Michael Angelo Batio http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/357/all en Mike Cerna Premieres New Song, "Soul In Motion" http://www.guitarworld.com/mike-cerna-premieres-new-song-soul-in-motion <!--paging_filter--><p>Today, GuitarWorld.com presents the premiere of "Soul In Motion," a new song by guitarist Mike Cerna.</p> <p>The track is from <em>Starbound</em>, Cerna’s instrumental guitar debut. The new release features homages to instrumental genres of yesterday and today. </p> <p>Accompanied by Craig J. Martinez (drums), Marc Malitz (bass) and featuring a guest solo by shredder Michael Angelo Batio, the album is a return to classic instrumental guitar. The diverse material was inspired by the 20-plus years Cerna has performed around the Chicago area. </p> <p>Unique songwriting, inspiring performances, artwork by artist Kelly Messer and production by Chris Wisco at Belle City Sound make for an exciting release!</p> <p>For more about Cerna, visit <a href="http://www.michaelcerna.com">michaelcerna.com</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/users/11731494&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/michael-angelo-batio-0">Michael Angelo Batio</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/mike-cerna-premieres-new-song-soul-in-motion#comments Michael Angelo Batio Mike Cerna News Tue, 18 Nov 2014 19:32:32 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22897 Dean Guitars CEO Elliott Dean Rubinson Talks Gigging with Uli Jon Roth, Balancing Life As a Musician http://www.guitarworld.com/dean-guitars-ceo-elliott-dean-rubinson-talks-gigging-uli-jon-roth-balancing-life-musician <!--paging_filter--><p>Elliott Dean Rubinson is known in the music industry as "the boss who rocks." He's the CEO and owner of Dean Guitars, ddrum and Luna Guitars. He's also a world-class bassist who has toured with Michael Schenker, Michael Angelo Batio and Uli Jon Roth. </p> <p>We recently sat down with Elliott to talk about his career and current projects.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: What was it like the first time you picked up a bass?</strong></p> <p>In junior high we had a band, and everyone played guitar. Since I was the worst, I was threatened to be ousted unless I'd switch to bass. Since I had zero money, I took the high strings off the guitar and played bass on my Kimberly electric guitar that barely worked. </p> <p>The day finally came when I went into New York City and picked up a Beatle bass copy and plugged it in, and the sound was immediately addicting. Then it was time to save up for the bass amp. With the singer's mic plugged into the bass amp, we were off!</p> <p><strong>What would your younger self think if he could see how much you've accomplished?</strong></p> <p>Never in a million years did I have aspirations to go this far. If you told me in my teens I would own a world-renowned guitar company and be playing with some of the greatest guitarists on the planet, I never would've believed it. I tell everyone I come in contact with that being successful is all about hard work, focus and drive. Setting that goal, believing in yourself and not letting an opportunity get by you is a recipe for success. When Michael Schenker asked me if I knew a bass player to fill in on a few gigs, I hadn't touched a bass in two decades. If you let an opportunity like that get by you, it might never happen again.</p> <p><strong>How do you balance being a touring musician with the responsibilities of being the owner and CEO of Dean Guitars, ddrum and Luna?</strong></p> <p>Balancing touring and running Dean Guitars? Actually, I'm looking for something to do in my spare time. A typical day on the road would be to wake up about 8 a.m., while the other guys are sleeping, and come out to the front lounge and fire up the computer and do five hours of phone calls and emails. The great thing is I can work right up to sound check at 4 p.m. That's the time when I switch hats. It's all about fine tuning the equipment and getting out of business mode and into rock mode. I then have until 10 p.m. to get my game face on. A few of the guys I play with call me Superman. Honestly, I would go crazy with too much free time. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/h9Xtibln4B4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Dean was responsible for making two of the most iconic guitars ever, both for Michael Angelo Batio — the Double (which is on permanent display at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame museum) and the Quad. What was that design process like?</strong></p> <p>Dean Guitars made the very first double guitar in the Eighties, and we mastered the technique. People always ask us how we make a case large enough, not realizing the guitar is actually two single guitars that lock together with two pins and a road case twist lock. It's really a clever design, and there is no need to try and improve it in our estimation. The Nitro "Freight Train" video always blew me away, between Michael's playing and the quad dropped from the sky, so I asked Michael if he thought it was a good idea to build a 2013 version. The thing is so slick, but it weighs a ton. Michael always relates it to wearing two bowling balls around your neck, but if there is anyone who has the stamina and work ethic to make it happen, it's him. He's an incredible human being.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/-lrWZuRn08I" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>On Batio's new release, <em>Intermezzo</em>, you made an amazing bass contribution to the song "8 Pillars of Steel." How were you involved in that album, and how did you track that part?</strong></p> <p>Mike called me one day and said he had a song on his new record he felt I'd be perfect for. It would feature a bunch of great guitarists including George Lynch, Dave Reffett, Rusty Cooley, Jeff Loomis, Craig Goldy and more. What an honor to be part of the rhythm section for this — and to have an eight-bar solo. Believe it or not, I had a friend named Marie Sorenson who brought her portable studio over to Dean Guitars; I took a two-hour break and ran down to our artist lounge and recorded it right there, playing through her Avalon preamp. I really like the tone she got using my Dean "John Entwistle Hybrid" bass. The bass is wired in stereo with the neck pickup being passive and the single coil being active. </p> <p><strong>ddrum is an impressive company as well, with a great artist roster (Vinnie Paul, Carmine Appice, etc.). What does the company hope to bring to drum fans that's unique?</strong></p> <p>I've long been a fan of drummers and drums and as a bassist always found I that I had keen eye for certain players. It is a huge honor to have people like the Appice brothers, Vinnie Paul (Pantera, HellYeah), Barry Kerch (Shinedown), Derrick Wright (Adele) in our family. There are a lot of great drum companies out there, but first off ddrums have acoustic and electronic kits plus world-class hardware. We feel we specialize in things other people don't do, like hybrid kits with triggers built in, unique configurations and finishes and, of course, we arguably have the world's best trigger seen on so many pro stages. Last week I did some gigs with Vinnie Appice and it was great to hear how great he made the kit sound!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/IoZ9G9CWFJU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>When you're playing with Michael Angelo Batio, Michael Schenker and Uli Jon Roth, what is your practice routine, work ethic and schedule like?</strong></p> <p>As you can imagine, my schedule is hectic. I get home at 8 p.m., have dinner and run down to my rehearsal room for an hour's worth of practice. That's about all I can fit in. But honestly there is so much more to preparing for gigs with these guys. Starting at 7 a.m. I try to get a physical workout at least five days a week, either stretching, bike rides, tennis, weights, etc., because when I do double duty with two bands a night, I'm up on stage for close to three hours and if you're not in shape, you're gonna die up there. </p> <p>The practicing is a little tricky and I'll tell you why. Uli has no set list! There are 25 to 35 songs he might call out, depending on how he's feeling and how the crowd is reacting, and I need to be ready for any or all. The Schenker set is much more structured with approximately 18 predetermined songs. Batio's set is also predetermined, but you need to be on your game for that one. If I am playing with two different bands in the same month, there is a fair amount of material to be on top of. Michael Schenker's set is very rehearsed as is Batio's, but Uli prefers to jam and take you to your limits. It's not unusual for him to put his guitar down and walk off stage, leaving us to jam. I feel extremely fortunate to have played around the world with these three amazing guitarists.