August 2013 http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/3506/all en The 25 Best Guitar and Music Apps http://www.guitarworld.com/25-best-guitar-and-music-apps <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Guitar World</em> presents everything you need to turn your smartphone or tablet into an extension of your guitar, including apps that will advance your playing, improve your tone, record your songs and maybe teach you something along the way.<br /> <br /><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Guitar</span></p> <p><strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitartoolkit/id284962368?mt=8">GuitarToolkit</a></strong></p> <p>Everything you need to get playing is already on your phone or tablet. You just need the app to get it going. GuitarToolKit is that app.</p> <p>It offers a tuner, an interactive and extensive chord chart, a drum-machine-like metronome and other features to get you on the right track. </p> <p>It can be customized for seven- and 12-string instruments, basses, banjos, mandolins and more, making it a go-to resource for the building blocks of metal, country, jazz or beyond. It was even designed with lefties in mind.</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitartoolkit/id284962368?mt=8">Agile Partners, $2.99</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/GuitarToolkit.jpg" width="620" height="365" alt="GuitarToolkit.jpg" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/tabtoolkit/id325946571?mt=8">TabToolKit</a></strong></p> <p>You’ve diligently learned Dimebag Darrell’s solo to “Cemetery Gates,” but a day before the big gig your singer finally admits he can’t actually reach the really, really high note Phil Anselmo sings toward the end of the song. </p> <p>No worries. TabToolKit lets you upload and download tab files and transpose them to any key to suit the rest of your bandmates. </p> <p>The beautifully designed app also offers standard and tab notation, MIDI multitrack playback for full scores, instrument guides (for learning fretboard placement) and more. No matter where you, you can be a Cowboy from Hell.</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/tabtoolkit/id325946571?mt=8">Agile Partners, $3.99</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tabtoolkit.jpg" width="620" height="413" alt="tabtoolkit.jpg" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-world-lessons/id942720009?mt=8">Guitar World Lessons</a></strong></p> <p>The recently released <a href="http://www.guitarworldlessons.com/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=scroller&amp;utm_campaign=25BestApps">Guitar World Lessons</a> app provides downloadable video guitar lessons—for purchase—in a host of genres—from blues to metal to bluegrass and jazz (and let's not forget shred!)—at the click of a button. </p> <p>Guitar World Lessons offers immediate delivery of hundreds of lessons from the massive and impressive <em>Guitar World</em> catalog. The app is <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-world-lessons/id942720009?mt=8">available at the iTunes store</a> for the iPhone and iPad. Note that the app download itself is free; instructional guitar and bass lessons can be purchased and downloaded by individual lesson or full download of the instructional product. </p> <p>The search function allows guitarists to search lessons and products by artist, song, genre or instructor. Some of <em>Guitar World</em>’s best-selling lesson products are featured, including <em>Guitar World</em> Senior Music Editor Jimmy Brown’s <em>Mastering Fretboard Harmony</em> and more. </p> <p>You can learn from Brown, Paul Gilbert, Dale Turner, Michael Angelo Batio or <em>Guitar World</em> Associate Editor Andy Aledort—and go <em>In Deep with Stevie Ray Vaughan, Play Rock Bass!, Learn Slide Guitar</em> and much more. </p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-world-lessons/id942720009?mt=8">New Bay Media, free</a></em></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/L8Y3aXxGiwQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/ultimate-guitar-tabs-hd-largest/id404167616?mt=8">Ultimate-Guitar Tabs HD</a></strong></p> <p>Guitar Tabs are an essential part of learning, so it would only make sense that guitarists would want to access every single one of Ultimate-Guitar’s more than 600,000 tabs on a whim. </p> <p>Better yet, the app can play the music to the site’s 150,000-plus Tab Pro offerings with loop and tempo control, and it offers a tuner, metronome and chord library.</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/ultimate-guitar-tabs-hd-largest/id404167616?mt=8">Ultimate-Guitar USA, free</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Ultimate-Guitar-Tabs.jpg" width="620" height="453" alt="Ultimate-Guitar-Tabs.jpg" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/jamplay-guitar-pack/id355277565?mt=8&amp;ls=1">JamPlay</a></strong></p> <p>If you regularly visit JamPlay online for its video guitar lessons, you’ll love JamPlay, which brings hundreds of guitar lessons for beginning and experienced players of acoustic and electric guitar to your mobile device. </p> <p>The app provides access to instructional videos and backing tracks, as well as utilities like chord and scale libraries, a metronome and a tuner. The chord library features thousands of chord voices with audio playback, while the scale library provides scales in all 12 keys, also with audio playback. Best of all, new lessons and backing tracks are added frequently, with no app updates or fees required. </p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/jamplay-guitar-pack/id355277565?mt=8&amp;ls=1">JamPlay, LLC, free</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-08%20at%201.51.31%20PM.png" width="620" height="530" alt="Screen Shot 2015-07-08 at 1.51.31 PM.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/steel-guitar/id323813692">Steel Guitar</a></strong></p> <p>Despite what your guitar teacher might have told you, your whammy bar will never let you sound exactly like Johnny &amp; Santo playing “Sleepwalk” on a steel guitar (unless you happen to be Jeff Beck). But Steel Guitar will. </p> <p>This fun app lets you simulate the experience with its easy-to-operate emulations of lap, eight-string, Nashville- and Texas-style steel guitars, as well as a number of distortion and effects options.</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/steel-guitar/id323813692">Yonac, free</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-08%20at%201.55.19%20PM.png" width="620" height="348" alt="Screen Shot 2015-07-08 at 1.55.19 PM.png" /></p> <hr /> <p><strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/chord!/id606691230">Chord!</a></strong></p> <p>Although pricey by basic app standards, Chord! offers a comprehensive interactive chord encyclopedia based on interval relationships, giving users many different inversions and fingerings. </p> <p>It also offers interactive scales with alternate fingering and optional piano displays. Next time your jazz-bo keyboard player starts jamming on a C major 13 chord, you can find the perfect scale in which to improvise.</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/chord!/id606691230">Thomas Grapperon, $4.99</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/chord.png" width="620" height="483" alt="chord.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-jam-tracks-acoustic/id375250919?mt=8">Guitar Jam Tracks</a></strong></p> <p>When it comes to practice, nothing beats playing with a full ensemble. </p> <p>The Guitar Jam Tracks series of apps provide full-band backing tracks for rock, reggae, jazz, “humbucker blues” and acoustic blues, delivering the ultimate experience in woodshedding. App developer Ninebuzz also offers a Scale Trainer &amp; Practice Buddy app for $4.99. </p> <p>In addition to the five previously mentioned styles, it includes an in-app purchase option for Garage Rock and the ability to float in tracks you’ve written in GarageBand and other apps. </p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-jam-tracks-acoustic/id375250919?mt=8">Ninebuzz, free</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/jam.png" width="661" height="515" alt="jam.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Amps, Effects, Recording and Tools</span></p> <p><strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/garageband/id408709785?mt=8">GarageBand</a></strong></p> <p>Since inspiration often strikes at inconvenient times, GarageBand can be a songwriter’s most invaluable tool, especially if you’re far away from your instrument. </p> <p>With realistic-sounding virtual-guitar tones that can be strummed as chords, regimented into scales (including exotic-sounding Klezmer and “South-East Asian” scales) or played as standard fretted notes, GarageBand makes it easy to sketch out song ideas. It also offers amps and effects to suit practically any kind of music. </p> <p>And because it offers simulated bass, drums, keyboards, strings, a sampler and even a virtual amp that you can plug into using an audio interface, you can write full demos and even smartly produced and mixed songs. </p> <p><em>Apple, $4.99</em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/gband.png" width="620" height="348" alt="gband.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/audiobus/id558513570">Audiobus</a></strong></p> <p>Recording enthusiasts know the power of the “bus” on a console: it’s what keeps everything connected. </p> <p>Now a recording-obsessed app developer has created a program that works like a bussing system between music apps, allowing users ostensibly to rout the signals from numerous apps—including AmpKit, Amplitube, StompBox and Animoog (see all below)—into GarageBand or other recording apps. Finally, your tone is always at your fingertips.</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/audiobus/id558513570">A Tasty Pixel, $4.99</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-08%20at%202.01.26%20PM.png" width="620" height="529" alt="Screen Shot 2015-07-08 at 2.01.26 PM.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ampkit+/id385758778">AmpKit+</a></strong></p> <p>Guitarist Alex Skolnick told <em>Guitar World</em> that he uses AmpKit+ almost religiously for warm-ups, whether he’s running through the blazing solos and riffs that he’s co-written with Testament or the jazzy chordings and improv ideas he plays in his eponymous trio. </p> <p>That’s because AmpKit+ replicates the sounds of four amps—the Peavey ValveKing and 3120, as well as vintage “British” and “Colonel” amps—and the effects of 10 stomp boxes, plus mic and cabinet options. In-app purchases include more options, such as the Peavey 6505+, but those on a budget can check out the free version of AmpKit, which offers the ValveKing and a pared-down selection of effects. </p> <p>Either way, you’ll need Peavey’s AmpKit LiNK, which ranges from $19.99 to $99.99, depending on the model. Like other apps mentioned here, AmpKit+ has Audiobus support. </p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ampkit+/id385758778">Agile Partners, $19.99</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-08%20at%202.04.00%20PM.png" width="620" height="531" alt="Screen Shot 2015-07-08 at 2.04.00 PM.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/amplitube/id373524000">AmpliTube</a></strong></p> <p>Like the PC and Mac programs of the same name, IK Multimedia’s AmpliTube offers digital stomp boxes and selectable head, cab and mic options. </p> <p>App users can mix and match 11 stomp boxes, five amps, five cabs and two mics in the full version and a more basic rig in the free edition of the app. </p> <p>In-app purchase options include a handy four-track recorder and a few more effects for writing on the go. Also available are branded versions of AmpliTube that offer the unique sounds of Slash, Jimi Hendrix and Fender amps for $14.99. Like AmpKit, AmpliTube requires its own endemic interface, the iRig, which retails for $39.99, and it has Audiobus support</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/amplitube/id373524000">IK Multimedia Production, $9.99</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tube.png" width="620" height="483" alt="tube.png" /></p> <hr /> <p><strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/digitech-stomp-shop/id481957668?mt=8">DigiTech Stomp Shop</a></strong></p> <p>The DigiTech Stomp Shop app is the perfect companion to DigiTech’s iStomp stomp box. </p> <p>The iStomp is a standard-size pedal that can be completely reconfigured by loading in any of DigiTech’s growing list of e-pedals, which include reverbs, choruses, delays, various DigiTech and DOD effects, and much more. The iStomp performs all of the effect processing internally and comes with 10 free e-pedals. </p> <p>Of course, you’ll want to add more, which is where the Stomp Shop app comes in. Once you have it on your iPod, iPhone or iPad, simply connect the device to the iStomp with the DigiTech Smart Cable, and start buying and downloading new effects from the e-pedal store in about as long as it takes to purchase a song. </p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/digitech-stomp-shop/id481957668?mt=8">Harman International Industries, free</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-08%20at%202.11.49%20PM.png" width="620" height="530" alt="Screen Shot 2015-07-08 at 2.11.49 PM.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/stompbox/id392607732?mt=8">StompBox</a></strong></p> <p>This iPad-only app’s name is a bit deceptive. </p> <p>While its graphics resemble a multi-effect pedal, they can also can replicate the look of rack-mountable gear, giving guitarists several approaches to dialing in the perfect tone and experimenting with the signal chain. </p> <p>StompBox contains 17 effects, including seven types of distortion and a Whammy-style pedal, as well as tools like a four-track loop recorder, a metronome and a tuner. </p> <p>You can chain up to 12 simultaneous effects, save 12 banks of six patches and do much more. Plus, StompBox works with various connectors, including the iRig and AmpKit LiNK, and has AudioBus support.</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/stompbox/id392607732?mt=8">4Pockets, $19.99</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/newest.png" width="620" height="463" alt="newest.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/taylor-eq/id396985507?mt=8">Taylor EQ</a></strong></p> <p>Taylor EQ lets you enhance the sound of any Taylor guitar to get the most out of it. </p> <p>Select from a range of EQ presets designed by Taylor Guitars engineers to optimize the tone of Taylor’s signature body shapes, including the GA, GS, GC, dreadnought, T5 and GS Mini. </p> <p>The app is also customizable with a six-band parametric EQ and a useful compressor-limiter. It’s versatile, too, since it will work with many iOS guitar adapters, but developer Sonoma Wire Works offers its own GuitarJack for $149.</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/taylor-eq/id396985507?mt=8">Sonoma Wire Works, free</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/taylor.png" width="620" height="445" alt="taylor.png" /></p> <hr /> <p><strong><a href="http://www.yonac.com/shredder/">Shredder</a></strong></p> <p>Why should keyboard players have all the fun? With Shredder, any guitarist can turn his ax into a synth, with no special pickup required. </p> <p>The app boasts a true analog synth engine that’s fully programmable, with two oscillators, a three-pass resonant filter, dual individually configurable LFOs and much more. </p> <p>Shredder includes several signature effect stomp boxes, a harmonizer that builds up to three intervals and, with the right connector, MIDI compatibility.</p> <p><em><a href="http://www.yonac.com/shredder/">Yonac Inc., $4.99 for iPhone, $9.99 for iPad</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-08%20at%202.17.56%20PM.png" width="620" height="422" alt="Screen Shot 2015-07-08 at 2.17.56 PM.