Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/2966/all en Bent Out of Shape: Wallner's Quick Licks, Part 1 — Rolling Harmonics http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-wallners-quick-licks-part-1-rolling-harmonics <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's a quick lick or technique that will work nicely in any guitarists "trick bag." </p> <p>It's not very musical, but it's something I often use in my rhythm and lead playing. I'm not entirely sure if there's a name for this technique, but I like refer to it as "rolling harmonics." </p> <p>The basic idea? You trill on a string with your fretting hand, then use your picking-hand pinky to catch harmonics. You can move your finger back and forth over the pickups, and you will catch different harmonics at different points along the sting. You have to be very gentle with your picking hand, otherwise you will "choke" the string and won't produce harmonics.</p> <p>This technique can be performed on any string and not necessarily with just trills on an open string. You can trill anywhere on the neck, but generally speaking the higher you go the harder it is to catch the harmonics. As I previously stated, it's not very musical but it's a cool effect and a great substitute for pick scrapes.</p> <p>I recorded a quick video demonstrating this technique using a 1959 Les Paul Reissue through an Orange Tiny Terror amp. That particular combination creates a very decent tone, and although there isn't a lot of gain, the harmonics come out very easily. I made a TAB for my video example — but any trills will be fine for you to try. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/hLs5FxjsPVs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/trill.jpg" width="620" height="64" alt="trill.jpg" /></p> <p>I've heard many players use this technique, most notably Eddie Van Halen. Play around with it and see if it fits into your playing. It's not for everyone, but you might find it useful every once in a while. Next week I will begin a new classical study similar to <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-paganinis-16th-caprice-g-minor">my previous Paganini series.</a> </p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-wallners-quick-licks-part-1-rolling-harmonics#comments Bent Out of Shape Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Thu, 26 Mar 2015 19:39:18 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19666 Bent Out of Shape: An Intensive 30-Minute Guitar Workout for Musicians On the Go http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-intensive-30-minute-guitar-workout-musicians-go <!--paging_filter--><p>Whether you're a professional guitarist or a hobbyist, finding time to practice can be difficult. </p> <p>We all have busy lives and responsibilities that distract us from our playing. For this reason, I've developed a quick, intensive guitar "workout" that can be completed in 30 minutes. You can use this by itself as a quick practice when time is limited or incorporate it into a longer practice session. Either way, this workout will help develop your playing in a number of important areas.</p> <p>The workout involves playing a diatonic scale with specific sequences chosen to improve important areas of your playing. You will improve your knowledge/theory of the scale across the whole fretboard and also improve the speed/accuracy of your picking technique. For this workout, you are going to need a metronome. </p> <p>For my examples, I am using the A minor scale. You will play each of these sequences to a metronome; when completed, you will increase the tempo and repeat all of the sequences again. You want to begin at a slow tempo, around 80 bpm, and after completion increase by 10 bpm (90, 100, 110, 120, etc.). </p> <p>The sequences are of varying difficulty, and as soon as one becomes too difficult, you should drop that sequence and continue with the rest. You should make a note of the highest tempo reached for each sequence so you can chart your progress over time. I have included target bpm's for each sequence. If you start at 80 bpm and take each sequence to its target, you should complete the workout in around 30 minutes. Of course, if you are an advanced player, you might be able take each sequence much higher than the target tempos.</p> <p>For each sequence, I've given you the tab and an audio example playing the sequence at 80 bpm and then at the target bpm. </p> <p><strong>Linear Sequences (Target: 160 bpm) </strong></p> <p>These sequences focus on playing the diatonic scale as "four-notes per sting" instead of the usual "three-notes per string." The idea is to use all four fingers when fretting the scale, as highlighted in the first sequence.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F88630142"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab1.jpg" width="620" height="420" alt="tab1.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Interval Sequences (Target 120 bpm)</strong></p> <p>These focus on playing the diatonic scale in intervals across three octaves. For this workout, we are using 3rd's, 4th's and 5th's. Note: Advanced players also will be able to play the scale in 6th's and 7th's.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F88630059"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab2.jpg" width="620" height="409" alt="tab2.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Arpeggio Sequences (Target 120 bpm)</strong></p> <p>You've probably seen the previous sequences before, but here's something I came up with that's fairly unique. These sequences involve playing the scale across two octaves as arpeggios. The first sequence is played as triad arpeggios (I-III-V). The second sequence is played as 7th arpeggios (I-III-V-VII).</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F88629993"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab3.jpg" width="620" height="278" alt="tab3.jpg" /></p> <p>These sequences could be applied to any diatonic scale in any key. After mastering A minor, try experimenting with different scale. If you have any questions or suggestions, feel free to leave me a comment. Good luck!</p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England now living in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and in 2012 toured Japan, America and Canada. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-intensive-30-minute-guitar-workout-musicians-go#comments Bent Out of Shape Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Tue, 03 Mar 2015 22:22:13 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18203 Bent Out of Shape: Improve Your Fretboard Knowledge with This Arpeggio Exercise http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-improve-your-fretboard-knowledge-arpeggio-exercise <!