January 2013 http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/3068/all en The 50 Greatest Led Zeppelin Songs http://www.guitarworld.com/50-greatest-led-zeppelin-songs <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>From “Dazed and Confused” to “You Shook Me” … from “Tangerine” to “The Lemon Song” … from “Trampled Under Foot” to “Stairway to Heaven” … <em>Guitar World</em> presents a critical analysis of the classic-rock group’s best tracks.</strong></p> <p>With the recent release of <em>Celebration Day</em>, the concert film immortalizing Led Zeppelin’s historic and most likely final reunion concert at London’s O2 Arena on December 10, 2007, guitarist-producer Jimmy Page reminded the world just how profoundly great and enduring his band’s music is. </p> <p>In homage to what is arguably hard rock’s most innovative group (and certainly its most influential), what follows is a tour of 50 of the most celebrated Led Zeppelin songs, with a focus on the guitar playing, songwriting and arranging genius of the quartet’s visionary founder. </p> <p>Compiling such a finite list presents tough choices for anyone, as the band’s recorded output of great music during its heyday was impressively prolific by any standard and includes well over 50 gems.</p> <p><strong>50. “D’yer Mak’er” (<em>Houses of the Holy</em>)</strong></p> <p>This lighthearted but heavy-sounding song, the title of which is intended to be pronounced “D’you Make Her,” was conceived as a playful melding of a Fifties doo-wop-style repeating chord progression and the quirky, syncopated rhythms of Jamaican reggae. </p> <p>Page makes good use of sliding sixth intervals on the song’s verse riff, providing a thin-textured but catchy and harmonically effective accompaniment to Plant’s vocals. His guitar solo, like so many of his others, is noteworthy for its tasteful, lyrical phrasing and emotive use of bends and finger vibratos.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/aoxQBvcKa9Y" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>49. “Tangerine” (<em>Led Zeppelin III</em>)</strong></p> <p>Like “Thank You,” this folky ballad, written exclusively by Page, offers good bang for your musical buck, in terms of packing a lot of expression into a handful of melodically embellished open “cowboy” chords. </p> <p>Jimmy achieved a rich texture by performing the song’s main guitar part on a 12-string acoustic and handsomely decorated the chorus with authentic country-style pedal-steel licks, for which he used lots of oblique bends and a wah pedal to accentuate their weeping sound. </p> <p>The chorus, played in the happy-sounding key of G, provides a welcome contrast to the somber feel of the verse and solo sections, which are in A minor. Also noteworthy is Page’s short and sweet slide solo, played with a thick, overdriven tone that effectively sustains his vibrato-ed notes and enhances their singing quality. </p> <p>He thoughtfully describes the underlying chord changes in his slide melody by closely following the chord tones as he works his way up to the highest note on the neck.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/WCFDo3XSUsQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>48. “Custard Pie” (<em>Physical Graffiti</em>)</strong></p> <p>This opening track from <em>Physical Graffiti</em> features a punchy, Les Paul–through-Marshall–driven “crunch riff” behind Plant’s sexually euphemistic lyrics, many of which were borrowed from songs by early American bluesmen of the Robert Johnson era, specifically “Drop Down Mama” by Sleepy John Estes, “Shake ’Em on Down” by Bukka White, and “I Want Some of Your Pie” by Blind Boy Fuller. </p> <p>Like “Houses of the Holy,” “Custard Pie” is built around a repeating two-bar riff based on an open A chord. </p> <p>As in other songs, Page makes great use of rests in the song’s main riff, which allows it to “breathe” nicely and draws attention to the vocals and drums. Jimmy’s penchant for jazz/R&amp;B harmony is manifested in the G11 chord he plays—in place of the perfectly acceptable straight G chord—near the end of each of the song’s verses, which are loosely based on the 12-bar blues form. </p> <p>The guitarist makes clever use of the wah pedal in his solo, which he begins with a repeating oblique-bend phrase that, with added wah-wah inflections, sounds like a toddler throwing a tantrum. The solo is also noteworthy for the way Page melodically acknowledges the chord changes by touching upon their chord tones as opposed to simply riffing away on the key’s major and minor pentatonic scales.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/0VH6kF8jlwA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>47. “That’s the Way” (<em>Led Zeppelin III</em>)</strong></p> <p>Like “Bron-Yr-Aur,” this mellow acoustic song was inspired by the serenity and pastoral beauty of the Welsh countryside during Page and Plant’s working vacation at the remote Bron-Yr-Aur cottage in 1970. </p> <p>The band performed the song live in open G tuning, but the studio version sounds in G flat, which is most likely the result of the instruments being tuned down a half step (or a possible manipulation of the tape speed in the mastering process, similar to what Page did with “When the Levee Breaks”). </p> <p>Jimmy strums the song with a pick and makes great use of ringing open strings within his chord voicings, even as he moves away from the open position. Particularly cool are the reverb-soaked pedal-steel licks that Page overdubbed, for which he alternates between major and minor pentatonic phrases—again, a fine example of “light and shade.” </p> <p>Also noteworthy is the climbing outro progression, for which Jimmy again combines open strings with notes fretted in the middle region of the neck to create unusual, lush-sounding chord voicings. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/TANKvE3sI3w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>46. “In the Light” (<em>Physical Graffiti</em>)</strong></p> <p>Jimmy broke out his violin bow once again and put it to great use in this song’s extended intro, providing a low, eerie, sitar-style drone as a backdrop to Jones’ mystical, echoing “bagpipe” melodies, creatively conjured on a synthesizer.</p> <p> Also particularly cool is the ominous-sounding descending blues-scale-based guitar riff that comes crashing in at the end of the intro (at 2:45) and the menacing, angular verse figure that follows, against which Page overdubbed a twangy, ringing open G note, played in unison with the D string’s fifth-fret G and treated with a shimmering tremolo effect.</p> <p>The song’s bright, triumphant-sounding final theme, introduced by Jones on a Clavinet at 4:09, stands in stark contrast to the hauntingly dark minor key-based sections that precede it—another example of “light and shade.” </p> <p>Also worth noting is the ascending major scale-based lead melody Page plays over the theme’s repeating progression at 4:25 and the way it moves in contrary motion to the descending bass line, a compositional technique regarded as one of classical music’s slickest moves.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/C3jRK-sdTSE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>45. “For Your Life” (<em>Presence</em>)</strong></p> <p>Page broke out his 1962 Lake Placid Blue Fender Stratocaster for this darkly heavy song about the excesses of drug use in the L.A. music scene, tastefully employing its whammy bar to create well-placed, woozy sonic nosedives. </p> <p>The song’s midtempo groove features sparse and restrained but fat-sounding guitar-and-bass riffs that include wide, dramatic “holes of silence” that are crossed only by the drums, vocals and a shaken tambourine. </p> <p>The arrangement really starts to develop at 2:07, as Page introduces a more ambitious new riff in a new key that’s propelled by a short machine-gun burst of triplets that further enhances the tune’s earthy midtempo groove. Jimmy’s solo, beginning at 4:17 is noteworthy for its melodic inventiveness, quirky phrasing and wailing, drooping bends.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/YSAtGNFPLXk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>44. “Friends” (<em>Led Zeppelin III</em>)</strong></p> <p>As mentioned earlier, Page employed the same open C6 tuning on this song that he used on “Bron-Yr-Aur” (low to high, C A C G C E), again employing the open strings as drones to create a mesmerizing, hypnotic effect. </p> <p>In this case, Jimmy is strumming heartily with the pick, as opposed to fingerpicking, and plays double-stop figures against ringing open notes to create hauntingly beautiful melodies, making extensive use of the exotic-sounding sharp-four interval (Fs in this case), as well as the bluesy flat-three (Ef) and Arabic-flavored flat-nine (Df), conjuring an intriguing East-meets-West kind of vibe. </p> <p>As he later did in “The Rain Song” and “Kashmir,” the guitarist moves a compact two-finger chord shape up and down the fretboard, played in conjunction with ringing open strings, in this case to craft an enigmatic-sounding octave-doubled countermelody to Plant’s vocals. As a finishing touch, a string ensemble, arranged by Jones, was brought into the studio to double and dramatically reinforce the countermelody.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/D8240QPQrNI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>43. “Trampled Under Foot” (<em>Physical Graffiti</em>)</strong></p> <p>Inspired by the cleverly euphemistic lyrics of Delta blues legend Robert Johnson’s 1936 composition “Terraplane Blues” and the funky grooves of James Brown and Stevie Wonder, this muscular song features Jones stretching out on a Hohner Clavinet keyboard and a hard-stomping, almost relentless one-chord vamp that’s broken up periodically by a brief string of accented chord changes, over which Page plays wah-inflected, Steve Cropper–style sixth intervals. </p> <p>Jimmy uses his wah pedal very creatively throughout the song and creates exciting aural images by treating his guitar with ambient reverb, backward echo and stereo panning effects, especially toward the end.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/jBku3rJ0Xe0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>42. “Houses of the Holy” (<em>Physical Graffiti</em>)</strong></p> <p>Built around a fat-sounding strut riff, this song is nothing but a good time. Particularly cool is the way Page and Bonham shake up the riff’s solid eighth-note groove throughout by playing off each other with quirky, syncopated 16th-note fills, such as those at 0:38 and 0:42. </p> <p>Also noteworthy is Page’s resourceful use, during the verses, of progressively descending triad inversions on the top three strings (not unlike those used by Pete Townshend in the Who’s “Substitute”), which provide an effective contrast to both Jones’ angular bass line during this section and the meaty main guitar riff.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/sn_3s9wmZuQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>41. “The Rover” (<em>Physical Graffiti</em>)</strong></p> <p>This song’s sexy main riff, introduced at 0:23, embodies that trademark “Led Zeppelin swagger,” resulting from Page’s clever application of pull-down bends on the lower four strings, which he uses to “scoop up to” target pitches from a half step below and make his guitar sing, just as he had done earlier on the low E string in his main riff to “Dazed and Confused” and with whole-step bends in the previously mentioned “Over the Hills and Far Away” inter-verse riff. </p> <p>The effect is accentuated in this case by the use of a phaser, which makes Jimmy’s guitar sound almost as if it’s played through a talk box. </p> <p>Also noteworthy are Page’s elegantly crafted, flamenco-flavored solo and the decorative second guitar part heard during the song’s choruses, for which Jimmy arpeggiates the underlying chord progression, in the process adding an attractive countermelody to the theme without obscuring Plant’s vocals.