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/fourtrack/id294768646">FourTrack</a></strong></p> <p>FourTrack offers a portable recording studio on your iPad for less than what a block of cassettes would have cost you at the peak of four-track fever. </p> <p>Better yet, it sounds better than your dad’s old Portastudio, since it records at CD quality, and offers a metronome as well as drum beats by Death Cab for Cutie’s Jason McGerr. </p> <p>And since it’s made by the same developers who created Taylor EQ (see above), it offers that app’s functions (as well as those of GuitarTone, another amp and effects modeling app) and it interfaces with the company’s GuitarJack port.</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/fourtrack/id294768646">Sonoma Wire Works, $5.79</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/jjj.png" width="620" height="483" alt="jjj.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/overdub/id460175493">Overdub</a></strong></p> <p>For those who enjoy multitracking at its most primal, Overdub lets you record sounds and get that fuzzy, vintage quality when overdubbing with them. It’s great for artists who work with loops and for indie-rockers who like a little grit in their recordings. </p> <p>The app even feels like a recording relic, thanks to cassette imagery (with a Memorex tape on display!) and groovy fast-forward, eject and tracking sounds.</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/overdub/id460175493">Kirill Edelman, free</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/overdub.png" width="620" height="459" alt="overdub.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/iamguitar/id407752080?mt=8">iAmGuitar</a></strong></p> <p>Savageapps made a splash with iAmBeatBox, an app that lets you create loop-oriented tunes with an innovative “magic gem” interface. </p> <p>iAmGuitar is a different sort of creature but no less interesting, turning your iPod Touch, iPhone or iPad into a virtual guitar that you can pick and strum. Choose between an electric guitar or six- and 12-string acoustic variations, select the key in which you want to play and press the chord “buttons” on the virtual fretboard. </p> <p>Strumming at the edges of the screen produces quieter tones, and velocity strumming allows for realistic playing dynamics. For on-the-go fun or songwriting, iAmGuitar is a player’s perfect companion. </p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/iamguitar/id407752080?mt=8">savageApps, free</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202013-10-16%20at%204.15.44%20PM.png" width="620" height="465" alt="Screen Shot 2013-10-16 at 4.15.44 PM.png" /></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Other Instruments</span></p> <p><strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/art-screaming-create-your/id514202275">The Art of Screaming</a></strong></p> <p>Admit it: You love playing guitar, but some part of you wishes you could add some killer back-up vocals to your band. </p> <p>Or maybe even just kick your singer out altogether and take the reins. </p> <p>For those of us still building confidence, vocal coaches Susan and Wolf Carr—whose client list has included members of Alice in Chains, Mastodon, Modest Mouse and Grizzly Bear—have developed an iPhone-only app that offers vocal warm-ups for practically every singing style that will set you on your path to the mic stand.</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/art-screaming-create-your/id514202275">The Art of Screaming, $12.99</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/scream.png" width="620" height="482" alt="scream.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/dm1-the-drum-machine/id431573951">DM1–The Drum Machine</a></strong></p> <p>Drum machines have a long lineage in rock, having filled the drum stool at some point for artists like the Jesus and Mary Chain, Smashing Pumpkins, Big Black and Godflesh. </p> <p>And while many guitarists might recoil from the idea of learning how a drum kit works, a drum machine, like the one replicated in the DM-1 app, makes for a workable alternative for people who cannot (or will not) work with a drummer. </p> <p>This intuitive app is MIDI friendly and offers samples from 86 electronic kits, 21 vintage sets and 65 in-house-produced sounds, each with customizable effects for making full song sequences.</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/dm1-the-drum-machine/id431573951">Fingerlab, $4.99</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/drum.png" width="620" height="467" alt="drum.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/animoog/id471638724?mt=8">Animoog</a></strong></p> <p>Developed by Moog—the company that revolutionized sound in the Sixties with its commercially successful modular synthesizers—Animoog mimics the functions of a real Moog synthesizer. </p> <p>You can create sounds from scratch using the graphical XY screen and sync what you play to MIDI (using an in-app purchase) and record right in the program. AudioBus support means you can direct Animoog’s sounds to other apps for even more mind-blowing sonic fun.</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/animoog/id471638724?mt=8">Moog Music, $29.99 for iPad, $9.99 for iPhone</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/ujn.png" width="620" height="463" alt="ujn.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/tachyon/id544585980?mt=8">Tachyon</a></strong></p> <p>Developed in association with Dream Theater keyboardist Jordan Rudess, Tachyon lets you blend the timbres of any two instruments—piano, electric guitar, industrial buzz-saw sounds and so on—in any octave range and then play the resulting hybrid. </p> <p>Ever wanted to play a guitar-violin? Here’s your chance. </p> <p>Even cooler, as you slide your fingers over the screen, a field of twinkling stars morphs into the shape of the instrument you’ve selected to play. </p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/tachyon/id544585980?mt=8">Wizdom Music, $1.99</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/th.png" width="652" height="476" alt="th.png" /></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Music Education</span></p> <p><strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/met-guitars/id414964902">Met Guitars</a></strong></p> <p>Developed for the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Guitar Heroes exhibit in 2011, Met Guitars is a multimedia treasure trove of information on the history of our favorite instrument. </p> <p>Video features focus on early guitars from Northern Italy and New York and go in-depth on the accomplishments of luthiers John D’Angelico, James D’Aquisto and John Monteleone. The app includes demonstrations that include audio of Chet Atkins playing a 1950 D’Angelico, and interviews with Monteleone.</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/met-guitars/id414964902">The Metropolitan Museum of Art, free</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/met.png" width="620" height="447" alt="met.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-collection-george-harrison/id499105381?mt=8">The Guitar Collection: George Harrison</a></strong></p> <p>Everything you’ve ever wanted to know about the Quiet Beatle’s gear gets a thorough examination in this app, licensed by the Harrison Estate. </p> <p>Full 360-degree imaging allows you to see the Gretsch, Rickenbacker, Fender and other guitars Harrison used, as well as the dings and scratches. </p> <p>Beatles enthusiasts will also marvel at audio introductions to the guitars by Harrison himself and at the nerdy, in-depth histories the developers included for each instrument and witty commentary by Conan O’Brien and insightful memories by George’s son, Dhani.</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-collection-george-harrison/id499105381?mt=8">Bandwdth, $2.99</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/hari.png" width="620" height="462" alt="hari.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/jimi-hendrix-complete-experience/id477975150?mt=8">Jimi Hendrix: The Complete Experience</a></strong></p> <p>There’s nothing like a little Jimi Hendrix to inspire you. Now you can get a regular dose of his genius right on your phone, courtesy of The Complete Experience. The app provides succinct overviews of the six-string revolutionary’s biography, discography, studio life and more, and it plays some of his greatest recorded moments to give you the motivation you need.</p> <p><em><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/jimi-hendrix-complete-experience/id477975150?mt=8">Experience Hendrix, free</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/jimi.png" width="620" height="467" alt="jimi.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/25-best-guitar-and-music-apps#comments Apps August 2013 Guitar World Lessons GW Archive IK Multimedia Guitar World Lists News Features Magazine Wed, 08 Jul 2015 18:37:27 +0000 Kory Grow 19472 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Tribute: The Complete, Untold Story of Slayer's Jeff Hanneman http://www.guitarworld.com/tribute-complete-untold-story-slayers-jeff-hanneman <!--paging_filter--><p><em>He influenced a generation and changed the course of metal forever. </em>Guitar World<em> presents the complete, untold story of Jeff Hanneman, Slayer’s guitarist for more than 30 years and the man behind such legendary thrash anthems as “Angel of Death,” “South of Heaven” and “War Ensemble.”</em></p> <p><strong>CAST</strong></p> <p>• <strong>Tom Araya</strong>: Slayer frontman/bassist<br /> • <strong>Kerry King</strong>: Slayer guitarist<br /> • <strong>Dave Lombardo</strong>: Former Slayer drummer<br /> • <strong>Kathryn Hanneman</strong>: Wife of Jeff Hanneman<br /> • <strong>Gary Holt</strong>: Longtime friend of Jeff Hanneman and current Slayer fill-in guitarist</p> <p>When news broke in the early evening of May 2, 2013, that longtime Slayer guitarist Jeff Hanneman had succumbed to liver failure at age 49, a shockwave of atomic force rippled its way across the metal community that left many stunned. </p> <p>As Facebook and Twitter became overrun with postings of shock, grief and recollections from fans who had spent the better part of their lives following Slayer like Rottweiler puppies, you could feel it—this one was different. This one hurt.</p> <p>To anyone who came of age in the mid Eighties wearing a denim jacket and studded wristband, Slayer was their introduction to aggressive speed metal, with riffs that cut like a buzzsaw blade and dark lyrical themes that often crossed into objectionable territory—and Hanneman was the primary force behind it.</p> <p>“By all accounts, he was the band,” says Slayer frontman and bassist Tom Araya.</p> <p>For those who had spent a lifetime in a perpetual state of whiplash from headbanging to such Hanneman-penned Slayer anthems as “Angel of Death,” “South of Heaven,” “Chemical Warfare” and “Raining Blood,” the reason he meant so much to so many was simple: because you could always count on Jeff to be Jeff, in the same way you could always count on Slayer to be Slayer. </p> <p>He didn’t say much, but he didn’t have to. He wrote the lion’s share of the band’s most beloved songs and lived to come out from behind a wall of Marshalls every time the band took the stage, raise his fist triumphantly to the rafters, and destroy. For nearly three decades, Jeff Hanneman was a fixture of that stage—a blonde symbol of young headbangers who fell in love with satanic-infused heavy metal aggression and never looked back well into their adulthood.</p> <p>“I’m amazed at how many people he touched,” Araya says. “They hardly knew him, but he affected a lot of people. And he didn’t even realize it.”</p> <p>But for all the love the heavy metal community had for Jeff Hanneman, there was a dark side to the guitarist that confused many of those who came into contact with him. Unlike, say, Dimebag Darrell, Jeff wasn’t everybody’s “bro.” He didn’t pose happily for pictures, glad-hand his way across the NAMM convention floor every January or help needy children. He had no love for the media. </p> <p>He also had a morbid fascination with Nazi Germany and derived a perverse sense of joy from proudly—and controversially—displaying Nazi iconography on his guitars. And he drank. A lot.</p> <p>“If he didn’t like you, he wouldn’t be hanging with you,” says Araya from his family farmstead in Buffalo, Texas. “He could pick at you and make you feel like crap. But if you tolerated it and stuck it out and showed that you could deal with the bullshit, then that’s how you became friends with him.”</p> <p>Slayer’s origins date back to 1981 in the South Gate and Huntington Park areas of Los Angeles. King and Hanneman met at a warehouse complex after King had gone there to investigate a band that was holding auditions for a guitar player. </p> <p>“As I was leaving, I saw Jeff just kinda standing around playing guitar, and he was playing stuff that I was into, like Def Leppard’s ‘Wasted’ and AC/DC and Priest. So I started talking to him and just said, ‘Hey, you want to start a band?’ I already knew Dave [Lombardo, drummer] and we had been playing together in his parents’ garage a bit, and so I brought Jeff in, then went to Tom [Araya, vocalist/bassist], who I was playing with in another band, and said, ‘Hey man, I have a different band if you’re interested.’ And that was it.”</p> <hr /> Lombardo remembers the first time he met Hanneman: “Kerry brought him to rehearsal in the garage one day. He had a small Fender Twin and the black Les Paul that’s on the back of <em>Show No Mercy</em>, and he was kinda quiet. <p>Jeff hadn’t been playing for very long at that point, and everything he did know he basically taught himself. But something about it just felt right from the get-go. It worked.”</p> <p>This fearsome foursome was now a unit, hell-bent on fusing elements of Iron Maiden, Motörhead, Dead Kennedys and Venom into an aggressive style of thrash metal that would ultimately alter the course of music. They were four youngsters with a shared vision, though Hanneman did stand apart from his cohorts in one respect: he didn’t drive. </p> <p>So while everyone else was able to get to and from rehearsal via their own wheels, Hanneman—who, depending on whom you ask, either never had a driver’s license or lost it early on after various DUI infractions—needed to be shuttled back and forth whenever the band got together. </p> <p>“When we started the band, Kerry would pick him up from his house in Long Beach and I would drop him off after rehearsal,” Araya says. “That was the trade-off. So we spent a lot of time in the car together, usually drinking beer. I would drop him off, and sometimes I’d hang with him at his house with his parents.”</p> <p>It was around this time—April-May 1983 to be exact, nine months before the release of the band’s debut album, <em>Show No Mercy</em>—that Hanneman met a girl named Kathryn. They hooked up as teenagers—he 19, she 15—and stuck together like glue for the remainder of Jeff’s life, up until the day he died. It’s safe to say their fate as a couple was sealed by the bizarre circumstances of their introduction. </p> <p>“My girlfriend and I were getting tired of going to the movies every weekend, so we decided to go see this band called Slayer at a little club in Buena Park called the Woodstock,” says Kathryn, who is now 46, from her home in southern California. “They were playing with a band called Leatherwolf. I begged my father to let us go to the show, knowing that I would be home later than my 10 o’clock curfew, and he was okay with that. There may have been 15 or 20 people at the show, so I was able to stand up front against the stage, on Jeff’s side. And before I knew it, he kneeled down, grabbed me by the hair, and started making out with me. I was blown away, and that was how we met.”