--paging_filter--><p>In this lesson, I'm going to teach you an arpeggio exercise that will help improve your music theory and knowledge of the fretboard.</p> <p>Players often play exercises only to improve technique, but it's important to vary your exercises to focus on other important parts of guitar playing. Although this exercise is based on arpeggios, it is meant to help you visualize scales differently from the standard "three note per string" shapes. </p> <p>How can learning an arpeggio exercise help with scales? </p> <p>The answer is simple: Arpeggios are derived from scales. A big problem for guitarists is not being able to switch between the two in a musical way. When you listen to solos, particularly in rock/metal, when guitarists play arpeggios, they are usually played with a sweeping or tapping technique, playing exclusively arpeggio sequences. Then when you hear scales, it's the same problem, but usually they are being played as ascending or descending alternate-picked sequences. </p> <p>Hardly ever will you hear a player integrate the two and sound musical and melodic. It all comes back to the age-old problem of guitar players whose solos sound like a bunch of exercises stuck together. There's the metaphor about players who sound like robots. These "robot" guitar players usually have two modes of lead playing: "scale mode" and "arpeggio mode." In the following weeks, I'm going to be working on a series of lessons to help you play less like a robot. </p> <p>My exercise is very simple and based off building arpeggios from scales. A simple way to look at building arpeggios is by stacking third intervals or simply skipping notes within a scale. For example, from the A minor scale (A B C D E F G), you would make an A minor arpeggio (A C E). You skip the B and D notes to make the arpeggio. You can carry on skipping notes within the scale to make larger arpeggios until you have eventually used every note from the scale to make an A minor 13th chord (A C E G B D F).</p> <p>This exercise applies that same system to every note within the key of A minor to make seven different 13th arpeggios. From every note of the A minor scale we build a 13th arpeggio by stacking thirds and play them in order. </p> <p>When playing this exercise, don't just memorize the frets from the tab; learn each note you are playing and visualize how ascending and descending through each arpeggio relates to the key scale of A minor. The way I have arranged the notes on the fretboard is not important, and if you have a good understanding of the theory behind the exercise, you should experiment with your own fretting. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/157832888&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab_8.jpg" width="620" height="279" alt="tab_8.jpg" /></p> <p>The goal of this exercise is to help develop your fretboard knowledge of scales. For that reason, each arpeggio is built strictly using only notes from the A minor scale. Some of the arpeggios in this exercise are not "normal" 13th arpeggios, which would usually involve flattening of certain intervals. However, if you can visualize how an arpeggio is derived from a scale, you can better incorporate them into your solos without relying on arpeggio shapes, which will usually end up sounding like exercises. </p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-improve-your-fretboard-knowledge-arpeggio-exercise#comments Bent Out of Shape Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Tue, 03 Feb 2015 18:41:32 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21765 Bent Out of Shape: Guitar Rehab, Part 2 — Building Finger Strength with String Bends http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-guitar-rehab-part-2-building-finger-strength-string-bends <!--paging_filter--><p>Welcome to part 2 of my new series of lessons for guitarists who have spent a period of time away from playing. </p> <p>"Guitar Rehab" is designed to get you back into playing, and each lesson will help you rebuild your technique. </p> <p><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-guitar-rehab-part-1-picking-hand-warmups">In the last lesson,</a> we focused on a rhythm guitar exercise to help warm up your picking wrist, build stamina and increase the accuracy of your picking and fret-hand coordination</p> <p>For this lesson, we're going to focus on building our fretting-hand muscle strength with a series of exercises built around string bends and vibrato. This lesson will mix rhythm and lead playing using the same backing track from <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-guitar-rehab-part-1-picking-hand-warmups">part 1.</a></p> <p>When I started playing again after taking a few months off, I immediately noticed how weak my fretting hands where when trying to execute string bends and vibrato. These exercises will gradually build up your finger strength and stamina. Each exercise will become progressively more difficult and require stronger technique. </p> <p>Before we begin, just a quick word of caution: If your hands start to ache or you feel tension/cramp-like feeling in fretting fingers when bending strings, it's time to take a break. You can injure yourself if you try too much too soon. Try to start gradually by practicing for about 30 minutes and then taking a 30-minute break. In the next lesson, I'll talk more about how to schedule your practicing when starting to play again.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/fig1_0.jpg" width="620" height="147" alt="fig1_0.jpg" /></p> <p>This first exercise is the same open-string pedal riff from part 1 with a simple phrase at the end involving two string bends. The first is a unison bend that involves anchoring your first finger on the string above and bending up to that pitch with your second and third finger on the string below. The second is a regular bend. I suggest using your first, second and third fingers to execute it.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/fig2_0.jpg" width="620" height="163" alt="fig2_0.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Exercise 2</strong> is a unison bend exercise following the bass line of the backing track. You descend through the A minor scale playing unison bends on the B and G strings, ending with the same phrase from <strong>Exercise 1.