News http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/4/%2526gt%3Bhttp%3A/www.facebook.com/www.facebook.com/%2526gt%3Bhttp%3A/OAS_url%27adstream_nx.ads/%27OAS_sitepage%27/%3Ca%20href%3D en The Bottle Rockets’ Brian Henneman: Rickenbacker Romance and Amplifier Angst http://www.guitarworld.com/bottle-rockets-brian-henneman-rickenbacker-romance-and-amplifier-angst <!--paging_filter--><p>Maybe you go way back with Brian Henneman: back to Illinois in the Eighties and the yeeeeeeeee-haaaaaaaa thrash-twang cowpunk-and-scorched-brimstone of Chicken Truck, perhaps? </p> <p>Or maybe you remember when Brian worked for Uncle Tupelo in the early Nineties: the roadie who would humbly come out for the encore, strap on a guitar and take the top of everyone’s head off with his lead breaks on a thundering cover of Neil Young’s “Cortez The Killer” … and then start lugging stuff out to the van.</p> <p>And while we’re at it, how about the role Henneman played in alt-country history that rarely gets acknowledged? A lot of the snarl, growl, chug and crunch you hear on Wilco’s debut album — 1995’s <em>A.M.</em> — was courtesy of Henneman. (He was listed as a “special guest” for those pre-Jay Bennett sessions.) Put an ear to the greasily chicken-picked “That’s Not the Issue” or the Crazy Horseness of “Too Far Apart”: pretty cool, eh?</p> <p>But never mind past glories and overlooked genius: The easiest way to dial into the music of Brian Henneman is to sit down with some Bottle Rockets — his main focus for the last 20-plus years. You could spend a lot of time trying to categorize their music — anything from rock ‘n’ twang to Americana punk — but in the end, you’re better off just listening and enjoying. </p> <p>An excellent crash course in the Rockets would be Bloodshot Records’ recently released two-disc bundle that combines the band’s first two albums with a slew of neat previously unreleased music. Altogether, there are 11 albums in the Bottle Rockets’ catalog so far — 10 studio and one live — with a new one simmering.</p> <p>Behind Henneman’s insightful lyrics and shoot-from-the-bluejeaned-hip riffs lies a total guitar nerd, one who still part-times in his hometown guitar shop when he’s not on the road and will talk gear for as long as you have time to spare. I had the chance recently to ask Brian about reuniting with the one that got away, the lifespans of parakeets and the recipe for Instant Keith Richards.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: Brian, in most photos I’ve seen of late, you’re brandishing a Rickenbacker … it looks to me like the two of you are going steady.</strong></p> <p>Yep, a Rickenbacker 360 … love it!</p> <p><strong>I’ve heard you refer to it during shows as your “new favorite guitar.” It sounds like you’d been pining for one for awhile.</strong></p> <p>Oh, yeah, 20 years, man. [laughs] I had one 20 years ago, but in those days I was too broke to keep it, you know? It was one of those deals where the house payment came due and the Rickenbacker had to go.</p> <p><strong>I think everybody has a “one that got away” story.</strong></p> <p>You got that right … and I’d been wanting one again ever since. [laughs] I’ve always loved the sound of a Rick. Tom Petty: he’s always played them. And Roger McGuinn, of course. I’m a huge, huge, huge Roger McGuinn fan. </p> <p>So I finally bit the bullet and got myself one again. I’m old enough and wise enough now to get exactly the one I wanted; in the color I wanted; with every feature I wanted … and it cost a lot of money, but I figure it’s going to be the last guitar I buy in my life. [laughs]</p> <p>I’ve got enough of ‘em. I’m full of guitars. [laughs]</p> <p><strong>Tell me what you like about the 360.</strong></p> <p>For one thing, I’m using a capo on a lot of the new songs, and the Rickenbacker is the best frigging capo guitar ever. The neck is really evenly shaped and it doesn't pull strings out of tune.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/JwXkGJo9m2g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>It seems like you’ve got a handle on the beast, as far as coaxing different tones out of it in the course of a set.</strong></p> <p>You know, I haven't really played my other guitars much since I got the Rick.</p> <p><strong>At the same time, John Horton — your picking partner in the Bottle Rockets — might work through a number of guitar voices during a show.</strong></p> <p>Oh, yeah, sometimes a Strat; sometimes a Flying V or a Firebird … John plays all kinds of stuff. The thing is, the Rickenbacker balances out with all of them … it always stands out from anything John wants to play.</p> <p><strong>Have you ever tried a combination that didn't balance out?</strong></p> <p>Ha! Good question! Yeah, one time we tried playing with two Stratocasters at the same time … and that did not work. [laughs]</p> <p><strong>Anybody get hurt?</strong></p> <p>Oh, man … We kept turning up because neither one of us could hear each other. At the end, we were so fucking loud … and we still couldn't hear each other.</p> <p><strong>But you’re still going to keep your Tele's handy, right?</strong></p> <p>I’ve got a Tele on my kitchen table here right now. (laughs)</p> <p><strong>Is it your <a href="http://www.crestonguitars.com/guitars/brian_hennemans_oat">Creston Tele — good ol’ Oat?</a> That’s my idea of total guitar porn …</strong></p> <p>Isn’t it? [laughs] Yeah, Creston Lea builds a frigging awesome guitar … the one you’re talking about is actually my best Tele. My other one is a total frigging mutt: The body is like, from 1951 or something. There are no original parts except the body. And that’s a really good guitar, too, except it’s kind of flimsy and old funky and doesn’t like to stay in tune. So the Creston is the go-to Tele for any kind of real, live road use.</p> <p><strong>I know your amp of choice for a long while was a Fender Blues Junior. Do you still have that?</strong></p> <p>The Blues Junior is a frigging great amp. I used that thing for five years and it was just a killer amp. It finally just died of old age; they're like … like parakeets, you know?</p> <p>So when it died, there was this amp at the guitar shop I work at — Killer Vintage in St. Louis — called a Buster. It’s made by Louis Electric and is a lot like a Tweed Deluxe with a stronger power section.</p> <p>So then I was at the crossroads: Do I get this thing for, like, the price of five Blues Juniors? Or do I just keep getting Blues Juniors until I die? Just wear ‘em out and replace ‘em?</p> <p>You know, I’m figuring my life span versus a Blues Junior’s would be about, oh, three more or so … something like that. Which would’ve been cheaper than the Buster … but I went ahead and got it anyway. It's a fucking killer amp.</p> <p><strong>And that’s what you’re using now.</strong></p> <p>Well, no … You see, I got the Buster before I got the Rick … and it's the best amp in the world for a Telecaster. You are Keith Richards when you plug into it, you know?