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/XikK2RJdZ18" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>40. “Dancing Days” (<em>Houses of the Holy</em>)</strong></p> <p>Page takes a riff-building approach on this light-hearted yet powerful rocker similar to that used by Keith Richards on many Rolling Stones classics, such as “Brown Sugar,” “Honky Tonk Women” and “Can’t You Hear Me Knocking.” </p> <p>Making great use of open G tuning (low to high, D G D G B D) and the convenient one-finger major barre-chord shapes it affords, he uses his fret hand’s available middle finger, ring finger and pinkie to add harmonic “extensions” and embellishments to index-finger barre chords. </p> <p>Page’s fascination with the Lydian mode, specifically its s4 interval, manifests itself in a musically compelling way in both the song’s sassy intro riff and its punchy verse and chorus riffs, all three of which convey a strong feeling of tension-and-release, as the harmonically turbulent s4 resolves downward in each case to the stable major third. </p> <p>Particularly cool is the soaring slide melody, a neatly executed overdub first appearing at 0:56, which requires quick position shifts and carefully attention to intonation (pitch centering).</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/jBku3rJ0Xe0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>39. “Bron-Yr-Aur” (<em>Physical Graffiti</em>)</strong></p> <p>Conceived during Page and Plant’s legendary 1970 retreat to Bron-Yr-Aur cottage in rural Wales and recorded during the sessions for Led Zeppelin III, this ingenious fingerstyle-folk instrumental is performed in the same open C6 tuning as “Friends” (low to high, C A C G C E). </p> <p>Page weaves the tune’s melodic themes into an impeccably uninterrupted stream of forward and backward 16th-note arpeggio rolls across the strings, with lots of droning open notes and unisons creating a rich natural chorusing effect and a lush, pastoral soundscape that puts the piece on par with the works of renowned late 19th-century impressionistic composers Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Gi76yMCXxtQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>38. “No Quarter” (live version, <em>The Song Remains the Same</em>)</strong></p> <p>This fully realized, extended performance of John Paul Jones’ keyboard showcase piece packs the same kind of dynamic punch and slow-jam rhythmic drama as “Since I’ve Been Loving You” and demonstrates both Jones’ and Page’s penchant for modal jazz and their respective skills at building extended, story-like solos over a one-chord vamp. (Incidentally, it is performed in standard tuning, a half step higher than the studio version from <em>Houses of the Holy</em>, for which the instruments sound a half step below concert pitch.) </p> <p>Also noteworthy are the two jarring, prog-rock-flavored chords in the song’s pre-chorus, Bfadds11 and Efadds11, first heard at 0:58 and 1:06, respectively.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/k5R9MB-edJ8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>37. “The Wanton Song” (<em>Physical Graffiti</em>)</strong></p> <p>Like “Immigrant Song,” this composition’s main riff demonstrates how alternating octaves combined with a strong, syncopated rhythm can create a compelling, heavy-sounding riff, and it’s safe to say that it probably inspired bands like Living Colour and Rage Against the Machine to pen their similarly styled riffs. </p> <p>And like “Out on the Tiles” and “The Ocean,” the use of wide, recurring “holes of silence” in the guitar and bass parts while the drums and vocals continue, creates pronounced dynamic and textural contrasts, which add to the song’s appeal. </p> <p>The instrumental interlude section that ensues after the second and fourth verses (at 0:59 and 2:03, respectively) provides a stark contrast to the raw power of the alternating-octaves riff and introduces a surprisingly jazzy chord progression within such a heavy rock song, with overdriven diminished seventh chords—something few other rock guitarists outside of Yes’ Steve Howe or Dean DeLeo from Stone Temple Pilots would have the vision and daring to use—employed as harmonic pivots to modulate to new keys. </p> <p>Page’s Leslie-treated minor-seven chord riff that ensues brings to mind the Isley Brothers’ 1973 R&amp;B hit “Who’s That Lady” and further demonstrates the breadth of Page’s stylistic influences.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/nrfQZ_anNYM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>36. “How Many More Times” (<em>Led Zeppelin</em>)</strong></p> <p>This lengthy final track from Led Zeppelin’s debut album and live set-closer in their early days was a favorite improvisational vehicle for the band, with open-ended jam sections that allowed Page to stretch out with scorching lead licks, reverb-drenched violin bow excursions and wah-wah-inflected chord strumming. </p> <p>As Jimmy told <em>Guitar World</em> in 1993, the song “was made up of little pieces I developed when I was with the Yardbirds, as were other numbers, such as ‘Dazed and Confused.’ ” He adds, “It was recorded live in the studio with cues and nods.” </p> <p>Embodying an eclectic blend of stylistic elements, the song features an interesting variety of rhythmic grooves, from a jazzy swing feel, to a straight-eighths funk beat, to a Latin bolero rhythm somewhat reminiscent of the previously recorded Jeff Beck instrumental “Beck’s Bolero,” on which both Page and Jones had played.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/NBqbuGgt0Us" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>35. “Gallows Pole” (<em>Led Zeppelin III</em>)</strong></p> <p>Led Zeppelin’s creative arrangement of this sardonic, centuries-old, storytelling Celtic folk song titled “The Maid Freed from the Gallows” begins very modestly, with Plant’s pleading vocals accompanied solely by Page’s quiet acoustic strumming. </p> <p>It builds in stages to a full-blown bluegrass-style “hoe-down,” with a mandolin and acoustic 12-string joining the fray midway through, followed by bass, drums and, finally, banjo (played by Page) and overdriven electric lead guitar, on which Page cleverly plays major pentatonic licks to conjure the sound of a country fiddle. </p> <p>The arrangement’s ambitious development is not unlike that of “Stairway to Heaven” in its magnitude and creates a similarly dramatic effect.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Tza0zaJUW9w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>34. “Out On the Tiles” (<em>Led Zeppelin III</em>)</strong></p> <p>This “forgotten classic” features another of Led Zeppelin’s signature octave-doubled, single-note “stomp riffs,” this one played at a faster tempo than most of their other similarly crafted songs, with Bonham grooving on one of his favorite funky drumbeats as Page and Jones lock-in on a tricky bass melody that drops an eighth note at the end of the first and third verses (at 0:24 and 1:40, respectively). </p> <p>Particularly cool- and powerful-sounding are the accented pulled bends on the low E string between the A power chords in the intro riff. It’s also worth pointing out that this is one of the very few uptempo Led Zeppelin songs that does not include a guitar solo; it doesn’t need one. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Uv2E8-Irn6c" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>33. “You Shook Me” (<em>Led Zeppelin</em>)</strong></p> <p>Led Zeppelin’s convincingly worthy cover of this Chicago-style slow blues song (written by Willie Dixon and J.B. Lenoir) showcases their thorough assimilation of and deep adulation for the style and ability to take it to the next level of intensity through each band member’s musical virtuosity and artistic depth of feeling. </p> <p>Page’s slide work, performed in the challenging and potentially unforgiving mode of standard tuning, is impeccable here, as he shadows Plant’s vocal melody with spot-on intonation and coaxes sublime vibratos from many of his sustained notes. </p> <p>Equally laudable is Jimmy’s wailing guitar solo, played without a slide, for which he employed tape echo and epic reverb effects to create breathtakingly soaring trails of cascading, screaming licks during the solo’s and song’s climax.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/dbwG0u3hb7M" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>32. “Celebration Day” (<em>Led Zeppelin III</em>)</strong></p> <p>This playful, uptempo rocker was built around a slinky slide riff conceived by Jones, the genesis of which he described in his column in Guitar World July 1997: “I came up with the intro/verse riff to “Celebration Day” while playing and old Danelectro baritone guitar like a lap steel, using an unusual, low open A7 tuning (low to high: A A A E G Cs), a steel bar and a nut saddle to raise the strings.” When performing the song live, Page would adapt this riff to standard-tuned guitar. </p> <p>On the recording, Page crafted a complementary and similarly slinky bend lick to play over the song’s main A-riff following each verse (initially at 0:24). </p> <p>Similar to what he later did between the verses in “Over the Hills and Far Away,” the guitarist uses pulled bends on the bottom two strings to reach up to the last note of each phrase he plays, in this case adding a bold, shimmering vibrato to each bend.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/o5cgrsWnPvo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>31. “Four Sticks” (<em>Led Zeppelin IV</em>)</strong></p> <p>Named after Bonham’s literal use of four sticks on the track (two in each hand), this tribal dance–like song features exotic rhythms and harmonic modalities that conjure images of Near Eastern and North African wildernesses from an earlier century. </p> <p>The arrangement is built around three guitar riffs, each incorporating an open-string bass pedal tone, or drone. As mentioned previously, Page used, for the song’s primary riff, the same “bending away from a unison” trick he employed in his “Whole Lotta Love” riff, with equally haunting results. In this case, he strums the open G string together with that note’s fretted equivalent on the D string’s fifth fret and pushes the fretted G slightly sharp by bending it upward (away from the palm).</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/jyZc2Xqav_4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>30. “Thank You” (<em>Led Zeppelin II</em>)</strong></p> <p>Before “Stairway to Heaven” or “The Rain Song” were ever conceived, this well-written, timeless love song displayed, along with “Babe I’m Gonna Leave You,” a sensitive, emotional side of Led Zeppelin, one that didn’t have to do with sexual lust or scorn. (Gee, what was George Harrison complaining about in commenting to Led Zeppelin that their songbook was lacking ballads?) </p> <p>Layering tracks of acoustic and clean 12-string electric guitars, Page weaved a tapestry of warm harmony behind Plant’s tender, low-key vocals and crafted an elegant single-note acoustic solo, one often celebrated and emulated for its melodic appeal by players such as Slash. </p> <p>Also noteworthy in “Thank You” are Page’s melodic 12-string runs behind Plant’s vocals during the song’s final two verses, specifically at 2:31 and 3:14.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/28BAZ_EFSt8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>29. “Bring It On Home” (<em>Led Zeppelin II</em>)</strong></p> <p>Like their other blues covers, Led Zeppelin’s reading of this Willie Dixon blues song has their unique artistic, stylistic stamp all over it, from its funky bass-and-drums groove, octave-doubled single-note riffs and Page’s soulful use of string bends, which, incidentally, Jones aggressively mirrors an octave lower on bass during the song’s main riff. </p> <p>Page added to the riff, at 1:54, a decorative high harmony line, as he would later do with riffs in “Black Dog,” “The Ocean” “Achilles Last Stand” and other songs, in each case further building the arrangement and enhancing its appeal. His harmony notes here form sweet-sounding sixth and third intervals based on the E Mixolydian mode.