News http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/4/all/%22http%3A/soundcloud.com/guitarworld%22%3EGuitarWorld%3C/a%3E%3C/%3Ehttp%3A/%27http%3A/www.kickstarter.com/projects/www.guitartv.com/www.bailbondslosangeles.us/%3Ehttp%3A/%3Ehttp%3A/www.guitartv.com/www.facebook.com/www.kaiserchiefs.com en Pettyjohn Electronics Announces the PettyDrive Deluxe, a Studio-Grade Dual-Channel Analog Overdrive Pedal — Demo Video http://www.guitarworld.com/pettyjohn-announces-pettydrive-studio-grade-dual-channel-analog-overdrive-pedal-demo-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Pettyjohn Electronics has announced the PettyDrive Deluxe, a studio-grade dual-channel analog overdrive pedal that's engineered to deliver the powerful tone and dynamic feel of boutique tube amps pushed to the edge of breakup.</p> <p>The two fully independent channels are uniquely voiced to compliment each other and provide a wide range of sounds that range from thick, saturated American iron and growl to harmonically rich British-like chime. </p> <p>Only the highest-possible quality audiophile components are used to ensure the lowest noise, years of reliability and the most articulate tone possible. The PettyDrive is a serious tool for tone, built for the modern working guitarist in mind with a balance of advanced tone shaping features, general ease-of-use and tone that truly inspires.</p> <p><strong>MSRP:</strong> $399 (Deluxe, pictured), $317 (Standard)</p> <p><strong>For more information about the PettyDrive, check out the videos and specs below and visit <a href="http://pettyjohnelectronics.com/shop/pettydrive-pedal-deluxe/">pettyjohnelectronics.com.</a> Follow Pettyjohn Electronics on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pettyjohnelectronics?fref=ts&amp;ref=br_tf">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/pettyjohnelec">Twitter.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hBN0Yr0YSYs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Unique Features:</strong></p> <p>• Hot-Rodded Chrome Knobs<br /> • Professional Studio-Grade Discrete Opamp Input Buffer Chip<br /> • Channel 2 is equipped with all Burr-Brown chips for maximum clarity and transparency.<br /> • Silver Nameplate</p> <p><strong>Main Features:</strong></p> <p>• Two Fully Independent, Stackable Overdrive Circuits<br /> • Channel 1/2 Order Flip<br /> • Unique Parallel Effects Loop on Channel 2 for New Pedal Combinations<br /> • Available with Standard or Deluxe Chip Set<br /> • Built with Highest Possible Quality, Audiophile Components for Excellent Reliability and Performance<br /> • Symmetrical Control Layout<br /> • Always-On Studio Grade Input Buffer for Zero-Loss Bypassed Tone<br /> • Internal True-Bypass Switching<br /> • Internal Charge Pump for Extra High Headroom<br /> • Easily Powered by Standard Pedal Power 9v-15v DC (-)<br /> • Current Draw: 100 mA<br /> • Cool Red Jewel Light Indicators<br /> • Made in the USA<br /> • Channel 1: Chime Drive</p> <p>• A unique preamp circuit that can be configured as a Boost or Low Gain Drive<br /> • Tilt EQ tone knob with Orange Drop Filter Caps for Sweet Tone Shaping<br /> • 3-Way Clipping/Headroom Mini-Toggle<br /> • 3-Way Low Cut Mini-Toggle<br /> • Use Independently or Stack with Channel 2<br /> • Channel 2: Iron Drive</p> <p>• Low to Medium Gain Overdrive voiced for Thick, Smoothly Saturated Tone<br /> • Clean Mix Knob for Enhanced Feel and Dynamics<br /> • Parallel Effects Loop for Combining Other Pedals in Totally New Ways!!<br /> • 3-Way Clipping Mini-Toggle gives access to Asymmetrical Silicone, LED and MOSFET clipping sections, Chosen for Their Unique Tonal Qualities.<br /> • 3-Way Low Cut Mini-Toggle<br /> • High-Cut Tone Knob for Taming Harsh High Frequencies</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MR0lbLErIHw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/pettyjohn-announces-pettydrive-studio-grade-dual-channel-analog-overdrive-pedal-demo-video#comments PettyDrive Deluxe Pettyjohn Electronics Videos Effects News Gear Thu, 02 Jul 2015 18:22:41 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24865 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jerry Garcia’s Tiger and Rosebud: A Look at the Last Guitars He Played Onstage http://www.guitarworld.com/jerry-garcia-s-tiger-and-rosebud-look-last-guitars-he-played-onstage <!