News http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/4/0 en Guitar World's Paul Riario Demos Ninebuzz Modal Buddy App for Guitarists — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-worlds-paul-riario-demos-ninebuzz-modal-buddy-app-guitarists-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In this new video, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Paul Riario demos the new Ninebuzz Modal Buddy app for iPhone and iPod Touch. </p> <p>The app teaches you the modes by letting you jamming along to several backing tracks. </p> <p>Check it out and download it in the itunes app store! The app is available <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/modal-buddy-guitar-jam-tool/id889181515?mt=8&amp;ign-mpt=uo%3D4">here.</a></p> <p>For more about Ninebuzz, visit <a href="http://www.ninebuzz.com/">ninebuzz.com</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/R-MsM6NENlM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-worlds-paul-riario-demos-ninebuzz-modal-buddy-app-guitarists-video#comments Ninebuzz Videos News Fri, 25 Jul 2014 17:52:59 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21946 Big Strokes: A Beginner's Guide to Sweeping http://www.guitarworld.com/big-strokes-beginners-guide-sweeping <!--paging_filter--><p>Although often regarded as a “shredder’s” technique, the notion of sweeping (or raking) the pick across the strings to produce a quick succession of notes has been around since the invention of the pick itself. </p> <p>Jazz players from the Fifties, such as Les Paul, Barney Kessel and Tal Farlow, would use the approach in their improvisations, and country guitar genius Chet Atkins was known to eschew his signature fingerstyle hybrid-picking technique from time to time and rip out sweep-picked arpeggios, proving that the technique is not genre specific. Within rock, Ritchie Blackmore used sweep picking to play arpeggios in Deep Purple’s “April” and Rainbow’s “Kill the King.”</p> <p>Fusion maestro Frank Gambale is widely considered to be the most versatile and innovative sweep picker and the first artist to fully integrate the technique into his style, applying sweeping to arpeggios, pentatonics, heptatonic (seven-note) scales and modes, and beyond. </p> <p>Gambale explains his approach wonderfully in his instructional video, <em>Monster Licks and Speed Picking</em>. Originally released in 1988, it remains a must-watch video for anyone interested in developing a smooth sweep-picking technique.</p> <p>It was Stockholm, Sweden, however that would produce the name most synonymous with sweeping in a rock context, one that gave rise to a guitar movement known as neoclassical heavy metal. </p> <p>Swedish guitar virtuoso Yngwie Malmsteen was influenced by Jimi Hendrix, Ritchie Blackmore and Uli Jon Roth but was also equally enthralled by 19th-century virtuoso violinist Niccolò Paganini. Attempting to emulate on his Fender Stratocaster the fluid, breathtaking passages Paganini would compose and play on violin, Malmsteen concluded that sweep picking was the perfect way to travel quickly from string to string with a smooth, fluid sound much like what a violinist can create with his bow. </p> <p>Malmsteen’s style has since influenced two generations of guitarists, including Tony MacAlpine, Jason Becker, Steve Vai, Mattias “IA” Eklundh, Ritchie Kotzen, Marty Friedman, John Petrucci, Vinnie Moore, Jeff Loomis, Synyster Gates, Alexi Laiho and Tosin Abasi, to name but a few.</p> <p>The first five exercises in this lesson are designed to give you a systematic approach to practicing the component movements of sweep picking: from two-string sweeps to six-string sweeps, and everything in between. Practicing each exercise with a metronome for just two minutes every day will improve your coordination and your confidence to use the technique in your own playing. </p> <p>Work from two strings up to six, keeping your metronome at the same tempo. This means starting with eighth notes, and while this will feel very slow, the technique will become trickier with each successive note grouping: eighth-note triplets, 16th notes, quintuplets and, most difficult of all, 16th-note triplets and their equivalent sextuplets. Focus on synchronizing your hands so that your pick and fretting fingers make contact with the string at exactly the same moment. Only one string should be fretted at any time (this is key!), and any idle strings should be diligently muted with your remaining fingers. </p> <p>If you fail to do this and allow notes on adjacent strings to ring together, it will negate the desired effect and sound like you are simply strumming a chord. When it comes to sweep picking, muting is the key to cleanliness. It is also the aspect that will take the most practice to master.</p> <p>The second set of five exercises handles some common sweep-picking approaches. These are shown in one position and based on one chord type each, thus focusing your attention on the exercise until you have become accustomed to the technique. </p> <p>The final piece helps you tackle the various aspects of sweeping while bolstering your stamina, as the bulk of it consists of nonstop 16th notes, with only a few pauses for “breathing.” Break it down into four-bar sections and practice each with a metronome, gradually building up to the 100-beats-per-minute (100bpm) target tempo. </p> <p><strong>Get the Tone</strong></p> <p>In rock, this technique is best suited to Strat-style guitars, using the neck pickup setting for a warm, round tone. Use a modern tube amp with the gain set to a moderate amount—just enough to give all the notes a uniform volume and sustain, but not so much that string muting becomes an impossible battle. </p> <p>The thickness and sharpness of your pick will hugely impact the tone of your sweep picking. Something with a thickness between one and two millimeters and a rounded tip will provide the right amount of attack and still glide over the strings with ease.