</p> <p>Had Hanneman attempted this act of onstage molestation with a different girl that night, he may have found himself in the back of a squad car. Instead, he found himself getting messages from the band’s manager that Kathryn—who had reached out to management to share photos she had taken that night—wanted Jeff to call her. </p> <p>“I asked the manager if he could have Jeff call me, and he told me Jeff was in Vegas visiting his grandmother,” she says. “I thought that was so sweet. About three weeks later, I was at home and my phone rang one night, and I picked it up and the voice on the other end said, ‘Hi, Kathy, this is Jeff from Slayer.’ And my heart started racing. I asked him how his grandmother was, and he said to me, ‘I wasn’t visiting my grandmother. I went to Vegas to break up with my girlfriend.’ And that was what I loved about Jeff—he was honest from the get-go.”</p> <p>Jeff and Kathryn’s relationship continued to grow as Slayer gained traction within the underground metal community—that is, as long they could figure out a way to travel the 20 or so miles between her home in Buena Park and his in Long Beach.</p> <p>“Since neither of us drove we either had to rely on Tom to pick me up and drive me to rehearsal to see Jeff or get my mom to drive me to Long Beach to see him,” Kathryn says. “And whenever Jeff could, he would take a bus to come see me. That’s how our relationship started, and eventually we just never separated unless he was on the road. We spent as much time together as we possibly could. </p> <p>“At first my dad was a little nervous when this guy showed up at our house wearing a leather jacket with black makeup around his eyes, but it didn’t take long before they were all getting along great. My parents loved him. All my girlfriends fell in love with him too. And they were always quick to say so.”</p> <p>While Kathryn has always taken careful steps to shield herself from the spotlight, she did play a key role in Slayer’s early Eighties reputation as a group parents abhorred when she agreed to pose in an early band promotional photo as a bloodied, lingerie-clad corpse.</p> <p>“I was around 16 at the time,” she says. “Jeff called me one evening and said they were about to do this photo shoot and that the girl they were going to use broke her toe and had to cancel, so he asked if I would fill in. And that I needed to bring some sort of black lingerie. I told him I had to get permission from my parents but that I’d be happy to do it. And since neither of us had driver’s licenses, Tom came out and picked me up and we went to the garage at Tom’s parents’ house, which is where they would rehearse, and we did the shoot. I was very shy and conservative in those days, but it was the least I could do. I was honored that they chose me.”</p> <hr /> Contrary to internet reports of them marrying in 1997, Jeff and Kathryn wed in Las Vegas in 1989 in a simple ceremony consisting of the happy heavy metal couple and the bride’s parents. The decision to marry wasn’t difficult for either Jeff or Kathryn, as they learned over a mid-afternoon breakfast at a local Denny’s a few weeks before heading to Vegas. <p>“We ordered breakfast and we each ordered a beer, and Jeff was just very quiet,” Kathryn says. “I looked at him and just said, ‘I don’t know what you’re thinking—but whatever you ask me, I’ll say yes to.’ He waited, and then he looked up at me and said, ‘Okay, let’s just fucking do it.’ And I said, ‘Okay, let’s just fucking do what?’ And he said, ‘Let’s just take off and get married.’ I said okay and asked him if he was sure, and he said, ‘Yes, I’m sure. I marry you, I marry you for life.’ ”</p> <p>Hanneman’s official cause of death was alcohol-related cirrhosis, a result of a lifetime of drinking. “Jeff was always a drinker,” says Lombardo, who left the band (for the third time at least) earlier this year. “He always had a Coors Light tall can in his hand. Always.”<br /> “Jeff and I always drank,” King adds. “They called Steven Tyler and Joe Perry the Toxic Twins. We were the Drunk Brothers.” He laughs. “The difference being that I don’t wake up in the morning and need a beer. Jeff didn’t know how not to drink.”</p> <p>“We partied and we partied hard,” says Exodus founder—and current Slayer touring guitarist—Gary Holt, who became friends with Hanneman in the early Eighties. “I have a million photos of us back in the day, just hanging out and drinking, beers in hand in the middle of the day at load-in.” </p> <p>For Kathryn, memories of Jeff and her father bonding over martinis in the evening are still vivid. “About a year or so after we met, Jeff moved in with me and my parents, and my dad would always love to come home and have a couple martinis. And he would offer Jeff a drink and they would sit and have their martinis and play video games. So I have known Jeff to drink from the day that I met him. I never really understood it, but drinking was always very much a part of Jeff’s life.”</p> <p>Hanneman’s reliance on alcohol was obvious to anyone who spent enough time with him. However, he did manage to stay away from hard drugs for most of his life, except for a few years in the mid Eighties when cocaine use became a common activity for Jeff and Tom.</p> <p>“You start making a little money, and the next thing you know, it’s there,” Araya says. “It’s readily available and people are eager to provide it. After a weekend binge, you find yourself driving down the 405 at six in the morning—I’m driving, Jeff’s feeding my nose, he’s feeding his nose. And you suddenly realize how easily this could have turned bad. I remember stopping, looking all around us—nobody else on the highway—and I looked at Jeff and said, ‘Man, this is fucking crazy. Look at us. We can’t be doing this.’ And we stopped, threw what we had out the window and never touched it again. He stuck with his alcohol and I stuck with my ‘greenery,’ and we went about our existence. </p> <p>“We had our vices, but we didn’t let them control our lives like you see with a lot of other bands that are just starting out. That was the one thing that I thought was really cool about us—we didn’t let those things destroy us. We had control of ourselves to some extent.”</p> <p>The extent to which Hanneman had control of his alcohol intake became questionable in the mid Nineties, when it started becoming more apparent to his wife and bandmates that Jeff was no longer just a hard-partying goofball metalhead from L.A. but a serious adult drinker.</p> <p>“I would express my concern, and he would back off for a few months—but then he would go right back to drinking,” Kathryn says. “A few years before his dad died in 2008, I did notice that Jeff was relying on alcohol to start off his day. But I couldn’t say much at that point, because I just knew we’d wind up in a verbal confrontation about it. And I’m not going to say I didn’t drink with him—I did drink with him, sometimes quite heavily. I figured if I couldn’t beat him, join him. But eventually I realized that I couldn’t go on like that, and that if I stopped I might be able to help him get away from it too. But I couldn’t. He just relied on it too much to get him through the day.”</p> <p>His bandmates are quick to point out that Hanneman’s drinking rarely became an issue within the group, though it did creep in on occasion.</p> <p>“The only thing that comes to mind,” says King, “was when we were on the Divine Intervention tour [in 1994/95], when Paul [Bostaph] was with us, and we wanted to play ‘Sex. Murder. Art.’ live. But on that album I pretty much played everything in the studio, so I don’t think Jeff had ever played that song. And he was just too messed up all the time to learn it, so Paul, Tom and I just did it as a three-piece because Jeff would not come onstage and play it. After that, we said, ‘Listen dude, like it or not, you’re a part of this band, and if we decide to play a song, you gotta play that fucking song.’ ”</p> <p>On the road, particularly in later years, Jeff spent most of his time on the tour bus after gigs by himself, watching the History Channel or reading a book about World War II. “Jeff was super intelligent about history—World War II became his thing,” says King.</p> <p>Hanneman, whose German-American father fought as an American soldier in World War II and brought home medals from dead Nazi soldiers that he gave to his son, was morbidly fascinated by the Second World War and Nazi Germany, collecting dozens of German soldier action figures and naming his various dogs and cats after Nazi officials and elements of WWII-era Germany. His own wedding ring was a collectable replica of a skull-emblazoned band worn by high-ranking Nazi official Reinhard Heydrich. While objects connected to this time in history are understandably offensive to many, to Jeff they were just symbols of the same darkness that energizes metal’s imagery.</p> <p>“Jeff wrote what he wrote,” says Araya. “And people would analyze it and come up with their own conclusions—but to Jeff it was just a song about this or that. There was no deep meaning behind anything. And a lot of the stuff he did, he knew that it would cause a reaction—he knew it would get a response. And if you’re going to make a big stink about it, that’s your problem—that was his attitude about it.”</p> <p>As the “quiet one” in Slayer, the guitarist never made socializing with fans a top priority.</p> <p>“He’d stay on the bus for a long time after a show,” Araya says. “And then when the crowds would thin out and all the VIPs were gone—all the wannabes who were hanging out and partying—once they dissipated, he would make his way out and see who was still hanging out. There are people who want to hang out just because it’s cool, but Jeff didn’t want to hang out with those people, so he would wait. If he didn’t like you, he wouldn’t hang with you.”</p> <hr /> And when it came to sightseeing, “Jeff pretty much only went to war museums, as you can imagine,” King says. “I remember the first time we went to Moscow, maybe around 1998. His whole thing was going to one of the Moscow war museums, so I was like, ‘Hey, that sounds cool,’ so I went with him. And it was just windy and cold as fuck there. But Jeff loved that stuff.” <p>For Kathryn, who preferred to remain at home when Jeff went on tour, all she could do was count the days until he returned. “It was extremely hard for me,” she says. “The first tour they did was a three-week tour from southern California up to San Francisco, and in those days there were no cell phones or internet, and it was difficult for him to stay in touch with me. And at first I just thought, Oh my god, I’m gonna die. When the band finally started touring Europe, he made sure to send me letters and postcards almost every day, and that was the only thing that kept me going, because I really didn’t know when I would talk to him again.”</p> <p>As the years wore on, returning home from tour usually meant the rest of the band had seen the last of Hanneman for a while. “He would just go home and detach,” King says. “He might have lived only 45 minutes away, but unless you were part of his inner circle, it was hard to stay in touch with him. And it took me a few years to understand that. For a while I was just like, ‘Why isn’t this guy calling me back?’ But as I got older I just realized that that was who Jeff was.</p> <p>“I don’t think Jeff and I were ever best friends,” continues King. “I think we were probably the closest in the band, but never best friends. To put it in a way that everyone could understand, Jeff and I were like business partners. Was he my friend? Of course he was my friend. But we didn’t really act like that. The last time I was at Jeff’s house was January 2003. We went to his place to watch the Raiders in the playoffs. And it sounds horrible, but it wasn’t horrible. That was just how it was.”</p> <p>“When Jeff was home, Jeff liked to be home and stay home,” Kathryn says. “He was over it—over the road, over people, over everything. He just wanted to hibernate for a while, and I always respected that. When he was home he liked to sleep in and just kick back during the day. Sometimes he’d get an idea for a song and run down to his music room and start working on music. </p> <p>And video games—Jeff was a huge video game buff. It started around 1983 with Intellivision, and after that it was Sega and Nintendo and everything else. If any new system came out, we went out and got it immediately. First-person shooters were his thing. He kept up to date on all of them.</p> <p>“The TV was always on <em>Seinfeld, Frasier, Cheers, Scrubs</em>. And of course football or hockey. Sometimes all the TVs in the house would be on, and we’d be watching different games in every room.”</p> <p>Pets, football, <em>Seinfeld</em>, video games, music—yes, home life for Jeff and Kathryn Hanneman was almost surprisingly wholesome, particularly around the holidays.</p> <p>“Christmas was his absolute favorite holiday,” Kathryn says. “He loved giving gifts, and he would always get me quite a few gifts. He started me on a German nutcracker collection and a bear collection, so he was always buying me new pieces for those. For Jeff, the bigger the tree, the better. Our house has 24-foot-high cathedral ceilings, and I remember one year him coming home with a tree that was 22 feet high! [laughs] And of course I would be the one climbing up and down the ladder decorating it. Jeff liked to just sit back and watch me decorate the tree.”</p> <p>When it came to playing guitar and writing songs at home, Jeff never had any kind of set structure. He would go long stretches without picking up a guitar when the band wasn’t active, and songwriting was done on the spur of the moment, whenever inspiration struck.</p> <p>“He would never ever say, ‘I need to go and write a song,’ ” Kathryn says. “It would just hit him out of nowhere. He never planned it or was preoccupied with it. If we were at a restaurant, he would ask me if I had the recorder with me, and I’d pull it out and he’d basically hum the riff or speak the lyric into the recorder. And if we were home in the middle of watching TV, he’d get up and run down to the music room and start laying out the drums. That’s how many of his Slayer songs came about.”</p> <p>Hanneman established himself as Slayer’s principal songwriter early on. By the late Eighties and early Nineties, he had formed a close working relationship with Araya, who handled lyrics for many of Hanneman’s most iconic songs, including “South of Heaven,” “War Ensemble” and “Seasons in the Abyss.”</p> <p>“We seemed to connect on ideas and themes,” Araya says. “He would have an idea that was half-written, and I’d read it and work on it and disappear and put thoughts together and then I’d say, ‘What do you think?’ and he’d say, ‘This is great. This is exactly what I was hoping you’d come up with.’ He was very encouraging about me putting my ideas down and the two of us working together. I always liked working with Jeff because he allowed me to do things that came naturally. There was a lot of freedom between the two of us when we wrote music and created songs. I think I’m really going to miss that.</p> <p>“Of all the songs that we’ve ever written as a band, the two songs that ended up getting Grammys—‘Eyes of the Insane’ and ‘Final Six’—were songs that Jeff and I worked on together. That’s something I’m really proud of and something I always tried to make him proud of. I would say, ‘Look, you wrote two Grammy-winning songs. You can’t get any better than that. That’s a milestone.’ ”</p> <p>Lombardo, too, had great respect for Hanneman as a songwriter and admired the fact that Jeff would present his songs with a basic drum-machine beat already in place. “So many guitar players can’t program a drum machine or play along with their own songs,” says Lombardo, who is currently performing and writing with his band, Philm. “Doing it the way he did takes a lot more talent because you’re thinking of all the instrumentation in a song rather than relying on other people. He heard everything in his mind before anyone else did.