</p> <p>The song’s middle verse sections sport a particularly bad-ass guitar riff, first appearing at 2:04 and built around sixth-interval double-stops, again based on the decidedly bluesy-sounding E Mixolydian mode. Notice how Page divides and orchestrates this riff into two separate guitar tracks, which he pans hard left and right in the stereo mix, accentuating the riff’s call-and-response quality.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/N_zTz5A_7Aw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>28. “Living Loving Maid (She’s Just a Woman)” (<em>Led Zeppelin II</em>)</strong></p> <p>Following on the heels of “Heartbreaker,” this playful and more light-hearted rocker features some of Jimmy’s most tasteful “power-pop” guitar parts. He recorded the song’s primary rhythm tracks on his Fender electric 12-string (the same guitar he used in the studio on “Stairway to Heaven” and “The Song Remains the Same”). </p> <p>As in “Heartbreaker,” “Good Times Bad Times,” “Communication Breakdown” and other songs, he liberally employs his go-to “Hendrix-style” thumbed chord “grips,” which, lacking the low fifth of a conventionally fretted major barre chord, add sonic clarity to his chord voicings. </p> <p>Jimmy’s solo in this song is short and sweet, featuring emotive bends and vibratos and culminating in one of his trademark chromatic climbs up the B string.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/OKI1k7LSAIE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>27. “Going to California” (<em>Led Zeppelin IV</em>)</strong></p> <p>Page also used open strings and unison notes to great effect on this acoustic folk masterpiece. Tuning both his low and high E strings down to D (in what is known as double drop-D tuning), the guitarist plays dreamy hypnotic arpeggio figures that feature lots of ringing, repeated notes played on different strings. </p> <p>With its blend of English and American folk-guitar styles (think Bert Jansch meets Merle Travis), “Going to California” is a finger stylist’s delight. Particularly compelling is the dramatic bridge section beginning at 1:41, played by Page in the parallel minor key, D minor. If you listen closely, you’ll hear two acoustic guitars fingerpicking different inversions of the same chords, thirds apart.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/S0Kbbjw28P4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>26. “What Is and What Should Never Be” (<em>Led Zeppelin II</em>)</strong></p> <p>Like “Ramble On,” this song is another masterwork study in dynamic and textural contrasts. Page begins each verse by strumming a breezy two-chord vamp using jazzy, George Benson–approved dominant ninth and 13th chords with a clean, mellow tone, as Jones plays one of his celebrated brilliantly lyrical, complementary bass lines. </p> <p>Taking advantage of the wide range of gain and overdrive afforded his Les Paul/non-master–volume Marshall tube amp pairing, Page cranks up his guitar’s volume on the choruses, resulting in a beefy crunch tone that perfectly suits the powerful riff he crafted for that section. </p> <p>The song also features one of Jimmy’s most tasteful slide solos, carefully executed in standard tuning and thus without the harmonic safety net that an open tuning affords.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/doKNr52rHdk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>25. “The Ocean” (<em>Houses of the Holy</em>)</strong></p> <p>On par with “Heartbreaker” and “Black Dog,” in terms of embodying that trademark Led Zeppelin octave-doubled single-note “stomp groove,” this song’s iconic intro/main riff demonstrates just how effectively heavy-sounding rests, or “holes of silence,” can be when sandwiched between notes in just the right places. </p> <p>This riff, as well as the power-chord-driven and similarly punctuated verse figure, are made to sound even more dramatic by the ambient room sound surrounding John Bonham’s drums, to which Page, the producer, rightfully deserves credit for his visionary use of distant miking techniques.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/JvoG36nUcSU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>24. “Rock and Roll” (<em>Led Zeppelin IV</em>)</strong></p> <p>The ultimate hot rod–driving song and tribute to Chuck Berry, this uptempo, straight-eighths blues-rock anthem features irresistibly boogie-woogie-like rhythms and a killer guitar solo that begins with Page playfully pulling off to open strings before ascending the neck with a daringly acrobatic chromatic climb somewhat reminiscent of his climactic lead in “Communication Breakdown.”</p> <p>Particularly artistic is the way Page lays back rhythmically during the song’s verses with sustained power chords, providing an effective, welcome contrast to the relentless eighth notes of the bass and drums.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/GonQSHxzb1k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>23. “The Lemon Song” (<em>Led Zeppelin II</em>)</strong></p> <p>Borrowing from Howlin’ Wolf’s 1964 blues hit and eventual standard, “Killing Floor,” Led Zeppelin created a derivative work that became a classic unto itself, showcasing their own renowned Memphis soul–style interactive blues-rock jamming, dynamic sensibilities and each individual musician’s fat tones. </p> <p>Not content to just play the song’s climbing intro riff on his low E string, Page employs hybrid picking (pick-and-fingers technique) to pair each low melody note with the open B string, creating a pleasing midrange “honk.” </p> <p>Also noteworthy in this arrangement is Page’s substitution, on the five chord in the song’s repeating 12-bar blues progression, of a minor seven chord, Bm7, for the customary dominant seven chord, which would be B7 in this case, creating a darker, more melancholy sound.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Zyhu2ysqKGk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>22. “Babe I’m Gonna Leave You” (<em>Led Zeppelin<em>)</em></em></strong></p> <p>Another acoustic masterpiece, this song features a bittersweet circular chord progression presented as ringing, fingerpicked arpeggios. Particularly noteworthy is the way Page spins numerous subtle melodic variations on the theme throughout the song (check out the one at 3:40), sweetening the aural pot with dramatic dynamic contrasts. </p> <p>This may be one of the most perfectly recorded and mixed acoustic guitar tracks ever. Notice how, in the song’s intro, the “dry” (up-front and un-effected) acoustic guitar is in the left channel while the right channel is mostly “wet,” saturated in cavernous reverb.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/iP9xMobANJM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>21. “When the Levee Breaks” (<em>Led Zeppelin IV</em>)</strong></p> <p>This track is revered for, among other things, its epic drum sound, resulting from the cavernous acoustics of Headley Grange and Page’s ingenious distant microphone placement, as well as his decision, as producer, to slow down the tape speed in the mastering process. </p> <p>Led Zeppelin’s cover of this blues song, written and first recorded in 1929 by Kansas Joe McCoy and Memphis Minnie, also features great slide playing by Page in open G tuning (low to high, D G D G B D). Due to the slowing of the tape speed, however, the pitch of the recording was lowered by a whole step, so the song actually sounds in the key of F.</p> <p>Page performed this song’s two guitar tracks on his Fender electric 12-string. Its additional strings, in conjunction with the open tuning, enhanced the unison and octave-doubling effect of many of the notes in the guitar parts, which already incorporate unison notes. The result is a huge wall of droning G and D notes with a natural chorusing effect that mesmerizes the listener in a way akin to the chorus chords in “Kashmir.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/wEKkJHSO8A0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>20. “The Battle of Evermore” (<em>Led Zeppelin IV</em>)</strong></p> <p>For this mystical-sounding folk-rock gem, Page and Jones traded the instruments they play on “Going to California,” with Page taking up the mandolin and Jones strumming acoustic guitar. According to Page, “ ‘The Battle of Evermore’ was made up on the spot by Robert and myself. I just picked up John Paul Jones’ mandolin, never having played one before, and just wrote up the chords and the whole thing in one sitting.”</p> <p>Page’s mandolin sound on this song is epic, which is partially the result of his taking advantage of the cavernous, majestic natural reverb of the location where he recorded his tracks, which was in the foyer of a large, old stone house in rural Wales called Headley Grange. (This location, by the way, is where several other tracks on <em>Led Zeppelin IV</em> and <em>Physical Graffiti</em> were recorded, most notably Bonham’s drums on “When the Levee Breaks.”) </p> <p>Page additionally doubled/layered his mandolin tracks on this arrangement and employed a tape echo effect, with a single repeat, timed to echo in an eighth-note rhythm relative to the song’s tempo, resulting in a continuous stream of percolating eighth notes.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/WGAKeHQUx-U" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>19. “Immigrant Song” (<em>Led Zeppelin III</em>)</strong></p> <p>With its fiercely galloping rhythms, jagged backbeat accents and ominous-sounding flat-five intervals, this ode to Viking pillage no doubt helped fuel the lustful creative fire behind hordes of heavy metal bands like Iron Maiden, Celtic Frost and Mastodon that came of age in the years following the song’s 1970 release. </p> <p>Particularly sinister-sounding is the way Page plays, during the song’s outro, an atypical second-position G minor chord shape over Jones’ C-note accents, in the process creating a highly unusual voicing of C9(no3).</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Q1lzfz_TjWI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>18. “Good Times Bad Times” (<em>Led Zeppelin</em>)</strong></p> <p>This punchy opening track from the band’s debut album set the stage for Zeppelin’s juggernaut conquest of the world of hard rock. Page octave-doubles Jones’ nimble, angular bass line on his slinky-strung Fender Telecaster, adding shimmering finger vibrato at just about every opportunity. </p> <p>The guitarist’s scorching, Leslie-effected lead licks, with their gut-wrenching bends and tumbling triplets, convey a man on fire and poised to win the West.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/6TdDqv0qRqw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>17. “Nobody’s Fault but Mine” (<em>Presence</em>)</strong></p> <p>Led Zeppelin’s turbo-charged reinvention of this traditional American gospel blues, or Negro spiritual, song was inspired primarily by singer and acoustic slide guitarist Blind Willie Johnson’s 1927 recording of it. Zeppelin’s version is built around a mesmerizing, laser beam-like guitar melody, which Page played with distortion and a flanger effect and doubled, both in unison and an octave higher, with Robert Plant additionally scat singing the line, adding to its mesmerizing, bigger-than-life quality. </p> <p>Page’s aggressive exploitation of string bending and vibrato techniques, in both the main riff and his solo, adds to the soulfulness of the band’s arrangement. Also noteworthy are Jones and Bonham’s lock-step bass-and-drum syncopations, which further add to the power and drama of the band’s arrangement.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/esZ15n6_5JY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>16. “Black Dog” (<em>Led Zeppelin IV</em>)</strong></p> <p>“Black Dog” was built around a snakey blues riff, initially written on bass by John Paul Jones and doubled an octave higher on guitar by Page. The rhythmic orientation of the song’s main riff to the beat has been the subject of heated debate among working musicians over the years, the point of contention being specifically where “one” is. </p> <p>When pressed for an explanation, Page was vague. But Jones, in his Lo and Behold column in <em>Guitar World</em> December 1996, states that this deceptive riff should be counted with the first A note — the root note of the song’s key and the fourth note of the riff—falling squarely on beat one. (Drummer John Bonham’s big cymbal crash on beat two is one of the things about this riff that throws a lot of people off.) </p> <p>Page enhanced the riff later in the song, at 3:18, by overdubbing a parallel-thirds harmony line. In the 1993 GW interview, the guitarist noted, “Most people never catch that part. It’s just toward the end, to help build the song. You have to listen closely for the high guitar parts.”