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_1_2.jpg" /></p> <p>[FIGURE 1] This Cmaj7 arpeggio on the two middle strings works just as well on the top two or bottom two. Lightly drag your pick across (push down, pull up) the two strings so that there’s very little resistance. This teaches your picking hand to make smooth motions rather than two separate downward or upward strokes.</p> <p>FIGURE 2 is a C7 arpeggio played across three strings. Strive to maintain the same smooth down/up motion with your pick used in the previous example. Focus on the pick strokes that land on downbeats, and allow the in-between, or “offbeat,” notes to naturally fall into place. Every three notes your pick will change direction. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_3.jpg" /></p> <p>Now let’s move on to four strings with this exotic C7 altered-dominant lick, reminiscent of one of Gambale’s fusion forays. Remember, sweep picking is most effective when each note is cleanly separated from the last, so aim to have only one finger in contact with the fretboard at a time in order to keep the notes from ringing together.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_4.jpg" /></p> <p>Now we move on to some five-string shapes, the likes of which you can hear in the playing of Steve Vai and Mattias Eklundh. The phrasing here is 16th-note quintuplets (five notes per beat). Once again, if you focus on nailing the highest and lowest notes along with the beat, the in-between notes should automatically fall into place. Move your pick at a constant speed to ensure the notes are evenly spaced. Say “Hip-po-pot-a-mus” to get the sound of properly performed quintuplets in your mind’s ear.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_5.jpg" /></p> <p>This six-string arpeggio is an A major triad (A Cs E), with the third in the bass and a fifth interval added to the high E string’s 12th fret, so we have the right number of notes for 16th-note triplets (six notes per click). When ascending, use a single motion to pick all six strings, making sure only one note is fretted at a time. The descending section includes a pull-off on the high E string, which, although momentarily disruptive to your picking, is preferable to adding another downstroke.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_6.jpg" /></p> <p>This major triad shape is an essential part of the Yngwie Malmsteen school of sweeping. Pay special attention to the picking directions in both the ascending and descending fragments. The alternating eighth-note triplet and quarter-note phrasing allows you to focus on the picking pattern in small bursts and then rest for a beat.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_7.jpg" /></p> <p>This example includes ascending and descending fragments again, this time played together. Concentrate on the general down-up motion of your picking hand rather than each pick stroke. Once you are comfortable with this shape you can apply the same approach to minor, suspended and diminished-seven arpeggios.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_8.jpg" /> </p> <p>This example is reminiscent of players such as Jason Becker and Jeff Loomis. We start with the three-string shapes from the previous example, followed by the six-string shape from FIGURE 5. This is quite challenging for the picking hand, so start very slowly and remember to keep the hand moving smoothly.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_9.jpg" /></p> <p>Here we utilize two-string sweeps with pentatonic shapes. Use your first finger on the fifth fret and third finger on the seventh fret. Keep your fingers flat against the two-string groups, and transfer pressure between strings using a rolling action to mute inactive strings and prevent notes from ringing together. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_10.jpg" /></p> <p>Economy picking requires that your pick take the shortest journey possible when crossing from string to string. This essentially means that when you play a scale, there will be a two-string mini-sweep whenever you move to an adjacent string. This exercise combines the eight-note B whole-half diminished scale (B Cs D E F G Gs As) and a Bdim7 arpeggio (B D F Gs).</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_11.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_11cont.jpg" /></p> <p>This piece is in the key of A minor. The first part is based around a “V-i” (five-one) progression, with the arpeggios clearly outlining the implied chord changes. We begin with some ascending two-string sweeps using alternating E (E Gs B) and Bf (Bf D F) triads. Next come some A minor triads (A C E), played with a progressively increasing number of strings; this is a great way to build your confidence in sweep picking larger shapes. The Bm7f5 (B D F A) arpeggio in bar 4 has a series of three-string sweeps combined with some challenging string skips. Bar 7 is an A minor pentatonic scale (A C D E G) played in fourths using two-string sweeps/economy picking. </p> <p>The second part of the piece has a more neoclassical approach and begins with some Yngwie-style three-string triads incorporating pull-offs. Be sure to follow the indicated picking directions. Bar 12 is the trickiest part of the piece to play and utilizes some Jason Becker–inspired six-string shapes. If you have problems with string muting or note separation, apply some light palm muting to the notes as they are picked. This is an effective way to improve note clarity. The final bar is based on the A harmonic minor scale (A B C E D F Gs) and incorporates economy picking when traveling from the fifth string to the fourth. </p> http://www.guitarworld.com/big-strokes-beginners-guide-sweeping#comments Avenged Sevenfold Guitar 101 Steve Vai Sweep Picking Tosin Abasi Yngwie Malmsteen News Features Lessons Fri, 25 Jul 2014 17:06:12 +0000 Charlie Griffiths http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17113 Learn Foundations of Jazz Guitar with '20 Essential Jazz Licks' DVD http://www.guitarworld.com/learn-foundations-jazz-guitar-20-essential-jazz-licks-dvd <!