</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/fig3_0.jpg" width="620" height="272" alt="fig3_0.jpg" /></p> <p>After that, we combine whole step and half-step bends to create a simple melody. You bend up a full step and hold the note. Then you bend up another half step so you are now three semitones higher than the original fretted note. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/fig4_0.jpg" width="620" height="84" alt="fig4_0.jpg" /></p> <p>The final exercise is another style of bend similar to unison but where you alternate pick each string one at a time instead of playing them both together. On the backing tracking after playing this exercise I have left this section looped for several times so you can improvise a solo at the end. Good luck!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/vxSmjC58gd4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/181072176&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-guitar-rehab-part-2-building-finger-strength-string-bends#comments Bent Out of Shape Guitar Rehab Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Fri, 19 Dec 2014 17:04:30 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23152 Bent Out of Shape: Guitar Rehab, Part 1 — Picking-Hand Warmups http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-guitar-rehab-part-1-picking-hand-warmups <!--paging_filter--><p>Welcome to my new series of lessons titled Guitar Rehab. </p> <p>If you follow my column, you might've noticed that I haven't written any new lessons in the past few months. I had a problem with my arm that required surgery. As a result, I was unable to play guitar for three months. </p> <p>Now that I'm able to play again, I'm excited to get back to writing and have many new lessons planned for the following weeks.</p> <p>Lack of inspiration, time commitments such as work, medical problems, loss of interest, even video games are all valid reasons people take a break from playing guitar. </p> <p>For that reason, I decided to start this series of lessons for anyone who has spent a period of time away from playing. These lessons will help you get back into playing regularly and give you some useful exercises to help rebuild your technique. When I started playing again, the first thing I noticed was how stiff my fingers felt and how uncoordinated my picking had become. My stamina was also very bad and my hands felt tired after only an hour of playing.</p> <p>This first lesson will focus on a rhythm guitar warmup, which is primarily geared toward your picking hand. The goal is to warm up your picking wrist and gradually increase your alternate-picking accuracy. </p> <p>For this series, all of the exercises will be played to a backing track, which I think will make them more enjoyable as opposed to just playing to just a click/metronome.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/fig1.jpg" width="620" height="110" alt="fig1.jpg" /></p> <p>This first exercise is a 16th note pedal rhythm. You begin on the open A and play straight open notes. Try to relax your picking wrist and rest your palm on the bridge to mute the strings a little. Your alternate picking should sound smooth and flow with the music.</p> <p>I'm going take a short break from the lesson to give my personal opinion about pedaling. I've read many lessons where they tell you to develop your alternate picking technique to a point where your down and up strokes sound identical. In my opinion, that’s good advice if you want to sound like a robot. </p> <p>Humans will naturally play the down stroke slightly heavier to create a slight dynamic within alternate picking. Again, this is only my opinion, but I prefer to hear this dynamic as opposed to playing each note identically. Pedaling will groove much better to the music if you have this dynamic.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/fig2.jpg" width="620" height="235" alt="fig2.jpg" /></p> <p>Back to the lesson! After the straight 16th note pedaling of the open A string, you will begin to play notes in sets of four across two stings (Exercise 2). You will play a descending pattern through the A minor scale with the open A between each note. This doesn't require too much coordination between picking and fretting hands but advances the exercise from a single string.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/fig3.jpg" width="620" height="241" alt="fig3.jpg" /></p> <p>The next step is to move from sets of four to sets of two across three stings (Exercise 3). This does start to get challenging, especially when changing stings. For this exercise I move away from A minor and play the same pattern in the keys of B minor, D minor and E minor.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/fig4.jpg" width="620" height="235" alt="fig4.jpg" /></p> <p>The final stage of the lesson is 16th notes, where you change note with every pick (Exercise 4). For this exercise, we just move through the common progression of A minor, G major and F major. I looped this chord progression of this exercise at the end of the backing track for you to improvise some solos over when you've finished.</p> <p>As you can see, with each stage of the exercise it becomes slightly more challenging and requires more accuracy between the fretting and picking hands. I've made a video demonstration and also given you the backing track to practice along to. Cheers!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/6PkrUZujzNk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/181072176&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-guitar-rehab-part-1-picking-hand-warmups#comments Bent Out of Shape Guitar Rehab Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Thu, 11 Dec 2014 20:51:37 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23080 Bent Out of Shape: Guitar Workout 2014 — Symmetrical Scales http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-guitar-workout-2014-symmetrical-scales <!--paging_filter--><p>Last year, I gave you <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-intensive-30-minute-guitar-workout-musicians-go">a 30-minute guitar workout designed for guitarists with limited practice time.</a> </p> <p>The goal of the workout was to give you an intense 30 minutes of practice. The positive response to this workout inspired me make a new version for 2014. As with my previous workout the goal is the same: 30 minutes of intense practice.</p> <p>My original workout was based around taking a diatonic scale playing different sequences, intervals and arpeggios derived from that scale. This workout focuses on using symmetrical scales to create similar sequences. "Symmetrical Scales" is not a musical term, but I've used it to describe the three scales this workout is based around.