</p> <p>Page and recording engineer Andy Johns tried a novel and ultimately successful experiment by triple-tracking the song’s rhythm guitar parts. As Page explained, “Andy used the mic preamp on the mixing board to get distortion. Then we put two 1176 Universal compressors in series on that sound and distorted the guitars as much as we could and then compressed them. Each riff was triple-tracked: one left, one right, and one right up the middle.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/npQbPpDF6hA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>15. “Ramble On” (<em>Led Zeppelin II</em>)</strong></p> <p>This song is all about contrasts, or as Page likes to say, “light and shade.” It begins with a mellow, folky acoustic strum riff pitted against a highly melodic Fender bass line for the verse sections, which lead up to a hard-hitting and highly inventive electric guitar–driven chorus riff. </p> <p>Page broadened the definition of the term “power chord” here by using the seemingly odd two-note combination of root and flatted seventh (Fs and E, respectively, played right after Plant sings “Ramble on!”), a pairing made even more unlikely by the fact that he plays it over John Paul Jones’ E bass note. The theoretical discord notwithstanding, it sounds great.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/a3HemKGDavw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>14. “Black Mountain Side” (<em>Led Zeppelin</em>)</strong></p> <p>Page spices up this traditional Celtic folk melody with East Indian musical flavors, hiring a bona fide tabla drummer to accompany him on the track and injecting his own fiery Indian-style acoustic lead break into the arrangement. </p> <p>Check out <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-jan-13-led-zeppelin">the January 2013 issue</a> of <em>Guitar World</em> to learn the secrets to this iconic song.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/z0OYZm4RhFE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>13. “In My Time of Dying” (<em>Physical Graffiti</em>)</strong></p> <p>This 11-minute track was inspired chiefly by Blind Willie Johnson’s reading of the traditional blues-gospel song “Jesus Make Up My Dying Bed” as well as a similarly titled rendition from the same era by Delta bluesman Charlie Patton. </p> <p>Zeppelin’s inspired interpretation of the song features some of Page’s best slide guitar work (performed in open A tuning: low to high, E A E A Cs E), as well as one of the fattest-sounding drum tracks in this or any other band’s catalog, the result of Bonham’s unique touch and feel and Page’s miking and mixing techniques.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/yZgblTKscX0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>12. “Kashmir” (<em>Physical Graffiti</em>)</strong></p> <p>Played in DADGAD tuning, which Page had previously used to great effect on both the Yardbirds’ “White Summer” and Led Zeppelin’s “Black Mountain Side,” “Kashmir” is built around four mesmerizing riffs, three of which involve the use of open-string unison- and octave-doubled notes, which create a natural chorusing effect and a huge wall of sound. </p> <p>Particularly noteworthy is the way Jimmy overlaid, at 0:53, the song’s menacing, ascending riff—the James Bond–theme-flavored part—on top of the recurring descending sus4 chord sequence. </p> <p>Page explained in the previously mentioned GW interview, “The descending chord sequence was the first thing I had—I got it from tapes of myself messing around at home. After I came up with the da-da-da, da-da-da part, I wondered whether the two parts could go on top of each other, and it worked! You do get some dissonance in there, but there’s nothing wrong with that. At the time, I was very proud of that, I must say.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/nQH3LtNePgI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>11. “Over the Hills and Far Away” (<em>Houses of the Holy</em>)</strong></p> <p>This song is another study in contrasts, specifically between English/Celtic-flavored acoustic folk and Les Paul–driven hard rock. It begins with a playful, folk-dance–like acoustic riff, which Page initially plays on a six-string and then doubles on a 12-string, that gives way, at 1:27, to crushing electric power chords and a clever single-note riff, for which Jimmy incorporates pulled bends on the bass strings (first heard at 1:37). </p> <p>Particularly cool is the way the guitarist reconciles this electric riff with the strummed acoustic chords previously introduced at 1:17. </p> <p>Also noteworthy is the grooving James Brown–style funk riff behind the guitar solo and the rhythmically peculiar, harmonized ascending single-note ensemble melody that follows at 3:00. To top it all off, Page, the producer, concludes the song with a “false ending.” </p> <p>As the band fades out, at 4:10, a lone guitar emerges with a final variation of the folk riff from the intro, but all you hear is the 100 percent “wet” reverb “return” signal, which creates a mystical, otherworldly, “faraway” effect.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/6bD9t44JUD4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>10. “Heartbreaker” (<em>Led Zeppelin II</em>)</strong></p> <p>With its menacing, octave-doubled blues-scale riffs and sexy string bends, this song epitomizes the “Led Zeppelin swagger.” Interestingly, the verse riff features Jones strumming root-fifth power chords on bass, treated with overdrive and tremolo, while Page alternately lays back on decidedly thinner-sounding thumb-fretted octaves — a signature technique heard in his and Jimi Hendrix’s rhythm guitar styles — and punches barre-chord accents together with the bass and drums. </p> <p>Page recorded the song with his 1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard, which he had recently bought from Joe Walsh, playing the guitar through his newly acquired 100-watt Marshall amplifier. The song also showcases some of Jimmy’s most aggressive, inspired soloing, including a free-form, tantrum-like a capella breakdown section. </p> <p>Page recorded the breakdown while the band was touring the U.S., using a studio different from the one where the rest of the song’s tracks were cut. He was unaware that his guitar on that particular section was tuned slightly sharp of the rest of the tracks, which are at concert pitch. The discrepancy goes unnoticed to most listeners and only becomes obvious if one goes to play along with the entire recording.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/npoYQMPCOvU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>09. "The Rain Song" (<em>Houses of the Holy</em>)</strong></p> <p>Performed in an unusual tuning (low to high, D G C G C D) with lots of ringing open strings and unison-doubled notes, this beautiful song features a sophisticated chord progression that was initially inspired by Beatle George Harrison, who challenged Page to write a ballad. </p> <p>After playfully evoking the verse section of Harrison’s “Something” on the first three chords of “The Rain Song,” Page veers off into an ultimately more ambitious and original progression. Particularly inventive and cool sounding is the Hawaiian-flavored dominant-ninth chord slide that precedes the first lyric line of each verse.</p> <p>When asked to explain why the studio version of “The Rain Song” is in the key of G while the live version, as heard in the film <em>The Song Remains the Same</em>, is in A, Page replied, “It surprises me to hear you say that, because I thought they were both in A. Okay, the [live] tuning is [low to high] E A D A D E. </p> <p>The only two strings that change are the G, which goes up to A, and the B, which goes up to D.” Page explained how he arrived at this unusual tuning. “I altered the strings around so that I’d have an octave on the A notes and an octave on the D notes, and still have the two Es,” he said. “Then I just went to see what finger positions would work.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/h1d4TLWmmcE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>08. “Ten Years Gone” (<em>Physical Graffiti</em>)</strong></p> <p>Like “The Rain Song,” this heart-warming yet heavy ballad demonstrates Page’s intuitive harmonic depth and sophistication, as he employs jazzy, “expensive”-sounding maj7, maj13, min9, dim7 and maj6/9 chords as effortlessly as Burt Bacharach, minus the associated schmaltz. </p> <p>The song’s instrumental interlude, which begins at 2:31, is particularly sweet and rich sounding. It features a laid-back, phaser-treated lead guitar melody with soulful double-stops over a bass, drums and clean, jangly rhythm guitar accompaniment. Also noteworthy is Page’s doubling of the chorus riff, first heard at 0:32, with an electric sitar.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/jYpydtdlWxA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>07. “Communication Breakdown” (<em>Led Zeppelin</em>)</strong></p> <p>With its down-picked “pumping” eighth notes and syncopated power-chord stabs, this song’s urgent verse riff embodies the spirit of Chuck Berry–style rock and roll. Not surprisingly, it served as the quintessential prototype for both heavy metal and punk rhythm guitar. </p> <p>Page’s piercing, well-crafted solo, with its climactic, chromatically ascending unison bends, is like Berry on steroids and demonstrates that Page, on his new band’s freshman outing, was already thinking “outside the box,” both figuratively and literally (the physical “box” being a pentatonic fretboard shape).</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/gOZCAjcYurE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>06. “Since I’ve Been Loving You” (<em>Led Zeppelin III</em>)</strong></p> <p>Jimmy’s impassioned guitar solo in this highly dramatic Chicago-style slow blues song is among his most inspired and emotive. </p> <p>The song’s chord changes and structure are truly original, and in his rhythm guitar part Page plays an inventively slick turnaround phrase at the end of each chorus (initially from 1:06–1:12) that mimics a steel guitar, with a bent note woven into and placed on top of two successive chord voicings. </p> <p>What makes this phrase so interesting and enigmatic is how, over the second chord, Dfmaj7 (played on organ by John Paul Jones) Page bends a C note up to D natural—the flat nine of Dfmaj7—and manages to make it sound “right.” It’s something few musicians apart from Miles Davis would have the guts to do.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/8RfOaAj7E5g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>05. “Whole Lotta Love” (<em>Led Zeppelin II</em>)</strong></p> <p>This song has one of the coolest intro and verse riffs ever written. Not content to play it “straight,” as his blues-rock contemporaries might have done, Page inserts a subtle, secret ingredient into this part, giving it that x factor and a spine-tingling quality. </p> <p>Instead of playing the riff’s second and fourth note—D, on the A string’s fifth fret—by itself, he doubles it with the open D string (akin to the way one would go about tuning the guitar using the traditional “fifth-fret” method), then proceeds to bend the fretted D note approximately a quarter step sharp by pushing it sideways with his index finger. </p> <p>The harmonic turbulence created by the two pitches drifting slightly out of tune with each other is abrasive to the sensibilities and musically haunting, but the tension is short-lived and soon relieved, as Page quickly moves on to a rock-solid E5 power chord. “I used to do that sort of thing all over the place,” said Page. “I did it during the main riff to ‘Four Sticks’ too.