</p> <p>But the Rickenbacker didn't sound as good out of the Buster. It’s too dirty for the Rick. So then I was going through all this shit to try to get the Rick tone I wanted …</p> <p><strong>And ended up with …?</strong></p> <p>A ’74 Fender Deluxe Reverb, which is perfect for the Rickenbacker. I still have the Buster … and maybe I should’ve stuck with the Blues Junior! </p> <p><Strong>I have one myself. All I’ve done is swap out the stock speaker with an Eminence Cannabis Rex and a new set of tubes. I’m playing a Classic Series Fifties Esquire through it with one of Jim Weider’s Big T bridge pickups. I love the thing. </strong></p> <p>Cool, sounds like a great combination. The Blues Juniors are the perfect size and the perfect volume. Look: I got five years out of mine. If I got five years, you’ll have yours the rest of your life. [laughs]</p> <p><em>A former offshore lobsterman, Brian Robbins had to wait a good four decades or so to write about the stuff he wanted to when he was 15. Today he’s a freelance scribe, cartoonist, photographer and musician. His home on the worldwide inner tube is at <a href="http://brian-robbins.com/">brian-robbins.com</a> (And there’s that <a href="https://www.facebook.com/BrianRobbinsWords">Facebook</a> thing too.)</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bottle-rockets-brian-henneman-rickenbacker-romance-and-amplifier-angst#comments Brian Henneman Brian Robbins The Bottle Rockets Interviews News Features Thu, 31 Jul 2014 16:17:30 +0000 Brian Robbins http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22000 Bad Seed Rising Premiere New Song, "Wolves at the Door" — Listen http://www.guitarworld.com/bad-seed-rising-premiere-new-song-wolves-door-listen <!--paging_filter--><p>Maryland-based teenage rock band Bad Seed Rising released their debut EP, <em>Charm City</em>, earlier this year on <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/charm-city-ep/id852275541" target="_blank"> iTunes</a> via Roadrunner Records. </p> <p>Today, the group has teamed up with <em>Revolver</em> and <em>Guitar World</em> to premiere their lyric video for "Wolves at the Door." Check it out below and let us know what you think in the comments or on Facebook!</p> <p>For more on Bad Seed Rising, visit their <a href="http://www.badseedrisingband.com/" target="_blank">official website</a> and follow them on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/badseedrisingband" target="_blank">Facebook</a>.</p> <p><iframe src="//www.youtube.com/embed/0dfh3gJse8k?rel=0" height="365" width="620" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bad-seed-rising-premiere-new-song-wolves-door-listen#comments Bad Seed Rising News Thu, 31 Jul 2014 15:59:05 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21999 Betcha Can't Play This: John Li's Django Reinhardt-Inspired Run http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-john-lis-django-reinhardt-inspired-run <!--paging_filter--><p>This run is heavily inspired by the great gypsy jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt. </p> <p>I begin by highlighting an Am6 arpeggio, with many chromatics and flat fives thrown in. I then move to Dm6 in bar 2, adding similar chromatic ornamentations. </p> <p>Next up is a B fully diminished seventh (over E7b9) with notes from the B half-whole scale thrown in for some percussive and melodic flavor. Finally, I end on what I would barely call an altered E dominant seventh, over which I actually play an A whole-half scale, before finally ending the entire thing on E.</p> <p>As indicated above and below the tab, I use a mixture of alternate and economy picking and some quick position shifts to get through the passage smoothly. When economy picking, rather than thinking of it as successive down-strokes or upstrokes, simply rest your pick on the adjacent string and push with the joints of your fingers. </p> <p>Instead of having your wrist do most of the work, it becomes more of a guide for the pick, and movement becomes minimized or economized. The object is to be able to play the lick smoothly and in time. As always, practice with a metronome and start out slowly!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/OVB5XLpgBhc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-05-06%20at%2012.20.38%20PM.png" width="620" height="616" alt="Screen Shot 2014-05-06 at 12.20.38 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-john-lis-django-reinhardt-inspired-run#comments August 2010 Betcha Can't Play This John Li Videos News Lessons Magazine Thu, 31 Jul 2014 15:34:16 +0000 John Li http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21184 Brian Setzer Premieres "Let's Shake" Music Video http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-premieres-lets-shake-music-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Earlier today, everyone's favorite rockabilly cat, Brian Setzer, premiered his new music video over at <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/music/2014/07/31/brian-setzer-lets-shake-video-premiere/13393293/">USAToday.com.</a></p> <p>Lucky for you, you can check out "Let's Shake" below. </p> <p>As always, be sure to let us know what you think of it in the comments below or on Facebook!</p> <p>"Let's Shake" is the lead-off single from Setzer's new album, <em>Rockabilly Riot! All Original,</em> which will be released August 12 via Surfdog Records. You can check out our new interview with Setzer <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/rockabilly-riot-brian-setzer-talks-new-album-gretsch-guitars-and-future-rockabilly">right here.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/xQaSBw_LEtM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-premieres-lets-shake-music-video#comments Brian Setzer Videos News Thu, 31 Jul 2014 14:34:47 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21997 Judas Priest's Rob Halford, Glenn Tipton and Richie Faulkner Talk New Album, 'Redeemer of Souls' http://www.guitarworld.com/judas-priests-rob-halford-glenn-tipton-and-richie-faulkner-talk-new-album-redeemer-souls <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This is an excerpt from the September 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the rest of this story, plus features on Dan Auerbach's off-beat guitars, Eric Clapton and his new J.J. Cale tribute album, 17 Amazing practice amps, columns, tabs and reviews of new gear from Epiphone, ESP Guitars, Visual Sound, Blackstar, G&amp;L Guitars, Ibanez and more, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-september-2014-the-black-keys/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=BlackKeysExceprt">check out the August 2014 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <p>When <em>Guitar World</em> sat down with Judas Priest guitarists Glenn Tipton and Richie Faulkner and frontman Rob Halford in New York City earlier this summer, there was a palpable sense of excitement and confidence in the air as we talked about Priest’s new return-to-form album, <em>Redeemer of Souls</em>. </p> <p>It felt like a fresh beginning for a group that, just a few years earlier, had seemed on the verge of imploding.