--paging_filter--><p>Master the skills and stylistic techniques of jazz guitar playing in this feature-filled lick pack DVD, <em><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/new-products/products/20-essential-jazz-licks/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=20JazzLicks">20 Essential Jazz Licks</a></em> ($14.95). </p> <p>You'll learn the foundations of jazz guitar, including jazz-blues licks, how to apply the modes over different types of chords, bossa nova guitar style, how to play chords and melody together, chromatic chord tones, chord and passing tones, jazz waltz, and how to move in and out of the pentatonic scale while soloing. </p> <p>Plus, the lessons cover a diverse range of techniques, including Django Reinhardt-style gypsy jazz runs, Wes Mongromery-style strummed octaves, Al Di Meola-style shred, and much, much more!</p> <p><strong>Learn to Play in the Style of:</strong></p> <p> • Al Di Meola<br /> • Wes Montgomery<br /> • Les Paul<br /> • Django Reinhardt<br /> • Jim Hall<br /> • John Scofield<br /> Pat Metheny</p> <p><strong><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/new-products/products/20-essential-jazz-licks/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=20JazzLicks">Head to the Guitar World Online Store now!</a></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/learn-foundations-jazz-guitar-20-essential-jazz-licks-dvd#comments News Features Fri, 25 Jul 2014 16:56:40 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17927 Metallica's Kirk Hammett Talks Recording "Super Heavy" Riff for Next Exodus Album http://www.guitarworld.com/metallicas-kirk-hammett-talks-recording-super-heavy-riff-next-exodus-album <!--paging_filter--><p>Tonight, Metallica's Kirk Hammett will jam with his pre-Metallica band, Exodus, at his "Fear FestEvil After Party" at the San Diego Comic-Con International.</p> <p>However, it turns out Hammett has gone one step further in terms of reconnecting with his old band.</p> <p>"I play a guitar solo on the new Exodus album," Hammett told <a href="http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/metallicas-kirk-hammett-on-recording-with-exodus-it-was-huge-20140725">Rolling Stone</a>.</p> <p>"It felt really casual, really cool — just like it did back in 1980 when we were all just hanging out back in the day," Hammett said. "Me, recording a solo on their album was a huge thing for me. Other than the Exodus demo that's been heard by a lot of people, it's the only time I ever recorded with Exodus. It was a huge thing for me."</p> <p>The song, "Salt in the Wound," will appear on an album that features Steve Souza, Exodus' vocalist from the late Eighties and early Nineties. Hammett calls it a "super heavy" riff. </p> <p>"I play a pretty cool solo, and then Gary [Holt] comes in and plays another solo, and you know what? I listened to that I thought, 'Wow, it's 1982 all over again and here we are, Gary and I are trying to cut each other's heads off with our guitar solos.' Nothing has changed much in the last 30 years. I love it. I love those guys."</p> <p>As for tonight's event in San Diego, Hammett added:</p> <p>"We're going to be playing 10 or 12 cover songs, but Rob [Trujillo] and I are adamant about not playing the usual cover songs that everyone else plays, like 'Communication Breakdown.' People are going to be expecting a bunch of heavy-metal cover songs. There's going to be some of that, but Rob and I, we like to stretch out a little bit so we'll be playing some different stuff, too. We're gonna be playing 'The Real Me' by the Who, which is a song both Rob and I love. And we're going to get funky and play [Kool and the Gang's] 'Jungle Boogie.'"</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/exodus">Exodus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/metallicas-kirk-hammett-talks-recording-super-heavy-riff-next-exodus-album#comments Exodus Kirk Hammett News Fri, 25 Jul 2014 16:33:30 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21942 Intervals, "Automaton" Dual-Guitar Playthrough Video — Exclusive http://www.guitarworld.com/intervals-automaton-dual-guitar-playthrough-video-exclusive <!--paging_filter--><p>Today, GuitarWorld.com presents the exclusive dual-guitar playthrough video for "Automaton" by Intervals.</p> <p>The video, which you can check out below, features guitarists Aaron Marshall and Lukas Guyader.</p> <p>The song is from the band's new album, <em>A Voice Within,</em> which is available <a href="https://www.districtlines.com/Intervals-US">at this location</a> and at <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/a-voice-within/id806210372">iTunes.</a></p> <p>Intervals will be on tour with Periphery and the Contortionist this fall! For more info — and everything Intervals related — follow the band on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/intervalsmusic">Facebook.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/A1bJ-yyu6bo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/intervals-automaton-dual-guitar-playthrough-video-exclusive#comments Intervals Videos News Fri, 25 Jul 2014 15:47:05 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21940 How Not to Build an Electric Guitar: Hazards of Electricity — Shocking Video http://www.guitarworld.com/how-not-build-electric-guitar-hazards-electricity-shocking-video <!--paging_filter--><p>As you know, people tend to make videos and post them to YouTube.</p> <p>In this case, a person named Mehdi Sadaghdar made a video — titled "How NOT to Build an Electric Guitar (The Hazards of Electricity)" — and posted it to YouTube. You can check it out below. When you do that, please let us know what you think in the comments or on Facebook!</p> <p>Sadaghdar added the following info to his clip:</p> <p>"Don't make your electric guitar this way! Just learn to be safe with electricity. For more design details, please visit <a href="http://www.electroboom.com/?p=336">electroboom.com</a>."</p> <p>You also can follow Sadaghdar on Facebook <a href="http://www.facebook.com/ElectroBOOM">HERE.</a></p> <p>Obviously, this video is meant to be a joke; not only that, it's meant to to teach people to respect electricity. Be sure to check out his sites for more info.