--paging_filter--><p>This weekend, the Grateful Dead will reunite for what is being billed as their final concerts. </p> <p>From July 3 through 5, guitarists Bob Weir, bassist Phil Lesh, and drummers Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart will reunite, along with Phish guitarist Trey Anastasio, for three shows at Chicago’s Soldier Field, the site of the band’s last concert with legendary Dead cofounder Jerry Garcia on July 9, 1995. </p> <p>With Grateful Dead’s last stand on the horizon, we thought this was a good time to celebrate the genius of Garcia, that band’s heart and soul. </p> <p>We could talk about Jerry’s playing, but instead we want to look at a pair of instruments that were near and dear to him: the Doug Irwin creations Tiger and Rosebud. These were the last two guitars Garcia played onstage, when he made what would be his final performance 20 years ago at Soldier Field.</p> <p><strong>Tiger (1979)</strong></p> <p>In 1972, Garcia began a long association with Irwin when he purchased a guitar called Eagle from the luthier. Garcia liked the guitar so much that he placed a custom order with Irwin. That guitar—dubbed Wolf, for the cartoon wolf sticker Garcia had originally applied below its bridge—was completed in 1973. When Garcia went to pick it up, he was so impressed by it that he placed an order for another custom guitar before leaving. </p> <p>Wolf became Garcia’s main instrument for the next four years, during which time he asked Irwin to make several modifications, including a buffered effect loop that let him wire his effect pedals to the guitar and bypass them with a switch. Eventually, though, Wolf was replaced by the guitar that Garcia had ordered back in 1973, when he’d received Wolf. That guitar was Tiger, which he received in July 1979.</p> <p>Garcia had given Irwin total freedom with Tiger, and he was not disappointed. The guitar was beautiful, with contrasting layers of tone woods, including cocobolo, maple and vermillion. Detailed pearl inlays on the body’s back and fretboard heightened the guitar’s status as a work of art. </p> <p>But Tiger was also a testament to Irwin’s technical innovation. The guitar’s coil-tap switches, five-position pickup selector, unity gain buffer, effect loop and other controls gave Garcia the freedom to craft a broad range of tones from the DiMarzio pickups, which included Dual Sound humbuckers in the middle and bridge positions and an SDS-1 in the neck (the Dual Sounds were replaced in 1982 with DiMarzio Super IIs).</p> <p>“There are 12 discrete possible voices that are all pretty different,” Garcia said of Tiger’s electronics. That tonal power is the reason Tiger was his main guitar for the next 11 years, a continuous run longer than that of any other guitar Garcia played.</p> <p><strong>Rosebud (1990)</strong></p> <p>Rosebud was Tiger’s replacement, and Garcia considered it to be Irwin’s masterpiece. While it bore similarities to Tiger, it featured a very different complement of electronic components. These included three humbuckers and a Roland GK-2 hexaphonic guitar synth pickup. Irwin mounted the GK-2’s MIDI and synth controls on the guitar for ease of use. The guitar also had hollow body cavities that reduced its weight by two pounds.</p> <p>Rosebud’s MIDI features were key to its versatility. Garcia had begun using guitar synths in the Eighties when he installed a Roland hexaphonic pickup on his Wolf guitar. In Rosebud, Garcia finally had one instrument with all the features he’d sought, allowing him to play a broad range of guitar tones as well as external sounds via MIDI.</p> <p>Rosebud was eventually succeeded by a replica of Tiger called Lightning Bolt, built by luthier Stephen Cripe. The guitar takes its name from the Grateful Dead lightning bolt, which adorns the cover plate below the bridge. But when it came time for the Dead to play Soldier Field in Chicago on July 9, 1995—Garcia’s last gig with the group—Lightning Bolt was in the shop for repairs. In its place was Rosebud. When the guitar began to suffer technical problems midway through the show, Garcia pulled out Tiger, playing his last notes onstage with the guitar that had been with him longer than any other instrument. </p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/grateful-dead">Grateful Dead</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/jerry-garcia-s-tiger-and-rosebud-look-last-guitars-he-played-onstage#comments Grateful Dead Jerry Garcia News Gear Thu, 02 Jul 2015 17:23:10 +0000 Christopher Scapelliti 24864 at http://www.guitarworld.com Stevie Ray Vaughan, Steve Vai, Yngwie Malmsteen, Slash and More Play "The Star-Spangled Banner" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/video-eight-solo-guitar-versions-star-spangled-banner <!