</p> <p>“The ‘vibey’ quality of Jeff’s songs allowed me to create these crescendos and decrescendos, making the song dynamically louder or bringing it back down with the drums. His songs were never just a constant roar of guitar playing—they were dynamic, and it gave me the opportunity to decorate the songs a little more in a form that made sense.”</p> <p>While news of Hanneman’s death in May came as a shock to all but his closest friends and family—“Was I surprised by how he died? No,” King says. “Was it a surprise that it was that quick? Yes.”—there were events that occurred in the previous few years that could be viewed as contributing factors in the guitarist’s downward spiral. One was the death of his father in 2008.</p> <hr /> “That’s when things really started to go downhill for him,” Kathryn says. “It was probably the hardest thing he ever had to face in his entire life. When I met Jeff he didn’t have all that great of a relationship with his father. But as time went on they became very close. So that took a toll on him. He was never quite the same after that. I just don’t think he cared anymore.” <p>It was also around this time that Jeff was quietly battling an arthritic condition that had been progressing over many years and was now beginning to worsen to the point of interfering with his playing. “His ability to play was slowly deteriorating,” Araya says, “but he didn’t let anybody know that. We could just tell that things were going wrong. It was becoming hard to get stuff out of him. He was very proud and didn’t want to make anyone worry about anything. Jeff would show up and play, and he didn’t want anyone to know or worry about what else was going on with him. He tried to be really strong and sometimes that can weigh you down.”</p> <p>“You would notice it in his hands and a little bit in his walk,” Lombardo says. “It seemed like he was struggling with his playing—it wasn’t fluid. You could hear it in the leads. His playing just wasn’t as tight as it could have been.”</p> <p>According to Kathryn, uric acid buildup from alcohol consumption no doubt contributed to Jeff’s arthritis, but there wasn’t much she could do about either problem that was plaguing the guitarist. “We took him to a specialist and got him diagnosed,” she says. “But as you can imagine, Jeff didn’t want to deal with any medication to help the problem. Jeff wasn’t a pill popper. When I would see him take an Aleve, I would know that he was in extreme pain from the arthritis and the Aleve would help him get through rehearsal or whatever he had to do. He dealt with that for many, many years.</p> <p>“Doctors wanted him to stay away from three of his favorite things—beer, red meat and peanut butter—but Jeff was going to do this his way, and he would just deal with the pain on his own terms.”</p> <p>In January 2011, an incident occurred that many would later assume was the cause of his death but wasn’t. Jeff was bitten on his right arm an insect that was carrying a flesh-eating disease called necrotizing fasciitis. Reports circulated that it was a spider that bit Jeff, but that was never confirmed. Whatever bit him, it was enough send the guitarist’s life into a tailspin.</p> <p>“Jeff had been visiting a friend in the L.A. area,” Kathryn says. “He was in the Jacuzzi one night relaxing, and he had his arm over the side, and he felt something, like a bite or a prick. But of course he didn’t think anything of it. He came home about a week later, and he was pretty well lit when he came through the front door. He wasn’t feeling well, and he just wanted to go upstairs and go to sleep. Before he did he said, ‘Kath, I need to show you something, even though I really don’t want to.’ </p> <p>"And he took off his shirt, and I just freaked out when I saw his arm. It was bright red and three times the normal size. I said, ‘Jeff, we need to go now. We need to get you to the ER.’ But all he wanted to do was go to bed and sleep, and I knew that I was trying to rationalize with a very intoxicated person. So there was nothing I could do that night. But the next morning I convinced him to let me take him in. He didn’t have a lot of strength, but I was able to get him into the car.</p> <p>“When we got to the hospital in Loma Linda, they took one look at him and they immediate knew what it was, so they took him right in. Jeff told me to go home because we both knew he’d be there for hours and neither of us thought it would be a life-or-death situation. About three or four hours later, Jeff called me and said, ‘Kath, it’s not good. They may have to amputate. I think you need to come back here.’ </p> <p>"When I got there, Jeff was on the stretcher waiting to go into surgery, and the doctor put it in perspective for me. He said, ‘I need you to see your husband. He may not make it.’ The doctor looked at Jeff and told him, ‘First I’m going to try to save your life. Then I’m going to try to save your arm. Then I’m going to try to save your career.’ And looking at Jeff on that stretcher and possibly saying goodbye, knowing that I may never see him again…”—she pauses—“…was one of the hardest moments of my life.”</p> <p>The next few days for the Hannemans could only be described as nerve-wracking. Jeff was in the ICU in an induced coma after the initial surgery and breathing through a tube, his arm, for the most part, intact. Doctors attempted to remove the breathing tube at one point, but Jeff was unable to breathe on his own. Finally, after about the fourth day, the tube was removed and Jeff was breathing again. Her husband was alive, but as soon as they removed the bandages from Jeff’s arm, Kathryn knew the road to recovery would be long.</p> <p>“I’ll never forget it—I couldn’t believe what I was seeing,” she recalls. “All I could do was look up at the doctor and say, ‘How the hell do you fix this?’ And he said, ‘You know, Mrs. Hanneman, you’d be very surprised.’ And at that moment I had all the faith in the world that this doctor could fix his arm.”</p> <p>Back home soon afterward, Jeff could begin the process of rehabilitating his arm in the hopes of regaining his ability to play guitar. The next few weeks saw more surgeries, staples and multiple grafts using skin from his left thigh. Wound-care suction devices were on hand to draw out the infection and help the skin grafts take. Physically, Jeff’s arm was on the mend. Emotionally, however, he was struggling. Depression was setting in.</p> <p>“I couldn’t get Jeff to go to rehab or therapy,” Kathryn says. “I think he was letting the visual of his arm get to his emotions, and it was messing with his mind. It was hard to keep him upbeat at that point.</p> <hr /> “I think he thought he could do this on his own—that he would just to go rehearsal and play, and that that would be his rehab. But I think he started to learn, once he tried rehearsing, that he wasn’t playing up to his ability and that he wasn’t able to play guitar at the speed he was used to. And I think that really hit him hard, and he started to lose hope.” <p>The incident with Jeff’s arm couldn’t have come at a worse time for the band. A European tour was booked for March and April 2011, and the legendary Big 4 tour, which saw Slayer sharing a stage with fellow thrash pioneers Metallica, Megadeth and Anthrax, was on the schedule between April and September. These shows were immensely important for the band, but it was becoming increasingly obvious that Jeff wouldn’t be able to participate. </p> <p>“For me it was really difficult to make the decision to go on without Jeff,” Araya says. “They started naming names to take his place, and I’m like, How can you guys even think about this? We can’t do this without Jeff. But we had to do something. Slayer, aside from being band members and really tight-knit, we are a business. Those are aspects of what we do that fans have a tough time understanding. So we had to make decisions because we were obligated to do these tours.”</p> <p>Of all the possible replacements for Hanneman being bandied about, everyone was most comfortable with Exodus mainstay Gary Holt, a longtime friend of the band’s. </p> <p>“I remember when the tour came up, Jeff said to me, ‘No. No. There’s no way in hell this band is going out without me,’ ” Kathryn says. “He was definitely hurt by the fact that, for the first time ever, the band had to go on without him, but eventually he became okay with it, and a lot of that was because it was his friend Gary that was going to fill in for him. He knew the band had to go on.”<br /> “Gary was a friend, he wasn’t an outsider,” Araya says. “We’ve known him for 30 years and he was a good friend of Jeff’s. When we first met Exodus, he and Jeff were inseparable.”</p> <p>Fans were hopeful that Hanneman was well on his way to a full recovery when the guitarist joined his bandmates onstage for two songs—“Angel of Death” and “South of Heaven”—at the Big 4 show in Indio, California, on April 23, 2011, four months after the bite on his arm. Behind the scenes, however, a different story was emerging.</p> <p>“He wasn’t at his best that night, but he was able to come out and do those two songs,” Araya says. “It was after that that I think he realized that he could only play for a little bit and then had to stop. He would come in to rehearse and he would jam out some parts and then he’d stop and just kind of fiddle with his guitar. He did that a few times, but then he just stop coming to rehearsal.</p> <p>“We told him, ‘Listen, we understand that you’re having a tough time playing your guitar, having a tough time coming back 100 percent, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t be a part of what we do, which is write songs. You are still Slayer, you are a big part of this band, you can still write music and you can still put ideas together. Sit in the studio and work with us, make us what we are.’ He was a big part of this band. I knew it and realized it a long time ago.”</p> <p>“We were holding out hope until the day he died,” King says. “If he ever came to us and said, ‘Okay, I can do this,’ there was no question. This was his gig. Now, did I think that would actually happen? No, I didn’t.”</p> <p>“I think part of him knew that he wasn’t going to be back in the band,” Kathryn adds.</p> <p>As the realism about his situation began to set in, Jeff was forced to accept the fact that his livelihood was being stripped away, no doubt fueling his alcohol-induced decline over the next year and a half. Factor in Hanneman’s uncommunicative, reclusive nature, and there wasn’t much his bandmates could do but carry on.</p> <p>“People have to make their own decisions about how they want to live their lives,” Araya says. “You can’t start dictating to people how they should live because it just pushes them away. It doesn’t help anything. It wasn’t easy but it’s not like we were blind to what was going on. We knew. And there were points that we tried to help and encourage him to come back—tell him he could still be a part of what we do, even if it wasn’t full time.</p> <p>“But I think a lot of it had to do with the fact that he didn’t want to let us down. He didn’t want to disappoint us. He was very prideful and wanted to make sure he could come back at 100 percent. I think when he was having real difficulty over that last year, he just didn’t want us to know about it. He kept saying that he needed more time. And the isolation didn’t help much either. I think that no matter how things would have worked out, the end result would have been the same.”</p> <p>“It eats you up because you think, Why can’t I fix this guy?” King says. “And it’s not that he didn’t want to be fixed. I mean, he didn’t want to die. But he also couldn’t help himself before it was too late.”</p> <p>On May 2, 2013, the sudden news took the metal community by storm: Jeff Hanneman had died. Araya recalls his final communications with his longtime friend and bandmate: “I had been texting with him, and he even sent me a song that he had been working on. So it seemed like he was doing okay. But when I got the call that he was back in intensive care, I became concerned. Eventually he stopped responding to my texts. It was like a one-sided conversation.</p> <p>“I was home with my family when I found out he had died. The phone rang and my wife answered it, and she had this look of dread on her face. She handed me the phone and didn’t say anything, and it was our manager, Rick [Sales], and he told me. I hung up the phone and went to my room and I cried.</p> <p>“It hit my family hard, because they really liked Jeff, they knew him really well. My mother was really upset, my sisters really loved Jeff, and my brother too—he was Jeff’s tech for a long time. Everyone in my family knew him and loved him a lot.”</p> <p>Currently, the future of Slayer is uncertain. Upcoming short tours of Europe and South America will go on as planned, but what happens after that is anyone’s guess. </p> <p>“I plan on continuing,” King says. “I don’t think we should throw in the towel just because Jeff’s not here.”</p> <p>As for Lombardo, even though his split from the band a few months ago was publicly acrimonious, he says his door is open for any future discussions with his former bandmates. “If they want to talk, I’m here. I don’t want any kind of animosity between us. Life is too short and we’re too old for that shit. I’m ready and willing, so we’ll see what happens.”</p> <p>Araya, on the other hand, has no idea what the future holds for this band. And it’s a decision he’s currently struggling with.</p> <p>“After 30 years, it would literally be like starting over,” he says. “To move forward without Jeff just wouldn’t be the same, and I’m not sure the fans would be so accepting of that drastic a change. Especially when you consider how much he contributed to the band musically. And you can have someone sit in for him, but there’s no one on this planet that can do what Jeff did. </p> <p>“There’s no replacing him.”</p> <p><strong><em>This feature is from the 2013 issue of Guitar World magazine. <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-13-jeff-hanneman/?&amp;utm_source=homepage&amp;utm_medium=website&amp;utm_campaign=JeffExcerpt">For more information, visit the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/August2013_0.jpg" width="620" height="807" alt="August2013_0.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slayer">Slayer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/tribute-complete-untold-story-slayers-jeff-hanneman#comments August 2013 GW Archive Jeff Hanneman Slayer Interviews News Features Magazine Fri, 02 May 2014 12:23:49 +0000 Jeff Kitts 19089 at http://www.guitarworld.com Talkin' Blues: Little Walter's Exciting Up-Tempo Jump-Blues Soloing Style http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-little-walters-exciting-tempo-jump-blues-soloing-style <!--paging_filter--><p>Last month, we saw how harmonica legend Little Walter applied his improvisational genius to slow blues. This month, we’ll see what Walter can teach guitar players about up-tempo soloing.</p> <p>Walter served his musical apprenticeship in Delta roadhouses during the early Forties and intently studied the style and techniques of down-home blues harmonica masters such as John Lee “Sonny Boy” Williamson, but he also took the instrument into new territory by emulating the jazz-tinged phrasing of jump-blues saxophonists. </p> <p>Jump was an offshoot of big-band swing that featured fast 12-bar boogie-woogie grooves and full horn sections, and saxophonists were the instrumental stars of the day. With his amplified harp backed by only electric guitars and drums, Walter proved that he could swing with the best of the big bands.