</p> <p>To begin, I've written the three symmetrical scales, all in the key of A for you to see how each scale is constructed. These are all scales you've seen before, starting with the chromatic scale. The chromatic scale uses all semitone (one-fret) intervals to create a 12-note scale. </p> <p>The second scale is the whole tone scale, which uses all whole tone (two-fret) intervals to create a six-note scale. The third scale is technically a diminished 7th arpeggio, which uses all minor third (three-fret) intervals; this also is commonly known as the diminished scale. As you can see from the TAB, each scale has a unique arrangement on the fretboard, which makes the sequences we derive from the scales more challenging.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab1_7.jpg" width="620" height="137" alt="tab1_7.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab2_8.jpg" width="620" height="160" alt="tab2_8.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab3_7.jpg" width="620" height="160" alt="tab3_7.jpg" /></p> <p>For a detailed explanation on how the following exercises should be practiced, see my original workout. You should begin each exercise at a slow speed of around 80 bpm. Every time you succesfully play the vivien203, increase the tempo by 10 bpm. Keep increasing the tempo until you reach the target bpm for each exercise.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/154661543&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><strong>Part 1: Chromatic Warm Up (Target Speed: 160 bpm)</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab4_3.jpg" width="620" height="132" alt="tab4_3.jpg" /></p> <p>The first exercise combines a linear chromatic sequence with string skipping. This exercise is basically a warm up to get your alternate picking and fretting fingers sync'd up. This should be very easy to build speed up to the target tempo of 160 bpm. Every string has 4 notes which is makes alternate picking very simple.</p> <p><strong>Part 2: Whole Tone Scale Intervals (Target Speed: 120 bpm)</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab5_0.jpg" width="620" height="132" alt="tab5_0.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab6.jpg" width="620" height="132" alt="tab6.jpg" /></p> <p>After warming up, we now move to the whole tone scale, which we will play as interval sequences. As this is a symmetrical scale, every interval is the same for every note of the scale. We start by playing the scale in thirds, which in this case is major thirds. </p> <p>Due to the more complicated picking pattern, I set a target speed of 120 bpm for this exercise. After thirds we play the scale in 4th's which in the whole tone scale is augmented 4th's. This exercise is great for developing an "outside picking" technique. Each pair of 4th's is played across two adjacent strings, and using strict alternate picking means you pick outside each string.</p> <p><strong>Part 3: Diminished Scale Sequences (Target Speed: 160 bpm)</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab7.jpg" width="620" height="160" alt="tab7.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab8.jpg" width="620" height="141" alt="tab8.jpg" /></p> <p>To finish, we will play diminished scale sequences in triplets and 16th notes. Because this scale has much wider intervals than regular diatonic scales these sequences can be very challenging to play at higher speeds. As each string only has two notes and the scale moves in a diagonal direction across the fretboard you will find your picking and fretting hand working much harder than with diatonic sequences. </p> <p>Hopefully you'll find this workout useful and use it as an alternative for my previous workout. I usually use these as a warm up for more intense/lengthy practice sessions but alone they provide you with a good technical practice which should keep your chops in shape, cheers!</p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-guitar-workout-2014-symmetrical-scales#comments Bent Out of Shape Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Wed, 10 Dec 2014 15:37:55 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21570 Bent Out of Shape: Paying Tribute to Gary Moore — "The Loner" http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-paying-tribute-gary-moore-loner <!--paging_filter--><p>If you've followed my column, you will have noticed that I regard Gary Moore very highly and have often cited his playing as inspiration for many of my lessons. </p> <p>For that reason, I wanted to pay tribute by recording a cover of one of my favorite Gary Moore songs, "The Loner." </p> <p>"The Loner," which was written by Max Middleton, originally appeared on a Cozy Powell album called <em>Over the Top</em>. It was then recorded by Moore, who made several changes and was credited and co-writer on his version, which appeared on his 1987 album, <em>Wild Frontier.</em> </p> <p>The main inspiration for my version came after hearing several live bootlegs, some of which were about 30 minutes long! This gave me the idea to have an improvised intro and outro section with the main song/theme in the middle. Stylistically I wanted it to be more of a natural blues sounding arrangement as opposed to the large amounts of synths featured on the Moore version.</p> <p>For my version, I felt it was important to feature musicians who had played with Moore. I asked bassist Neil Murray (ex-Whitesnake, Black Sabbath), who played on some of Moore's early solo albums such as <em>Corridors of Power</em> and <em>Victims of the Future.</em> </p> <p>For the keys, I thought Don Airey (Deep Purple) would be the perfect fit; not only am I a huge fan of Don's work, but he also played with Moore on many of my favorite recordings. The original Moore version used a drum machine, so I asked Vinny Appice (ex-Black Sabbath, Dio) to record the drums. I thought Vinny's style would fit the song perfectly as I wanted a slow blues feel with tasteful fills.</p> <p>For my guitar track, I used a '78 Les Paul custom through a Marshall 2204. I spent a lot of time experimenting with guitar tones but decided to keep it simple. I used my guitar's volume and tone controls to get more dynamics. For example, in the intro I used the volume control to clean up the tone and also played sections with my fingers instead of a pick. The main theme is played with the tone control of the bridge pickup rolled all the way down. The intro and outro were improvised using mostly minor scales and minor pentatonics, which was easy considering my backing was played by world-class musicians.