--paging_filter--><p>Happy Independence Day, everyone!</p> <p>In honor of this week's holiday, I originally—and simply—wanted to share a grainy, vintage video of my all-time favorite guitarist, Stevie Ray Vaughan, performing "The Star-Spangled Banner" in ancient times. </p> <p>But then I noticed Steve Vai's particularly awesome version of the song ... and Yngwie Malmsteen's recent version ... and Eric Johnson's version—and then I found versions by Slash and Dave Mustaine ... and, of course, there's the granddaddy of them all, Jimi Hendrix at Woodstock.</p> <p>So I figured the more, the merrier! I could've kept on going (There's always Cliff Burton's version, and a commenter mentioned Neal Schon), but I think eight versions of the same song gets the point across, and this represents a nice mix of styles. </p> <p>Feel free to complain, compare and contrast! Enjoy your holiday! </p> <p><strong>TED NUGENT</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/NepNJO2nwU0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>STEVE VAI</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/tyCRSZjtYBI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>YNGWIE MALMSTEEN</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/anWu1WUwnSk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>SLASH</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/hKco_PvmUHw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>DAVE MUSTAINE</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/D8GHCpjlpwY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>ERIC JOHNSON</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/rCKCbdLxBoQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>STEVIE RAY VAUGHAN</strong> </p> <p>Note: This video needs to be edited!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/UnyvPZSvLW8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>JIMI HENDRIX</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sjzZh6-h9fM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Damian Fanelli is the online managing editor at Guitar World.</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ted-nugent">Ted Nugent</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/eric-johnson">Eric Johnson</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-eight-solo-guitar-versions-star-spangled-banner#comments Damian Fanelli Dave Mustaine Eric Johnson Jimi Hendrix Slash Steve Vai Stevie Ray Vaughan Ted Nugent Zakk Wylde Blogs News Thu, 02 Jul 2015 16:33:38 +0000 Damian Fanelli 11505 at http://www.guitarworld.com Smooth Jazz Version of Metallica's "Enter Sandman" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/smooth-jazz-version-metallicas-enter-sandman-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Today we bring you a very well-done smooth jazz version of Metallica's "Enter Sandman."</p> <p>The video, which was created and posted a few Februarys ago, is the handiwork of YouTube user <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzk0m5Ibzv-JDJHRrNNbGyw">Andy Rehfeldt</a>, who adds:</p> <p>"All instruments were arranged, played and recorded by me. YouTube doesn't pay me anything, so please <a href="https://www.paypal.com/us/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_flow&amp;SESSION=K-M1nwxZHPojwsaUfUBi-Zg9r50jyHEXutc4BmcnCOKAR60sjdbKnBmr2VO&amp;dispatch=5885d80a13c0db1f8e263663d3faee8de62a88b92df045c56447d40d60b23a7c">Buy me a Beer!</a></p> <p>Whether or not you buy Rehfeldt a drink, be sure to check out this video!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OBmM79YadYM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/smooth-jazz-version-metallicas-enter-sandman-video#comments Andy Rehfeldt Metallica Videos News Thu, 02 Jul 2015 16:09:46 +0000 Damian Fanelli 23631 at http://www.guitarworld.com Betcha Can't Play This: Ethan Brosh's Cascading Harmonics — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-cascading-harmonics-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In this new edition of Betcha Can't Play This, guitarist Ethan Brosh demonstrates his way of playing cascading harmonics.</p> <p>You'll notice this video is much longer than the typical Betcha Can't Play This video, since it goes into greater left- and right-hand detail—and into greater detail across the board. You'll also notice there's no tab included (Again, the longer video explains the fret positions and a whole lot more).