</p> <p><strong>How do you get gigs with guys of this level?</strong></p> <p>Obviously, you have to have the chops or they wouldn't be asking. But there's so much more people don't see. The Number 1 thing I try to be is low maintenance. We usually have only one rehearsal before a tour, and I come totally prepared in terms of the material. The last thing these guys want to do is stop to show you a part. Not good. I make sure I have backup basses, strings, etc., and I make sure I'm ready for any potential equipment issues. </p> <p>I have a pedal board that fits in my suitcase, complete with my wireless receiver, and all I have to do is run one cable and plug it in. I am ready in two minutes and never want to hold up anyone. Obviously being entertaining on stage, having the proper stage clothes, etc., is part of it. There is really an inner-circle of musicians a lot of these guys know about and use, and I do everything I can to remain in it! </p> <p>I'm all about rock-solid bass. I am going to lay down a foundation with the drummer that is going to make the guitarist feel comfortable soloing over it, as opposed to trying to be a lead bassist. I am really enjoy playing with Batio because he encourages you to improvise and expand your abilities. Every bass player would love this.</p> <p><strong>Dean is interesting in that it has legacy artists like Leslie West in addition to newer artists like Jacky Vincent. How has Dean been able to accomplish this, and what's next for the company?</strong></p> <p>Growing up as a bassist, I loved some of the guys like Leslie West, Schenker, Roth, Vinnie Moore, etc., and I wanted to make sure these guys became the cornerstone of what we were doing because, let's face it, these are the guitarists who influenced everyone of our generation. </p> <p>More than once I've looked on the side of the stage or in the audience, and Kirk Hammett and James Hetfield came out to see Schenker or Roth. These guys know what an inspiration some of the Dean artists are. That said, there are some great new guitarists who we are proud to have in the family, like Jacky Vincent or Zoltan of Five Finger Death Punch. We want to stay relevant to all ages, and I think when guys like this see how we treat our artists and how easy it is to work with Dean Guitars, they tell their peers and in turn they come to talk with us. I'm very proud of what we have built here in Florida.</p> <p><strong>What advantage do you think Dean has over its competitors?</strong></p> <p>The Number 1 thing is the fact that our company is a band of great musicians who love to be surrounded by music and instruments. There are so many gigging musicians here who road test the instruments on stage and report back. This is invaluable. </p> <p>Just being able to make instruments that are balanced correctly, play properly and sound great cannot be done strictly in the corporate world. In addition, some of our competitors simply cannot make decisions and changes as nimbly as we do. We can sit down with an artist and make the decision to do a signature guitar for him on the spot. No board meetings, no voting, no two-month lag. Just a, "Yes, we can do this." I see this as being a huge advantage.</p> <p><strong>Dean is well represented around the world. Is this something the company is always working on? New countries and new territories?</strong></p> <p>Dean Guitars has distributors around the world covering Europe, Australia, South America, the Pacific Rim, etc. That said, we do have countries where we don't have the representation we'd like. For instance, we get a lot of calls from people looking for our high-end U.S. guitars from our artists like Dave Mustaine or Dimebag Darrell. They get frustrated because these guitars are just not everywhere as we only build 500 pieces a year, and typically the limited-run pieces are pre-sold. With the world becoming a smaller place, it is getting a bit easier to find what customers are looking for from Dean.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/GDX6QIkRdzw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>I've seen you refer to Dean's more high-end guitars, like the Sky, in interviews. What is Dean's strategy for pleasing all of its customers — from the kid who wants an inexpensive introductory model, all the way up to the guy who wants a $7,000 custom shop "Ferrari"?</strong> </p> <p>I think Dean Guitars has the widest range of product offerings of any guitar company. Uli Jon Roth's Sky, which is the most sophisticated guitar on the planet, is a $13,000 machine, while we offer entry level guitars for $99. Something else a lot of people don't know is that acoustic guitars, bluegrass instruments and basses are a large part of our business, offering things like 12-string basses, Aphex-equipped acoustic guitars and specialty instruments like six-string banjos.</p> <p>Of course, we are super proud of our iconic Dean "V" headstock that you can spot from 100 yards away, which is arguably one of the most famous headstocks of all time. But we are very pleased we can accommodate the entry level player as well.</p> <p><em>Photo: Jerry Averill</em></p> <p><em><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Reffett">Dave Reffett</a> is a Berklee College of Music graduate and has worked with some of the best players in rock and metal. He is an instructor at (and the head of) the Hard Rock and Heavy Metal department at The Real School of Music in the metro Boston area. He also is a master clinician and a highly-in-demand private guitar teacher. He teaches lessons in person and worldwide via Skype. As an artist and performer, he is working on some soon-to-be revealed high-profile projects with A-list players in rock and metal. In 2009, he formed the musical project Shredding The Envelope and released the critically acclaimed album The Call Of The Flames. Dave also is an official artist endorsee for companies like Seymour Duncan, Gibson, Eminence and Esoterik Guitars, which in 2011 released a Dave Reffett signature model guitar, the DR-1. Dave has worked in the past at Sanctuary Records and Virgin Records, where he promoting acts like The Rolling Stones, Janet Jackson, Korn and Meat Loaf.</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/michael-angelo-batio-0">Michael Angelo Batio</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/dean-guitars-ceo-elliott-dean-rubinson-talks-gigging-uli-jon-roth-balancing-life-musician#comments Dean Guitars Elliott Dean Rubinson Luna Guitars Michael Angelo Batio Uli Jon Roth Interviews News Features Mon, 02 Jun 2014 20:42:00 +0000 Dave Reffett http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21413 Michael Angelo Batio Premieres "8 Pillars of Steel" Music Video Featuring George Lynch, Jeff Loomis, Dio's Craig Goldy and More http://www.guitarworld.com/michael-angelo-batio-premieres-8-pillars-steel-music-video-featuring-george-lynch-jeff-loomis-dios-craig-goldy-and-more <!--paging_filter--><p>Michael Angelo Batio has released the music video for a new song, "8 Pillars of Steel."</p> <p>The guitar-heavy instrumental track, which is from Batio's new album, <em>Intermezzo</em>, was written by Batio and features guest appearances — and solos — by George Lynch, bassist Elliott Dean Rubinson (Uli Jon Roth, Michael Schenker), Jeff Loomis (Conquering Dystopia, Nevermore), Craig Goldy (Dio), Dave Reffett (Shredding The Envelope), Andrea Martongelli (Arthemis) and Rusty Cooley (Day Of Reckoning).</p> <p>That's drummer Joe Babiak behind the kit.</p> <p>"8 Pillars Of Steel" is the first single from the new album, which is Batio's first album to feature his new signature model Dean MAB 7 Warrior seven-string guitar. </p> <p>Other guest stars on the album include Guthrie Govan, Michael Romeo (Symphony X), Chris Poland (ex-Megadeth, OHM), Mike Lepond (Symphony X), Joe Stump (Holy Hell), Andrea Martongelli, Alex Stornello, Bill Peck, Maxxxwell Carlisle, Florent Atem, Annie Grunwald (Formless), Tobias Hurwitz, Joe Rose and more.</p> <p>Check out the complete track listing below the video. </p> <p>The album is available at <a href="http://angelo.com/cds.html">angelo.com</a> and <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/intermezzo/id776312146">iTunes.