</p> <p>Overall I'm pleased with how the cover came out, and it fits the style I was going for. So here's my tribute to Gary Moore featuring Neil Murray, Don Airey and Vinny Appice!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/A1xcx3baHcY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-paying-tribute-gary-moore-loner#comments Bent Out of Shape Gary Moore Will Wallner Blogs Tue, 02 Dec 2014 23:09:29 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23013 Bent Out of Shape: Add Some "Speed" to Your Playing with a Simple Shred-Style Lick http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-add-some-speed-your-playing-simple-shred-style-lick <!--paging_filter--><p>If you've read my previous columns, you might have caught on to the fact that I'm not a fan of purely technique-based solos. I prefer a more melodic approach to lead guitar playing. </p> <p>However, sometimes in rock and metal, there are moments when fast, "shred style" licks are appropriate. Most of my previous lessons focus on the melodic side of my playing, so I wanted to switch things up and give you a simple "shred" lick that's easy to learn and has many applications. </p> <p>In its most basic form, the lick is a sequence of six notes played as a sextuplet or two sets of triplets (depending on the tempo). The notes are played on the same string, which makes it very easy to alternate-pick and build speed. </p> <p>Once you have mastered the basic pattern, you can apply the lick to different scales and positions to give an almost endless amount of variations. </p> <p>I'm going to guide you through the basic form and then show you a few more of my favorite ideas.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F110358844"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab1_3.jpg" width="620" height="70" alt="tab1_3.jpg" /></p> <p>The basic form is played using the first three notes of the E minor scale on the high E string at the 12th fret. Memorize the pattern, then loop it up to create an alternate picking exercise. As with any other speed-building exercise, use a metronome to track your progress.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab2_4.jpg" width="620" height="70" alt="tab2_4.jpg" /></p> <p>When you are comfortable with the pattern, try moving it through every set of three notes within the E minor scale starting on the fifth fret of the B string. This is a nice ascending pattern that will help you memorize how to play entire scales on one string.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab3_3.jpg" width="620" height="70" alt="tab3_3.jpg" /></p> <p>This is the same approach, but it utilizes switching strings to expand the range of the pattern. An accomplished musician will be able to play any scale vertically and horizontally across the neck and be able to switch between the two at any position within the scale. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab4_1.jpg" width="620" height="70" alt="tab4_1.jpg" /></p> <p>You don't have to stay with just groups of three notes. This idea expands the original pattern into an E minor arpeggio. Yngwie Malmsteen uses a similar lick in "Far Beyond the Sun."</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab5.jpg" width="620" height="70" alt="tab5.jpg" /></p> <p>This final idea is taken from one one of my own solos where I change the feel of the pattern by switching to 16th notes. I change the sequence slightly to make a pattern of 16th notes to fit nicely into a bar. To do this, I play the original six-note pattern twice and then play an additional four notes to complete the bar. This creates an interesting dynamic and makes the lick sound less like an exercise.</p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-add-some-speed-your-playing-simple-shred-style-lick#comments Bent Out of Shape Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Tue, 28 Oct 2014 15:31:27 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19252 Bent Out of Shape: Wallner's Quick Licks, Part 2 — Arpeggio Intervals http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-wallners-quick-licks-part-2-arpeggio-intervals <!--paging_filter--><p>When soloing, I try to use a balanced mix of scales, intervals and arpeggios. </p> <p>Something I always struggle with is trying to incorporate arpeggios into my solos without having them sound too generic. </p> <p>A lot of the common arpeggio shapes are difficult to use without sounding "cliche" or like a bad Yngwie Malmsteen clone. It might come as a surprise to players to hear that you don't have to use a sweep-picking technique to play arpeggios!</p> <p>Here's an easy arpeggio shape that can be learned and incorporated into your playing relatively easily. The goal is that harmonically it's clear I'm playing the same basic arpeggio — but hopefully in a more creative way. It basically involves playing arpeggios as separate intervals "stuck together." </p> <p>For example, an A minor arpeggio (A-C-E) could be viewed as a minor third interval (A - C) stuck to a major third interval (C - E). <strong>Example 1</strong> maps out an A minor arpeggio across three octaves. Learning this example will demonstrate how to play a simple minor arpeggio in broken intervals. </p> <p>When you factor in the root octave, you end up with the following interval sequence: minor 3rd (A - C), major 3rd (C - E), perfect 4th (E - A). When you play <strong>Example 1</strong>, it's easy to hear the harmony of an A minor arpeggio, but to me it sounds a lot more interesting than a straight-forward arpeggio.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/123329344&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab_3.jpg" width="620" height="353" alt="tab_3.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Example 2</strong> expands on this idea by combining multiple arpeggios in the key of A minor to create a more musical-sounding lick. This example outlines the following arpeggios: A Minor - G Major - F Major. Use this as a starting point and then experiment with your own ideas using my method to make your own unique sequences. </p> <p>The final clip on the audio is an example of a similar lick used in an actual solo from one my own songs. I play a straight-forward E minor arpeggio, which leads into a basic pentatonic descending lick. It's simple but effective!