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/OhmmAFHwlEk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>04. “The Song Remains the Same” (<em>Houses of the Holy</em>)</strong></p> <p>Like a getaway chase on a stolen horse, this ambitiously arranged song, with its galloping rhythms and fleet-footed solos, is guaranteed to give you an adrenaline rush. Particularly noteworthy is Page’s decision to overlay two electric 12-string guitars during the song’s opening chord punches, each playing different and seemingly irreconcilable triads, such as the pairing of C major and A major. </p> <p>“I’m just moving the open D chord shape up into different positions,” Page told <em>Guitar World</em> in 1993. “There actually are two guitars on this section. Each is playing basically the same thing, except the second guitar is substituting different chords on some of the hits.”</p> <p>He adds, “ ‘The Song Remains the Same’ was originally going to be an instrumental, like an overture to ‘The Rain Song,’ but Robert [Plant] had some other ideas about it! I do remember taking the guitar all the way through it, like an instrumental. It really didn’t take that long to put together — it was probably constructed in a day. And then of course I worked out a few overdubs.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/mmQ35xMxzd4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>03. “Stairway to Heaven” (<em>Led Zeppelin IV</em>)</strong></p> <p>Jimmy Page trampled over two rules of pop music with this masterpiece: it’s more than eight minutes long, a previously prohibitive length for pop radio formats, and the tempo speeds up as the song unfolds. </p> <p>“Stairway” is the epitome of Page’s brilliance as not only a guitarist, but also as a composer and arranger, as he layers six-string acoustic and 12-string electric guitars throughout the song in a gradual crescendo that culminates in what many consider to be the perfect rock guitar solo, performed on his trusty 1959 Fender “Dragon” Telecaster (his go-to guitar in the early days of Led Zeppelin).</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/9Q7Vr3yQYWQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>02. “Dazed and Confused” (live version, <em>The Song Remains the Same</em>)</strong></p> <p>Clocking in at more than 28 minutes, this marathon performance marks the apex of this song’s evolution and showcases some of Led Zeppelin’s most intense jamming and collective improvisation in a variety of styles. Page is at the height of his powers here, in terms of both chops and creative vision, never at a loss for a worthwhile musical idea. </p> <p>The otherworldly violin-bow interlude, beginning in earnest at 9:10 and spanning nearly seven minutes, is particularly inspired, and Page’s use of tape echo and wah effects in conjunction with the bow is absolutely brilliant.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ZQgYn23Xvck" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>01. “Achilles Last Stand” (<em>Presence</em>)</strong></p> <p>This epic, 10-minute song is Page’s crowning achievement in guitar orchestration. </p> <p>The ensemble arrangement, bookended by a swirling, unresolved arpeggio loop, really begins to blossom at 1:57, and from this point on, Page spins numerous melodic variations over top of the jangly, plaintive Em-Cadd9s11 chord progression that underpins most of the composition. </p> <p>Interestingly, Page previewed this chord vamp in the 1973 live version of “Dazed and Confused” that appears on <em>The Soundtrack to The Song Remains the Same</em>, beginning at 5:52.</p> <p>Thoughtful consideration was put into the stereo image of each guitar track, which keeps the entire recording crisp despite the dense arrangement. The song also features one of Page’s most lyrical guitar solos (and one of his personal favorites).</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/p6S9oqJRclo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/robert-plant">Robert Plant</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/50-greatest-led-zeppelin-songs#comments GW Archive January 2013 Jimmy Brown Jimmy Page John Paul Jones Led Zeppelin Robert Plant Guitar World Lists News Features Magazine Fri, 09 Jan 2015 13:17:17 +0000 Jimmy Brown http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17825 In Deep: How to Utilize Unusual Alternate Tunings in the Style of Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-how-utilize-unusual-alternate-tunings-style-led-zeppelin-s-jimmy-page <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the January 2013 issue </em>of Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=indeep">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>Jimmy Page is regarded as one of rock’s greatest guitarists, bandleaders and producers for the incredibly rich canon of music he created with Led Zeppelin. But not everything produced by the man was as crushingly heavy as Zep favorites like “Whole Lotta Love,” “Heartbreaker,” “Black Dog” and “Rock and Roll.” </p> <p>Jimmy was often quoted as saying his true passion was to create a combination of “light and shade” in the form of contrasting and complementary musical sounds. These sounds often found their roots in acoustic English and Celtic folk music, and can be heard as well in the proto-metal electric sounds of the Jimi Hendrix Experience, Cream and Page's former band, The Yardbirds. </p> <p>A standard technique found in English and Celtic folk music is the incorporation of alternate tunings, utilized by some of Page’s favorite guitarists, such as Bert Jansch and Davey Graham.</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2001336225001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2001336225001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2001362976001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2001362976001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>Part 3</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2001191274001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2001191274001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-how-utilize-unusual-alternate-tunings-style-led-zeppelin-s-jimmy-page#comments In Deep January 2013 Jimmy Page Led Zeppelin In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Thu, 09 Jan 2014 11:19:57 +0000 Andy Aledort http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17301 Carbonite Copy: The Travis Stevens Han Solo Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/carbonite-copy-travis-stevens-han-solo-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p>When friends of Evanescence guitarist Ben Moody were looking for a special present for him, they didn’t want to get him an ordinary guitar. </p> <p>Instead, they commissioned Travis Stevens to build a one-of-a-kind Han Solo in Carbonite guitar for Moody, who is also a <em>Star Wars</em> fanatic.</p> <p>“Ben’s friends heard about my Millennium Falcon guitar and searched the internet to find me,” Stevens says. “They wanted something <em>Star Wars</em>–related, and I came up with the Han Solo idea shortly after finishing the Falcon guitar. </p> <p>"The rectangular shape worked well as it’s similar to the Bo Diddley signature Gretsch ‘Twang Machine,’ and Han in Carbonite is one of the most iconic images from the <em>Star Wars</em> movies.”</p> <p>Stevens downloaded all the images of that scene he could find (including a photo of Moody at the Skywalker Ranch posing with the original prop) and collected reproduction toys for reference to help him as he carved the likeness of Han entirely by hand. </p> <p>The semihollow body consists of a maple top and back, mahogany sides, and a mahogany center block attached to a bolt-on maple neck. Bare Knuckle custom-configured the Aftermath humbucking pickup covers and pole pieces to match the Carbonite colors. Controls are side mounted to preserve visual aesthetics, and a multicolor LED illuminates Han’s color-changing “life-support system,” also located on the side.</p> <p>Although Stevens makes his living as a music teacher in Pennsylvania, he offers his guitar customization services to anyone with an unusual idea. “Prices are dependent on parts,” he explains. “A guitar like the Han Solo would sell for $2,000 to $3,000, but I just renovated a Pearl Harbor–motif guitar and a Boba Fett–themed Strat that each sold for $1,200.”</p> <p><em>More details about Travis Stevens’ Han Solo guitar and other designs can be found at <a href="http://www.travisstevensnerdcrafts.com/">TravisStevensNerdCrafts.com</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Photos: Angela Boatwright</em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/upnew.jpg" width="489" height="1200" alt="upnew.jpg" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/carbonite-copy-travis-stevens-han-solo-guitar#comments Evanescence It Might Get Weird January 2013 Travis Stevens Electric Guitars News Features Gear Magazine Mon, 30 Dec 2013 13:57:31 +0000 Chris Gill http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17926 Review: Orange Micro Terror Guitar Amp http://www.guitarworld.com/review-orange-micro-terror <!--paging_filter--><p>At first glimpse, the Orange Micro Terror amp head looks like a tiny scale model of the already diminutive Orange Tiny Terror head. After hearing it plugged in and cranked up, it seems more like a cunning magic trick, because your eyes will tell you that there’s no possible way an amp that small can sound so good and produce volume output that loud. </p> <p>That’s also the moment when the Micro Terror transforms from an amusing novelty to an essential object of lust, which fortunately is easy to satisfy, thanks to the Micro Terror’s undersized price tag.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1998339405001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1998339405001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-orange-micro-terror#comments January 2013 Orange Orange Amplification Amps News Gear Magazine Thu, 31 Oct 2013 09:07:12 +0000 Chris Gill, Video by Paul Riario http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17303 Dear Guitar Hero: As I Lay Dying’s Phil Sgrosso and Nick Hipa Talk Gear, Tattoos, Sandwich Punching and More http://www.guitarworld.com/dear-guitar-hero-i-lay-dying-s-phil-sgrosso-and-nick-hipa-talk-gear-tattoos-sandwich-punching-and-more <!--paging_filter--><p>They’re the six-string duo behind one of metalcore’s biggest bands, and they used to like to punch each other’s sandwiches. But what <em>Guitar World</em> readers really want to know is …</p> <p><strong>The guitar work on your new album, <em>Awakened</em>, is awesome. What was the hardest song for you guys to write, guitar-wise? — Viking Nilsson</strong></p> <p><strong>PHIL SGROSSO</strong> It was probably “Wasted Words.” [Bassist] Josh [Gilbert] came up with the original song idea, and then Nick, Josh and I revised it. It was the one song where we all really came together and gave it a collective effort.</p> <p><strong>NICK HIPA</strong> That was also the song we were the least prepared for, going into the studio. A lot of the guitar parts and arrangements were in question. We weren’t even sure if it was gonna make the record. Then when we finally hashed it out, it was like, This song is sick! But of all the songs, it was the most cumbersome to pull together.</p> <p><strong>You guys have some awesome tattoos. Who did your work and what’s your favorite piece? — Charlotte M.</strong></p> <p><strong>SGROSSO</strong> Several of us have tattoos by Tod Bain from San Diego. Actually he’s in Fort Worth, Texas, now. [Vocalist] Tim [Lambesis] has the most tattoos, and he goes to 454 Tattoo in San Diego.</p> <p><strong>HIPA</strong> I pretty much only go to Tod, and Jasmine Wright from Buju Tattoo. I don’t know about Phil, but my favorite tattoo is the [Iron Maiden] “The Trooper” album artwork that Phil has on his calf. It’s not my tattoo, but I’m proud of it! [laughs] It looks so good. </p> <p><strong>SGROSSO</strong> Tod Bain did that one. “The Trooper” was the first Iron Maiden song I ever heard, and I instantly knew they were gonna be one of my favorite bands for the rest of my life.