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/QT_3xwqVmt0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong><em>Intermezzo</em> Track Listing</strong></p> <p>01. Intermezzo<br /> 02. Kaleidoscope Images<br /> 03. Oceans of Time<br /> 04. I Pray the Lord<br /> 05. 8 Pillars of Steel (featuring Elliott Dean Rubinson on bass; solos by, in order, Dave Reffett, Jeff Loomis, MAB, Rusty Cooley, George Lynch, Andrea Martongelli and Craig Goldy)<br /> 06. The Possession – A Tone Poem<br /> 07. 5 Four Ever (featuring Alex Stornello from 2:34 to 3:07 and Guthrie Govan from 3:22 to 4:08)<br /> 08. Juggernaut (featuring solos by MAB, Chris Poland, Dave Reffett, Annie Grunwald, Guthrie Govan, Mike Lepond and Michael Romeo)<br /> 09. Overload Intro (featuring Florent Atem)<br /> 10. Overload (featuring solos by Tobias Hurwitz, Ken and Darren Burridge, Bill Peck, Peter Ema, Joe Rose, Joe Stump, Florent Atem, Maxxxwell Carlisle and MAB)</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/michael-angelo-batio-0">Michael Angelo Batio</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/michael-angelo-batio-premieres-8-pillars-steel-music-video-featuring-george-lynch-jeff-loomis-dios-craig-goldy-and-more#comments Craig Goldy Dave Reffett Jeff Loomis Michael Angelo Batio Videos News Wed, 05 Mar 2014 18:53:18 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20653 NAMM 2014: NAMM Metal Jam to Feature Michael Angelo Batio, Metal Jam All-Stars http://www.guitarworld.com/namm-2014-namm-metal-jam-feature-michael-angelo-batio-metal-jam-all-stars <!--paging_filter--><p>Present and former members of Whitesnake, Dio, Anthrax, Korn, King Diamond, Rising Force, Alcatrazz and more will take part in the 2014 NAMM Metal Jam Wednesday, January 22, at the Whiskey A Go Go in West Hollywood, California.</p> <p>The show was organized by DeathRiders/original Anthrax vocalist Neil Turbin and Dave Reffett, guitarist and GuitarWorld.com blogger.</p> <p>Turbin and Reffett will co-headline the event with Michael Angelo Batio and the Metal All-Star Jam, which will feature present/former members of Whitesnake, Dio, Anthrax, Korn, Rising Force, the Iron Maidens and more.</p> <p>The event also will feature present and former members of Ted Nugent's band, Alice Cooper's band, Starz, Agent Steel, Holy Grail, Scar Symmetry, Nitro, Chastain and more. You can check out the complete lineup below. It takes place one day prior to the 2014 Winter NAMM Show in Anaheim, which runs January 23 to 26. </p> <p>NAMM Metal Jam is an all-ages event. </p> <p><strong>Check out the details:</strong></p> <p><strong>What:</strong> NAMM Metal Jam 2014<br /> <strong>Featuring:</strong> Michael Angelo Batio, Neil Turbin, Dave Reffett and the NAMM Metal Jam All-Stars (See lineup below)<br /> <strong>Where and When:</strong> <a href="http://www.whiskyagogo.com/site/">Whisky A Go Go</a>, 8901 W. Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood; 7 p.m. to 1 a.m. PST Wednesday, January 22; all ages<br /> <Strong>Tickets:</strong> <a href="http://www.ticketweb.com/">ticketweb.com
</a><br /> <strong>More information:</strong> <a href="http://www.nammmetaljam.com">nammmetaljam.com</a></p> <p><Strong>Scheduled to appear:</strong></p> <p>The “Metal Jam” portion of the show will feature an array of guest all-star performers. The official lineup of artists on this year’s event is:

<br /> • Derek St. Holmes (Ted Nugent) - Vocals, Guitar<br /> • Glen Sobel (Alice Cooper) - Drums<br /> • Michael Devin (Whitesnake) - Bass Guitar<br /> • Rowan Robertson (Dio, DC4) - Guitar<br /> • Mark Boals (Dio Disciples, Ring Of Fire, Yngwie J. Malmsteen's Rising Force) - Vocals<br /> • Michael Angelo Batio (Solo artist, Nitro, Holland) - Guitar<br /> • Neil Turbin (DeathRiders, Anthrax) - Vocals<br /> • Dave Reffett (Shredding The Envelope) - Guitar<br /> • Matt Thompson (King Diamond) - Drummer<br /> • Bill Hudson (Emphatic, Circle II Circle, Cellador) - Guitar<br /> • Ralph Santolla (Obituary, Deicide) - Guitar<br /> • Per Nilsson (Scar Symmetry) – Guitar<br /> • Aquiles Priester (Angra, Hangar, Vinnie Moore)<br /> • Andrea Martongelli (Arthemis) - Guitar<br /> • Mike Hansen (Hurricane, George Lynch, Steve Vai) - Drums<br /> • Tony Cavazo (Hurricane) – Bass Guitar<br /> • Mitch Stewart (Circle II Circle) – Bass Guitar<br /> • Jeff Williams (Onslaught) – Bass Guitar<br /> • Eli Santana (Holy Grail) - Guitar<br /> • Courtney Cox (The Iron Maidens) - Guitar<br /> • Linda MacDonald (The Iron Maidens) - Drums<br /> • Kirsten Rosenberg (The Iron Maidens) - Vocals<br /> • Rigo Amezcua (Agent Steel) - Drums<br /> • Juan Garcia (Agent Steel, Masters of Metal) - Guitar<br /> • Shane Gibson (Korn) - Guitar<br /> • Robert Cardenas (Possessed, Agent Steel) – Bass Guitar<br /> • Jeff Bowders (Paul Gilbert Band, G3, POD) - Drums<br /> • Veronica Freeman (Benedictum) – Vocals<br /> • Leather Leone (Chastain) – Vocals<br /> • Clammy (Exciter) – Bass Guitar<br /> • Greg Walls (Anthrax) – Guitar<br /> • Howie Simon (Alcatrazz, Nelson) - Guitar<br /> • Dino Deluke (Sledd, Nemesis) - Drums<br /> • Peter Deluke (Sledd, Nemesis) - Keyboards<br /> • August Zadra (Dennis DeYoung (Styx) Band) – Guitar<br /> • Michael Lee Smith (STARZ, Looking Glass, Hellcats) - Vocals<br /> • Steve "Zeus" Johnstad of Mayday, Son, NRG - Vocals<br /> • Thane Farace (Ghost Of War, Bloodied Angels) - Guitar<br /> • Stuart Fujinami (Reverend, Heretic) – Guitar<br /> • Annie Grunwald (Formless) - Guitar<br /> • Sean Elg (DeathRiders, Nihilist) - Drums<br /> • Arnold Gonzalez (DeathRiders) - Guitar<br /> • Michael Lopez (DeathRiders) - Bass<br /> • Casey Trask (DeathRiders) – Guitar<br /> • Joe Gettler (Razormaze) – Guitar<br /> • Xander Demos (Sabbath Judas Sabbath) - Guitar<br /> • Joe Rose (Michael Angelo Batio’s Intermezzo album) - Guitar<br /> • Lisa Margaroli (Celebrity Trash) - Vocals<br /> • Dan Lauzon (Entropy, E-Force)</p> <p>Special host MC: Caleb Smith of New Zealand’s <em>The Sick Room</em> radio show. Sponsored by Madison Amps LLC.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/namm-2014-namm-metal-jam-feature-michael-angelo-batio-metal-jam-all-stars#comments Michael Angelo Batio NAMM 2014 News Tue, 07 Jan 2014 20:52:09 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20150 Time to Burn: Applying Modes to Different Tonal Centers http://www.guitarworld.com/time-burn-applying-modes-different-tonal-centers <!--paging_filter--><p>When working on writing melodies for my original compositions, my standard approach is to examine the chord progression in order to determine which scales or modes would best apply. </p> <p>A mode is the notes of scale, such as the major scale, oriented around a different root note and chord; Modes offer great flexibility in terms of the way they relate to a set of chords within relative keys, which makes them especially useful in more progressive styles of rock.</p> <p>For example, if I’m in the key of Fs minor, I can use the Fs Phrygian mode (Fs G A B Cs D E) to create a simple motif like the one shown in FIGURE 1. </p> <p>The flexibility comes from the fact that this set of notes can be used to create six other modes just by starting on a different note in the series; likewise, each of these scale degrees relates to a different chord, which opens up options for different chord progressions and tonal centers.</p> <p>If we take the notes of the Fs Phrygian mode but start from B, this creates the B Aeolian mode, also known as the B natural minor scale (B Cs D E Fs G A); this mode relates perfectly to a B minor chord. FIGURES 2a and 2b illustrate how the two modes correlate and overlap. </p> <p>Notice that, in terms of structure, the only difference between these two modes is the second scale degree: in Fs Phrygian, the second is minor, or flatted (f2), whereas in B Aeolian, the second scale degree is major, or natural. </p> <p>FIGURE 3 is a solo played over a two-part chord progression that offers an example of how to use the same set of notes to create two different sounds: the first part of the progression, bars 1­–6, is played over an Fs minor tonal center, for which I utilize Fs Phrygian; the second part, beginning in bar 7, is played over a B minor tonal center, for which I use B Aeolian. Additionally, I continue to use these same seven notes over the last two chords in the progression, E5 and G5, creating E Dorian (E Fs G A B Cs D) and G Lydian (G A B Cs D E Fs) sounds. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/timetoburn1208.