</p> <p>But he also created a unique instrumental voice by fusing wind-driven reeds with electric power and grit. A prime example of Walter’s jump style was captured on his best-selling 1955 single “My Babe” (<strong>FIGURE 1</strong> adapts similar phrases to the guitar). </p> <p>Walter compensates for the harp’s relatively limited melodic range by exploiting rhythm, dynamics and its unique tone, particularly the natural overtones that make every note sound bigger than the equivalent picked string. Guitarists need to crank up the distortion and reverb in order to narrow the gap. More challenging to emulate is Walter’s masterful breath control, which he uses to add subtle swing and dynamic variations to every phrase. </p> <p>We guitarists can approximate some of the same qualities with ghost notes—fretting certain notes (indicated by Xs in the tablature, as in bar 2)—without fully depressing the string. On individual notes, enhancethe effect with hybrid picking (pick-andfingers technique). Pick the ghost note with a downstroke and pluck the following regular note with a bare finger. </p> <p>For arpeggios (as in bar 6), sweep pick with consecutive upstrokes and quickly mute the fretted notes immediately after you pick them by relaxing your finger pressure against the strings so that they break contact with the fretboard and cease to ring.</p> <p>Walter also frequently thickens his sound with double-stop trills, as in bar 1, going into bar 2. On guitar, fret the double-stop with your index finger at the 13th fret and hammer-on/pull-off repeatedly with your middle finger.<br /> Attempting to capture the qualities of another instrument can be a slippery task because it challenges guitar-centric assumptions about technique and phrasing. Aspiring to evoke the spirit of Little Walter shows us just how much there is yet to discover right under our own fingers.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="350" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F6902229"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-05-01%20at%202.58.04%20PM.png" width="620" height="706" alt="Screen Shot 2014-05-01 at 2.58.04 PM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-05-01%20at%202.58.15%20PM.png" width="620" height="230" alt="Screen Shot 2014-05-01 at 2.58.15 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-little-walters-exciting-tempo-jump-blues-soloing-style#comments August 2013 Keith Wyatt Little Walter Talkin' Blues Blogs News Lessons Magazine Thu, 01 May 2014 19:00:58 +0000 Keith Wyatt 18611 at http://www.guitarworld.com Purple Heart: Daredevil Guitar Virtuoso Steve Morse Discusses Deep Purple's New Album, 'Now What?!' http://www.guitarworld.com/purple-heart-daredevil-guitar-virtuoso-steve-morse-discusses-deep-purples-new-album-now-what <!--paging_filter--><p>When <em>Guitar World</em> catches up with Steve Morse, it’s at a rare moment when the Deep Purple guitarist is actually at home. “I’m in the U.S. right now, oddly enough,” he says, calling from his house in Ocala, Florida. He laughs: “But management will try to change that soon.”</p> <p>Indeed, for the past several years, Deep Purple have embarked upon something akin to what Bob Dylan fans have taken to calling that artist’s Never Ending Tour. It seems as if the veteran British metal act is always playing somewhere, to someone. In much of the world, Deep Purple are as popular as ever, performing before large crowds in Europe, Australia, Southeast Asia and the Americas.</p> <p>In addition to the substantial road work, Deep Purple have just released a new studio album, <em>Now What?!</em> Recorded by legendary producer Bob Ezrin, it’s their first album in eight years and their 19th since forming in England 45 years ago. Featuring veteran members Ian Gillan (vocals), Roger Glover (bass) and Ian Paice (drums), Purple are currently rounded out by Morse, who has been with the band since 1996, and keyboardist Don Airey, who joined in 2002 to replace founding organist Jon Lord, who passed away in June 2012. </p> <p>Though it had been a while since the band had entered the studio together, Morse says the material for <em>Now What?!</em> came quickly. “We did three writing sessions over the course of a year and ended up with over 20 songs,” he explains. “I remember saying to the guys, ‘Can we please stop putting new ones on the pile? I can’t remember them all!’ ”</p> <p>Morse took time out to speak with <em>Guitar World</em> about the new songs, his gear on <em>Now What?!</em> and touring—but not too much time, as he had to get ready to head back out on the road. “It’s crazy,” Morse says. “Two days ago, we were on top of a mountain in Austria, playing outside, with people skiing all around us. Now I’m in Florida, and soon I’ll be in Europe. I get to see more countries and different cultures than most people who work for the Department of State.”</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: <em>Now What?!</em> is Deep Purple’s first studio effort in eight years. Why did you decide to make the album now?</strong></p> <p>Actually, I was one of the guys asking the same thing! My vision was every tour we’d do another song and just release it on the web site. I’d say, “Don’t even try to sell it, because things are different these days as far as how people listen to music.” But the rest of the guys were like, “Well, this is what we do, this is what we’ve always done. So let’s do the best studio album we can.” And Bob [Ezrin] agreed. So I got into it wholeheartedly. </p> <p><strong>You cover a lot of stylistic ground on the album. There are plenty of straightforward rockers, like “Hell to Pay” and “Weirdistan” but also mellow, jazzy cuts, like “All the Time in the World,” and more epic tunes, like “Above and Beyond.”</strong></p> <p>I think we just naturally do that, because Ian Paice is one of those drummers that can play swing-type stuff as smoothly as rock. So it leaves room for a lot of different feels. “All the Time in the World”: the verse in that is kind of slinky and relaxed but still has a little bit of swing to it. And “Above and Beyond” was me sort of pushing the band musically in a certain direction. I was imagining an orchestral background mix with sort of a Zeppelin-y heaviness. </p> <p>And chord-wise I guess it’s a little more proggy, more like the kind of thing I might have brought into a Kansas writing session [Morse was a member of Kansas in the late Eighties]. Lot of different triads over the tonic, which sort of stays the same. So there were a lot of different ideas. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/BEWYRRaxFhU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>One of the great guitar spots on the album is the intro to “Uncommon Man,” which begins with an extended, unaccompanied solo from you. How did that come about?</strong></p> <p>That was Bob, pure and simple. I don’t think I would have thought to do anything like that. But he came to one of our shows, and afterward at the studio he said, “I want you to do something like you did at the concert.” And I said, “That was improv.” So he said, “Well, then do an improv. You’re rolling.” </p> <p>We were all in a circle looking at each other, and I just started playing like I would live. And Don [Airey] has super-incredible ears, so he heard what I was doing and just followed along. Then when Don started leading with the chords, I had to listen and try to follow him. And if you listen to the song, there’s one chord where I didn’t quite get it. There are a couple notes in one of the runs that don’t completely match. I meant to do that! [laughs] But it was just one of those moments where it was the entire band doing the take and there was no way to fix it. It was literally a moment in time. And I love when we keep takes, especially when it’s the first take. Even if it’s not perfect, it’s really cool to have those spontaneous moments.</p> <p><strong>What gear did you use on the album?</strong></p> <p>My main guitar was my Music Man four-pickup signature model. I also used my three-pickup Music Man Y2D. And I basically went straight into my Engl signature head [the Engl E656]. I use two of them. For pedals, I had a TC Electronic Hall of Fame Reverb, a Flashback Delay and a PolyTune. The weird thing about my pedal setup is that the delays are never between the guitar and the amp; they’re between the guitar, amp and the second amp. So the dry amp is never affected. The only effect I ever put between the guitar and the dry amp is a Keeley Compressor for some of the rhythm stuff. It does a great job of compacting that single-coil pickup. You can hear it on “All the Time in the World.” </p> <p>I leave the delay pedals on all the time and control the output through my Ernie Ball volume pedals. Those are summed into the second amp, which is basically just a slave amp. It’s only heard when I press down on the volume pedals, and then you only hear the delay, short or long. So the engineer has to have both of those cabs at equal volume. So the dry amp is always on and always dry, and most of the time you hear nothing from the wet amp.</p> <p><strong>When you’re in the studio or onstage with Deep Purple, are you always aware of the band’s considerable history?</strong></p> <p>Sure. There’s no question about it. I came into the band playing this stuff as a fan would. Live, I try to make it sound like the record, but for the solos I try to do something a little bit reminiscent of the record and then go off and do my own thing, just to keep things from becoming too repetitious for me as a player. I understand that some people want to hear the exact solo they’ve memorized from listening to the record so many times, so on a couple songs I do parts of the solos. But on the other hand I understand that people also go to more than one show and they might want to hear something different each night.</p> <p><strong>Is there a song you most enjoy playing?</strong></p> <p>“Hard Lovin’ Man” [from 1970’s <em>Deep Purple in Rock</em>]. It’s got the galloping rhythm and a great solo. That’s one of the few tunes where I cop the lead Ritchie [Blackmore] played—not exactly, but for the segments that have that minor-third harmony, I use a Whammy Pedal to match it. </p> <p><strong>As far as playing live, it seems like the band is on tour all the time. </strong></p> <p>Well, the other guys love it. Me, having raised my son and stepdaughter during the time I’ve been in the band, I don’t love that philosophy quite as much. But it’s been great to have a very good job. I can’t complain.</p> <p><strong>Is there a region where you feel Deep Purple’s fanbase is the most devout?</strong></p> <p>That’s a good question. We just did a tour with Journey in Australia, and that seemed to go really nice as far as fan reaction. But I guess when we get to Eastern Europe and the former Soviet countries, they’re really hardcore. Even [Russian Prime Minister Dmitry] Medvedev—apparently when he was younger he used to DJ at underground parties and play Deep Purple songs. This was when it was illegal to do that. </p> <p><strong>Medvedev told you this?</strong></p> <p>He did! We were at his house for a get-together for dinner, and he told us this story through a translator. His son plays guitar too. He’s a music man! But it just goes to show you: everywhere you go, people are pretty much the same. </p> <p><em>Photo: Getty Images</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/steve-morse">Steve Morse</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/deep-purple">Deep Purple</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/purple-heart-daredevil-guitar-virtuoso-steve-morse-discusses-deep-purples-new-album-now-what#comments August 2013 Deep Purple Steve Morse Interviews News Features Thu, 10 Oct 2013 15:20:01 +0000 Richard Bienstock 18647 at http://www.guitarworld.com Review: ESP LTD Elite ST-1 Duncan and EMG Electric Guitars http://www.guitarworld.com/review-esp-ltd-elite-st-1-duncan-and-emg-electric-guitars <!--paging_filter--><p>Nine times out of 10, your workhorse guitar is going to be a midpriced instrument—not so spectacular that you’re afraid to take it out of its case but also not so inexpensive that it suffers from compromised performance. </p> <p>ESP’s new LTD Elite Series guitars are designed to fit this special niche, building on the success of the company’s budget-minded LTD Series and delivering high-end tone and playability with a price-balanced complement of features and finish. They’re built in Japan, right alongside ESP’s high-end creations, and they’re based on some of ESP’s most popular models. </p> <p>The LTD Elite ST-1 imbues an idealized superstrat-style ax with custom-shop playability and tone, and is expressly designed for the modern shredder who likes a retro vibe. </p> <p><strong>Features</strong></p> <p>Only the fingerboards, pickups and hardware color differ between the two LTD Elite ST-1 models: one has a set of active EMGs (81-SA-SA) and black hardware with a rosewood board, while the other sports a maple fretboard, chrome hardware and Seymour Duncan pickups (Custom humbucker and two STK-S4 Classic Stack Plus single-coils). </p> <p>The alder bodies are topped with book-matched quilted maple and feature natural wood binding, which adds to the top-shelf aesthetic. ESP uses medium to heavy slabs of alder for these ST-1s, so that they provide the fullest midrange and maximum bass weight. As expected, the double-locking Floyd Rose tremolo system is recessed and back-routed, ready for the wildest cirque-du-whammy pitch acrobatics. A few other points that illustrate the ST-1’s thoughtful engineering are the low-friction control pots and an upward-angled input jack that’s intended to please stage players who run the cable to a strap-mounted wireless system. </p> <p>The LTD Elite ST-1’s thin, U-shaped maple neck obviously takes its cues from the fastest, hallmark shredder guitars of the Eighties. It’s not too wide, doesn’t rest too deep in the palm and utilizes an almost unperceivable bevel to soften the fingerboard’s edge. Upon closer inspection, I noticed that ESP is cutting the extra jumbo fretwire short and then side filling the fret slots, so that there will never be a problem with protruding, sharp wires. Bravo! The heel is angled and faceted for unobstructed upper-register access, and the rotary truss-rod adjustment is properly positioned between the neck butt and pickup. The quilted-maple headstock veneer is matched to the body color, and the EMG-loaded ST-1 includes an ingenious, flip-type battery door. </p> <p><strong>Performance</strong></p> <p>Each of these guitars has its own tonal signature, but the playing experience and feel are otherwise identical. On one hand, the maple fretboard and Duncan pickups produce particularly bright sonics, sometimes exhibiting the slicing cut of a dreadnought-sized acoustic. Bass notes were especially resonant and metallic from this model, and using the Duncan single-coils brought forth an aggressive, vintage demeanor. </p> <p>Flipping to the Duncan Custom bridge pickup and running it through a Mesa Mark V’s rich high-gain circuitry delivered the best results, clear and punchy with a teeth-gritting, razor-sharp zing of harmonics trailing every note. </p> <p>The rosewood- and EMG-equipped LTD Elite ST-1 was quite a different animal. Its sweet acoustic nature and earthy midrange inspired Malmsteen-esque arpeggios and Gary Moore–style soaring solo lines. For high gain, it matched best to one of my modified Marshalls or a Hughes &amp; Kettner TubeMeister, augmenting each amp’s brilliant sting with the sinister warmth of an alligator’s smile. In this platform, the EMG’s delivered more kick than I’m used to hearing from active pickups, and their extreme harmonic content, combined with the ST-1’s powerful midrange, allowed me to turn the amp’s gain down without reducing crunch or sustain.