</p> <p>In December 2010, more than 40 years after the group’s formation in Birmingham, England, Judas Priest had announced that their Epitaph World Tour would be a farewell jaunt. </p> <p>When, a few weeks later, Rob Halford said in an interview, “I think it’s time,” and asked fans to “not be sad” and “celebrate and rejoice over all the great things we’ve done,” the heavy-metal community took it as a sign that the mighty Judas Priest were finally hanging up their studded leather belts. </p> <p>With the internet abuzz over the uncertainty of their future, Judas Priest went into damage control mode and quickly issued a statement that read, in part, “This is by no means the end of the band. In fact, we are presently writing new material, but we do intend this to be the last major world tour.” </p> <p>For much of their career, the band members’ comments about Judas Priest’s future probably wouldn’t have caused much of a stir. But in today’s 24/7 feeding frenzy known as the internet, it’s a very different story.</p> <p>“It does make you choose your words carefully,” Halford says. “With today’s speed of communication, you’ve only got to get one word wrong and the whole place blows up. In retrospect, there probably should have been a different way to project the whole Epitaph experience.”</p> <p>Some additional turbulence shook the Judas Priest camp in April 2011 when longtime guitarist K.K. Downing announced that he was leaving the group just two month’s ahead of the Epitaph tour. The band wasted no time announcing 31-year-old British guitarist Richie Faulkner as Downing’s replacement. Faulkner’s debut with the band took place on national television on May 25, 2011, when Judas Priest performed live during the season finale of <em>American Idol.</em></p> <p>After the completion of the 120-date Epitaph tour in May 2012, Judas Priest took some much needed time off to regroup and begin work on a new album. They made a few public appearances, and a couple of best-of packages found their way into the marketplace, but otherwise things were fairly quiet on the Priest front.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/shwOv_J7QGo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Then, this past April, the band announced a July 15 release date for <em>Redeemer of Souls</em>, its first album of new material since 2008’s poorly received conceptual double album, <em>Nostradamus</em>. Wisely, the group issued a free stream of the title track alongside the announcement. From its opening chugging riff to Halford’s distinct voice intoning, “It’s time to settle the score,” to Tipton and Faulkner’s searing solo trade-offs, <em>Redeemer of Souls</em> makes it clear that Priest has not only survived the past few years’ unrest but also regained the fire in their belly that had been missing for quite some time.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD EXCERPT: Back in 2010–2011, there was a lot of speculation that Judas Priest were on the verge of disbanding. But with Redeemer of Souls and new tour dates on the horizon, it seems as though the band has a renewed sense of energy.</strong></p> <p><strong>Rob Halford:</strong> I think it’s very natural for a band that’s had a long career in rock and roll to become a little bit philosophical. That’s just human nature, and we weren’t afraid to talk about it. But I don’t think we ever said specifically “This is the end.” It was probably the “Farewell Tour” that gave people that impression. We probably should have called that something different. We called it that because it was our way of saying that this is the end of the big, massive world tours. We’re still going to go out and play, but it’s not going to be these big two-year schleps, which are grueling for any band.</p> <p>But there’s definitely a change in tone around the band these days, and a lot of that is because of this guy right here [points to Faulkner]. Richie has brought something to this band that is very infectious and vibrant, and I think you can sense all of that great feeling coming through in these new songs.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/jq8kwk8288A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Glenn, did you feel that there was a negative vibe swirling around the band during the Epitaph tour?</strong></p> <p><strong>Glenn Tipton:</strong> I don’t know if it was a negative vibe around us as much as it was a little bit unsure of what the future held for Judas Priest. For me, the Epitaph tour was one of the most satisfying and gratifying tours we had ever done. It was a grueling task to go out and play for two and a half hours every night, but to play a song off every album brought out a lot of sentimental feelings, and I think we all rose to the occasion.</p> <p>But you’re right in the sense that there was a little bit of uncertainty around the band—what we were going to do next, that kind of thing. And it wasn’t until we started writing the album and really getting into the meat and potatoes of it that we realized, Hold on, this is going to be more than just another album—there’s something special going on here. And that starts to breed enthusiasm. You look forward to the future. You look forward to playing these songs onstage. So I think the band has evolved since the Epitaph era into a different way of thinking. We’ve never been more content, and we’re excited about the future.</p> <p><strong>Halford:</strong> In light of the Epitaph experience, if and when the final note is played, we certainly won’t be announcing it. I think it’s just going to happen one day, and that’s probably the nicest way to do it. You take very small steps back until you’re done, and I think it’ll be that way for us. But the fact that Priest’s music will live forever, the way Beethoven and Bach’s music lives forever, that really is the most incredible accomplishment that you can dwell on and feel proud of.</p> <p><strong>After the Epitaph tour, did you feel as though there was unfinished business within the band? Like there was more to accomplish?</strong></p> <p><strong>Tipton:</strong> I think we’ve always felt that way. We’ve never been satisfied with one record—we’ve always wanted to do another. It’s the same with touring: you know that at some point you’re going to want to go out and do another tour. Even with this record, we recorded 18 songs. I mean, where did that come from? So there’s plenty left in this band.</p> <p><strong>Richie, what was it like for you around the time of the Epitaph tour? Was it disappointing to join a legendary band like Judas Priest and suddenly have people speculating about the group’s demise?