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/TwIvUbOhcKE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/how-not-build-electric-guitar-hazards-electricity-shocking-video#comments ElectroBoom WTF Videos News Fri, 25 Jul 2014 15:14:43 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21939 Get 'AMPLIFi: The Guitar Amp, Reinvented' Free When You Download Guitar World at the Apple Newsstand http://www.guitarworld.com/get-amplifi-guitar-amp-reinvented-free-when-you-download-guitar-world-apple-newsstand <!--paging_filter--><p>Right now, you can get Line 6's <em>AMPLIFi: The Guitar Amp, Reinvented</em> for free when you download <em>Guitar World</em> at the <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-world-magazine/id469908707">Apple Newsstand.</a></p> <p>From <em>AMPLIFi: The Guitar Amp, Reinvented</em>:</p> <p>"We told you that we reinvented the experience you’ll have with your guitar amp, would you believe us? Well that’s what we set out to do, and we think it’s going to rock your world.</p> <p> "AMPLIFi is an entirely new breed of amp, with features you need to see and hear to believe. First of all, it delivers your tone with absolutely stellar sound quality. That’s because it has five speakers that combine to give you full-range tone. That means you’ll hear the highest of highs, the lowest of lows, and all that tone-soaked sweetness in between. It’s an incredibly pure way to hear your tone.</p> <p> "There’s also a free iOS app that lets you tweak tones from your iPhone or iPad. This ain’t no ordinary app though. It syncs to your music library, so when you play a song, the app automatically pulls up a guitar tone that matches the tone on the track—instantly."</p> <p>The special section also features <em>Guitar World</em>'s review of AMPLIFi, a complete list of specs and more.</p> <p>Remember that a one-year subscription to <em>Guitar World</em> is only $14.99 at the Newsstand! </p> <p><strong><em>Guitar World</em> is available for download <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-world-magazine/id469908707">right here.</a></strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-07-24%20at%204.50.04%20PM.png" width="620" height="672" alt="Screen Shot 2014-07-24 at 4.50.04 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/get-amplifi-guitar-amp-reinvented-free-when-you-download-guitar-world-apple-newsstand#comments Guitar World Line 6 News Thu, 24 Jul 2014 20:59:11 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21937 J.D. Simo: The Best Guitarist in Nashville? — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/jd-simo-best-guitarist-nashville-video <!--paging_filter--><p>J.D. Simo used to hold the highly coveted guitar spot in the Don Kelley Band in Nashville (top video), which has since been filled by the fleet-fingered Daniel Donato. </p> <p>Now Simo has branched out on his own (bottom video).</p> <p>Simo blends the best elements of blazing, tasteful, authoritative country guitar with several thousand spoonfuls of the best of Cream-era Eric Clapton — and a touch of Peter Green.</p> <p> Don't mind the headline; we're merely asking the question. Let us know what you think in the comments or on Facebook!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zdlNlOEPlFc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/5vdGAjaxjNI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jd-simo-best-guitarist-nashville-video#comments J.D. Simo Videos News Thu, 24 Jul 2014 20:01:04 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21935 Alter Bridge Premiere “Cry of Achilles” Music Video http://www.guitarworld.com/alter-bridge-premiere-cry-achilles-music-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Today, Alter Bridge teamed up with RevolverMag.com to premiere the official music video for "Cry of Achilles," a song off their latest album, <em>Fortress.</em> </p> <p>The animated clip was directed by SiLee films via Genero. Check it out below and let us know what you think in the comments or on Facebook!</p> <p>Alter Bridge will be touring the U.S. in October. Tour dates are listed <a href="http://www.revolvermag.com/news/alter-bridge-premiere-cool-new-animated-music-video-cry-of-achilles.html">here.</a></p> <p><iframe src="//www.youtube.com/embed/9M0xyPBb-Cc" height="365" width="620" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/alter-bridge">Alter Bridge</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/alter-bridge-premiere-cry-achilles-music-video#comments Alter Bridge Videos News Thu, 24 Jul 2014 18:21:00 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21932 Yes Release EPK for New Album, 'Heaven & Earth' — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/yes-release-epk-new-album-heaven-earth-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Yes have released a trailer that discusses their new album, <em>Heaven &amp; Earth</em>, which was released July 22 on Frontiers Records. </p> <p>In the video, which you can watch below, Yes discuss the inspiration and recording process behind <em>Heaven &amp; Earth</em>. You also can hear snippets of some of the album's tracks in the background. </p> <p><em>Heaven &amp; Earth</em> is the band's 21st studio album and their first since 2011's <em>Fly From Here</em>. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/2JMW29ONinM?list=PLeasUbhvyXXrFVsGArWAW_lZtLYqbVjiJ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/yes">Yes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/yes-release-epk-new-album-heaven-earth-video#comments Yes Videos News Thu, 24 Jul 2014 17:19:37 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21920 Betcha Can't Play This: Building Suspense with Andy Timmons — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-building-suspense-andy-timmons-video <!--paging_filter--><p> Here's a cool, suspenseful-sounding climbing run that’s based on the A minor pentatonic scale [A C D E G] and the A Dorian mode [A B C D E F s G].