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/michael-angelo-batio-0">Michael Angelo Batio</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/time-burn-applying-modes-different-tonal-centers#comments December 2008 Michael Angelo Batio Time to Burn Blogs Lessons Magazine Wed, 24 Apr 2013 12:18:36 +0000 Michael Angelo Batio http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17184 Exclusive Video: Michael Angelo Batio Double-Shred Medley http://www.guitarworld.com/exclusive-video-michael-angelo-batio-double-shred-medley <!--paging_filter--><p>Check out this classic video of a double-shred medley from the one and only Michael Angelo Batio. You can watch the video below.</p> <p>For a mini-lesson by Batio from his new DVD, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/learn-shred-guitar-vol-2">"Learn Shred Guitar Volume 2,"</a> you can head <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-michael-angelo-batio-shows-how-incorporate-odd-meter-heavy-riffs">here</a>.</p> <p>This lesson is called "Odds or Evens: Incorporating Odd Meter Into Heavy Riffs," and it features Batio demonstrating the main riff from his song "Hands Without Shadows" from his 2006 album of the same name. </p> <p><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-shred-michael-angelo-batio-new-learn-shred-guitar-volume-2-dvd">Click here for more info on the DVD.</a> </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/iQ8ml7eENuI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/exclusive-video-michael-angelo-batio-double-shred-medley#comments Michael Angelo Batio News Features Wed, 03 Apr 2013 18:46:13 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/12230 Photo Gallery: 2013 NAMM Metal Jam at the Whiskey A Go Go in West Hollywood http://www.guitarworld.com/photo-gallery-2013-namm-metal-jam-whiskey-go-go-west-hollywood <!--paging_filter--><p>Some people consider the Winter NAMM Show the musical-instrument Super Bowl. </p> <p>It's a time for instrument manufacturers and other companies to unveil their new product lines. It's also a time when some of the best musicians in the world head to Anaheim, California, to rock out, share their passion for music and jam with their peers.</p> <p>What makes Winter NAMM week so exciting is the fact that you never know what performances you might witness. Stevie Wonder might announce an impromptu jam session with Sheila E. at the Hilton. This year, George Lynch, Ray Luzier and Billy Sheehan put on a stunning show at the Sheraton. Dennis Chambers, Greg Howe and Victor Wooten also wowed the audience at the Marriott.</p> <p>Then there was the NAMM Metal Jam, which took place Wednesday night, January 23, at the Whiskey A Go Go in West Hollywood. It has become one of the main NAMM kick-off events, helping to set the tone for the week. </p> <p>A lot of great players were involved in the Metal Jam this year, including Michael Angelo Batio, Queensryche guitarists Michael Wilton and Parker Lundgren, Neil Turbin (DeathRiders singer and original Anthrax frontman), Aquiles Priester (drummer for Tony Macalpine), Mark Boals (Yngwie Malmsteen), Zak Stevens (Savatage, Circle To Circle), Jeff Martin (Racer X, Michael Schenker), Eli Santana (Holy Grail), keyboardist Michael T. Ross (Lita Ford, Missing Persons), Dave Reffett (solo artist, Shredding The Envelope) and many others.</p> <p>Photographer Alex Solca was on hand to capture all the action, and you can see his photos in the gallery below. Solca has photographed Nirvana, Metallica, Slayer, George Lynch and many others. Enjoy!</p> <p><em>Photos: Alex Solca</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/michael-angelo-batio-0">Michael Angelo Batio</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/photo-gallery-2013-namm-metal-jam-whiskey-go-go-west-hollywood#comments Alex Solca Anthrax Dave Reffett Michael Angelo Batio NAMM 2013 Blogs Galleries News Features Thu, 14 Feb 2013 10:24:28 +0000 Guitar World Staff, Photos by Alex Solca http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17793 NAMM 2013: NAMM Metal Jam to Feature Michael Angelo Batio, Metal Jam All-Stars http://www.guitarworld.com/namm-2013-namm-metal-jam-feature-michael-angelo-batio-metal-jam-all-stars <!--paging_filter--><p>Current and former members of Anthrax, Queensryche, Rising Force, Racer X and other classic metal bands will take part in the NAMM Metal Jam 2013 this Wednesday, January 23, at the Whiskey A Go Go in West Hollywood, California.</p> <p>The show was organized by DeathRiders/original Anthrax vocalist Neil Turbin and Dave Reffett, guitarist and GuitarWorld.com blogger.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/namm-2013">[[ Keep up with Guitar World's NAMM 2013 coverage right here! ]]</a></strong></p> <p>DeathRiders will co-headline the show with guitarist Michael Angelo Batio (Nitro, Holland) and the Metal All-Star Jam, which will include members of Anthrax, Queensryche, Rising Force, Racer X, The Iron Maidens, Holy Grail, Lizzy Borden, Lynch Mob, Leatherwolf, Holy Grail, Hurricane and others.</p> <p><strong>Check out the details:</strong></p> <p><strong>What:</strong> NAMM Metal Jam 2013<br /> <strong>Featuring:</strong> Michael Angelo Batio with DeathRiders (original Anthrax vocalist Neil Turbin) and the NAMM Metal Jam All-Stars (See lineup below)<br /> <strong>Where and When:</strong> <a href="http://www.whiskyagogo.com/site/">Whisky A Go Go</a>, 8901 W. Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood; 7 p.m. to 1 a.m. PST Wednesday, January 23; all ages<br /> <Strong>Tickets:</strong> <a href="http://www.ticketweb.com/t3/sale/SaleEventDetail?dispatch=loadSelectionData&amp;eventId=3265404">ticketweb.com</a><br /> <strong>More information:</strong> <a href="http://www.nammmetaljam.com">nammmetaljam.com</a></p> <p><Strong>Scheduled to appear:</strong><br /> Michael Angelo Batio of MAB, Nitro, Holland: Guitar<br /> Neil Turbin of DeathRiders, Anthrax: Vocals<br /> Dave Reffett of Shredding The Envelope: Guitar<br /> Parker Lundgren of Queensryche: Guitar<br /> Mark Boals of Ring Of Fire, Don Dokken, Rising Force: Vocals<br /> Greg Walls, ex-Anthrax: Guitar<br /> Jeff Martin of Racer X, Badlands, Michael Schenker Group: Vocals<br /> Marten Andersson of Lizzy Borden, Lynch Mob: Bass<br /> Eli Santana of Holy Grail: Guitar<br /> Michael T. Ross of Missing Persons: Keyboards<br /> Michael Olivieri of Leatherwolf: Vocals and guitar<br /> Ann Boleyn of Hellion: Vocals<br /> Steve "Zeus" Johnstad of Mayday, N.R.G.: Vocals<br /> Sean Elg of DeathRiders, Nihilist: Drums<br /> Arnold Gonzalez of DeathRiders: Guitar<br /> Michael Lopez of DeathRiders: Bass<br /> Casey Trask of DeathRiders: Guitar<br /> Courtney Cox of the Iron Maidens, Femme Fatale: Guitar<br /> Wanda Ortiz of the Iron Maidens: Bass<br /> Linda McDonald of the Iron Maidens, Phantom Blue: Drums<br /> Andrew Freeman of Hurricane, Lynch Mob, Last In Line, The Offspring: Vocals<br /> Tony Cavazo of Hurricane: Bass<br /> Mike Hansen of Hurricane: Drums<br /> Joe Gettler of Razormaze: Guitar<br /> Mandy Lion of World War III, War Machine: Vocals<br /> Ronny North of Ronny North Band: Guitar<br /> Diego Valadez of Cellador: Synth and vocals<br /> Xander Demos of Sabbath Judas Sabbath: Guitar</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/michael-angelo-batio-0">Michael Angelo Batio</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/namm-2013-namm-metal-jam-feature-michael-angelo-batio-metal-jam-all-stars#comments Anthrax Dave Reffett Michael Angelo Batio NAMM 2013 News Sun, 20 Jan 2013 23:50:58 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17626 Time to Burn: Phrasing Arpeggios Over a Chord Progression http://www.guitarworld.com/time-burn-phrasing-arpeggios-over-chord-progression <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This column is taken from the May 2007 issue of Guitar World.</em></p> <p>One of my favorite things to do is take a classically flavored chord progression, like the one shown in FIGURE 1, and use it in a rock guitar context. This particular progression is based for the most part on what is known as the cycle of fourths, in that the root note of each of the first five chords is the interval of a fourth above the previous root note. The first chord, Gm, is the tonic or “home” chord that defines the key. The five chords that follow are all built from the notes of the G natural minor scale (G A Bf C D Ef F), and the final chord, D7, is derived from G harmonic minor (G A Bf C D Ef Fs). </p> <p>A musically effective way to play over a progression like this is to string together a sequence of arpeggios that clearly outlines the chord changes. The danger with this methodical approach, however, is that by beginning each arpeggio on its root note and playing it straight up and down, you can sound too predictable and, ultimately, not very melodic. But as I will demonstrate, you can use arpeggios to outline a chord progression in ways that sound more musical and inventive. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/timetoburn0507_1.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/timetoburn0507_2.jpg" /></p> <p>In FIGURE 2, I’ve put together a phrasing scheme with a series of arpeggios that navigate the chord progression in a way that varies the direction, or contour, of the line. I also begin each arpeggio on a chord tone other than the root note, which creates a harmonious counterpoint when heard together with the root note, played by a bass or other instrument. Notice how I establish a “thematic phrasing structure” over the two chords in bar 1 that is then applied and adapted to both pairs of chords in bars 2 and 3. In bar 4, I end the phrase with a more scalar line based on the D Phrygian-dominant mode (D Ef Fs G A Bf C), which is the fifth mode of G harmonic minor.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/timetoburn0507_3.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/timetoburn0507_4.jpg" /></p> <p>There are times, however, such as when you’re playing a capella (unaccompanied), when it just feels better to sweep through each arpeggio in a more straight-ahead, rhythmically uniform fashion, as demonstrated by the “virtuoso-style” runs in FIGURES 3 and 4.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/time-burn-phrasing-arpeggios-over-chord-progression#comments Michael Angelo Batio Blogs Lessons Thu, 15 Nov 2012 16:13:00 +0000 Michael Angelo Batio http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17139 Video: Michael Angelo Batio Makes Cameo in Kia Commercial http://www.guitarworld.com/video-michael-angelo-batio-makes-cameo-kia-commercial <!--paging_filter--><p>Kia must be working on building up their rock cred, because just a few months after featuring <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-motley-crue-feature-kia-super-bowl-commercial">Motley Crue in their Super Bowl ad</a>, the car company featured none other than Michael Angelo Batio in a new Canadian ad for the Korean-based car company. </p> <p>Check out Batio's cameo around 25 seconds into the video below.</p> <p>And if that's not enough MAB for you, check out this <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/exclusive-video-michael-angelo-batio-double-shred-medley">exclusive video</a> of a spectacular double-shred medley filmed last fall at <em>Guitar World</em> HQ.</p> <p>You can pick up the <em>Learn to Shred: Volume 2</em> DVD starring Michael Angelo Batio <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/dvds/products/learn-shred-guitar-vol-2">here</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/yh_Rz4VdscU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/michael-angelo-batio-0">Michael Angelo Batio</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-michael-angelo-batio-makes-cameo-kia-commercial#comments Michael Angelo Batio News Tue, 12 Jun 2012 17:15:16 +0000 Josh Hart http://www.guitarworld.com/article/15983 Interview: Michael Angelo Batio Discusses Tone, Gear and His 'Speed Kills' DVD http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-michael-angelo-batio-discusses-tone-gear-and-his-speed-kills-dvd <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's the second part of my recent interview with shredder Michael Angelo Batio. To see where we left off, <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-michael-angelo-batio-discusses-shock-em-dead-joys-touring-and-his-upcoming-album">check out part 1 right here.</a></p> <p><strong>Something your fans really dig is your tone. What kind of racks, gear, etc., do you use?</strong></p> <p>This is funny because I'm in my studio now, and I'm looking at hundreds of different effects. I have a guitar collection, a pedal collection and I'm looking at a 1960s Fender Fuzz Wah I just picked up in New York. I used to have one when I was a kid, and a volume pedal that slides to the right. I mean, it's just so freaky -- it actually looks like a ship or a zeppelin. Even with my show, I assembled this massive pedal board with the whammy pedal and all sorts of stuff. I took it all off. </p> <p>My tone is an amp with the overdrive backed off. I have the mids as cranked as I can make them. Low bass, treble and presence wherever it's needed, and an overdrive pedal and my delay through the effects loop. That's my tone. I can get it 99 percent of the time through almost any amp, but I've got to keep the setup simple. I found the more gear I start adding, all of a sudden my tone starts to go away. </p> <p>It's the signal chain. I like Morley wahs a lot, and they say there is no degradation in the sound. But I've noticed the more pedals one adds, for me, my tone gets less. And now when I record, I don't even use effects unless it's a wah or something for a part. I add the delay post, so it's really dry: guitar and amp and my overdrive pedal. That's the essence. </p> <p>The older I get, that's just pretty much what it is. Even playing with Mark Tremonti -- there's a video on YouTube; he does a very similar thing, but he's got his delay like me, and he’s got the overdrive pedal, he's got a few more effects, but he can take them out of the signal chain and it still gets that really cool sound like mine when I play -- because he keeps it simple.</p> <p><strong>You're really into history, and I heard you recently visited the Shroud of Turin in Italy. What was that like?</strong></p> <p>It was awesome. It’s in Torino, which is what the Italians call Turin. It's called the Royal Chapel in the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist. You walk into this place and see the Shroud. It's there, and you're close to it, but they don't have it where it's absolutely visible. It's not 100 percent on display right now. </p> <p>That's not even the only thing. You walk into this church, and it's half a millennium old, and you see these artworks. They had this one fresco by this artist that was, you know, it's not like Michelangelo or any of the real famous ones, but it was incredible, and he’s showing people being boiled in oil, and I mean it's this really graphic violence in biblical terms. I walked around for a few hours just looking at the different art work and sculptures and different religious figures that were part of the church that are now like cast in stone, and it’ll say an Italian name and it'll be like the year 1430 through 1452, and I mean it's incredible. It gives you a really spiritual feeling. </p> <p><strong>You’re Italian too, right?</strong></p> <p>Yeah, but I'm actually more German then Italian. On my mom’s side, it's 100 percent Sudetenland German, but my dad’s side is Italian. A few other things mixed in, but all European. </p> <p><strong>You're such a Chicago fixture. Have you ever tried to perform the National Anthem for a Blackhawks game or a Bears game?</strong></p> <p>I did it. In fact, I was looking at the video just the other day. It's another crazy example of seizing an opportunity. I was playing at the NAMM show in 2002, and this was when I was still demoing stuff. Did you know I'm banned from doing that? It was maybe six or seven years ago and Dean had me play at their booth, and we had hundreds of people show up, and NAMM told them I wasn't allowed to play, that it wasn't a demo, it was a concert. And if I played on the floor again, they would shut the booth down. It was cool. </p> <p>But in 2002, I was playing there and this guy came up to me named Derek, who works with the LA Kings. He said he was a big fan and he'd love to have me do the National Anthem. So I pick a date when the Blackhawks are playing the LA Kings, and they flew me out to the Staples Center in Los Angeles and put me up in a beautiful hotel. The day I picked was March 11, 2002, the six-month anniversary of 9/11, and they televised it nationally. </p> <p>Doing all the session work for so many years as I have, they wanted it to be 90 seconds, so I had it like 88 seconds. I had timed it perfectly. It was perfectly played, and it was live. We had like a minute or two minutes between a commercial break to wheel the amps onstage, and I was on a 6-by-6-foot platform and we wheeled it on. They introduced me, I played, and they wheeled me off. It was awesome. </p> <p><strong>Did you have any idea that your <em>Speed Kills</em> instructional video would have such an impact on so many players?