</strong></p> <p><strong>Faulkner:</strong> When I came onboard and was welcomed into the family, I was very aware of where the band were in their career. Not that I wasn’t already aware of it, since I’m a fan of the band, but it certainly wasn’t something I was going to pass up just because there’s a chance that the band was coming to the end of its career. And maybe if there was any sense within the band of winding down, maybe I’m the one who’s keeping them going. And some people out there might not like me for that, but what was I going to do? Not join the band? Sometimes you just have to take the bull by the horns. And as a result, here we are with 18 new studio tracks and a new Judas Priest album. </p> <p><strong>Were you involved in the songwriting for <em>Redeemer of Souls</em> from the get-go?</strong></p> <p><strong>Faulkner:</strong> From day one, it’s always been a family of creative people. It’s not one or two people calling the shots and you just show up, play a gig and go home. From the rehearsals to picking the set list to the stage production, it’s a very inclusive process, and that transcends right into the songwriting for the album.</p> <p>Priest have always had the vocalist and the two-guitar-player writing team, and it was the same this time. I was taught to write metal songs by these guys. When you're 14 or 15 years old, you listen to <em>Screaming for Vengeance</em> and use that as a model for writing songs. So, for me, when you’re now in the studio writing songs with these guys, you don’t have to put on a different hat or write songs you wouldn’t normally write; it comes from your heart, because it’s what you’ve been brought up with. So it was a very organic and intuitive experience for me to write songs with these guys.</p> <p><em>Photo: Jimmy Hubbard</em></p> <p><em>This is an excerpt from the September 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the rest of this story, plus features on Dan Auerbach's off-beat guitars, Eric Clapton and his new J.J. Cale tribute album, 17 Amazing practice amps, columns, tabs and reviews of new gear from Epiphone, ESP Guitars, Visual Sound, Blackstar, G&amp;L Guitars, Ibanez and more, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-september-2014-the-black-keys/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=BlackKeysExceprt">check out the August 2014 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/judas-priest">Judas Priest</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/judas-priests-rob-halford-glenn-tipton-and-richie-faulkner-talk-new-album-redeemer-souls#comments Judas Priest September 2014 Interviews News Features Magazine Thu, 31 Jul 2014 14:24:09 +0000 Jeff Kitts http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21873 Christmas in July Sale at Guitar World Store: All DVDs $10! http://www.guitarworld.com/christmas-july-sale-guitar-world-store-all-dvds-10 <!--paging_filter--><p>Yes, exactly like the headline says, we're having a major "Christmas in July" sale at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/dvds/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=XmasInJuly">Guitar World Online Store!</a> </p> <p>Each DVD at the store is only $10!</p> <p>We have five pages of top-notch instructional DVDs to scroll through!</p> <p><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/dvds/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=XmasInJuly">Head to the store now!</a></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/christmas-july-sale-guitar-world-store-all-dvds-10#comments News Features Thu, 31 Jul 2014 14:21:06 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21996 The Songwriting Sourcebook: How to Turn Chords Into Great Songs http://www.guitarworld.com/songwriting-sourcebook-how-turn-chords-great-songs <!--paging_filter--><p>Originally published in 2003, and now revised and updated, <em>The Songwriting Sourcebook: How to Turn Chords into Great Songs</em> is the third entry in Rikky Rooksby's bestselling <em>How to Write Songs</em> series. </p> <p>This easy-to-use book will help you write better songs by explaining the art of writing effective chord sequences It shows:</p> <p>• How three and four chords can lay the foundation for a simple song, and how to move on to progressions using five and six chords </p> <p>• How to give your chord sequences additional color by adding chords that are not strictly in key, including blues chords </p> <p> • How to write chord sequences for songs in minor keys as well as major keys, and how to take progressions into new territories by changing key</p> <p> • How to fine-tune the color of your chords by understanding the emotional potential of sevenths, sixths and ninths </p> <p>All examples come with easy-to-read guitar chord boxes, and the accompanying 20-track audio CD features original recordings that illustrate some of the points made in the book. </p> <p><strong><em>The Songwriting Sourcebook</em> <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/mix-books/products/the-songwriting-sourcebook/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=SongwritingBook">is available now at the Guitar World Online Store for $24.99.</a></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/songwriting-sourcebook-how-turn-chords-great-songs#comments guitar basics Rikky Rooksby News Features Thu, 31 Jul 2014 13:44:50 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16914 Jacky Vincent of Falling In Reverse Discusses Joe Satriani's 'Surfing With the Alien' — The Record That Changed My Life http://www.guitarworld.com/jacky-vincent-falling-reverse-discusses-joe-satrianis-surfing-alien-record-changed-my-life <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Falling In Reverse guitarist Jacky Vincent chooses and discusses the record that changed his life.</em></p> <p><strong>Joe Satriani</strong><br /> <em>Surfing With the Alien</em> (1987)</p> <p>“<em>Surfing with the Alien</em> inspired me to become a musician and want to learn guitar. </p> <p>"My dad had the CD in his collection before I was even born. As a young kid I would pick it out and play it, and I have vivid memories of attempting to learn ‘Crushing Day,’ ‘Midnight,’ ‘Always with Me, Always with You,’ ‘Surfing with the Alien’ and ‘Satch Boogie.’ It meant so much to my development as a player because it was the album that introduced me to the guitar and songwriting techniques I use today. </p> <p>“<em>Surfing with the Alien</em> made it apparent to me early on that you didn’t even have to have a vocalist to create an incredible and enjoyable album. </p> <p>"It’s safe to say I wouldn’t be the player I am now, or probably even be a musician at all, without this album being available to me when it was. The guitar tones, songs and soloing on the record remain some of my favorites to this day.