</p> <p><strong>List Prices</strong> ESP LTD Elite ST-1 with Duncans, $2,350; with EMGs, $2,520 </p> <p><strong>Manufacturer</strong> The ESP Guitar Company, <a href="http://espguitars.com/">espguitars.com</a></p> <p><strong>Cheat Sheet</strong></p> <p>The LTD Elite ST-1’s beautifully engineered neck is among the most playable and fastest ever designed, offering a thin, U-shaped contour, side-filled fret slots, beveled edges and 24 extra-jumbo frets. </p> <p>Players can choose from an active set of EMGs with a mellower-sounding rosewood fretboard or a trio of Seymour Duncan pickups with the sharp attack of a maple fingerboard. </p> <p><strong>The Bottom Line</strong></p> <p>ESP’s LTD Elite ST-1 is one of the very few midpriced planks that truly offer a shredder’s paradise of speed, custom-shop quality, old-school styling and blazing modern tone.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2484481592001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2484481592001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-esp-ltd-elite-st-1-duncan-and-emg-electric-guitars#comments August 2013 ESP Electric Guitars News Gear Magazine Thu, 10 Oct 2013 14:20:30 +0000 Erik Kirkland, Video by Paul Riario 18594 at http://www.guitarworld.com Dear Guitar Hero: Buzz Osborne of The Melvins Discusses Aluminum Guitars, Tool's Adam Jones and Growing Up with Kurt Cobain http://www.guitarworld.com/dear-guitar-hero-buzz-osborne-melvins-discusses-aluminum-guitars-tools-adam-jones-and-growing-kurt-cobain <!--paging_filter--><p><em>He fronts one of the most respected experimental alt-metal bands, and he grew up with Kurt Cobain. But what </em>Guitar World<em> readers really want to know is…</em></p> <p><strong>From Venom and David Bowie to Throbbing Gristle and Ram Jam, you picked some crazy songs for your new covers record [<em>Everybody Loves Sausages</em>]. How did you go about choosing them? — Marty Groban</strong></p> <p>We’ve always loved playing covers. When we decided to put this together, we picked songs that influenced us. That’s why a lot of it is pretty old. I was a huge Bowie fan since I was 12 years old. That was the first “punk” rock I got into in the Seventies. I didn’t find out about a lot of the other stuff that was going on, like New York Dolls and Roxy Music, until a lot later. </p> <p>I lived in a time warp in the middle of nowhere, and there certainly wasn’t internet back then. I didn’t have any friends with hip older brothers either. In the town where I grew up, the older brothers were listening to the Eagles or maybe Jethro Tull. Whatever…I’ll take Tull over the Eagles. Actually, I’ve always thought they’d be a better band if they were called the Spread Eagles. [laughs]</p> <p><strong>I’ve heard you’re a big fan of Buck Owens. Have you been into country music for a while? — Joe Zucchiatti</strong></p> <p>I’ve liked country music for forever. And Buck Owens is just one of many country guitarists I like. I think Buck’s Sixties records are really progressive. He used a lot of fuzz bass, and some country fans actually gave him shit for that. His stuff is incredible, and his guitar player, Don Rich, is fucking amazing. That whole band is amazing. I’m a die-hard Buck Owens fan. You know who else loves Buck Owens? Jello Biafra. He’s a huge fan. But new country drives me crazy. It just sounds like REO Speedwagon. I’m not into it. If I’m listening to country, it’s Hank Williams, George Jones, Merle Haggard and stuff like that. If people out there don’t take that stuff seriously, well, they just haven’t listened to it and don’t know what they’re talking about.</p> <p><strong>Was, or is, the use of drugs ever a part of your creative process? — Chris Lukasik</strong></p> <p>For me—and I am strictly speaking for myself—I’ve never found alcohol or drugs to be anything but anti-creative. Let’s look at someone who was an amazing artist that advocated drug use: Hunter S. Thompson. I would say Hunter S. Thompson’s career was totally destroyed by drugs and alcohol. During the last 30 years of his life, his writing was completely horrible. What can you attribute that to? And we can make a long list of musicians who made a few good records and then had everything collapse because of their drug and alcohol use. Look at the Rolling Stones, who are one of the best bands ever. The last time they did a good record was in the mid Seventies. So for the vast majority of their career the music they made is crap. What else could it be? </p> <p>In our own band, I’ve only found drugs and alcohol to be a massive problem. That is one of the main reasons why we stop playing with musicians—because they can’t get it together. But am I gonna tell people what to do? I don’t think so. If you wanna get wasted, you should get as wasted as you want. You should O.D. with a giant stockpile of drugs in front of you. </p> <p>Go ahead! If I were in charge you would have all the freedom in the world to do whatever you wanted. But don’t expect me to pick up the pieces, because you blew it. I would advise you not to do drugs. But if you’re going to do it, I would advise you to go insane with it. The only thing worse than a drug user is a candy-ass drug user. [laughs] Like, “Oh, I’m too much of a pussy to take it all the way.” Then fuck you. I can learn nothing from you! [laughs]</p> <p><strong>I’ve heard stories that Kurt Cobain used to roadie for the Melvins when you were first starting out in Washington. Is that true, and when did you first meet Kurt? — Miles Hunter Ray</strong></p> <p>I knew Kurt since he was in little league. We lived in a very small town and we went to school together, even though he was a few years younger than me. What originally attracted me to him was his dark sense of humor. We were kindred spirits. We’d sit in art class and he’d draw perfect representations of the art teacher being killed. We’d laugh our asses off. People don’t really understand that he was a funny motherfucker. He was not just some down, dour drug addict. Nobody laughed more than Kurt, and we had great times together. </p> <p>I always think it’s funny that people say he roadied for us. Look at him! He couldn’t lift himself out of bed. You think he could roadie for someone? But we all hung out a lot. [Nirvana bassist] Krist Novoselic drove for us for a while. But roadie? We didn’t have a roadie. I didn’t even know what a roadie was until 1990. In order to hire someone to roadie you have to be making money. The first time we made money was in 1988, and that was $200. If we would go to Seattle and play a show and make $160, maybe we’d all go buy everyone a burrito. That’s it. There was no money. </p> <p>And people also say Kurt tried out for the Melvins. Yeah, right. I’ve never had tryouts for this band, ever. I can’t imagine doing that. We all jammed and played together back then. It was hopeless and stupid and horrific and mind numbing. There are happy memories, but in the end it’s a tragedy. I can’t rewrite history in such a way that makes me feel good about it. Honestly, I wish Kurt would have never become famous and was still alive. I don’t give a fucking shit about any of that [success]. If that hastened his death, it’s the worst thing that could have happened. </p> <p><strong>I love how Melvins songs always challenge songwriting conventions. Any tips you’d like to share? — Chris</strong></p> <p>One of my main problems with music is that the basic formula is always the same: verse, chorus, verse, chorus, bridge, verse, chorus, chorus, chorus, end. One of the bands that changed that was the Beatles. If you listen to “Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey.” It’s three verses, bridge, end. That’s not to say you can’t use a normal structure; I just prefer not to do that. I wanna drag people outta the normalcy of music…whatever that may be. </p> <p>One thing I do is record any idea I have, on my iPhone or whatever. If can’t record for whatever reason, I won’t play new stuff. I’ll play stuff I already know. I don’t wanna fall on something and not be able to record it. I’m so paranoid about that. Another thing I do if I’m trying to come up with vocals is, once you come up with the guitar line, you play guitar melodies instead of vocals and then sing those melodies. That really helps. </p> <p><strong>You played Les Pauls for years, but it seems since you switched to those aluminum guitars you’ve never looked back. What about those guitars makes them so special? — Adam Thompson</strong></p> <p>I found those guitars about three years ago. The guys in Isis were playing them. We rehearsed at the same facility in L.A. as they did, and I saw these weird aluminum guitars. I picked one up, and what instantly sold me on it was the neck. It was the same thickness from the headstock to the body. You can’t get that thin of a neck with wood because it’ll break. Plus, I have the hands of a five year old. You look at a picture of Hendrix and he could wrap his finger around a Strat neck like four times, whereas a Strat neck looks like a Precision Bass in my hands. </p> <p>So I called Kevin Burkett from Electrical Guitar Company and asked if he could make an aluminum guitar that’s a Les Paul scale. And he did it. What people don’t realize is that these aluminum guitars actually have more low end than Les Pauls. They’re wonderful guitars. I have about seven of them. But if you gave me the best guitar and amp in the world, and gave Hendrix the worst guitar and amp…he would still fucking bury me! [laughs] So it’s not just about the gear. Hendrix could stomp you into the dirt even with a five-string acoustic. </p> <p><strong>I love that the Melvins are always collaborating with people. Adam Jones from Tool always talks about how much he loves you. Have you ever considered recording music with him? — Graham Muttram</strong></p> <p>Well, on <em>The Crybaby</em> record we did a whole song with Tool called “Divorced.” We’ve done stuff off and on, but Tool’s pretty busy. Adam’s the one millionaire- rock-star kinda guy that doesn’t treat me like a peon. We’re actually friends above and beyond all that, which is nice. I’m not good at networking and I’m not good at parties. I’m the guy that would rather drive to San Diego to see a big rock show than see it in L.A. [laughs] I don’t wanna deal with it! If Adam lost all of his money tomorrow, it wouldn’t affect our relationship at all, thank god. Maybe he and I could get jobs at Starbucks.</p> <p><em>Photo: Travis Shinn</em></p> <p><a href="https://plus.google.com/u/0/+BradAngle?re=author">Brad Angle Google +</a></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/dear-guitar-hero-buzz-osborne-melvins-discusses-aluminum-guitars-tools-adam-jones-and-growing-kurt-cobain#comments August 2013 Buzz Osborne Dear Guitar Hero The Melvins Interviews News Features Wed, 04 Sep 2013 20:06:54 +0000 Brad Angle 19086 at http://www.guitarworld.com Smokin’ Axes: The Glassical Creations Chili Pepper Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/smokin-axes-glassical-creations-chili-pepper-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p>Considering that millions of guitarists have spent countless hours staring cross-eyed at glass pipes, it was inevitable that one day someone would put two and two together and make a glass guitar. </p> <p>For guitarist and glass blower Nick Eggert, who built this unique glass guitar with chili pepper embellishments, the concept of a glass guitar was a perfectly natural development.</p> <p>“I took my love for music, guitars, glass blowing and art and combined them into one,” says Eggert, who sells his handiwork via a company called Glassical Creations. “I’ve been a glass blower for two years now, making everything from pendants to smoking accessories. This guitar is one of six glass-bodied instruments I’ve made so far, which include four guitars, a bass and a banjo.”</p> <p>The Glassical Creations chili pepper guitar has a borosilicate glass body mounted on a pine body. Eggert used a variety of molds to craft a basic glass frame, then added the lacework and various chili pepper–shaped details. The hardware includes a pair of Lace Sensor single-coil pickups, master volume and tone controls, and a vintage-style tremolo bridge. </p> <p>Eggert also made a custom glass whammy-bar handle and installed a smoking attachment that allows guitarists to puff and play, which he offers as an option on his guitars. </p> <p>“The guitar sounds great,” he says. “I don’t know how much the glass body affects the tone. I’ll let others be the judge of that.”</p> <p>Work has just started on a second round of Glassical Creations instruments, which Eggert will be selling between $4,000 and $8,000 depending on style, options and the intricacy of the work involved. </p> <p>For more details, visit <a href="https://www.facebook.com/GlassicalCreations">facebook.com/GlassicalCreations</a>.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202013-08-26%20at%2011.26.09%20AM.png" width="620" height="261" alt="Screen Shot 2013-08-26 at 11.26.09 AM.png" /></p> <p><em>It Might Get Weird: Guitar World goes inside the minds of some of the world’s most creative custom-guitar builders.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/smokin-axes-glassical-creations-chili-pepper-guitar#comments August 2013 Glassical Creations GW Archive It Might Get Weird Electric Guitars News Features Gear Magazine Mon, 26 Aug 2013 15:29:14 +0000 Chris Gill 18702 at http://www.guitarworld.com All That Jazz: How to Play "Out of the Blue" http://www.guitarworld.com/all-jazz-how-play-out-blue <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the August 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-13-jeff-hanneman/?&amp;utm_source=homepage&amp;utm_medium=website&amp;utm_campaign=sidebar">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>This month, I’d like to talk about the track “Out of the Blue,” from my latest CD, <em>All Over the Place</em> (available from the Heads Up International division of the Concord Music Group). This record is aptly named, because it features a variety of different musical styles, represented across the 11 new original compositions I penned for the record. </p> <p>In writing the music, I had in mind the specific styles that I wanted to touch upon, as well as the talents of all of the great musicians that play on the record, such as bassists Anthony Jackson, Richard Bona, Victor Wooten, Dave Holland, Tom Kennedy, Will Lee and Victor Bailey, saxophonist Kenny Garrett, trumpeter Randy Brecker, and drummers Dave Weckl, Keith Carlock and Lionel Cordew. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2479774293001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2479774293001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/all-jazz-how-play-out-blue#comments All That Jazz August 2013 Mike Stern News Lessons Magazine Tue, 16 Jul 2013 15:42:10 +0000 Mike Stern 18604 at http://www.guitarworld.com Take Guitar World's "Raining Blood" Transcription Challenge and Compete for a Marshall 15-Watt Mini Stack Amp! http://www.guitarworld.com/take-guitar-worlds-raining-blood-transcription-challenge-and-compete-marshall-15-watt-mini-stack-amp <!--paging_filter--><p>Last month, <em>Guitar World</em> launched its new monthly transcription challenge. We kicked things off with Jason Becker's "Perpetual Burn," the transcription for which appeared in our July 2013 issue.</p> <p>Guitarists checked out the transcription, learned the applicable section of the song and sent us videos of themselves playing the song's "Guitar 2" part to Jeff Loomis' backing track. The winner, Joshua Kraft of California, was selected by Becker himself after we sent him videos of our three finalists. The prize? A Carvin JB200C Jason Becker Tribute Guitar.</p> <p>The subject of this month's challenge is Slayer's "Raining Blood," the five-page transcription for which appears on Page 112 of the August 2013 issue of <em>Guitar World</em> magazine. This month, you'll be competing for a new Marshall MG Series MG15CFXMS 15W Mini Stack Carbon Fiber guitar amp (MSRP: $540).