</p> <p><strong>I’m an atheist, and I really like how you’re honest about your Christian beliefs without pushing them on people. But I’m wondering, would you ever not play with a certain band because of their beliefs—say a satanic black metal band? — John Freeman</strong></p> <p><strong>HIPA</strong> I don’t think we would ever not play with bands because of what we think they believe or what they think we believe. Everyone’s entitled to their opinions and beliefs. What I’ve come to find is that no matter who we’re touring with, we end up getting along fine because we have a lot in common. We love metal, and we also end up liking the same shows and hanging out and drinking beer or whatever. I’ve found it’s more about focusing on what you have in common rather than what you don’t. I think it’s a testament to the openness of the metal community that we’ve gotten along great with the majority of bands we’ve ever toured with.</p> <p><strong>Random question: What’s on your bucket list? Swimming with sharks? Playing onstage with Slayer? — Jessica Dykstra</strong></p> <p><strong>HIPA</strong> Hmm… I’m pretty sure I’ve already done both! [laughs] Well, I’m sure I’ve played with Slayer a bunch. And unfortunately I’ve probably been swimming with sharks without knowing it. I surf a lot, and I sometimes wonder, What’s going on down there? What’s that swimming past my feet? [laughs]</p> <p><strong>SGROSSO</strong> For me, it’s probably just seeing bands that I’ve grown up listening to. Like we just went to see Roger Waters perform The Wall. We were in the studio in Colorado, but had tickets for his show in San Diego. So we flew down for a night to see it. It was incredible and very inspiring. It was perfect timing to help get our own creative juices flowing.</p> <p><strong>HIPA</strong> Oh, I wanna add one to my bucket list, in case there’s someone out there that wants to make my wildest dreams come true. I really want be on that show Wipeout! [laughs] Actually, I don’t even have to be on the show; I just want be able to run through all the obstacle courses with the bouncy soapy rubber balls, pools of water and foamy things swinging around. It looks like the best time ever! I’ve actually submitted an online application to be on the show, but I never heard back. So if anyone knows anyone, help me hook it up!</p> <p><strong>My band and I are having the hardest time finding legitimate booking agents and management. Most we find are scams. Do you have any experience with shady industry stuff? — Mike Fitzpatrick</strong></p> <p><strong>SGROSSO</strong> We’re fortunate, because we all think a lot about the decisions we make and who we want to work with. We’ve seen other bands have a lot of issues, but we’ve been fortunate to find people that we’re all comfortable working with.</p> <p><strong>HIPA</strong> When this band was starting out, nobody was willing to do the work for us. Everyone in the band had to play the role of the management team. Our bass player was tour managing, Tim was taking calls, and everyone played a roll. There is something to be said for creating your own success and making things happen for yourself. If you think a certain person is gonna make everyone like your band and make you bigger, you’re really just giving a lot of control to someone. And a lot of times people can take advantage of that. Just be as creative and hardworking as you can be, and I think it will pay off and be more rewarding than just hoping that someone will show up and do it all for you.</p> <hr /> <strong>Nick, I read you’re an avid surfer. What are some of your favorite breaks, and do you take any boards on tour with you? — Jack Shea</strong> <p><strong>HIPA</strong> I never brought a board with me on tour, because we don’t really have time to surf. But once we got to surf in Australia, which was really cool. When we’re home, our favorite breaks are in Oceanside: the harbor, the pier and the secret spots in South Oceanside. Phil surfs, too, out in Carlsbad. That’s one of the perks of living by the coast: our local breaks are our favorite breaks.</p> <p><strong>Do you still play the “Sandwich Game,” where you punch each other’s unattended sandwiches? — Brendan Van Wichen</strong></p> <p><strong>HIPA</strong> We actually retired from playing the Sandwich Game in 2009. We were in Philly, and Phil punched my cheesesteak, and I got super bent because I’m like, “A cheesesteak isn’t a sandwich!” Because it wasn’t fully open; it was scooped out, like a pita or something. So we got into this argument that lasted an hour and led to genuine aggression and swearing. [laughs] All the other guys in the band could not believe we were getting so heated. It was a miserable time, and we both decided the Sandwich Game wasn’t fun anymore. </p> <p><strong>SGROSSO</strong> We still like to play pranks, but it depends on who our crew is. We had this tour manager, and we would zip-tie his shoes together or zip-tie him to a pole. [laughs]</p> <p><strong>HIPA</strong> Oh, here’s another example of our immature humor. We were on tour and staying at the home of a friend who had these gross, really graphic porn mags. We were flying home the next day, so Phil took a Coke can and taped a few of the pages from the porno mag around the can. At the airport, we distracted our friend and slipped the can of Coke into his carry-on bag. So he goes through security and we’re all on the other side laughing at him while the security guys ask him, “Sir, do you have any liquids or gels in your bag?” Then they open up his bag and find the can with the most foul, vulgar pictures ever. [laughs] Our friend was instantly humiliated and red in the face. Luckily for him, and us, TSA had a sense of humor that day.</p> <p><strong>Nick, it seems like you and Tim have really gotten into working out. Do you think it helps you be a better guitarist? — Jeremy</strong></p> <p><strong>HIPA</strong> We started getting pretty serious about health and fitness about two years ago. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that the two oldest guys in the band are also the ones that decided to start taking care of themselves. [laughs] Tim does more of a bodybuilding-type workout, where I do more of a CrossFit-style [core strength and conditioning] thing. I’ve found it really helps my headspace. The CrossFit stuff is so miserable and physically challenging that when you push yourself through it, everything else in life seems easier.</p> <p><strong>I saw you guys at Mayhem Fest, and you sounded amazing! Can you tell me what your guitar and amp setups were? — Tyné Diek</strong></p> <p><strong>HIPA</strong> My setup is pretty minimal. It’s a [Fractal Audio] Axe-Fx II [guitar processor] and a Matrix GT1000 power amp through a Mesa cab. You can really create any sound you can imagine with that setup. I played an arsenal of custom Ibanez ARTs with Edge Pro bridges, and Ibanez Destroyers and RGs with Seymour Duncan pickups. I also use DR Strings and the small jazz-style In Tune guitar picks.</p> <p><strong>SGROSSO</strong> I also use the Axe-Fx with the 5150 setting. I usually run it through an EVH power amp. I play PRS guitars with EMG-81 pickups and DR Strings, but lately I’ve been checking out Charvel. They’ve got some nice guitars and they’re local to Southern California, which is closer to home.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/i-lay-dying">As I Lay Dying</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/dear-guitar-hero-i-lay-dying-s-phil-sgrosso-and-nick-hipa-talk-gear-tattoos-sandwich-punching-and-more#comments As I Lay Dying Dear Guitar Hero GW Archive January 2013 Nick Hipa Phil Sgrosso Interviews News Features Magazine Thu, 20 Jun 2013 20:02:44 +0000 Brad Angle http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17930 Review: Britannia Guitars Scorpion Elite http://www.guitarworld.com/review-britannia-guitars-scorpion-elite <!--paging_filter--><p>Britannia Guitars president Marc Alexander became fascinated with Lucite when he saw the Rolling Stones’ Keith Richards and Bill Wyman playing translucent Ampeg Dan Armstrong guitars in the Sixties. </p> <p>Both men raved about the natural sustain of their instruments. In the 50 years that followed, luthiers have produced only a handful of instruments made of Lucite: the material is not only heavy but also difficult to work with. Undeterred, Alexander developed precise manufacturing methods and solved the weight issue by using extensive cutouts. </p> <p>His new Scorpion Elite is an excitingly ornate Lucite masterpiece that’s as sonically impressive as it is visually intriguing. </p> <p><strong>Features</strong> </p> <p>Aside from saving weight (my Scorpion Elite weighed 8.6 pounds—less than a typical Les Paul), the cutouts serve as carry handles or as a stabilizing grip during one-handed fretboards flurries. All the hardware is gold, and the tremolo’s block is custom built for lower weight and proper depth. Alexander loads the Scorpion Elite with Gold Lace Sensor pickups that are veneered in genuine blue abalone and sealed with nitro lacquer. </p> <p>These are wired to a five-way switch, dual tone controls and a push/pull volume pot that taps the coils. The 22-fret bolt-on maple neck offers a deep, D-shaped profile and an extensive tree-of-life abalone inlay. In addition, all 2012 Britannia guitars now feature a sharper headstock shape that’s more befitting of the guitars’ eye-popping designs. </p> <p><strong>Performance</strong> </p> <p>Lucite is neither extremely loud nor particularly dynamic, and it is most-often prized for its balanced response, long sustain and detailed presentation. These qualities were joyfully apparent when I paired the Scorpion Elite with my Mesa Mk V. Chords sounded more even and complete than on many wood-bodied guitars, and double-stops had greater depth and note separation. </p> <p>The low-output Gold Lace Sensors accentuated these attributes, bringing clean tones to life with round warmth. As I stepped up the gain, the Scorpion Elite’s even-order harmonics took on a life of their own, adding zing and grind that are rarely experienced (think Clapton’s “Bad Love” solo, only fatter). </p> <p><strong>List Price $2,650</strong><br /> MANUFACTURER Britannia Guitars, <a href="http://britanniaguitars.com/">britanniaguitars.com</a></p> <p><strong>The Bottom Line</strong></p> <p>Britannia Guitars’ Scorpion Elite takes Lucite guitar design to the extreme, rewarding players with balanced tone, inspiring note distinction and vibrant sustain. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1998339428001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1998339428001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-britannia-guitars-scorpion-elite#comments Britannia Guitars January 2013 Electric Guitars News Gear Tue, 18 Jun 2013 15:28:46 +0000 Eric Kirkland, Video by Paul Riario http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17305 My Playlist! Kaz and Julian of Redlight King Pick the Top 5 Songs on Their iPods http://www.guitarworld.com/my-playlist-kaz-and-julian-redlight-king-pick-top-5-songs-their-ipods <!--paging_filter--><p>Below, Kaz and Julian of Redlight King list the tunes that are in heavy rotation on their respective iPods. Redlight King's debut album, <em>Something for the Pain</em>, is available now.</p> <p><strong>01. “Boom Boom,” John Lee Hooker</strong></p> <p><strong>KAZ</strong> “I’m a huge John Lee fan, and I used to listen to this song over and over again in my brother’s ’65 Ford. John Lee recorded the song several times, but nothing beats the original version recorded in 1961, and his tone is second to none. He played the blues till the day he died. Enough said.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/wSnQ0bdHW0s" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>02. “Control,” Mutemath</strong></p> <p><strong>JULIAN</strong> “Mutemath is such an incredible live band, and this song is an example of how they capture their performances and musicianship in their recordings. The guitar line that is played underneath the chorus complements the vocal and is just plain tasty as hell! The song ‘Control’ proves that you can be catchy and melodic but still really fucking cool.