</p> <p> The concept is to ascend the neck on just two strings—in this case the G and D—using a uniform alternate picking pattern applied to shifting positions. </p> <p> What I’m essentially doing here is stringing together groups of 16th notes played in four-note shapes, or modules, and playing mostly two notes per string, with a couple of exceptions here and there wherein I stay on the G string and repeat the first two notes instead of crossing over to the D string.</p> <p> Notice how the contour of the line climbs and falls—kind of like a statistics graph chart—as I ascend a couple of positions, take a step back and then continue ascending. I find this kind of ‘up two, back one’ or ‘up three, back one’ contour more interesting and dramatic than just a straight ascent. It also enables you to prolong a lick by not running out of fretboard as quickly.</p> <p> One valuable thing about this approach, which I’ve worked on a lot, is that it helps you to learn scales up and down the neck, or horizontally, as opposed to just learning them vertically in separate positions. This way of playing and thinking can help you connect ‘blind spots’ and also enables you to maintain a consistent timbre by staying on the same strings throughout a run.</p> <p> As is almost always the case when you’re playing any kind of fast lick like this, it’s important to try to use both hands to mute the strings you’re not playing on to suppress any sympathetic vibrations, which create noise that distortion unfortunately amplifies. The bass strings are best muted by lightly resting the palm of the picking hand on the bridge saddles as you pick the higher strings, while the treble strings may be muted with the fleshy side of the fret-hand fingers.</p> <p>Equally important is that you resolve a lick smoothly. Notice here how I conclude the run with a bend and a hearty finger vibrato, which serves as the icing on the cake.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/n5p-i-jGc0s?list=PL198C391437BDEA9D" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/andy.jpg" width="620" height="205" alt="andy.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-timmons">Andy Timmons</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-building-suspense-andy-timmons-video#comments Andy Timmons Betcha Can't Play This February 2009 Videos Betcha Can't Play This News Lessons Magazine Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:42:40 +0000 Andy Timmons http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21923 Synth City: 10 Classic Guitar Synth Songs http://www.guitarworld.com/synth-city-10-classic-guitar-synth-songs <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's an ode to a piece of gadgetry rarely heralded on GuitarWorld.com, something that has brought a whole new world of sounds to guitarists' fingertips: the guitar synthesizer, aka the guitar synth.</p> <p>A guitar synth is a synth module whose input device is a guitar instead of a keyboard. To quote Norm Leet from Roland's UK website, "The most important part of a guitar synth system is the divided — or hexaphonic — pickup, which allows each string to be treated individually and for the attached synth to be able to detect finger vibrato and string bending." </p> <p>At first these systems were farily sizable, taking up so much space that they had to be housed in specially designed guitars that were part of the entire synth system. Today's synth systems, however, are tiny things that can fit into pretty much any guitar.</p> <p>Modern systems send the pitch information as MIDI to allow you to control external modules or keyboards. This also means that pitch information can be recorded by a MIDI sequencer. </p> <p>Countless artists have dipped their toes into the world of guitar synths -- everyone from Eric Clapton to Steve Hackett to Eric Johnson and Jeff Loomis — and some players made it a massive part of their sound, including Pat Metheny, Robert Fripp and Adrian Belew. Carlos Alomar even recorded an entire album for synth guitar — 1990's <em>Dream Generator</em>. </p> <p>Here are 10 classic songs that feature guitar synths. They demonstrate at least some of the many dreamy, bizarre sounds (or "soundscapes," as some people like to say in this context), these devices can create.</p> <p>10. <strong>"Stranger In a Strange Land," Iron Maiden, <em>Somewhere in Time</em>, 1986</strong></p> <p>After completing a masterful trilogy of albums with 1984's <em>Powerslave</em>, Iron Maiden took a turn for the progressive, unleashing a barrage of synth guitars on their listeners with their sixth studio album, <em>Somewhere in Time</em>. </p> <p>Easing their fans into the idea, the album's first single, "Wasted Years," was the only track on the album to feature no synthesizers at all. Its follow-up, "Stranger in a Strange Land" — the tale of an Arctic explorer frozen and lost in time — featured Adrian Smith and Dave Murray's guitars processed through synth effects, giving their dual guitar attack a distinctive larger-than-life chorus sound.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ry42FHfz67A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>09. <strong>"Never Make You Cry," Eric Clapton, <em>Behind the Sun</em>, 1985</strong></p> <p>By the mid-'80s, the guitar synth was officially a bandwagon, and even ol' Slowhand himself, Eric Clapton, hopped on — if only briefly.</p> <p>Clapton used a Roland guitar synth to record "Never Make You Cry" from his successful 1985 album, <em>Behind the Sun</em>, which was co-produced by Phil Collins of Genesis (a major guitar synth band, especially during the <em>Duke</em> tour). </p> <p>It's only fitting that Clapton experimented with cutting-edge technology on <em>Behind the Sun</em>, the album that kicked off a period of slick commercial releases by the venerable guitarist, including 1986's <em>August</em> and 1989's <em>Journeyman</em>. </p> <p>Before its release, he had been coasting along on a series of rootsy, laidback, Band- and J.J. Cale-inspired albums, from 1974's <em>461 Ocean Boulevard</em> to 1983's <em>Money and Cigarettes</em>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/E8nC6e4OI4w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>08. <strong>"Are You Going With Me?," Pat Metheny, <em>Offramp</em>, 1982</strong></p> <p>Over the decades, guitarist Pat Matheny has become closely associated with Roland guitar synths — especially the GR-300. But it all started with his 1982 album, <em>Offramp</em>, which featured his first documented use of the Roland GR-300.