</p> <p>For more about this amp, visit <a href="http://www.marshallamps.com/product.asp?productCode=MG15CFXMS&amp;pageType=OVERVIEW">marshallamps.com.</a> </p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Here's what's involved:</span></p> <p>• <strong>ENTER</strong> the <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/enter-guitar-worlds-raining-blood-challenge-and-win-marshall-mg-series-mg15cfxms-15w-mini-stack-carbon-fiber-amp">"Raining Blood" Transcription Challenge at our CONTESTS page</a>. NOTE: You MUST officially enter the contest <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/enter-guitar-worlds-raining-blood-challenge-and-win-marshall-mg-series-mg15cfxms-15w-mini-stack-carbon-fiber-amp">at this link</a>, and it wouldn't hurt to read the rules and restrictions! <strong>For instance, you must be at least 18 years old and a resident of the US or Canada to enter.</strong></p> <p>• <strong>CHECK OUT</strong> <em>Guitar World's</em> transcription of Slayer's "Raining Blood" (<a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-13-jeff-hanneman/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=SlayerContest">Page 112 in the August 2013 issue</a>), and send us a video of yourself playing the song as close to our transcription as possible. <strong>To be more exact, video yourself playing sections A, B and C starting at the beginning of the transcription and stopping just before the vocals kick in (In other words, play everything before section D). Unfortunately, we do not have a backing track for you to use this month.</strong></p> <p>• <strong>UPLOAD</strong> your video to YouTube and email the video link to <em>Guitar World</em> at guitarchallenge@guitarworld.com.</p> <p>A team of <em>Guitar World</em> editors will choose the winner. Good luck!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wDk6fvkEp2k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/CUDWLp1yIWw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slayer">Slayer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/take-guitar-worlds-raining-blood-transcription-challenge-and-compete-marshall-15-watt-mini-stack-amp#comments August 2013 Marshall Marshall Amplification Slayer Transcription Challenge News Features Mon, 15 Jul 2013 15:44:45 +0000 Guitar World Staff 18738 at http://www.guitarworld.com A Tribute to Jeff Hanneman: The Slayer Guitarist’s Wife Recalls the Spider-Bite Incident and How It Lead to Her Husband’s Downfall http://www.guitarworld.com/tribute-jeff-hanneman-slayer-guitarist-s-wife-recalls-spider-bite-incident-and-how-it-lead-her-husband-s-downfall <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This is an excerpt from the August 2013 issue of Guitar World magazine. For the rest of this story, plus a Jeff Hanneman poster and features on Buzz Osbourne of the Melvins, Joe Bonamassa, Iggy and the Stooges, Steve Morse of Deep Purple, Eric Clapton's 2013 Crossroads Guitar Festival, the 25 Best Guitar &amp; Music Apps and more, <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-13-jeff-hanneman/?&amp;utm_source=homepage&amp;utm_medium=website&amp;utm_campaign=JeffExcerpt">check out the August 2013 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <p>In January 2011, an incident occurred that many would later assume was the cause of Jeff Hanneman’s death but wasn’t. </p> <p>Jeff was bitten on his right arm by an insect that was carrying a flesh-eating disease called necrotizing fasciitis. Reports circulated that it was a spider that bit Jeff, but that was never confirmed. Whatever bit him, it was enough send the guitarist’s life into a tailspin.</p> <p>“Jeff had been visiting a friend in the L.A. area,” says Kathryn, his wife of 24 years. “He was in the Jacuzzi one night relaxing, and he had his arm over the side, and he felt something, like a bite or a prick. But of course he didn’t think anything of it. He came home about a week later, and he was pretty well lit when he came through the front door. He wasn’t feeling well, and he just wanted to go upstairs and go to sleep. </p> <p>"Before he did he said, ‘Kath, I need to show you something, even though I really don’t want to.’ And he took off his shirt, and I just freaked out when I saw his arm. It was bright red and three times the normal size. I said, ‘Jeff, we need to go now. We need to get you to the ER.’ But all he wanted to do was go to bed and sleep, and I knew that I was trying to rationalize with a very intoxicated person. So there was nothing I could do that night. But the next morning I convinced him to let me take him in. He didn’t have a lot of strength, but I was able to get him into the car.</p> <p>“When we got to the hospital in Loma Linda, they took one look at him and they immediate knew what it was, so they took him right in. Jeff told me to go home because we both knew he’d be there for hours and neither of us thought it would be a life-or-death situation. </p> <p>"About three or four hours later, Jeff called me and said, ‘Kath, it’s not good. They may have to amputate. I think you need to come back here.’ When I got there, Jeff was on the stretcher waiting to go into surgery, and the doctor put it in perspective for me. He said, ‘I need you to see your husband. He may not make it.’ The doctor looked at Jeff and told him, ‘First I’m going to try to save your life. Then I’m going to try to save your arm. Then I’m going to try to save your career.’ And looking at Jeff on that stretcher and possibly saying goodbye, knowing that I may never see him again…”—she pauses—“…was one of the hardest moments of my life.”</p> <p>The next few days for the Hannemans could only be described as nerve-wracking. Jeff was in the ICU in an induced coma after the initial surgery and breathing through a tube, his arm, for the most part, intact. Doctors attempted to remove the breathing tube at one point, but Jeff was unable to breathe on his own. Finally, after about the fourth day, the tube was removed and Jeff was breathing again. Her husband was alive, but as soon as they removed the bandages from Jeff’s arm, Kathryn knew the road to recovery would be long.</p> <p>“I’ll never forget it—I couldn’t believe what I was seeing,” she recalls. “All I could do was look up at the doctor and say, ‘How the hell do you fix this?’ And he said, ‘You know, Mrs. Hanneman, you’d be very surprised.’ And at that moment I had all the faith in the world that this doctor could fix his arm.”</p> <p>Back home soon afterward, Jeff could begin the process of rehabilitating his arm in the hopes of regaining his ability to play guitar. The next few weeks saw more surgeries, staples and multiple grafts using skin from his left thigh. Wound-care suction devices were on hand to draw out the infection and help the skin grafts take. Physically, Jeff’s arm was on the mend. Emotionally, however, he was struggling. Depression was setting in.</p> <p>“I couldn’t get Jeff to go to rehab or therapy,” Kathryn says. “I think he was letting the visual of his arm get to his emotions, and it was messing with his mind. It was hard to keep him upbeat at that point.</p> <p>“I think he thought he could do this on his own—that he would just to go rehearsal and play, and that that would be his rehab. But I think he started to learn, once he tried rehearsing, that he wasn’t playing up to his ability and that he wasn’t able to play guitar at the speed he was used to. And I think that really hit him hard, and he started to lose hope.”</p> <p><strong>For the rest of this story, plus a Jeff Hanneman poster and features on Buzz Osbourne of the Melvins, Joe Bonamassa, Iggy and the Stooges, Steve Morse of Deep Purple, Eric Clapton's 2013 Crossroads Guitar Festival, the 25 Best Guitar &amp; Music Apps and more, <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-13-jeff-hanneman/?&amp;utm_source=homepage&amp;utm_medium=website&amp;utm_campaign=JeffExcerpt">check out the August 2013 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/August2013_0.jpg" width="620" height="807" alt="August2013_0.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slayer">Slayer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/tribute-jeff-hanneman-slayer-guitarist-s-wife-recalls-spider-bite-incident-and-how-it-lead-her-husband-s-downfall#comments Articles August 2013 GW Archive Jeff Hanneman Slayer Interviews Features Magazine Sun, 07 Jul 2013 17:24:06 +0000 Jeff Kitts 18590 at http://www.guitarworld.com String Theory: Drawing Inspiration from a Sax Legend and Melodic Minor's Two Coolest Modes http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-drawing-inspiration-sax-legend-and-melodic-minors-two-coolest-modes <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the August 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-13-jeff-hanneman/?&amp;utm_source=homepage&amp;utm_medium=website&amp;utm_campaign=sidebar">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>In this and next month’s columns, I’d like pay tribute to one of my biggest musical heroes, the late, great tenor saxphonist Michael Brecker. His huge tone, jaw-dropping chops and ferociously funky and always brilliantly compelling solos inspired me early on to learn the language of jazz and taught me a great deal about the art of phrasing and playing intriguing, “outside”-sounding lines that have a method to their musical madness—meaning a theoretical basis that one can analyze, learn from and apply. </p> <p>And so, I’ve composed a 32-bar solo, presented in two parts and played over a repeating eight-bar chord progression, that was inspired by Brecker’s improvisation on the track "Quartet No. 2 (Part 2: Dedicated to John Coltrane)" from pianist Chick Corea’s 1981 album <em>Three Quartets</em>. That performance features Brecker, backed by an elite acoustic jazz rhythm section, soloing over essentially the same chord progression, albeit in a different key, C minor. My tribute solo is in the more guitarist-familiar key of E minor and follows the progression Em7-C13-B7alt-Em9-B7alt.</p> <p><strong>PART ONE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2484443893001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2484443893001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2484418904001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2484418904001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-drawing-inspiration-sax-legend-and-melodic-minors-two-coolest-modes#comments August 2013 Dean Markley Jimmy Brown String Theory News Lessons Magazine Wed, 03 Jul 2013 15:01:27 +0000 Jimmy Brown 18602 at http://www.guitarworld.com Iggy Pop and James Williamson Discuss 'Ready to Die,' the First Iggy and The Stooges Album in 40 Years http://www.guitarworld.com/iggy-pop-and-james-williamson-discuss-ready-die-first-iggy-and-stooges-album-40-years <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This is an excerpt from the August 2013 issue of Guitar World magazine. For the rest of this story, plus a tribute to Slayer's Jeff Hanneman and features on Buzz Osbourne of the Melvins, Joe Bonamassa, Steve Morse of Deep Purple, Eric Clapton's 2013 Crossroads Guitar Festival, the 25 Best Guitar &amp; Music Apps and more, <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-13-jeff-hanneman/?&amp;utm_source=homepage&amp;utm_medium=website&amp;utm_campaign=IggyExcerpt">check out the August 2013 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <p>Rage and despair are the ruling passions on <em>Ready to Die</em>, the new album by Iggy and the Stooges. Well, that and big boobs. Only James Newell Osterberg Jr., a.k.a. Iggy Pop, could follow up the disc’s death-haunted title track with an homage to humongous hooters, the aptly named “DD’s.” </p> <p>“I guess I’ll accept that distinction,” Iggy says with a laugh. “It’s funny that that song gets a lot of attention. If it was as bad as some people say it is, it wouldn’t be getting noticed. But it’s getting noticed as much as its subject gets noticed.” </p> <p>So the question becomes, does the 66-year-old godfather of punk spend more time these days thinking about death or boobs?</p> <p>“Boobs,” he answers without hesitation. “It’s a more fun subject. Sometimes when I find myself thinking about death I’ll say to myself, ‘Jim, think about sex. You’ll feel better.’ ” </p> <p>But apart from this track, <em>Ready to Die</em>’s tune stack skews more toward the dark side. With song titles like “Gun,” “Job,” “Burn,” “Sex and Money,” “Dirty Deal” and “Unfriendly World,” the disc is a rabid, guitar-charged howl ripped from today’s headlines—a soundtrack for the meltdown of Western civilization, spiked with the foreboding shadow of mortality and the napalm stench of a world that’s more brutal, ugly and money- and power-hungry than ever before. </p> <p>“Well…all that stuff does pop up,” Iggy defers. “To be honest with you, it’s not like I walk around the street or my garden or the beach in rage and despair. But when I listen to James Williamson’s guitar and his music, those are the kind of lyrics that seem to suit it perfectly. What he does is intense.” </p> <p>Williamson and Pop’s first studio collaboration was 1973’s seminal <em>Raw Power</em> album. It was a defining moment in rock history, an album that would go on to launch a thousand punk and alternative-rock bands and influence the development of heavy metal in the early Seventies. Sex Pistols guitarist Steve Jones and consummate alternative guitar stylist Johnny Marr are among Williamson’s greatest acolytes. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F81782649"></iframe></p> <p>The Stooges split up amid scenes of drug-induced dysfunction a year after <em>Raw Power</em>’s release, their not so elegantly wasted final show documented on the 1974 live album Metallic K.O. Williamson went on to produce a few of Iggy’s solo recordings in the late Seventies but dropped out of music entirely in 1980. He attended California Polytechnic University and ended up working for Sony as vice president of technology standards. But now he’s back in black, and <em>Ready to Die</em> is the first studio album since <em>Raw Power</em> to bear the Iggy and the Stooges’ band name. Williamson produced <em>Ready to Die</em> and laid down the disc’s snarling viper’s nest of toxic rock guitar tracks.</p> <p>“It’s impossible for this new album not to be compared to <em>Raw Power</em>,” Williamson says. “That’s the benchmark that everybody’s looking for. And we didn’t necessarily want to make another <em>Raw Power</em>. We already did that. But the goal I had was to make us sound like us. That’s what I think you’re hearing. It’s just hard-charging guitars, big drums and vocals.”</p> <p>“<em>Raw Power</em> was my first album, and I didn’t really know what I was doing,” Williamson admits. “We recorded the basic tracks live, and there was a lot of bass bleeding into the drums. When all was said and done, we made the engineer do a lot of things he didn’t want to do. We were a bunch of bull-headed young guys.” </p> <p>In contrast, <em>Ready to Die</em> is the work of mature rock and rollers on top of their game. Their craft, individually and collectively, is finely honed and supremely dialed in. But they seem to have lost very little of their youthful sound and fury. It never takes much to bring out Iggy’s inner beast. And after three decades cooped up in the corporate world, Williamson comes on like a wild panther sprung from his cage. He is one of those rare rock guitarists who combine the soul of a rock and roll animal with a scientist’s obsessive command of the physics of guitar tonality. Or in Iggy’s words, “He’s an ace vice president of nerd-ology now.”