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/TdoExbtboYs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>03. “I Ain’t Worried,” Rancid</strong></p> <p><strong>KAZ</strong> “I should have gotten into Rancid sooner, but better late than never. A roots punk-rock band that continues to keep it real in a digital age. Their music has heart, and it’s filled with adrenaline, and if you don’t like ’em, guess what? They ain’t worried. This track is the shit.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/o8ldNlcmkoo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>04. “Future Breed Machine,” Meshuggah</strong></p> <p><strong>JULIAN</strong> “As much as I’m a fan of the classic bands and artists like Zeppelin and Dylan, I’m a bit of a guitar nerd who grew up on metal. ‘Future Breed Machine’ and the record Destroy Erase Improve introduced me to a whole new perspective of heavy music. Fredrik Thordendal’s solo in the bridge before that massive breakdown is one of my favorite parts on the whole record.”<br /> <iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/JhK5r9wRKu0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>05. “Busy Bein’ Born,” Middle Class Rut</strong></p> <p><strong>KAZ</strong> “They’re a killer two-piece rock band out of Sacramento and a perfect example of how less can be a whole hell of a lot more. The drums are huge, the guitars are huge and the vocals soar. Their sound hits me in the face and the grit-filled angst in the lyric hits me right in the chest.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/mvqtWjN7lOI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Photo: Jonathan Pushnik</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/my-playlist-kaz-and-julian-redlight-king-pick-top-5-songs-their-ipods#comments January 2013 Redlight King News Features Magazine Thu, 11 Apr 2013 12:34:14 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18022 Review: Godin Session Custom http://www.guitarworld.com/review-godin-session-custom <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the January 13 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=tosin">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>Everyone has that one go-to guitar that they sit up playing late into the night. It’s not too shiny or fancy, but it feels good and always delivers the rapturous tones that keep your passion burning hot. Godin’s Session Custom is designed to be one of these deeply personal instruments, built from the finest Canadian wood stocks, gently shaped for a time-worn feel, and loaded with sweet-voiced custom pickups and Godin’s own High-Definition Revoicer circuit. </p> <p><strong>Features</strong></p> <p>As a Canadian company, Godin has local access to some of the world’s finest woods. This is immediately evident when you look at the basswood body’s void-free and pronounced grain, visible through the slightly opaque black finish. Both heavier and denser than the flyweight basswood found on heavy-metal instruments, this basswood, from Canada’s Laurentian Forest, produces the classic mellow lows with a brighter, fuller midrange. Its Tele-style shape is comfort-enhanced by soft bevels on the front and back of the guitar’s top edge, as well as a slippery-smooth satin finish. Godin paid equal attention to the bolt-on neck joint, nearly creating the seamless feel of neck-through construction by rounding the neck butt and heel to match the curvature of the lower cutaway. The thin and nicely tapered neck feels almost identical to those on mid-Sixties Strats that I’ve played. It’s made from Canadian rock maple, rounded over the shoulders and finished even slicker than the satin body. </p> <p>Godin’s nontraditional pickup choices really add to the Session Custom’s personality and tonal flexibility. There’s a vintage-style covered humbucker in the neck slot and a Custom Cajun Godin single-coil in the bridge position, wired to a five-way blade switch, master volume and tone. The secret weapon is Godin’s High-Definition Revoicer (H.D.R.) circuit, activated by a tiny button near the tone pot. It essentially turns the pickups from passive to active, significantly augmenting the output, frequency response and harmonic content. Godin’s final dose of innovation is the floating Tru-Loc trem system, which makes it possible to lock the arm into various positions. </p> <p><strong>Performance</strong> </p> <p>The Session Custom’s acoustic tone has the fatness that I expect from basswood, but with more attack and punch in the uppermost mids. Hybrid-picked country licks sounded rude and snappy using the bridge pickup, and adding the H.D.R. and a fuzz pedal put me in Electric Ladyland territory. The neck humbucker reveals other dimensions. Through a clean amp, it barks P-90-like high-mids, and takes on a rather liquid tone when overdriven. Combining the divergent pickups resulted in inspiring layers of character that are more distinct than you might achieve with the traditional combinations of identical pickups found on most guitars. </p> <p><strong>LIST PRICE $????</strong><br /> MANUFACTURER Godin Guitars, godinguitars.com </p> <p><strong>Cheat Sheet</strong><br /> Godin’s High-Definition Revoicer expands the highs, lows and volume, turning vintage-voiced pickups into a harmonically accelerated active set.</p> <p>Canadian Laurentian basswood is heavier and harder than other basswoods, featuring louder highs and a greater dynamic range. </p> <p><strong>The Bottom Line</strong><br /> If you’re looking for a new world of passive/active sounds and the feel of a well-played vintage, Godin’s Session Custom will quench your thirst for tone.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1998348611001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1998348611001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-godin-session-custom#comments January 2013 Electric Guitars Gear Wed, 19 Dec 2012 16:19:12 +0000 Eric Kirkland, Video by Paul Riario http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17304 Excerpt: Motionless in White Discuss Their Sophomore Album, 'Infamous' http://www.guitarworld.com/excerpt-motionless-white-discuss-their-sophomore-album-infamous <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following is an excerpt from the January 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>, which is now available on newsstands and in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-jan-13-led-zeppelin">online store</a>.</em> </p> <p>Given that there aren’t very many—or, perhaps, any—metal bands in recent memory to have emerged from the steely northeastern Pennsylvania city of Scranton, it’s not surprising that the six members of horrorcore act Motionless in White have experienced their fair share of sideways glances when they’re out and about in town. After all, the city’s two biggest claims to fame are Vice President Joe Biden, who was born there, and Dunder Mifflin, the Scranton-based fictional paper company at the center of The Office. And neither looks particularly out of the ordinary.</p> <p>“We’ve all gotten the looks from people, and the name calling as someone drives by,” guitarist Ryan Sitkowski says. Adds co-guitarist Ricky Olson, “We get the stares.” He laughs. “But then again, we get that everywhere we go.”</p> <p>Though Motionless in White might look more than a bit out of place in their hometown, they’d probably stick out just as much in New York City or L.A. Because while they’re hardly the first metallers to cloak themselves in black and embellish this uniform with copious tattoos, piercings and gobs of strategically applied makeup, they seem to take special pleasure in not only producing a spectacle but also making sure it’s a confrontational one. </p> <p>Take, for example, the promotional video for “Immaculate Misconception,” the raging breakout track from their 2010 debut full-length album, <em>Creatures</em>. It begins with the band members, led by singer Chris “Motionless” Cerulli, weaving through a crowd of buttoned-up, enraged protestors holding signs emblazoned with slogans like “Repent or Die” and “Music from Hell.” Plenty of blood, brawling and lyrics about “stomp[ing] your fucking face in” follows, and by the video’s end, Cerulli, wearing little more than a crown of thorns, has assumed the role of the ultimate outcast himself, Jesus Christ, as he takes his place upon the cross. It’s a bit over the top, to say the least (there is also a cameo from Twisted Sister’s Dee Snider, who, as Pontius Pilate, whips Christ/Cerulli into submission). But it’s also pretty memorable.</p> <p>“I think that’s why our band sticks out,” Olson says. “We’re not afraid to do these types of things that other people might think are taboo.” It’s partly why Motionless in White chose to title their new, sophomore album Infamous. “People like to talk about us,” Olson continues. “And a lot of the time they’re talking shit. But I don’t think that’s necessarily a bad thing. Any word of mouth is good in our opinion.”</p> <p><strong><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-jan-13-led-zeppelin/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=Stories&amp;utm_campaign=LedZepExcerpt">For the rest of this story, check out the brand-new January 2013 issue of <em>Guitar World</em> magazine. The issue also features a roundup of the 50 Greatest Led Zeppelin Songs, a full interview with Page, Plant and Jones, and a complete "Black Mountain Side" acoustic guitar lesson.</a></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/excerpt-motionless-white-discuss-their-sophomore-album-infamous#comments January 2013 Motionless in White Interviews News Features Tue, 18 Dec 2012 16:25:46 +0000 Richard Bienstock, Photo by Justin Borucki http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17280 Excerpt: Jimmy Page Discusses Led Zeppelin's Post-Reunion Singer Search http://www.guitarworld.com/excerpt-jimmy-page-discusses-post-reunion-singer-search <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following is an excerpt from the January 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>, which is now available on newsstands and in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-jan-13-led-zeppelin">online store</a>.</em> </p> <p><strong>Weren’t there plans to form another band with a different singer and go on tour?</strong></p> <p>No. You see, what we did—doing all of the rehearsals—was not to play any new stuff, not to get sidetracked. After it was done, Jason, myself and John Paul Jones felt it was the right thing to do to go in and start playing new material and see how we were getting on. I thought that, really, we should play on our strengths and start working on quite a lot of music. </p> <p>We had a few things together, but Robert had his Alison Krauss project [<em>Raising Sand</em>] to promote. There was talk about bringing in some other singers, but that would have changed the character of what we were doing, and done it rather suddenly. There was a lot of…I won’t say pressure but a lot of hinting about “this singer and that singer.” And for me, it was more about, “Let’s see what we can really do.” But I don’t think we really got a chance to do that. </p> <p><strong>So it would have been too early at that point?</strong></p> <p>To do what? Bring in a singer on it? Yes. I think we needed to work on the material first and all the various sorts of textures and moods that we could create. But that wasn’t to be either.</p> <p><strong>Everybody thought you would replace Robert with another singer and go on a Led Zeppelin reunion tour. That is obviously a misunderstanding then.</strong></p> <p>Well, look: even If we had eventually settled on a singer, I think it would have been premature to go on tour. Of course, we would have played Led Zeppelin material, but I would also want to be playing some really, really good new material as well, to knock people’s socks off. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-jan-13-led-zeppelin/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=Stories&amp;utm_campaign=LedZepExcerpt">For the rest of this story, check out the brand-new January 2013 issue of <em>Guitar World</em> magazine. The issue also features a roundup of the 50 Greatest Led Zeppelin Songs, a full interview with Page, Plant and Jones, and a complete "Black Mountain Side" acoustic guitar lesson.