</p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-wallners-quick-licks-part-2-arpeggio-intervals#comments Bent Out of Shape Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Thu, 16 Oct 2014 17:38:36 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19958 Bent Out of Shape: Learning Paganini's 16th Caprice in G Minor http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-paganinis-16th-caprice-g-minor <!--paging_filter--><p>A couple of weeks ago, <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-intensive-30-minute-guitar-workout-musicians-go">I gave you a short, 30-minute guitar workout</a> designed for guitarists whose practice time is limited. </p> <p>The positive response I received prompted me to create an additional lesson, which, in combination with my original workout, will give you a good hour of intensive practice. </p> <p>For this lesson, I have selected a classical piece for you to learn: Paganini's 16th Caprice in G minor. Learning classical pieces is a great way to improve your technique and theory. It's also more beneficial to practice something musical, rather than just working on exercises. Use my 30-minute workout as a warmup and then spend an additional 30 minutes to an hour working on this piece. </p> <p>It's very challenging and features a good selection of arpeggios, wide intervals, chromatic runs, string skipping and sequences. It's very rewarding to learn and play in its entirety. Because of its length, I have the divided the piece into three parts. </p> <p>Your first task will be to memorize the notes, which in itself is a big challenge. I would suggest taking it one bar at a time, memorizing the notes and working out the fingering. Then attempt to perform the bar in full. Start at the beginning with bar 1, and add a new bar every day. Once the notes are memorized, you can begin to work with a metronome and build speed. </p> <p>Start at 80 bpm playing 8th notes and increase the metronome by 10 bpm after each successful performance. When you reach 120 bpm, go back to 60 bpm and play the piece as 16th notes. From there, take it as fast you can. </p> <p>It's meant to be at a tempo of 165 bpm, which is incredibly fast for a piece so complex. I can only get to around 120 bpm before it becomes too challenging. For this lesson, I have recorded myself performing the piece in full at the comfortable tempo of 100 bpm. Use this as a reference for yourself when learning. I have also marked in the Soundcloud link where each of the three parts begins to help you navigate.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F90255673"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/caprice1.jpg" width="620" height="1145" alt="caprice1.jpg" /></p> <p>The first part begins with several arpeggios which you will need to play using sweep picking (bars 1 to 6). Everything else should be played with alternate picking. There's a tricky string skipping section at bar 7, which you can either play with your second finger or entirely with the pick. After bar 8, it repeats from the beginning. From bars 9 to 14, you have more arpeggios and string-skipping, but this time you will not need to sweep the arpeggios. Bar 14 ends with a long A# major arpeggio over three octaves. </p> <p>Next week, we will look into detail at the second part of the piece and also analyze some of the theory used in its composition. Best of luck, cheers!</p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England now living in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and in 2012 toured Japan, America and Canada. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-paganinis-16th-caprice-g-minor#comments Bent Out of Shape Niccolo Paganini Will Wallner Blogs News Lessons Fri, 05 Sep 2014 17:40:03 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18306 Bent Out of Shape Show Review: Blackmore's Night Live in Berlin http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-show-review-blackmores-night-live-berlin <!--paging_filter--><p>On August 26, I had the pleasure of seeing Blackmore's Night live in Berlin, Germany. </p> <p>It was my first chance to see guitar legend Ritchie Blackmore in concert, and living on the West Coast, I didn't think I'd ever get the opportunity as Blackmore's Night performs mostly in Europe and, on rare occasions, on the East Coast in the U.S. </p> <p>The 1,600-capacity Admiral Palace theater provided a very intimate setting. The stage looked as if it could've been used for a William Shakespeare play with greenery, flowers and rocks covering musical equipment and curtains painted to look like castle walls hanging on either side. When the concert began, all eyes were on Blackmore as he strummed his acoustic guitar and greeted fans in the front row who dressed as if they were at a renaissance fair. </p> <p>If I had to describe Blackmore's Night musically, I'd say they are a fusion of renaissance, folk and rock. It became clear from the beginning that they didn't have a problem breaking the rules. How many renaissance concerts have you seen with an arena-rock-style drum solo? A very impressive group of young talented musicians provided the perfect backing to Blackmore's Night. </p> <p>The concert was full of dynamics, and each song featured a wide spectrum of different arrangements. The best example of this was probably a Deep Purple cover of "Soldier of Fortune," which began with Ritchie and his wife, Candice Night, alone on stage playing very softly. The stage volume was so low, the entire audience had to be silent. As the song progressed, more instruments joined in until every member of the band played with full force. At that moment, it felt like more like a rock concert.</p> <p>Behind the band was a large screen where different moving images would appear relating to specific songs. The stage production enhanced the live music to create a very enjoyable experience. At times it was easy to forget I was watching one the greatest rock guitarists of all time as songs like "Renaissance Faire" had everybody singing and clapping. </p> <p>Two hours into the concert came the moment I had been waiting for as Blackmore returned from a short break carrying his signature yellow cream Fender Stratocaster. The band played "The Moon Is Shining" from their latest album, and the sound of an electrified Blackmore had the audience on their feet. The highlight came as he began his outro solo, which lasted about five minutes. Like a master, Blackmore built a solo that took the entire audience on an emotional journey. As he moved higher and higher up the neck and held a high bend for several seconds, the audience was in awe. </p> <p>As a guitar fan I thought it couldn't get any better than that. </p> <p>At which point he walked over to the front of the stage, dropped to his knees and began going crazy up and down the neck with both hands, flipping his guitar over and abusing his whammy bar. I cannot describe the audience reaction as the entire venue shook with a deep growl. With that single move, Blackmore reminded everyone that he was still the rock guitar god he's always been. As the song ended, I couldn't help but notice the man next to me was crying. I was also relieved that my friend got the moment on film! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zBC7vejEkM4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>The concert ended up lasting well over two and a half hours with Ritchie and Candice taking requests from the audience. Other highlights included "Fires at Midnight," which began with Ritchie alone on stage, on a stool, improvising acoustically for a few minutes. The beautiful melodic phrases had the audience in silence again, which contrasted perfectly the heavy metal style moves of moments earlier. </p> <p>To say I enjoyed the concert would be a huge understatement. I would urge any guitarist to see Blackmore's Night if you get the chance. </p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-show-review-blackmores-night-live-berlin#comments Bent Out of Shape Blackmore's Night Ritchie Blackmore Will Wallner Videos Blogs Mon, 01 Sep 2014 15:47:09 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22241 Bent Out of Shape: Jake E. Lee-Inspired, Staccato-Style Riffs http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-jake-e-lee-inspired-staccato-style-riffs <!--paging_filter--><p>A couple of weeks ago, <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-white-wizzard-devils-cut-guitar-solo-lesson-part-1">I showed you how to play a solo I recorded for the new White Wizzard album.</a></p> <p>In that solo, I highlighted a riff/lick where I double-picked each note with palm muting to create a staccato-style effect. </p> <p>The inspiration for this lick came from former Ozzy Osbourne guitarist Jake E. Lee, who used this effect in several Osbourne songs. The pre-chorus and chorus of "Bark at the Moon" use this technique, as well as the main riff from "Waiting for Darkness." </p> <p>For this lesson, I want to explore some more applications of this technique and give you some ideas of how you can use it in your own playing. The technique can be applied to virtually any single-note sequence you can come up with. </p> <p>I find it best to create a simple melodic line and then apply the technique to create a riff or motif. I've found it particularly useful in my solos as a way to create dynamics.</p> <p>To start, here's the lick from my previous lesson. Its just a very simple D minor pentatonic idea, which, combined with the technique, creates a much more memorable passage. This also is a good way to use pentatonics outside of the traditional rock-style licks. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F99867732"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab1_1.jpg" width="620" height="87" alt="tab1_1.jpg" /></p> <p>Here's a riff inspired by Jake E Lee's "Waiting For Darkness." It features a simple B natural minor melody followed by descending thirds. This is taken from one of my own compositions, where I used it as the main theme within the song.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab2_1.jpg" width="620" height="65" alt="tab2_1.jpg" /></p> <p>This is similar to the previous idea, but it uses A harmonic minor and a flat 5th to create a darker-style riff. This is taken from another solo I recorded. I was struggling to find something that sounded good over the backing music. There was no chord progression, rather just quick-moving power chords through a harmonic minor/diminished hybrid scale. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab3_0.jpg" width="620" height="52" alt="tab3_0.jpg" /></p> <p>If you don't like to sweep pick, this technique will allow you to play arpeggios with some speed. My final example features a simple A minor to G major chord progression played as arpeggios across all six strings. This is a great application for this technique. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab4.jpg" width="620" height="150" alt="tab4.jpg" /></p> <p>Hopefully you can take my examples and come up with your own ideas. It's also worth mentioning Jake E. Lee has a new album coming out sometime soon, which is a much welcomed return to the world of music for the highly influential guitarist. </p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-jake-e-lee-inspired-staccato-style-riffs#comments Bent Out of Shape Jake E. Lee Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Wed, 20 Aug 2014 14:48:47 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18740 Bent Out of Shape: Learning Mozart's Symphony No. 25 in G Minor, Part 9 http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-mozarts-symphony-no-25-g-minor-part-9 <!--paging_filter--><p>Welcome to the final part of learning Mozart's 25th symphony in G minor! </p> <p>It has taken nine lessons, but we've finally reached the end of the piece. </p> <p>For everyone who has followed me throughout this series, I hope you found it rewarding and challenging. Hopefully this piece has helped you improve as a player in terms of technique and theory. </p> <p>When I began learning the piece, I was looking for something easier technique-wise than my previous Paganini series. I feel this piece is a lot more accessible for beginner to intermediate players and is a really good introduction to classical music for rock/metal guitarists.</p> <p>After <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-mozarts-symphony-no-25-g-minor-part-8">Part 8</a>, there's a lot of repetition of previous parts before we get to the new material I will show you in this lesson. If we look at the Soundcloud guide track below, Part 8 finishes at 7:01; following this, you should play Part 6 in full, which brings you to 7:55. </p> <p>At this point, you should play the following sequence: Part 1, Part 2, Part 7 and Part 8. That sequence will finish at 9:58, where Part 9 begins.