</strong></p> <p>Thanks, and no, I didn't. It's kind of nice now that time has kind of given me a place in guitar history, which is cool. My goal back then was to further the technical side of rock guitar playing. When you look at jazz guitar, and you look at classical guitar, and you look at different genres like Gypsy jazz, the playing as well as the music was of a virtuoso caliber. But rock wasn't. And there’s a few reasons. </p> <p>One, the electric guitar is a much newer instrument than almost any popular instrument in the world. I mean the piano's got it by centuries, the acoustic guitar starting from the lute; it's 500 years old. So the electric guitar is 60 years old, give or take, so it's a new instrument. Rock was a new genre, so it had an evolution it needed to go through. I know my early CDs like <em>No Boundaries</em> still hold up technically. But that was the goal -- to say, "Look, the music’s always been great. No one can write a better rock song than AC/DC or Led Zeppelin," but I wanted the level of playing, the caliber of player to be elevated to the jazz and the classical status as far as guitar. And I think we did it. And my techniques stood the test of time. </p> <p>It's one thing to be out there doing instructional programs and be a really great player. There are so many great players, and I think it's awesome. It's another one to be somebody like me who's like a pioneer of it and to go out year after year and tour and tour and tour. I know my technique’s been able to keep me from being injured and what I said 20 years ago, most of it, not every little thing -- there's a few things I've adjusted over the years -- but I think 90 percent of it still holds true today. And I think that's why it sold. And plus the look back then, my rocket guitar, and it was probably the best I’ve ever looked, you know. I was in great shape, so that didn't hurt either.</p> <p>It's funny because Doug Marks from Metal Method, I've worked with him for a long time. We see these things as completely different things. He sees it as a lesson, which I understand, and that's why I like working with him. I see it as a lesson, but to me it's a statement of the time. That was that moment in time that was captured that cannot be recaptured. He is a business person, and he sees it as, well you can redo it. Which we did, we redid a new version, but I don't look like that anymore. I play better now, but it's still that moment in time that can never be recaptured. It was then and it was real. And there was no editing of the audio; we couldn’t even do it, It's impossible. It was linear film editing. It was videotape, but it was still tape. It wasn't on a hard disc. That technology was not available back then, so that's what I loved. It was real, in-your-face.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/michael-angelo-batio-0">Michael Angelo Batio</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-michael-angelo-batio-discusses-tone-gear-and-his-speed-kills-dvd#comments GW Archive Michael Angelo Batio Interviews Features Mon, 12 Dec 2011 15:35:59 +0000 Dave Reffett http://www.guitarworld.com/article/13837 Interview: Michael Angelo Batio Discusses 'Shock 'Em Dead,' the Joys of Touring and His Upcoming Album http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-michael-angelo-batio-discusses-shock-em-dead-joys-touring-and-his-upcoming-album <!--paging_filter--><p>I recently interviewed Michael Angelo Batio, who played a blazing solo on my 2010 song "Standstill And Scream." <a href=" http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/standstill-scream-feat.-michael/id344860499?i=344860554">You can check that out right here.</a></p> <p>Here's part one of our three-part conversation.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/50-fastest-guitarists-all-time-guitar-world-readers-poll-results">In a recent GW poll</a>, you were voted the fastest guitar player of all time. How does it feel to win -- and more importantly, how do you play so fast?</strong></p> <p>It feels great to win, but as much as people associate me with being fast, it was never my goal. I never set out to be the fastest, but what I loved about the contest is that I just got my new issue of <em>Guitar World</em> yesterday, and they said over 440,000 votes were cast. That's a great number, you know. </p> <p>And how do I play fast? I work really hard and warm up before I play, even to this day. I have a regimen where if I have hours to practice, then I can extend that, but if I have only five or 10 minutes to warm up, I have a real short warm-up regimen. It's been a valuable asset as far as being ready to play and never being hurt. </p> <p>On the road, I'm playing different guitars. Especially with clinics; I’m playing different guitars, different amps, different string gauges all the time. You don't know how many times I’ve asked for .009’s to .042's tuned down to E flat for leads, and I'll get .011’s and a guitar I've never played. It's fine, but I attribute it to just having a real good workout regimen on guitar and taking it very seriously, the technical side.</p> <p><strong>You're just back from a European tour, correct? How was that experience?</strong></p> <p>It was fantastic. I'm up to 52 countries. I could sit here for three days and tell you about driving from Lugano, Switzerland, through the Alps into Italy, and I've seen some really beautiful things. It's not a secret, but part of my success has been that I have really good relationships with the people I work with. I find that the reason I get to tour so much is because I've worked with a lot of these people before. They know me, I know them and we do a great job and it's successful. </p> <p>It's gotten to be really fun for me because I’ll travel to Switzerland, they're all friends of mine; I’ll go to Italy, they're all friends of mine. I'll go to Slovenia, they're buddies, and Russia, etc. So it's kind of like a global network of people I know, and it's really fun.</p> <p><strong>I first heard of you when I saw the movie <em>Shock 'Em Dead.</em> I was 13, and I'd never seen anybody play that fast or articulately before. Is it true that you held a performance at the recent cast reunion event?</strong></p> <p>Yes. We performed at a theater in West Hollywood that was built in the 1940s for silent movies. This rich couple lived at the theater and they loved silent movies, but by the 1940s people were talking in movies, and silent movies were dead for more than a decade already. So this organization took over this theater. I love history as it is, and you'll see autographs, signed photos of silent movie stars and authentic photos at this beautiful venue. For the reunion, the place was packed and some of the cast members were there, the director, etc. </p> <p>It's fun to watch that movie; it's become a really cool, campy B-movie cult picture. Stephen Quadros, the guy who had the starring role, we had known about each other for so long but we never met on the set because, outside of acting in my scene, I was his stunt double for the guitars. I played all the guitars in the movie except for one or two scenes, but it was so cool and great to see people who were really fans of the movie. And when you're with an audience, they’re laughing at and making reactions to parts of the movie that you'd never do if you were watching it by yourself. It was almost like <em>Rocky Horror Picture Show.</em></p> <p><strong>Here's Batio's scene in <em>Shock 'Em Dead</em>. He appears at 3:27:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="450" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/r9wHmk1usDE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>You've been talking about recording a new album. Can you tell me anything about it?</strong></p> <p>I have put off recording because of my show, the <em>Hands Without Shadows: A Tribute to Rock Guitar</em> show. I worked on that quietly for five years, and this last year I really ramped up. I mean just the multiple screens -- there's so many logistics. It's big like a theater production. So I didn't release any new CDs since <em>Hands Without Shadows 2,</em> which was the precursor to the show. </p> <p>The new CD will be out next year. I've already finished recording one track -- no leads yet -- but I'm using Rudy Sarzo on bass for some of the stuff. I'm going to have Elliott Rubinson, the owner of Dean Guitars, play bass on a few of the tracks, and there will be different guest stars. It's going to be all original material except for one song, “Still Of The Night” by Whitesnake. And I made the verses like fusion; I mean, you should hear the drum beat on there. It's really killer. That'll be like a bonus track. It should be out in 2012, and it will be ultra-progressive and really heavy. I'll do my best playing that I can do.