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/lCGCG_N2b30" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/jacky-vincent-falling-reverse-discusses-joe-satrianis-surfing-alien-record-changed-my-life#comments Falling In Reverse Jacky Vincent Joe Satriani July 2014 The Record that Changed My Life Interviews News Features Magazine Wed, 30 Jul 2014 20:32:16 +0000 Jacky Vincent http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21929 Kiss Guitarist Tommy Thayer Discusses 'Montrose' — The Record That Changed My Life http://www.guitarworld.com/kiss-guitarist-tommy-thayer-discusses-montrose-record-changed-my-life <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Kiss guitarist Tommy Thayer chooses (and discusses) the record that changed his life.</em></p> <p><strong>Montrose</strong><br /> <em>Montrose</em> (1973)</p> <p>“I came of age in the early to mid Seventies, and in that era, the most influential album to me was the first Montrose record. </p> <p>"I still remember the first time I heard it. It was actually at a party at my house. I had these older brothers and sisters, and we would have these huge parties when my parents were out of town. </p> <p>"We’d have kegs and hundreds of people there. So this guy brought the first Montrose record out and put it on. When I heard 'Rock the Nation' into 'Bad Motor Scooter,' I was like, ‘Oh, my god. I love this!’ It was so powerful. People that grew up in the Sixties might scoff at that and say it’s derivative or second generation…and it is. But I was 13 years old when I heard it, and it blew me away. </p> <p>"There’s no doubt that Ronnie Montrose was one of the quintessential hard rock–blues guitarists of all time.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/x8T_PQoTC30" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/kiss">Kiss</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/kiss-guitarist-tommy-thayer-discusses-montrose-record-changed-my-life#comments July 2014 Kiss Montrose The Record that Changed My Life Tommy Thayer Interviews News Features Magazine Wed, 30 Jul 2014 19:55:32 +0000 Tommy Thayer http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21925 Orange Amplification at 2014 Summer NAMM: Dual Dark 100 Guitar Amp — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/orange-amplification-2014-summer-namm-dual-dark-100-guitar-amp-video <!--paging_filter--><p>As always, several members of the <em>Guitar World</em> crew were on hand at the 2014 Summer NAMM Show in lovely and talented Nashville, Tennessee, taking pics, getting the latest gear news and shooting plenty of videos.</p> <p>While we were at the show, we had a chance to stop by the Orange Amplification booth. Our visit is chronicled in the video below. </p> <p>In the clip, the Orange crew show off their Dual Dark 100 amp while discussing its characteristics and tone. </p> <p>Take a look and tell us what you think in the comments below or on Facebook. And while you're at it, be sure to check out our massive <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/2014-summer-namm-show-photos-gear-galore-nashville">2014 Summer NAMM photo gallery.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/lxMIVVU4T78" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/orange-amplification-2014-summer-namm-dual-dark-100-guitar-amp-video#comments Orange Orange Amps Summer NAMM 2014 Videos Amps News Gear Wed, 30 Jul 2014 19:52:29 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21964 Bootstraps Premiere "Haywire" Music Video — Exclusive http://www.guitarworld.com/bootstraps-premiere-haywire-music-video-exclusive <!--paging_filter--><p>Today, GuitarWorld.com presents the exclusive premiere of "Haywire," the new music video by LA’s Bootstraps.</p> <p>The haunting track is from the band's new self-titled album, which was released earlier this year.</p> <p>“We tracked the album live, the old-fashioned way” with help from Richard Dodd (Civil Wars, Kings of Leon), who enhanced this vision in the studio," Bootstraps frontman Jordan Beckett said. “Live recording as a full band is just that, it’s alive, making it possible to capture moments and the feeling that makes music music.”</p> <p>Besides Beckett, the band features Chris Jaymes, We Barbarians member David Quon and ex-Cold War Kids drummer Matt Aveiro.</p> <p>For more about Bootstraps, check out their <a href="http://bootstrapsmusic.com">official website</a> and follow them on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/bootstrapsmusic">Facebook.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://cache.vevo.com/m/html/embed.html?video=USUMV1400180" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bootstraps-premiere-haywire-music-video-exclusive#comments Bootstraps Videos News Wed, 30 Jul 2014 19:47:35 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21992 Brandon Kinney Talks Songwriting and Getting His Start In Nashville http://www.guitarworld.com/brandon-kinney-talks-songwriting-and-getting-his-start-nashville <!--paging_filter--><p>When Brandon Kinney arrived in Nashville 20 years ago, he knew he wanted to work in the music industry. What he didn’t know was that he would find his niche crafting songs for other artists, and he certainly didn’t expect to become one of Music Row’s most in-demand songwriters.</p> <p>It was a long, slow road from student at Belmont University to publishing deals with Sony ATV, Love Monkey Music and Tom-Leis Music. </p> <p>Along the way, Kinney worked day jobs, made inroads via colleagues who were already signed and even signed a recording contract as a solo artist. In 2005, Lonestar gave him his first hit when they recorded “You’re Like Coming Home.” His phone started ringing, and in 2009, “Boots On,” a co-write with Randy Houser, became BMI’s second-most-performed song of the year. </p> <p>Since then, Kinney has been on a winning streak, landing cuts and writing hits for numerous country artists — Randy Travis, Willie Nelson, Jake Owen and Luke Bryan are a few of the names who have recorded his songs. In 2012, “Outta My Head” became a hit for Craig Campbell and was the second-longest-charting song in Billboard history, holding steady for 54 weeks.</p> <p>Kinney was at the Sony offices for a writing appointment when he took some time to discuss songwriting, Nashville then and now, and what he has learned since signing his first deal.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: What attracted you to the guitar, and when did you begin writing songs?