</p> <p>The finale starts with the same octave theme seen at the very beginning of the piece. However, this time it expands and develops the melody within the G harmonic minor scale. I decided to play every note in this section as an octave with a hybrid picking technique. I use my pick to play the low octave and the third finger on my picking hand to play the high octave. You will need to practice this technique cleanly to achieve a consistent sound throughout the whole melody section. </p> <p>Following this, we now play a quick 16th-note repetitive pattern from the first three notes of the G minor scale. This pattern is repeated for three whole bars, which will require an accurate alternate-picking technique. To make it slightly more challenging, I also play the same pattern up an octave during the second bar. To change position between octaves while maintaining consistent 16th note alternate picking will be a good challenge. Practice this very slowly and gradually increase the speed. </p> <p>Once you've learned this final part, all I have left to say is congratulations! This piece is over 10 minutes long and being able to play the whole thing is a tremendous achievement. Well done!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/AUkcOMrnxto" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/133750265&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab_7.jpg" width="620" height="711" alt="tab_7.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-mozarts-symphony-no-25-g-minor-part-9#comments Bent Out of Shape Mozart Will Wallner Videos Blogs Lessons Thu, 05 Jun 2014 16:31:56 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21469 Bent Out of Shape: Learning Mozart's Symphony No. 25 in G Minor, Part 8 http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-mozarts-symphony-no-25-g-minor-part-8 <!--paging_filter--><p>Welcome to the penultimate lesson on learning Mozart's 25th symphony in G minor! </p> <p>We are very close to the end, and — for everyone who has followed me with this series — I hope you've found it useful. For this lesson, much like with <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-mozarts-symphony-no-25-g-minor-part-7">Part 7</a>, we're going to play something that follows a previous section (in this case, from Part 4) but within a different relative key. </p> <p>Part 8 takes the same themes from <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-mozarts-symphony-no-25-g-minor-part-4">Part 4</a> (which is based in Bb major) but arranges the notes within the much more dramatic sounding scale of G harmonic minor.</p> <p>The melodies and movement within the scale are identical but begin on a different root note. It's quite interesting to see how by changing your root within the same scale (in this case G minor) you can create a completely feel or emotion. This is the principle behind modes and is clearly demonstrated in the difference between Part 4 and Part 8. (BTW: You can find parts 1 through 7 under RELATED CONTENT — right below my photo.)</p> <p>This section is mostly 8th and quarter notes, which makes very easy technically except for two bars with 16th-note phrases. By now, we have seen similar sections in previous parts so these should not pose too much trouble for you.</p> <p>As an additional challenge, I have arranged the majority of the melodies on the high E string. This will help develop your skills playing on a single string and also help visualize a minor scale along a single string instead of the standard "three note per string" shapes.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/661OQZHqRqE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/133750265&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab_6.jpg" width="620" height="699" alt="tab_6.jpg" /></p> <p>Next week will be the final lesson, cheers!</p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-mozarts-symphony-no-25-g-minor-part-8#comments Bent Out of Shape Mozart Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Tue, 20 May 2014 16:34:03 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21302 Bent Out of Shape: Learning Mozart's Symphony No. 25 in G Minor, Part 7 http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-mozarts-symphony-no-25-g-minor-part-7 <!--paging_filter--><p>Today we are going to learn Part 7 of Mozart's 25th Symphony in G Minor. </p> <p>It's been a while since we started learning the piece, but we're getting very close to the end. To catch up on all the other parts of this lesson, look under RELATED CONTENT directly below my photo to the left.</p> <p>You might remember me saying I was learning this piece with you, section by section. For that reason, it was difficult for me to predict how many lessons would be needed to cover the entire piece. I can now tell you that after this lesson, we'll need two more lessons to finish up. </p> <p>Part 7 is very interesting because it relates very closely to <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-mozarts-symphony-no-25-g-minor-part-3">Part 3</a>. This new section follows the same themes within Part 3, but in a different relative key. Part 3 was based around Bb major, which is the relative major scale of G minor. Part 7, however, features the same themes but played in G minor and, in some sections, G harmonic minor. </p> <p>We begin in bars 1 to 8 with an octave theme followed by a harmonic minor line that mirrors Part 3 exactly. This isn't technically challenging, but you might like to experiment with different styles of vibrato for the sustained octave notes. </p> <p>As in Part 3, we now play a series of arpeggios outlining the following chord progression: G minor / C minor / F major / Bb major / Eb major / A diminished. These can be played in several different ways. I demonstrated for you in Part 3 the volume swell technique and also 16th-note tremolo picking. You might also like to play around with triplets or even double-picked 8th notes to see which you prefer. In the example, I play 16th-note tremolo picking, which isn't too difficult as long as you have a good alternate-picking technique. </p> <p>To finish we play a sequence of descending arpeggios, which, for me, are the most challenging part of this section as you need to begin every arpeggio from the high E string. This can be difficult as you finish each arpeggios on the A or low E and then need to skip back to high E without interruption. </p> <p>As with anything technically challenging on the guitar, start off slow to a metronome and gradually increase the tempo. Good luck and see you next week with Part 8! </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/133750265&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_CxrcIxr5gc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab-for-will.jpg" width="620" height="749" alt="tab-for-will.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-mozarts-symphony-no-25-g-minor-part-7#comments Bent Out of Shape Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Sun, 20 Apr 2014 16:02:58 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21044