</p> <p><strong>Here's a sampling of Batio's <em>Hand's Without Shadows: A Tribute To Rock Guitar</em> video:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="345" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ool5_5avLGA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Will the new album be all instrumental? Any vocals?</strong></p> <p>You know, we’re talking about it. I work with a really great singer and we're talking about working on some music. I'd say at this point it'll be instrumental. If I do a vocal CD, it will be in addition to this. I've been dying to put out a new record, but I just haven't had the time. It was tour and the show versus touring and recording like normal, and this last year and a half was spent on the show. Next year we’re going to be touring with it all over.</p> <p><strong>Have you had the chance to meet any of your guitar heroes?</strong></p> <p>Yeah. One of my heroes was Eddie Van Halen. We did a benefit for Jason Becker in the 1990s in Chicago and Eddie headlined. I was on there and Vinnie Moore, Zakk Wylde, Steve Lukather, Steve Morse and Billy Sheehan ... the list goes on and on and on. After the show, I was sitting where the monitor board is on the side of the stage, but the monitor guy wasn't there -- and it was just me and Eddie, talking one-on-one for almost half an hour. He did most of the talking and I just sat and listened. </p> <p>He told me he thought I was a great player and he liked what I did. Then we were just talking about Sammy Hagar versus David Lee Roth -- and I had never even heard him speak before. All the years I had been a Van Halen fan, I never heard his actual voice! So after this conversation, he grabs me and kisses me on the cheek, and I thought, "If that was anybody but any Eddie Van Halen ... (laughs)." </p> <p>And Les Paul -- I talked to him one-on-one about 20 years ago, and he watched me play the double guitar. I have a picture on my website of him holding my double guitar with me. He was standing behind it and he told me after I played it he goes “and I thought I invented everything.” </p> <p><strong>What music do you have on your iPod that your fans might be truly surprised by?</strong></p> <p>You know on your computer where it says how many days' worth of music you have? I have probably over a month's worth of music. I mean it's just tens of gigabytes on there. And I've only got one movie on there, <em>Twilight</em>. So I've got a lot of the stuff with great guitar players on there, but I've also got Andrea Bocelli's Christmas CD and <em>The Monkees' Greatest Hits</em>, because there's a song they did called “Valerie,” and I'm pretty sure it's Chet Atkins on guitar. He's absolutely ripping clean guitar down in harmonic minor. It’s awesome. He's completely shredding and I think it was a No. 1 hit back then. </p> <p>I have Celine Dion singing the <em>Titanic</em> theme -- I mean just things like that. I like Linkin Park, the Avenged Sevenfold guys; it was kind of cool Synyster Gates got No. 3 in the fastest guitar player poll. And I've got classic hits of 1973. They have a whole series of <em>Billboard</em> CDs like that; when I was on Warner Bros., they had a division that had all those CDs, so I've got a whole stack of that stuff. So I just started putting them in my iPod.</p> <p><a href="http://secure.nps1.net/guitarworld/index.php?main_page=product_info&amp;cPath=1&amp;products_id=261&amp;utm_source=guitaworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=113011ReffettBatio">Be sure to check out Michael Angelo Batio's DVD, "Learn Shred Guitar, Vol. 2," which is available now at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/michael-angelo-batio-0">Michael Angelo Batio</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-michael-angelo-batio-discusses-shock-em-dead-joys-touring-and-his-upcoming-album#comments Dave Reffett Michael Angelo Batio Blogs Interviews Wed, 30 Nov 2011 17:12:59 +0000 Dave Reffett http://www.guitarworld.com/article/13731 Interview and Video: Guitarist Florent Atem Discusses His Slide Picking Technique http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-and-video-guitarist-florent-atem-discusses-his-slide-picking-technique <!--paging_filter--><p>For this week's column, I wanted to give some attention to a buddy of mine who is a very promising young guitarist.</p> <p>His name is Florent Atem from Tahiti. He has a very cool technique that he created called slide picking that he will explain in this interview. Here is a video of Florent playing in this style: </p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: So Florent how did you come up with this slide picking technique?</strong></p> <p>Well, as a guitar player, my main focus has always been to find my own voice on the instrument. I had the privilege to study at GIT (Guitar Institute of Technology) at Musician's Institute in Hollywood a while ago, but apart from that, I am mainly self-taught. Besides learning about music theory and what I would call the “tradition” of blues, rock or jazz improvisation, I have always enjoyed trying to push the boundaries of what I could do on my instrument. </p> <p>That is how I came up with this concept I refer to as “slide picking," which I immediately felt had the potential to be developed into a real, usable and special technique. It consists in sliding the guitar pick across the strings while pressing them against the fretboard to produce notes. It really is the missing link between tapping and sweep picking since it combines their main features in a single motion.</p> <p><strong>What do you find it to be most useful for?</strong></p> <p>I have found many different ways to apply this technique to all sorts of scales or arpeggios. It can be particularly useful to perform all kinds of “sequenced” licks. It also makes it incredibly easy to execute phrases that would otherwise be virtually impossible to play and, most importantly, creates a truly unique sound.</p> <p><strong>Run us through the approach you have when playing in this technique.</strong></p> <p>In standard tuning, sliding the pick from one string to the next -- “vertically,” while staying at the same fret -– will produce the sound of a perfect fourth, except for the second and third strings, which will produce a major third. Now, sliding the pick “diagonally," that is to say while going up or down a fret as you slide from one string to the other, will yield a major third or a flat fifth, which respectively become a minor third and a perfect fourth on the second and third strings. </p> <p>Combining those basic slide-picking motions makes it possible to stack those intervals on top of each other. Then, pulling off to a fretted note will produce yet another interval. From there, it is quite easy to come up with all sorts of patterns to create all kinds of sounds. Of course, experimenting with altered tunings opens a whole new realm of possibilities.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="345" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/bEh4yJrLu8w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Any practice tips for anyone out there who might be trying to learn it?</strong></p> <p>I would recommend getting used to the simplest, most basic slide picking motions, such as a vertical slide on two adjacent strings to begin with, just to get an overall feel. This should be practised in both directions, from low to high and high to low. The fretting-hand might then be added in and it can be very effective to focus on a short sequenced lick until each note really flows evenly. </p> <p>Proper pick positioning, a firm attack and good fretting-hand muting are the key elements for the notes to ring clearly. Finally, it should be noted that slide picking can also be achieved with the fingernails, the thumbnail being rather suited for descending slides and the others for ascending ones.</p> <p><strong>What would be your best advice for someone who runs into trouble trying to play this?