</p> <p>Bringing Williamson back to rock was one of Iggy’s many great contributions to the music. The chain of events was set in motion in 2003 when Iggy reunited original Stooges Ron and Scott Asheton (guitar and drums, respectively) with ex-Minutemen/Firehose bassist Mike Watt, who took over from original Stooge Dave Alexander. But when Ron died in 2009, Iggy started talking to James Williamson again. It was their first real conversations since parting acrimoniously during the making of Iggy’s 1980 solo album, <em>Soldier</em>.</p> <p>“I hated Williamson and Williamson hated me,” Iggy says bluntly of the situation in back in Eighties. “Everybody just hated being there in the studio. So I finished off the record by myself, with just a rhythm section.” </p> <p><em>Photo: Jason Goodrich</em></p> <p><strong>For the rest of this story, plus our tribute to Slayer's Jeff Hanneman and features on Buzz Osbourne of the Melvins, Joe Bonamassa, Steve Morse of Deep Purple, Eric Clapton's 2013 Crossroads Guitar Festival, the 25 Best Guitar &amp; Music Apps and more, <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-13-jeff-hanneman/?&amp;utm_source=homepage&amp;utm_medium=website&amp;utm_campaign=IggyExcerpt">check out the August 2013 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/August2013_0.jpg" width="620" height="807" alt="August2013_0.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/stooges">Stooges</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/iggy-pop-and-james-williamson-discuss-ready-die-first-iggy-and-stooges-album-40-years#comments August 2013 Iggy and the Stooges Iggy Pop James Williamson Interviews News Features Mon, 01 Jul 2013 15:05:35 +0000 Alan Di Perna 18684 at http://www.guitarworld.com Review: Kemper Profiling Amp http://www.guitarworld.com/review-kemper-profiling-amp <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the August 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-13-jeff-hanneman/?&amp;utm_source=homepage&amp;utm_medium=website&amp;utm_campaign=sidebar">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>Today’s digital modeling technology delivers many very impressive sounds, but sometimes playing through even the best amp models feel like you’re wearing someone else’s clothes. If you own some of the same amps commonly found in modeling software and products, you know what I’m talking about. While many models sound great, they may not sound quite as good as that vintage Marshall “Plexi” you sought for more than a decade until the right one came along, or that magical tweed Fender you own that has its own personality.</p> <p>The Kemper Profiling Amp revolutionizes the digital modeling by enabling users to create their own models of any amp and swap and share thousands of models with a vibrant online community of Kemper owners. By taking a digital snapshot of amp or even amp emulation software tones, the Kemper Profiling Amp allows you to take your studio sounds to the stage or bring your entire amp collection on the road without the excess bulk, weight and maintenance hassles. It’s also a great tool for the studio that enables users to save any guitar tone and replicate it in case it’s needed several months later to fix or re-do a track. </p> <p><strong>Features</strong></p> <p>The Kemper Profiling Amp provides a complete rig. The signal chain consists of, in order, stomp effects, the amp stack with equalizer section and speaker cabinets, and stereo master effects. The stomp section offers up to four effects at once, selected from eight effect types: distortion, wah, chorus, phaser/flanger, compressor, EQ, delay and effect loop. The stack section consists of the amplifier module, EQ and cabinet. The studio effect section has four selections: X, consisting of the stomp effects in stereo; Mod, which is the same as the stomp modulation effects, but with two parameters controllable via the front-panel knobs; and delay and reverb. Like an amp, the front panel has gain, volume and master volume controls as well as multifunction knobs below the large LCD, which are generally used to adjust bass, middle and treble tone settings.</p> <p>The rear panel offers a wide variety of connection options. A standard 1/4-inch guitar input and 1/4-inch headphone jack are conveniently located on the front panel, while various outputs, digital S/PDIF In and Out, MIDI In/Out/Thru, two pedal/switch jacks, Ethernet network, USB and return/alternative input jacks are located out of the way on the back. Outputs include direct/send with its own ground/lift switch, monitor output also with ground/lift, left and right XLR and left and right 1/4-inch master outputs with ground/lift switch.</p> <p>The Kemper Profiling Amp ships with well over 200 presets featuring amp/speaker models and effects settings already loaded and can store several hundred more presets that users create themselves or download from the Rig Exchange on Kemper’s website, which currently offers more than 3,000 rigs shared by Kemper users.</p> <p><strong>Performance</strong> </p> <p>In a nutshell, the Kemper Profiling Amp does for guitarists what sampling technology did for keyboardists. While Kemper’s pre-existing collection of models is very impressive, having the ability to profile any amp you own or can rent, borrow, steal or otherwise acquire is a true breakthrough. Performing this task is surprisingly easy, involving a simple setup where a guitar is plugged into the Kemper’s input, a cable is connected from the direct out/send jack to the amp’s input, and a microphone is positioned in front of the speaker and plugged into the return input. The incoming mic signal is monitored either via the headphone jack or by using the main outs connected to a mixer and studio monitors. Creating an amp profile is a simple matter of selecting either the distortion or clean setting (depending on the amp’s tone) and then engaging the profile process, which sends three series of test tones that are analyzed and captured.</p> <p>Basically, the Kemper takes a snapshot of a particular amp setting, and the sound it delivers is uncannily indistinguishable from a recording of it—including preamp and speaker distortion and even the mic’s individual character. If your amp produces several sounds that you like, you’ll need to create an individual profile of each setting. You can even process the sounds of rotary speaker cabinets and many non-time based effects like distortion, although some effects don’t work well with the profiling process. Further gain and EQ adjustments can be made inside the Kemper, which is particularly helpful if you love the distortion character of a tiny low-watt combo with just a volume and tone control and wish you could sculpt its tone with three-band EQ. </p> <p><strong>Cheat Sheet</strong></p> <p><strong>List Price</strong> $2,025</p> <p><strong>Manufacturer</strong> Kemper GmbH, kemper-amps.com</p> <p>The Kemper automatically processes test signals to create custom amp models</p> <p>A dedicated stomp effects section provides up to four effects at once, selectable from eight effect types.</p> <p>The stack section allows you to customize amp models by combining different amp modules, speaker cabinets and EQ settings and adjust definition, power sag, pick attack and compression.</p> <p>The effects section provides studio quality effects in stereo, including Stomp, modulation, delay and reverb.</p> <p><strong>The Bottom Line</strong> </p> <p>Providing the ability to create models of any guitar amp, the Kemper Profiling Amp is a revolutionary digital modeler that does for guitarists what sampling did for keyboardists, opening up a vast world of custom sounds.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2516071008001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2516071008001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-kemper-profiling-amp#comments August 2013 Kemper Amps News Gear Magazine Mon, 01 Jul 2013 14:07:28 +0000 Chris Gill, Video by Paul Riario 18593 at http://www.guitarworld.com Review: Danelectro '67 Heaven Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/review-danelectro-67-heaven-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the August 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-13-jeff-hanneman/?&amp;utm_source=homepage&amp;utm_medium=website&amp;utm_campaign=sidebar">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>In the vast history of guitar design, Danelectros shine as iconic, incomparable oddities, sort of the Andy Warhol of our industry. Nothing else can duplicate the twangy rumble that emanates from their hollow, pressed-wood bodies and lipstick pickups, and each Danelectro model rarely gets more than its 15 minutes of fame, as the limited catalog is replaced every few years. </p> <p>This makes the new ’67 Heaven even more noteworthy as the company’s first-ever reissue, an update really, of the famous Danelectro Hawk that originally debuted in 1967. </p> <p><strong>Features</strong> </p> <p>Yes, you read correctly, the hollow body is made of nothing more than pressed wood, a key ingredient in the Danelectro tone recipe. Instantly recognizable Lipstick tube pickups deliver the singular Dano sounds of yesteryear, but these are somewhat hotter than the originals. Of course the hand-applied, textured alligator finish is also a new addition to the original ’67 design—each displaying a unique pattern—as is the ostrich-eye vinyl that wraps around the body’s edge. The chrome bridge is completely adjustable, and the concentric pots are specific to each pickup, with the outer ring controlling volume and the inner knob adjusting tone. Maple is used for the ’67 Heaven’s neck, and Danelectro fans will recognize its vintage C shape. </p> <p><strong>Performance</strong> </p> <p>Sounds from the ’67 Heaven sit squarely between those from an amplified acoustic and a solid body electric, grunting out raw and snarling mids, speaker-thumping dynamic bursts and Dano’s signature nasal twang. This ’67 Heaven delivers gutsier bass than some of its brethren, and its overwound pickups serve to smooth and balance the instrument’s innate acoustic overtones, especially when plugged into a crunchy or heavily overdriven amp. Run through a touch-sensitive clean amp, like my Fender Vibro-King, the ’67 Heaven reveals the depth of its acoustically enhanced soul.</p> <p><strong>The Bottom Line</strong> </p> <p>Whether you play slide blues, ice-age rock, hillbilly jazz or pure country, Danelectro’s ’67 Heaven is a must-have for your collection. </p> <p><strong>List Price</strong> $?????????</p> <p><strong>Manufacturer</strong> Danelectro, danelectro.com </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2484507905001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2484507905001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-danelectro-67-heaven-guitar#comments August 2013 Danelectro Electric Guitars News Gear Magazine Mon, 24 Jun 2013 14:40:55 +0000 Eric Kirkland, Video by Paul Riario 18597 at http://www.guitarworld.com Metal for Life: Pentatonic Trailblazing — Unusual Ways to Navigate Through a Familiar Scale to Produce Fresh-Sounding Licks http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-pentatonic-trailblazing-unusual-ways-navigate-through-familiar-scale-produce-fresh-sounding-licks <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the August 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-13-jeff-hanneman/?&amp;utm_source=homepage&amp;utm_medium=website&amp;utm_campaign=sidebar">online store</a>.</em></p> <p><strong>The August 2013 issue of <em>Guitar World</em> features the incorrect Metal for Life column. The correct column is presented here in its entirety, complete with tab and videos. </strong></p> <p>In this month’s column, I’d like to demonstrate a variety of ways to twist that staple scale heard in virtually all rock and metal solos—the trusty old five-note pentatonic scale—into new and unusual phrases and patterns. </p> <p>I was initially inspired to come up with these licks from a conversation I had with a saxophone player who asked me, “Why do so many guitarists always play pentatonic runs exactly the same way?”—meaning, why do most guitarists play up and down through the pentatonic scale within the confines of a single fretboard position? </p> <p>He pointed out, “Every time you guys play a solo, your fingers all look the same!” I thought about that and realized that he had a legitimate point, so I set out to come up with a bunch of licks that ascend and descend the fretboard with unexpected finger slides and position shifts that, by their very nature, create a smooth, legato sound that is more “horn-like” than the typical, stock lead guitar phrases we are all so familiar with.</p> <p>The first two licks I’m going to show you are based on A minor pentatonic, which is outlined in ascending form in fifth position in FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2 illustrates a lick, played in steady 16th notes, that is based on a sequence of four-note descending “cells” that gradually move up the fretboard on each successive beat from one position, or “box,” of A minor pentatonic to the next. The trick here is that the last note of each four-note “cell” includes a quick finger slide up to the next position. </p> <p>Throughout this lick, I keep my fret-hand fingers arched so that they’re set directly above the frets, parallel with the fretwire. This way, I can easily focus on my fretting technique, making sure that each note is fretted cleanly and will sound loud and clear.</p> <p>As you play through FIGURE 2, note that the index finger does all the upward sliding as we move from beat to beat. Additionally, you’ll see that I pick the first note on each string and then sound the following note with a pull-off. The only really tricky part of this phrase is found on beat two into beat three, as beat two begins with a pinkie pull-off and beat three begins with a ring finger pull-off. Sometimes it can feel weird switching fingers like this, so give special attention to this part of the phrase by “looping” these two four-note cells over and over.</p> <p>Now let’s apply this approach to an ascending phrase (see FIGURE 3). This run is similarly constructed with successive four-note cells that ascend from one position of A minor pentatonic to the next, via a series of index-finger slides, but it involves the use of hammer-ons instead of pull-offs. The only potentially tricky part of this lick falls on beat four of bar 1, for which a wide index-to-pinkie hammer-on move has to jump quickly from ninth position to 10th position.</p> <p>FIGURE 4 is built from a pattern, based on the A blues scale (A C D Eb E G), that’s played in three different octaves and fretboard positions. Using alternate picking, I play an initial eight-note melodic sequence across the top two strings in eighth position. I then quickly shift down to fifth position and play the same pattern on the middle two strings, then finally shift down to third position and do the same thing on the bottom two strings, using the same fretting and fingering scheme in each successive octave.</p> <p>Let’s wrap up with a riff based on E minor pentatonic (E G A B D), performed entirely with natural harmonics (see FIGURE 5). Be sure to allow all notes to ring together as much as possible.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202013-06-18%20at%202.24.08%20PM.png" width="620" height="471" alt="Screen Shot 2013-06-18 at 2.24.08 PM.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART ONE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2479774661001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2479774661001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2479774643001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2479774643001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-pentatonic-trailblazing-unusual-ways-navigate-through-familiar-scale-produce-fresh-sounding-licks#comments August 2013 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak News Lessons Magazine Fri, 21 Jun 2013 15:38:30 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak 18606 at http://www.guitarworld.com