</strong></p> <p>My dad bought me an electric guitar, but we traded it in for an acoustic pretty quick because, starting out, I wasn’t as much into playing licks or lead parts, and I thought that’s all the electric guitar was for. I said, “I’m going to get an acoustic so I can actually play a song.” I didn’t know anything about playing guitar. </p> <p>My interest in music was probably infused in me from birth, because my parents used to turn the radio to a country station and put it in my room by the crib, so that when they had friends over I wouldn’t wake up because I could deal with the noise. They said I was dancing all the time when the radio came on. I just loved music. My mom played piano in church and she would get me up to sing at evening services. </p> <p>I was playing football, loving football, and I was also into bicycles. I got a head injury from a bicycle accident and it put me out of football completely at the start of my eighth-grade year. My dad played guitar a little bit when he was a kid, and he showed me how to play “Wipeout.” I was bummed out because I couldn’t play football anymore, so he said, “Why don’t we get you a guitar?” We got a guitar and I stayed in my room for hours every day. </p> <p>That’s all I wanted to do. That probably went on for a month and a half before I started getting interested in writing. I looked at the credits on Paul Overstreet’s record and noticed that there were other writers on there with him. One night, around 1:30, I couldn’t sleep, and this lyric and melody popped into my head. I got up and wrote it in about 30 minutes. I didn’t have a recorder because I wasn’t planning on writing anything. I was not prepared. I was afraid I might forget it, so I played it about a thousand times. I stayed up until probably 3 or 4 in the morning trying to remember it. The next morning I played it again and I played it for both of my parents. They loved it. And I got a recorder.</p> <p><strong>Were you attracted more to lyrics or melodies, or was there a difference?</strong></p> <p>I’ve never separated the two. I loved song lyrics, but I looked at it as a whole thing. I wasn’t focused on just writing a good lyric. I wrote what came from the heart the first time, and I thought, That rhymes and that’s cool. But there was no focus primarily on one or the other. To me, it was one vehicle. </p> <p><strong>When did it become obvious that it was time to move to Nashville?</strong></p> <p>My dad always encouraged me to be an artist. He thought I needed to be up there like George Strait! I didn’t do much in high school to let people know that I was even interested in music, besides playing in church. I went to Jacksonville Junior College in Jacksonville, Texas. I played a talent show there and people seemed to be into it. I put my guitar away for a while and didn’t write because I’m so one-track-minded that I couldn’t make my grades and write songs and play guitar at the same time. I thought I maybe wanted to be a pilot or an engineer. It was always in the back of my mind that I wanted to sing and write songs, but I didn’t understand that you can get a publishing deal and write songs for somebody else to record. I hadn’t gotten that far in the process. </p> <p>When I went to Belmont [Kinney relocated to Nashville in 1994], I was thinking more about sitting at a console and recording, because I’m not a great guitar player. I play enough to sing my songs. I got here and I started meeting other people who wrote songs. I took publishing classes and I realized you can actually do this for a living. That’s when I started leaning toward it as a career. I was just doing it because I loved it and I got a little attention! It was fun. I wanted to be an artist, too, but there are too many talented singers here that can’t get it going and I didn’t want to fall into that, so I focused on writing. </p> <p>When I graduated, I started plugging songs for a company out of San Antonio. I did that for a year and half. I didn’t get my first writing deal until 2001. Between 1997 and 2001, I drove a Coca-Cola truck and worked for a cell phone company to make ends meet. It allowed me to come to Music Row and do some writing with my buddies. One of them that I had gone to college with had gotten a publishing deal, so he could do demos and they were pitching his songs. I was able to keep my foot in that door until I signed my first deal and was able to quit my day job.</p> <p><strong>What was the music scene like in Nashville when you arrived?</strong></p> <p>It was rocking! Garth Brooks was there and country music was hotter than it had ever been. It was a money-making machine. They were signing all kinds of artists, a lot of songwriters had deals, and it seemed there weren’t any hard times at all, but then again, I was still in school, so I wasn’t in the middle of it. It was still somewhat hard to get in, but I got my internships, and nearly every act seemed to be doing good and selling millions of records. Around 1997 or 1998, it started slowing down. I remember people saying, “It’s about to make a turn. It’s going to be coming back to traditional pretty soon.” I think some of them are still saying that. It was a good time to come in. It’s still good times; sales are picking up for some artists. But I don’t think we’ll ever see it like the early ’90s again.</p> <p><strong>Has downloading affected country music the way it has affected other genres?</strong></p> <p>That has been part of the problem. It has affected a lot of people. One of my buddies had 6 million plays on Pandora and he got under $600 for all of those plays. There’s Pandora and downloading, and they’re starting to find ways to monitor that, but you still have the pirates and all of that stuff going on where they’re getting it for free, and legitimate companies are not paying what they should.</p> <p><strong>You toured after releasing your album. What did you learn from performing live and how have those lessons helped you as a songwriter?</strong></p> <p>I opened for Sara Evans, so her crowd was a little tamer. She played a lot of theaters, so there were a lot of women and the boyfriends of the girls that wanted to be there. I thought that it was going to be a disaster, because my music was more for the beer-drinking crowd with a weird sense of humor. I put songs on my record that nobody else wanted to cut because they were afraid to cut them, and rightfully so! In that situation I learned that you can’t judge the crowd and say, “They’re not going to like this.” You’ve got to throw it out there and see what happens. They like to have a good time. You can’t play ballad after ballad, and tearjerker after tearjerker, because people come there to escape their normal life and you don’t want to bring them down. So I tried to keep it upbeat, keep them laughing, and keep them feeling good. </p> <p>When I write for other artists, I’m picturing them onstage and thinking, What is going to get the crowd into this? It’s not just the lyrics or the melody; sometimes it’s the production, so when I produce a demo that my publishing company is going to pitch to an artist, I think, What’s going to get the crowd fired up? What’s going to make the artist feel cool and look cool? That’s pretty much what I pulled from touring. What was good about being onstage is that I got to witness what worked and what didn’t, but at the same time, every artist is different. There are artists who can sing ballad after ballad, but they’re not singing to 18- to 25-year-olds who are drinking beer and wearing bikini tops. It’s probably an older crowd. If you’re writing for an artist who gets their sales from that audience, then you play it safer and you write deeper stuff. But when somebody’s drunk, they don’t want to get too deep. </p> <p><strong>At what point did you feel that you “got it” as a songwriter — that you understood the craft and had the material to take to audiences?