</p> <p>The album features the samba-based "Are You Going With Me?," which has since become a trademark Metheny song. Its lengthy, trancelike guitar solo is played on the Roland. Check it out below.</p> <p>Metheny still uses his GR-300, which has since been discontinued by the company.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/qY8z1w1JzMs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>07. <strong>"Who's to Blame," Jimmy Page, <em>Death Wish II,</em> 1982</strong></p> <p>In 1981, former Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page was asked to compose and record the <em>Death Wish II</em> soundtrack by his neighbor, director Michael Winner. </p> <p>It was just what Page needed — an opportunity to start creating music again, now that John Bonham (and with him, Led Zeppelin) was gone.</p> <p>Page mirrored the film's moodiness and edginess with a slew of new devices, including the Roland GR-505 guitar synth and TR-808 Rhythm Composer. The guitar synth can be heard on the entire soundtrack album, which was re-released on JimmyPage.com late last year in a "heavyweight vinyl package." Only 1,000 copies were made.</p> <p>Page continued experimenting with guitar synths and even appeared in several Roland print advertisements in the early to mid-'80s.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/jF8X0t-Fllw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>06. <strong>"Venus Isle," Eric Johnson, <em>Venus Isle</em>, 1996</strong></p> <p>Texas guitar great Eric Johnson started dabbling with guitar synths in the late '80s, but he didn't seriously record with them until his 1996 album, <em>Venus Isle</em>, an album full of what he calls "extra textures." </p> <p>Johnson uses a Roland guitar synth to create those textures on several tracks, including "Mountain," "Battle We Have Won," "When the Sun Meets the Sky" and the title track, which you can check out below.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/RypgfOTUNRI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>05. <strong>"Discipline," King Crimson, <em>Discipline</em>, 1981</strong></p> <p>If you were putting together a dream team of guitar synthists, you'd probably want King Crimson's Robert Fripp and Adrian Belew batting third and fourth in your lineup.</p> <p>The guitarists were among the most proficient guitar synth users of their generation, and Fripp continues to push the boundaries of synthetic sound with his mesmerizing Soundscapes shows.</p> <p>On King Crimson's <em>Discipline</em> album, Fripp and Belew made great and bountiful use of the Roland GR-300. On later albums, they moved into GR-700 territory.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_-dZNzXylVE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>04. <strong>"Racing in A," Steve Hackett, <em>Please Don't Touch,</em> 1978</strong></p> <p>The upbeat and catchy "Racing in A" is from Steve Hackett's <em>Please Don't Touch</em> album from 1978. </p> <p>It was the first solo album he recorded after leaving Genesis and his first album to feature his pioneering work with the Roland GR-500 guitar synth. </p> <p>"Racing in A" is a five-minute-long progressive-rock masterpiece that glides along for more than a minute with its almost-Yes-like rhythm before the vocals kick in (But Hackett keeps the spotlight squarely on the GR-500). </p> <p>As is the case with several other selections on this list, be sure to check out the entire <em>Please Don't Touch</em> album for more examples of Hackett's guitar synth work.</p> <p>By the way, that's Hackett's photo at the top of this page (and all the pages in this story). </p> <p><strong>NOTE: We've included a cool live performance of "Racing in A," plus (for the purists), the studio version.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/NDIj1plyU04" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wkxk4IAmWvs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>03. <strong>"Turbo Lover," Judas Priest, <em>Turbo</em>, 1986</strong></p> <p>"Turbos were all the rage, the in-thing," said Judas Priest bassist Ian Hill of the mid-1980s. "I'd even bought a vacuum cleaner because it had the word 'turbo' on it!"</p> <p>Perhaps this obsession with the super-charged is what lead the boys in Priest to experiment with guitar synthesizers on their 1986 classic "Turbo Lover." </p> <p>Taken from the album <em>Turbo</em> — easily among the most divisive albums for diehard fans — the song featured a whole new sonic palette for the band, with guitarists K.K. Downing and Glenn Tipton employing guitar synths and anything else they could get their hands on to give the song its distinctive futuristic, sci-fi feel.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/DdwuxoSHsSo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>02. <strong>"Don't Stand So Close to Me," The Police, <em>Zenyattà Mondatta</em>, 1980</strong></p> <p>"Don't Stand So Close to Me," which appeared on The Police's 1980 <em>Zenyattà Mondatta</em> album, features Andy Summers jamming away on an early Roland synth (He had a few models during the band's heyday, including a GR-707).</p> <p>"After Sting had put the vocals on 'Don't Stand So Close To Me,' we looked for something to lift the middle of the song," Summers said in 1981. "I came up with a guitar synthesizer. It was the first time we'd used it. I felt it worked really well."</p> <p>"I was sort of known for [guitar synth] then, and I was in a pretty high-profile band," Summer said in a more recent interview for Roland. "I was trying to fill out two hours with a trio, trying to keep it interesting all the way. The Roland synths blended in quite well."