></p> <p>I feel that the guitar needs to be tuned to A440 so you can get the correct response out of it. And I believe that if you play some of those low-tuned songs on a guitar in standard tuning, you’ll hear that a lot of them don’t have good melodies. It becomes almost atonal and percussive. But now everybody does it, and because everybody’s in a band and has a song, you hear it more and more. A study was done recently that said there’s something like seven or eight million bands on MySpace. Now, how many of those bands do you think suck?</p> <p><strong>I don’t know. Seven or eight million?</strong></p> <p>A lot of ’em, yeah! I’m a professional, and a lot of people I know who are professionals suck. There was a period when I kinda sucked.</p> <p><strong>You think so?</strong></p> <p>I think that the [1999 Megadeth] record <em>Risk</em> would have sold if it had been called the Dave Mustaine Project. I think people would have loved that. But they expected to hear Megadeth, and they heard the record and were like, You know what, Dave? We know you’re having problems with Marty, but you’re the leader, so tell him to shape up or ship out. </p> <p>Well, I kinda did, and that’s why he shipped out. After Risk I told him, “Man, we need to go back to our roots.” And he had a nervous breakdown. I mean, God bless the little fighter, but I didn’t want the guy to have to have a day nurse with him. You know that footage of Michael Jackson walking to court in his pajamas? That’s kinda how Marty was showing up at the end. He would walk in and it was like, Oh my God. And I thought, You know what? This is because we worked him too hard. </p> <p><strong>Do you ever talk to any of the former members? In particular, do you have a relationship with Dave Ellefson, with whom you had a pretty public falling out after almost 20 years of playing together?</strong></p> <p>You know, Dave sued me for 18-and-a-half million dollars. [In 2004, Ellefson filed suit against Mustaine claiming, among other things, breach of fiduciary obligation, libel and emotional distress.] And he lost. That had to have hurt. And the fans—a lot of them turned on him. That had to have hurt. He lost one of his oldest friends. That had to have hurt. </p> <p>There probably were a lot of changes, financial and otherwise, he had to make in his life after Megadeth. That had to have hurt, too. And I’m not the kind of guy to sit back and watch that happen to somebody who, at one point, I loved. So I met with Dave a while ago and we had dinner, and he said, “You know, [suing you] was the stupidest thing I’ve ever done. I wish I never did it.” So I forgave him. Bottom line for me is there’s this one little thing I’ll always be curious about: I just keep thinking, if he had won the lawsuit, what would he have done? Would he have taken 18-and-a-half million dollars from me? Or would he have just said, You know what? I was just trying to prove a point. Let’s get back together and you behave yourself.</p> <p><strong>Do you think he wants to be back in Megadeth?</strong></p> <p>I don’t know. I think a person would be nuts not to want to be with me. I have a successful enterprise here. The band is better now than we’ve ever been. And I think our success right now is probably more obvious than it’s ever been.</p> <p><strong>That must feel good, given that you’re a quarter-century into your career with Megadeth. Did you think you’d be going this long?</strong></p> <p>Well, one thing that I realize is that when I started playing, things were so different in terms of what we considered “excess.” Marijuana was a juvenile drug, cocaine was kind of like a sophisticated drug, and heroin was for the serious guys. And it got so out of control in the late Eighties and Nineties. </p> <p>My god, how many people OD’d during that time? I was one of them. Nikki [Sixx] was one of them. Several people died. It’s just crazy what we were doing. But it was all in the name of rock and roll. A lot of it, I don’t even remember what happened. Someone would come up to me and say, ‘Yeah, you died yesterday.” And I’d go, “Really?”</p> <p><strong>Does it surprise you that you’re still standing?</strong></p> <p>Yes, but here’s the thing that I love — the way the story is coming to a climax. Retirement is looming, and I’m actually okay with it. It’s a lot different when you surrender the baton as opposed to having someone take it out of your hand. And I’m ready to pass the baton because there are so many guitar players that are better than me right now, and there have been all along. I think there’s a new generation out there that needs to have its shot. </p> <p><strong>When you say “retirement is looming”—just how close is it?</strong></p> <p>I’ve got one more record on my contract. Then I’m done. </p> <p><strong>What will you do after that?</strong></p> <p>I’ll probably move off into the private sector. I have a studio going [Vic’s Garage, in San Marcos, California] that I’m handling with my son, and we’re trying to do a little “metal academy” type thing there. Just something cool to give back to the community, because man, I’m so overpaid and underworked, I have to give something back.</p> <p><strong>So you’ll become more of a behind-the-scenes kind of guy?</strong></p> <p>As I get older I have to. I have to go get surgery on my back in a couple days. I’m losing my mobility because of headbanging for all these years. So just by process of elimination I’m having some things taken away from me. And if I can’t do it onstage anymore, I don’t wanna do it at all. I’m too much of a proud person.</p> <p><strong>When that day comes, will you leave feeling you accomplished everything you set out to do?</strong></p> <p>I feel that way right now. So I very much could walk away. And I’m actually leaning more toward leaving then staying because of my own pride and concern for wanting to go out on top. It’s important for me to do the right thing, and I think it would be great, if I was going to stop, to do it on the right level. Especially in this business, because people are always clamoring for more and more. But like I said, it’s time for me to start getting into some philanthropy.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dave-mustaine">Dave Mustaine</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-megadeth-guitarist-dave-mustaine-2009s-endgame#comments Chris Broderick Dave Mustaine GW Archive January 2009 Megadeth Interviews Features Magazine Thu, 17 Jan 2013 16:19:14 +0000 Richard Bienstock, Photo by Ross Halfin http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17449