</strong></p> <p>I’ve always had an idea, but in the past four years I feel more confident than I’ve ever felt. I feel like this is my time. Before, especially when I was in my artist deal, I was writing a lot of funny songs. People loved them, but nobody would record them because they were a little bit too quirky, and they were afraid that listeners would going to get tired of hearing them. I’ve dialed in a little bit more in the past four years. That’s a long time to wait, but I’ve hit and missed since 2001. I’ve been more consistent in dialing in what I want to say. I never really cared before. I just said, “Well, this sounds like a hit,” or “I’m just going to write my song and not worry about it.” Now it’s “What do these guys want?” I’ve buckled down more and I’ve grown a lot as a writer. They say that the best way to get good is to write with someone who’s better than you, and I’ve tried to do a lot of that and learn from them.</p> <p><strong>Your songs have positive, upbeat lyrics and melodies. Are you happy by nature, or are happy songs just more radio-friendly?</strong></p> <p>I’ve always been that way. Any time I’ve tried to write a “downer” song, it brought me down and I said, “Screw it, I just want to go home.” I like to have fun. I was raised around goofy people. Everybody was always cracking jokes and having a good time. We had our serious moments, but I always seemed to thrive a little bit more when I could laugh or get to rocking. I enjoyed Merle Haggard and all that stuff, I listen to that too, but I don’t want to listen to downer songs all the time. When I write, if I’m going to sit here for six or seven hours, I can't sit here depressed, trying to find out what this song needs. </p> <p>“Outta My Head” was kind of a sad song, but it was still upbeat, it had some passion to it, and it was fun to write. As long as I’m having fun in the writing session, I think I write a better song, and that’s why I stick with those topics. I have my share of leaving songs and all that, but it’s rare that I ever write a song where I’m sitting at the house, on the couch and drinking, because I know that an artist is not going to want to self-loathe all the way through the song. Nobody wants to do that in front of a crowd unless it’s a killer song. If it’s a killer idea, I’ll do it because I get excited about it, but most of the time I like to keep it upbeat. </p> <p><em>Photo: Stephen Gilbert</em></p> <p><em>Read more of Brandon Kinney’s interview <a href="http://www.examiner.com/article/brandon-kinney-writes-the-songs-that-make-the-whole-country-world-sing">here</a></em></p> <p><em>— Alison Richter</em></p> <p><em>Alison Richter interviews artists, producers, engineers and other music industry professionals for print and online publications. <a href="http://www.examiner.com/music-industry-in-national/alison-richter">Read more of her interviews right here.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/brandon-kinney-talks-songwriting-and-getting-his-start-nashville#comments Alison Richter Brandon Kinney Interviews News Features Wed, 30 Jul 2014 18:44:29 +0000 Alison Richter http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21962 ‘Museum’: Former White Lion Vocalist Mike Tramp Talks New Music, Guitars and Touring http://www.guitarworld.com/musuem-former-white-lion-vocalist-mike-tramp-talks-new-music-guitars-and-touring <!--paging_filter--><p>For former White Lion vocalist Mike Tramp, it’s no longer about filling arenas, selling T-shirts or playing the old songs. Today, Tramp focuses on one main thing: following his heart. </p> <p>It’s why he’s spent the better part of the past two years touring the world with just a guitar, playing everywhere from sports bars to small hunting lodges deep in the Pennsylvania wilderness, places where Tramp says he feels right at home.</p> <p>And although there have been glimpses of Tramp’s inner-self in his White Lion past (“When the Children Cry” comes to mind), perhaps there's no better reflection of Tramp’s soul than his new album, <em>Museum</em>, which will be released August 18.</p> <p>From the Seventies vibe of songs like “Down South” to his own frustration (“Trust in Yourself”) and personal healing (“Better”), Tramp’s pain, love and frustration are on full display. Listening to <em>Museum</em>, one quickly discovers the bloodline that is Mike Tramp. There’s no makeup or make believe. Just plenty of truth. </p> <p>I recently spoke to Tramp about his new album, gear and the satisfaction he gets from his vagabond touring lifestyle.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: How would you describe this new album as a whole?</strong></p> <p>It's a true reflection of me as a songwriter and about not being controlled by the “image” anymore. It’s knowing that the guidelines, doors and walls that surrounded White Lion back in the Eighties just don’t exist for me anymore. I’ve taken a step to try to create something that's recognizable and has connections to my past, but is still part of the future.</p> <p><strong>Why the title <em>Museum</em>?</strong></p> <p>I fell in love with music when I was growing up in the late Sixties and Seventies, back when so many bands would just record an album and not worry about whether or not it would fit in with the other songs they’ve done before. I remember being in the studio and saying, "This is like being inside of a museum in its own time." These are displays of songs that represent who I am.</p> <p><strong>How did you approach writing for this album?</strong></p> <p>Anytime I sit down with a guitar, I’ll write a song. I might not finish it, but it's always in my head and in my hands. I've left myself open and free to go into the studio and start the song and see where it's going to take me. There are no barriers anymore. For this album, there were songs I specifically wrote from a different point of view, one of them being “Down South." </p> <p>It started as a guitar riff I had written years ago on electric. Originally, I was thinking it might be along the lines of an AC/DC riff. I remember I asked Soren Andersen (co-producer) to give me a beat loop for the song, and the second he did that, I wrote the rest of the song. I used that same formula for "Slave," another guitar-oriented track. Both songs started from the riff.</p> <p><strong>What can you tell me about the song “Trust in Yourself”?