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/KNIZofPB8ZM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>01. <strong>"Ashes to Ashes," David Bowie, <em>Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps)</em>, 1980</strong></p> <p>It's Hammer time. Guitarist Chuck Hammer is an accomplished player and Emmy-nominated digital film composer who has recorded with Lou Reed, David Bowie and Guitarchitecture, to name just a few. </p> <p>But Hammer might be best known for his textural guitar synth work on "Ashes to Ashes" from Bowie's <em>Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps)</em> album. Hammer used a Roland GR-500 with an Eventide Harmonizer to get the synthetic string sound that can be heard in the video below. He actually used four multi-tracked guitar synths, each one playing opposing chord inversions. Be sure to check out the rest of album, which features a healthy dose of Hammer.</p> <p><em>Rolling Stone</em> put Hammer in the category of "musical pioneers" along with guys like Robert Fripp and Allan Holdsworth.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/CMThz7eQ6K0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eric-clapton">Eric Clapton</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/iron-maiden">Iron Maiden</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/judas-priest">Judas Priest</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eric-johnson">Eric Johnson</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/synth-city-10-classic-guitar-synth-songs#comments Adrian Belew Andy Summers David Bowie Iron Maiden Judas Priest King Crimson Robert Fripp Roland The Police Guitar World Lists News Features Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:21:33 +0000 Damian Fanelli, Josh Hart http://www.guitarworld.com/article/15794 Betcha Can't Play This: Bill Hudson's Lydian Cascade http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-bill-hudsons-lydian-cascade <!--paging_filter--><p>This is a scalar run based on the F Lydian mode [F G A B C D E], which is the fifth mode of C major. It incorporates several different lead-playing techniques and sounds cool when played over an F or F5 chord.</p> <p>I start off with an ascending F major triad [F A C] sweep across the top four strings, played in a rhythm of 16th-note triplets. </p> <p>Once I hit the high E string, I switch to legato phrasing, continuing the triplet rhythm and using all four fret-hand fingers, spread out wide, to perform "stacked" hammer-ons and pull-offs, capped off by a pick-hand tap with the middle finger.</p> <p> Once I come back down to the F note at the 13th fret, I skip over to the G string, where I play another legato sequence, this time incorporating a descending finger slide followed by two hammer-ons and three consecutive taps with the pick hand, using the first, second and fourth fingers.</p> <p> When performing this tapping sequence, I temporarily clamp the pick between my thumb and the top side of the fretboard. I then jump back up to the high E string and perform another ascending legato sequence, incorporating taps with the first and third fingers. </p> <p> After the last tapped note, I switch to straight alternate picking and play a descending sequence of cascading 16th notes and 16th-note triplets across the top four strings, followed by an ascending climb that finishes with a high bend. When practicing this lick, be mindful of the different rhythmic subdivisions used.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/9Btp369CEsg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-14%20at%201.08.38%20PM.png" width="620" height="379" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 1.08.38 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-bill-hudsons-lydian-cascade#comments Betcha Can't Play This Bill Hudson February 2011 Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:01:22 +0000 Bill Hudson http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21007 ESP LTD AS-1FM LB Alex Skolnick Signature Guitar — Review http://www.guitarworld.com/esp-ltd-1fm-lb-alex-skolnick-signature-guitar-review <!--paging_filter--><p>Alex Skolnick is among a few guitarists who have achieved multigenre success and acclaim, first as a wild young gun with the iconic metal thrash band Testament, and then as a tasteful and technically impressive jazzbo with the Alex Skolnick Trio. </p> <p>In recent years, he has become something of a vintage guitar enthusiast. So when ESP approached him about building a signature guitar with his name on it, Skolnick was skeptical that a modern company could create a guitar capable of matching the refined sounds of aged classics. </p> <p>ESP met this lofty challenge and, after rigorous testing by the man himself, is now offering the Alex Skolnick signature model. I tested the budget-friendly AS-1FM LB, which differs in some details to the high-end version but otherwise offers the same bold response, unblemished build quality and significant tonal versatility. </p> <p><strong>Features:</strong> Make no mistake, the Skolnick signature plank is absolutely a modern-built vintage guitar. Forget about weight-relieving contours and thin necks—this is a thick guitar. Elements of ESP’s Eclipse model are evident in the styling, but its design otherwise harkens back to the roots of great guitar building, demonstrating why it’s so hard to beat the tonal matchup of a thick, single-cut mahogany body topped with flamed maple and married to a beefy but oh-so-comfortable U-shaped mahogany neck. </p> <p>Contemporary performance-enhancing elements include a TonePros locking Tune-o-matic bridge and tailpiece, precise Grover tuners, Dunlop Straploks and extra-jumbo frets. The Seymour Duncan SH-4 (bridge) and SH-1 (neck) humbuckers have dedicated volume knobs but share the master tone pot, which can be pulled to coil split the neck pickup.