</strong></p> <p>As with any other technique, it is very important to practice slowly at first. Slowing things down should enable you to understand what the problem is and what you need to focus on. It might also be a good idea to experiment with different types of picks and find out what works best for you.</p> <p><strong>You have played shows in Tahiti with Michael Angelo Batio. What was it like jamming and playing with Michael?</strong></p> <p>Michael was actually the one who prompted me to share this slide picking technique with the guitar world. As we were sound checking before his second Tahiti show in 2009, he noticed an “unusual sound” and asked me what it was. That made me realize I might, perhaps, have something valuable to offer to the guitar community. I am always happy when people are drawn to the very unique sound of this technique and not just the visual, physical move. Performing with Michael is always an amazing experience. He is such an accomplished, unreal player and a dear friend.</p> <p><strong?What is the best place for people out there to check out your stuff or buy your music?</p> <p>Some of my material is available on Amazon, CD Baby or iTunes, most of the places where music can be found online. Beside winning a few awards in Tahiti and Hawaii, I was also fortunate to be nominated twice at the Grammy Awards in the past few years, as part of a Hawaiian “slack key” guitar project. That material is also available online and so are the records I did with my sister, Carole Atem, who is an amazing singer and keyboard player. Finally, my first solo record, titled <em>Dreamtown</em>, <a href="http://www.angelo.com/html/affilated_artists_page_2.html#Florent">is available from M.A.C.E. Music on Michael Angelo Batio’s website.</a> I cut that album at The Plant Studios in Sausalito with John Cuniberti, Jeff Campitelli and Matt Bissonette – who are all well known for their work with Joe Satriani – as well as Michael Manring.</p> <p><strong>Are you working on any cool projects for the future? A new album, maybe?</strong></p> <p>I am focusing on live performances and clinics at the moment, but I am still writing new material so there will definitely be a new album, hopefully in a near future.</p> <p><strong>Who are your biggest influences?</strong></p> <p>Eric Johnson, Michael Angelo Batio, Joe Satriani, Steve Vai, Nuno Bettencourt and Paul Gilbert have always been among my favorite players. I also really like Pat Martino, Joe Diorio, Wes Montgomery, Allan Holdsworth and Al Di Meola, just to name a few. Apart from guitar players, I have to mention John Coltrane, Dave Weckl, Simon Phillips, Virgil Donati and Peter Gabriel.</p> <p><strong>Who would make up your dream band, if you could put together a band of anyone, a singer, drummer, the whole thing?</strong></p> <p>It is virtually impossible for me to narrow down the choices to only a few names but according to my style, but I would say either Simon Phillips or Virgil Donati on drums, Roscoe Beck on bass, David Garfield on keyboards, Peter Gabriel on vocals and Eric Johnson on guitar. I do not really need to be in the band: I would just watch music history in the making.</p> <p><em><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Reffett">Dave Reffett </a>is a Berklee College of Music graduate and has worked with some of the best players in rock and metal. He is an instructor at (and the head of) the Hard Rock and Heavy Metal department at The Real School of Music in the metro Boston area. He also is a master clinician and a highly-in-demand private guitar teacher. He teaches lessons in person and worldwide via Skype. As an artist and performer, he is working on some soon-to-be revealed high-profile projects with A-list players in rock and metal. In 2009, he formed the musical project Shredding The Envelope and released the critically acclaimed album The Call Of The Flames. Dave also is an official artist endorsee for companies like Seymour Duncan, Gibson, Eminence and Esoterik Guitars, which in 2011 released a Dave Reffett signature model guitar, the DR-1. Dave has worked in the past at Sanctuary Records and Virgin Records, where he promoting acts like The Rolling Stones, Janet Jackson, Korn and Meat Loaf.</em></p> <p><em>Dave Reffett headshot photo by Yolanda Sutherland</em></p> </strong?what></p><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/michael-angelo-batio-0">Michael Angelo Batio</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-and-video-guitarist-florent-atem-discusses-his-slide-picking-technique#comments Dave Reffett Florent Atem Michael Angelo Batio Blogs Interviews Features Thu, 17 Nov 2011 21:43:20 +0000 Dave Reffett http://www.guitarworld.com/article/13620 Video: Michael Angelo Batio Pays Tribute to Metallica http://www.guitarworld.com/video-michael-angelo-batio-pays-tribute-metallica <!--paging_filter--><p>Tired of playing just one guitar at a time, Michael Angelo Batio is the kind of guy that says, "Screw it, just put four of them together!"</p> <p>That said, Batio and all four necks of his massive guitar paid tribute to Metallica at his recent show at Santa Fe Station in Los Angeles with a medley of the thrash band's classic tunes. You can watch video of the performance below.</p> <p>Batio is currently <em>way</em> ahead in our readers poll on the fastest guitarist of all time. Have your say and cast your vote <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/poll-who-fastest-guitarist-all-time">here</a>!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/K8-ZH9r9Ohk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-michael-angelo-batio-pays-tribute-metallica#comments Metallica Michael Angelo Batio News Tue, 27 Sep 2011 16:50:07 +0000 Josh Hart http://www.guitarworld.com/article/12940 Video: Michael Angelo Batio Shows How to Incorporate Odd Meter Into Heavy Riffs http://www.guitarworld.com/video-michael-angelo-batio-shows-how-incorporate-odd-meter-heavy-riffs <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's a mini-lesson by shred-meister Michael Angelo Batio from his brand-new DVD, <a href="http://secure.nps1.net/guitarworld/index.php?main_page=product_info&amp;cPath=1&amp;products_id=261&amp;utm_source=DVD_MAB2_scroller&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_campaign=gw-list">"Learn Shred Guitar Volume 2."</a> </p> <p>This lesson is called "Odds or Evens: Incorporating Odd Meter Into Heavy Riffs," and it features Batio demonstrating the main riff from his song "Hands Without Shadows" from his 2006 album of the same name. The riff is played in 15/8 time. First he plays it at regular speed, then he slows it down for the folks playing along at home.</p> <p>The <a href="http://secure.nps1.net/guitarworld/index.php?main_page=product_info&amp;cPath=1&amp;products_id=261&amp;utm_source=DVD_MAB2_scroller&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_campaign=gw-list">"Learn Shred Guitar Volume 2"</a> DVD includes several more lessons from Batio, including:</p> <p><strong>Elegant Shred:</strong> A Classical-Style Etude for Rock Guitar<br /> <strong>Four-In Territories:</strong> Getting the Most from Four-Note Groups<br /> <strong>Sleight of Hand:</strong> My “Over-Under” Fretting Trick<br /> <strong>Mode Swings:</strong> Applying Modes to Different Tonal Centers<br /> <strong>Modal Citizen:</strong> Adapting Modal Shapes to Different Tonal Centers<br /> <strong>Economic Crunch:</strong> Using Economy Picking to Play Arpeggios<br /> <strong>Prime Numbers:</strong> More on Odd Meters, and How to Play “Hands Without Shadows”<br /> <strong>Space Oddity:</strong> Soloing Over Odd Meters<br /> <strong>Goin’ Nuclear:</strong> Applying Shred Techniques to the Blues<br /> <strong>Rolling Hills:</strong> Flatpicking Arpeggios on “No Boundaries” (Part 1)</p> <p>... and lots more. <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-shred-michael-angelo-batio-new-learn-shred-guitar-volume-2-dvd">Click here for more info.</a> </p> <p><em><a href="http://secure.nps1.net/guitarworld/index.php?main_page=product_info&amp;cPath=1&amp;products_id=261&amp;utm_source=DVD_MAB2_scroller&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_campaign=gw-list">"Learn Shred Guitar Volume 2" is available for $14.95 at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1082558197001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1082558197001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-michael-angelo-batio-shows-how-incorporate-odd-meter-heavy-riffs#comments Michael Angelo Batio News Features Wed, 03 Aug 2011 14:55:40 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/12054