</strong></p> <p>I was raised a casual Christian. When I came to America in the Eighties and was introduced to some of ways people were using religion as a tool and watching how the government was able to get away with all kinds of things, it really turned me off. All of the things that control human beings; where bit by bit people started giving up their own judgment of life. If you can't find trust in yourself, then it doesn't feel right to my soul.</p> <p><strong>What was the recording process like?</strong></p> <p>When Soren and I get together, it's like two people at each other's houses, ordering pizza and watching movies. It's that kind of environment. We think so much alike and at the same time we think opposite, so we’re able to create these really great songs. It's a great process and I treasure every moment.</p> <p><strong>Will you be touring in support of the new album?</strong></p> <p>Yes, I'll be starting a European tour next month once the album is released and I'll be back in the U.S. sometime next March.</p> <p><strong>What are some of the differences between the way you tour now as opposed to the way you did when you were with White Lion?</strong></p> <p>With White Lion, I remember sitting on the tour bus while we were pulling in and I remember having to find the dressing rooms in the back of the arenas. Now I’ll pull up to the venue and walk in the front door. Sometimes it might be a sports bar or a dive out in the middle of the woods, but I'll go in and meet the club owner, have a beer, set up and play. It's a completely different world and feels like I'm visiting old friends. </p> <p><strong>Tell me a little about your setup.</strong></p> <p>I play Martin guitars exclusively. I've grown up with them and now have four great ones I use. I've also added just a little loop and a keyboard pad to my sound to help fill it out and give some of the old White Lion songs a little bit of a beat. I've found a happy medium and I'm excited to take this new music out there.</p> <p><strong>Over the course of your career, is there one memory that stands out above all others?</strong></p> <p>There would probably have to be one from each decade. Although I played Madison Square Garden with White Lion and AC/DC, the memories of that experience are hard for me to remember. But then I played a hunting cabin out in the hills of Pennsylvania and it's something I'll never forget. Lately, the highlights are musical because I'm so proud of these songs and the production. In the end, I think the overall highlight for me will be from being able to identify, adapt and change with the times.</p> <p><strong>A lot of artists have started to form “super group” side projects with other musicians for an album and tour. Do you ever see yourself taking part in something like that?</strong></p> <p>You can never say never. I do get offers from time to time, but right now I don't feel there's anything I could do better than what I'm doing right now. It certainly would have to be a collaboration with other people who feel the same as I do. It’s got to be for musical satisfaction. Some people think you only want to go back to that one and only place, but I already have those albums. When you want to hear a young Mike Tramp in his prime, you listen to <em>Pride</em>. To hear the next step, you listen to <em>Freak of Nature</em>. Now there are the solo albums where I'm dealing with the issues affecting me. They're all different chapters of my life.</p> <p><em>James Wood is a writer, musician and self-proclaimed metalhead who maintains his own website, <a href="http://gojimmygo.net/">GoJimmyGo.net</a>. His articles and interviews are written on a variety of topics with passion and humor. You can follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/JimEWood">Twitter @JimEWood.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/musuem-former-white-lion-vocalist-mike-tramp-talks-new-music-guitars-and-touring#comments James Wood Mike Tramp White Lion Interviews News Features Wed, 30 Jul 2014 18:26:47 +0000 James Wood http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21971 Vandenberg's MoonKings Premiere "Lust and Lies" Music Video — Exclusive http://www.guitarworld.com/vandenbergs-moonkings-premiere-lust-and-lies-music-video-exclusive <!--paging_filter--><p>Today, GuitarWorld.com presents the exclusive premiere of "Lust and Lies," the new music video from Vandenberg's MoonKings.</p> <p>The song is from the band's self-titled album, which will be released August 5 (released February 24 overseas). </p> <p>The album, which marks the return of Adrian Vandenberg to the world of music, is Vandenberg's first collection of new material in 16 years. Joining the former Vandenberg and Whitesnake guitarist are Jan Hoving (vocals), Sem Christoffel (bass) and Mart Nijen Es (drums). </p> <p>"'Lust and Lies' is one of my fave tracks from the debut album by my brand-spankin' new band, Vandenberg's MoonKings," Vandenberg told GuitarWorld.com. </p> <p>"It's got all the ingredients of what makes me just as excited and proud about my bunch as I was when I just started listening to Zep, Free, Hendrix, Cream, etc., and playing my Les Paul: pure, undiluted, unpolished, raw, dynamic, energetic, groovin' blues-rock-based rock played live, straight from the heart on to analog tape by four guys who are in this biz for the music. What you see and hear is exactly what you get!"</p> <p>For more about Vandenberg's MoonKings, visit <a href="http://www.moonkingsband.com/">moonkingsband.com</a> or <a href="https://www.facebook.com/moonkingsband">facebook.com/moonkingsband</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/UWmFIfZ2rJ4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/vandenbergs-moonkings-premiere-lust-and-lies-music-video-exclusive#comments Adrian Vandenberg Vandenberg's Moonkings Videos News Wed, 30 Jul 2014 15:25:26 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21988 Metallica in Istanbul, Turkey: Rehearsal, "...And Justice for All" and "Turn the Page" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/metallica-istanbul-turkey-rehearsal-and-justice-all-and-turn-page-video <!--paging_filter--><p>As you probably know by now, the staff over at MetallicaTV (the band's official YouTube channel), like to stay busy. </p> <p>Late last week, they posted the latest behind-the-scenes video from Metallica's never-ending road show. This time, you get to see a fly-on-the-wall clip of the band's July 13 show (and pre-show) in Istanbul, Turkey.</p> <p>The clip shows the band rehearsing a few tunes, then performing "...And Justice for All" and "Turn the Page" at the actual show. Enjoy!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/fiBzOQSNtLM?list=PLJvQXRgtxlulYgB1tznRR0h8biN2QCiM7" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/metallica-istanbul-turkey-rehearsal-and-justice-all-and-turn-page-video#comments Metallica Videos News Wed, 30 Jul 2014 14:59:54 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21987