</p> <p><strong>Performance:</strong> If handed the ESP Skolnick guitar while blindfolded, I might easily assume it to be a true vintage piece, not just for the Fifties-style neck shape and overall weight but also because of its immediacy and loud acoustic response, which brings to my mind the last few chord blasts from the Who’s “Won’t Get Fooled Again.” It delivers equally powerful spikes in the low and high mids rather than the centered-midrange focus that makes so many all-mahogany guitars sound similar. This opens the top end beyond mahogany’s typically mellow range, making it highly capable of screaming treble harmonics, pick chirps and serious punch. </p> <p>Both Duncan pickups are well matched to the Skolnick’s tone, offering enhanced lows and searing treble from the bridge bucker and clear but warm neutrality from the neck pickup. Single-coil tones from the tapped neck pickup are surprisingly snappy and sparkling, yet sound almost like a smooth semihollow when the tone is rolled off. </p> <p><strong>List Price:</strong> $1,356<br /> <strong>Manufacturer:</strong> The ESP Guitar Company, <a href="espguitars.com">espguitars.com</a></p> <p><strong>Cheat Sheet:</strong><br /> The chunky 24 3/4–inch-scale mahogany neck is deep but not wide in the hand, with enough mass to transfer rich blasts of volume and resonance into the loud-ringing mahogany body.</p> <p>Pulling the tone pot taps the neck pickup into single-coil mode, ideal for blues, classic rock and old-time jazz tonalities. </p> <p><strong>The Bottom Line:</strong> Mirroring Alex Skolnick’s vast musical range and evolved taste, the economical ESP’s LTD AS-1FM LB signature guitar is a true multi-genre instrument that’s capable of delivering world-class acoustic response, impressive volume and versatility. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3578119067001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3578119067001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/alex-skolnick">Alex Skolnick</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/esp-ltd-1fm-lb-alex-skolnick-signature-guitar-review#comments Alex Skolnick ESP July 2014 LTD Videos Electric Guitars News Gear Magazine Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:26:57 +0000 Eric Kirkland, Video by Paul Riario http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21311 Vox Night Train NT50H-G2 Head — Review http://www.guitarworld.com/vox-night-train-nt50h-g2-head-review <!--paging_filter--><p>It’s been about five years since Vox introduced the 15-watt Night Train amp head, a diminutive lunch-box-format mini amp that packs an impressive punch. </p> <p>Since then, Vox has expanded the Night Train line, most recently with its next-generation G2 Series, which includes the 50-watt Night Train NT50H-G2 head. </p> <p>An upgrade of the previous NT50H head, the Night Train NT50H-G2 is the most powerful, gig-worthy and versatile Vox Night Train amp to date, providing several new features like digital reverb, an XLR speaker-emulated DI jack and more performance-friendly functionality than its predecessor.</p> <p><strong>Features:</strong> The Night Train NT50H-G2 is a 50-watt head driven by two EL34 (power amp) and three 12AX7 tubes (preamp). The amp provides two fully independent channels—Bright and Girth—each with its own set of gain, treble, middle and bass controls, while the Girth channel also includes a volume control. The thick switch now functions on both channels (not just the Bright channel as on its predecessors), and the master section includes reverb, tone cut and master volume controls. The rear panel offers a single 16-ohm and a pair of eight-ohm speaker output jacks, mono send and return jacks for the effect loop, a 1/4-inch footswitch jack for the optional Vox VFS2A footswitch and a new XLR speaker-emulated DI output.</p> <p>The main differences between the Generation 2 and its previous incarnation include its glossy black finish (which replaces the previous flashy chrome-plated housing), digital reverb, XLR DI, thick switch for both channels, and the deletion of the tight and effect loop bypass switches.</p> <p><strong>Performance:</strong> One of the most impressive features of the original mini Night Train amp was its stellar clean tone. The NT50H-G2’s Bright channel delivers similarly excellent clean tones that feature the distinctive Vox chime and the original Night Train’s bite and satisfyingly full body, but with significantly more clean headroom and output. Overdrive crunch emerges when the gain control is above 12 o’clock, but the clean character remains even at full gain. The Girth channel produces ballsy high-gain distortion with a crisp, harmonically complex crushed-glass sparkle, and when the thick switch is engaged it goes into modern metal territory.</p> <p>The built-in digital reverb pairs quite nicely with both clean and high-gain distortion tones, sounding lush and deep on the former and providing a sense of space while retaining clarity on the latter. The thick switch is like a built-in overdrive pedal, providing a preset gain and midrange boost that expands the amp’s tonal palette and functions like additional channels. </p> <p><strong>List Price:</strong> $978.60<br /> <strong>Manufacturer:</strong> Vox Amplification, <a href="voxamps.com">voxamps.com</a></p> <p><strong>Cheat Sheet:</strong><br /> The thick switch functions on both channels, providing the Bright channel with added crunch and bite and the Girth channel with fat sustain and impressive gain boost.</p> <p>Built-in digital reverb provides the Bright channel with lush, deep textures and the Girth channel with an added sense of space, while retaining clarity.</p> <p><strong>The Bottom Line:</strong> The Vox Night Train NT50H-G2 is a compact but versatile amp head that provides a wide variety of tones and impressive volume output that’s ideal for live gigs and the studio alike. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3578120454001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3578120454001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/vox-night-train-nt50h-g2-head-review#comments July 2014 VOX Amps News Gear Magazine Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:18:10 +0000 Chris Gill, Video by Paul Riario http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21310