</a></strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/GW201301coverUS.jpg" width="620" height="805" /></p> <p><strong>Over the past 20 years, Brad Tolinski, editorial director of <em>Guitar World, Revolver</em> and <em>Guitar Aficionado</em> magazines, has interviewed Jimmy Page more than any other journalist in the world. Those interviews have led to a new book, <em>Light &amp; Shade: Conversations With Jimmy Page,</em> which was published October 23. <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/products/light-shade">Get your copy here!</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/excerpt-jimmy-page-discusses-post-reunion-singer-search#comments January 2013 Jimmy Page Led Zeppelin Interviews News Features Magazine Wed, 12 Dec 2012 15:30:50 +0000 Michael Han, Photo by Ross Halfin http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17295 Excerpt: Led Zeppelin Discuss Their 2007 Reunion Show http://www.guitarworld.com/excerpt-led-zeppelin-discuss-their-2007-reunion-show <!--paging_filter--><p>The first thing you notice is how close together they are. Led Zeppelin are not scattered around the huge stage of the O2 Arena in London like 100-meter-relay runners awaiting the baton, like most bands at this venue. </p> <p>They are huddled within a few feet of each other in the center of the stage, and they stay that way for most of the two hours or so of <em>Celebration Day</em>, the new movie that captures their one-off return to playing live in December 2007. </p> <p>Jimmy Page might wander off a few feet to hit a guitar pedal, John Paul Jones occasionally sets his bass down to sit at a keyboard, but Robert Plant sings from the heart of the group, just in front of the drum kit — occupied by Jason Bonham, son of Zeppelin’s drummer John, who died in 1980. For most of the film, all four of them are in frame simultaneously.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/win-led-zeppelin-celebration-day-prize-pack">[[ Win a Led Zeppelin 'Celebration Day' prize pack that includes the album and Brad Tolinski's new book, 'Light &amp; Shade: Conversations with Jimmy Page'! ]]</a></strong> </p> <p>“It was like a shield wall — it was a Romano-British shield wall, and what was coming at us was the idea of failure and ridiculousness — for me,” says Robert Plant, speaking on a sunny autumn morning at his local pub in north London. “It would be precocious of me to walk to the front of the stage and take on a kind of rock singer pose at that time in my being — and that’s five years ago. I could only send it up, and I don’t want to do that.”</p> <p>“It was always like that,” counters John Paul Jones, talking later that day at the Connaught Hotel in London, where he and Page are both ensconced. “You need to be that close. There’s a lot going on, a lot to concentrate on and focus on. Plus, I like to feel the wind from the bass drum.”</p> <p>“This was going to be a critical show,” Jimmy Page says. “We only had one shot at it, so we needed to go out there and do it really well. There was a lot of listening to be done, a lot of communication — nods and winks — and you can see this generate through the course of the evening to the point where we’re really communicating through the music.”</p> <p><em>Celebration Day</em> will likely mark the world’s last chance to see Led Zeppelin communicating through the music. At a press conference the following day, they avoided questions about whether they will ever again reunite, but Plant’s ambivalence about Zeppelin’s role in his current life is evident during our conversation. He talks about how being the singer in the band is “just kind of narrating some bits and pieces which hold together some great instrumentation.” </p> <p>He says fronting Led Zeppelin means being specifically a rock and roll singer — and how that’s not what he is any more; he’s a singer. He talks about how the lyrics of those old, old songs are the words of a young man — “There was nothing cerebral about what I was doing at all” — even if he knows his writing got better as the band matured.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-jan-13-led-zeppelin/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=Stories&amp;utm_campaign=LedZepExcerpt">For the rest of this story, check out the brand-new January 2013 issue of <em>Guitar World</em> magazine. The issue also features a roundup of the 50 Greatest Led Zeppelin Songs, an extra interview with Page and a complete "Black Mountain Side" acoustic guitar lesson.</a></strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/GW201301coverUS.jpg" width="620" height="805" /></p> <p><strong>Over the past 20 years, Brad Tolinski, editorial director of <em>Guitar World, Revolver</em> and <em>Guitar Aficionado</em> magazines, has interviewed Jimmy Page more than any other journalist in the world. Those interviews have led to a new book, <em>Light &amp; Shade: Conversations With Jimmy Page,</em> which was published October 23. <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/products/light-shade">Get your copy here!</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/robert-plant">Robert Plant</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/excerpt-led-zeppelin-discuss-their-2007-reunion-show#comments GW Archive January 2013 Jimmy Page Led Zeppelin Ross Halfin Interviews News Features Magazine Sat, 08 Dec 2012 12:06:59 +0000 Michael Han, Photo by Ross Halfin http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17294 Hole Notes: The Fingerstyle and Flat-Picking Passages of John Denver http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-fingerstyle-and-flat-picking-passages-john-denver <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the January 13 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=blues">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>John Denver began his career in folk groups in the Sixties and had chart success as a songwriter, but it was the sweet sounds of his Seventies solo records that made him a household name. Hits like “Take Me Home, Country Roads,” “Annie’s Song” and “Rocky Mountain High” helped bring folk, pop and country to the commercial forefront that decade. Though he was often dismissed for his wholesome, clean-cut image, Denver was undeniably a stellar tunesmith and a fantastic fingerpicker. </p> <p>While the subject matter of his songs revolved around relationships and nature, many were penned of his love for the state of Colorado, where he lived for many years (he even changed his name from Deutschendorf to “Denver” in honor of the state’s capitol). In the Eighties and Nineties, up until his death, he also lent his efforts to raising awareness of environmentalist causes, political issues and humanitarian work. He died in a plane crash—a solo flight, with Denver at the helm—in 1997. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="http://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F2863188%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-EvUJl&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;secret_url=true"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-fingerstyle-and-flat-picking-passages-john-denver#comments Hole Notes January 2013 Tue, 04 Dec 2012 16:50:29 +0000 Dale Turner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17308 Talkin' Blues: Lonnie Mack and the Birth of Blues-Rock http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-lonnie-mack-and-birth-blues-rock <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the January 13 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=blues">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>Fifty years ago, during the short interlude between Elvis and the Beatles, there was a brief sighting of that rarest of species: the “instrumental hit record.” Riding on the coattails of surf music came a spate of non-vocal bestsellers in styles ranging from cool R&amp;B (Booker T. &amp; the MGs’ “Green Onions”) to funky piano jazz (Ramsey Lewis’ “The In Crowd”) to shuffle blues (Freddie King’s “Hide Away”). Joining them was a young guitar slinger from southern Indiana named Lonnie Mack, who in 1963 unexpectedly hit the charts with his instrumental cover of Chuck Berry’s “Memphis.” Pumping his Flying V through a grainy-toned Magnatone amp, he attacked the strings with fast, aggressive single-string phrasing and a seamless rhythm style that significantly raised the guitar virtuoso bar and foreshadowed the arena-sized tones of guitar heroes to come. Well before the term was coined, “Memphis” defined blues-rock.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="http://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F2863153%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-OJmQJ&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;secret_url=true"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-lonnie-mack-and-birth-blues-rock#comments January 2013 Lonnie Mack Talkin' Blues Tue, 04 Dec 2012 16:46:35 +0000 Keith Wyatt http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17307 Metal For Life: Mastering the Art of Vibrato http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-mastering-art-vibrato <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the January 13 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=tosin">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>Vibrato technique is an essential aspect of guitar playing, and one that, unfortunately, many players often overlook or give insufficient attention to. Every great guitar player you can think of—Eddie Van Halen, Jimi Hendrix, Jeff Beck and Yngwie Malmsteen, to name but a few—has an array of powerful vibrato techniques that makes his playing spring to life with vitality, energy and emotion. Vibrato is the thing that makes our guitar playing sound the most like the human voice, and it is in every guitar player’s best interest to devote hours of practice time to the development of a strong, stable and reliable collection of vibrato techniques. </p> <p>Great vibrato is not something that will happen magically on its own—one must practice it constantly to develop it and control it, and also to determine which vibrato techniques suits your playing the best.</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1998472922001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1998472922001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1998472894001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1998472894001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-mastering-art-vibrato#comments January 2013 Metal For Life Tue, 04 Dec 2012 16:16:22 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17300 All That Jazz: The Art of Songwriting, and How to Play “War Torn Johnny,” Part One http://www.guitarworld.com/all-jazz-art-songwriting-and-how-play-war-torn-johnny-part-one <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the January 13 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=jazz">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>This month, I’d like to address the sometimes tricky process of songwriting. Most of my songs start as a germ of an idea that comes to me during an improvisation. I’ll have a cool little nugget of “stuff” that catches my interest enough that I am inspired to investigate it further and perhaps forge a composition from it. </p> <p>I think that for many of us, a new song idea springs from a moment of improvisation. From there, it becomes a question of how to take a cool little riff and expand it to something that can actually be played by a band. That’s the challenging part. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1998380470001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1998380470001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/all-jazz-art-songwriting-and-how-play-war-torn-johnny-part-one#comments All That Jazz January 2013 Tue, 04 Dec 2012 16:14:35 +0000 Wayne Krantz http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17299