</p> <p>For two other Betcha Can't Play This columns by Brosh, check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-guitarist-ethan-brosh-lays-down-challenge">Betcha Can't Play This: Guitarist Ethan Brosh Lays Down the Challenge</a> and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-diminished-madness-guitarist-ethan-brosh">Betcha Can't Play This: Diminished Madness with Guitarist Ethan Brosh</a>. You'll find a third one under RELATED CONTENT, below the photo.</p> <p><strong>For more about Brosh, visit <a href="http://ethanbrosh.com/">ethanbrosh.com</a>.</strong></p> <p>As always, good luck! We have more on the way!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/-VIGjUeI8uw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-cascading-harmonics-video#comments Betcha Can't Play This Ethan Brosh Videos Betcha Can't Play This News Lessons Thu, 02 Jul 2015 14:51:14 +0000 Guitar World Staff 22094 at http://www.guitarworld.com Betcha Can't Play This: Nita Strauss Solo Lick from Alice Cooper Tour http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-nita-strauss-solo-lick-alice-cooper-tour <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's a brand-new edition of Betcha Can't Play This featuring Alice Cooper guitarist Nita Strauss, who recently visited <em>Guitar World</em> HQ.</p> <p>Last time, she played a <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-nita-strauss-descending-legato-lick-video">Descending Legato Lick.</a> This time, she demonstrates a lick from her solo spotlight section from her shows with Cooper.</p> <p>As with the other <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-cascading-harmonics-video">new "Betcha Can't Play This" videos</a>, this is an expanded version of the usually brief "Betcha" videos on GuitarWorld.com.</p> <p>Also, note that there are no tabs, since Strauss explains key left- and right-hand techniques in the clip. </p> <p>For other recent Betcha Can't Play This columns, check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-guitarist-ethan-brosh-lays-down-challenge">Betcha Can't Play This: Guitarist Ethan Brosh Lays Down the Challenge</a> and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-diminished-madness-guitarist-ethan-brosh">Betcha Can't Play This: Diminished Madness with Guitarist Ethan Brosh</a>. </p> <p>As always, good luck! We have more on the way!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/f7W24uUt4Qo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/alice-cooper">Alice Cooper</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-nita-strauss-solo-lick-alice-cooper-tour#comments Alice Cooper Betcha Can't Play This Nita Strauss Videos News Lessons Thu, 02 Jul 2015 14:49:02 +0000 Guitar World Staff 22935 at http://www.guitarworld.com The 30 Best Albums of 2015 — So Far http://www.guitarworld.com/25-best-albums-2015-so-far <!--paging_filter--><p>Well, we've come to the halfway point of the year—and then some. </p> <p>It's time to look back at what has, so far, been a strong year for music, one in which the guitar has been pushed to new creative peaks on new albums in an array of genres. </p> <p>From Sleater-Kinney's nervy punk to JD McPherson's fierce roots rock to Periphery's always-impressive technical metal, the guitar has had quite a year already. And forget we have another six months of releases coming our way. You'll find those in our year-end-wrap-up stories in December.</p> <p>On that note, let's have a look at 30 of the year's best albums (so far). </p> <p><strong>NOTE: This list is presented in alphabetical order, not from worst to best or best to worst. So there's no order of preference. Enjoy!</strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/25-best-albums-2015-so-far#comments Charlie Thompson JD McPherson Pokey LaFarge Whitey Morgan year end 2015 News Features Thu, 02 Jul 2015 14:27:38 +0000 Guitar World Staff, Intro by Jackson Maxwell 24815 at http://www.guitarworld.com Acoustic Fingerstylists Andy McKee, Jon Gomm and Daryl Kellie Are Blazing a Daring Style of Percussive, Alternate-Tuned Shred http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-fingerstylists-andy-mckee-jon-gomm-daryl-kellie-style-percussive-alternate-tuned-shred <!--paging_filter--><p>In the Eighties, radical fingerstylists like Michael Hedges and Preston Reed pioneered an acoustic guitar style based on an alternate-tuned, percussion-heavy, new age–tinged sound. </p> <p>Kaki King explored it further in the new millennium beginning with her 2002 debut, <em>Everybody Loves You</em>.</p> <p>Some people have dubbed the style “progressive acoustic guitar,” while others prefer “modern fingerstyle.” </p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.jongomm.com/">Jon Gomm</a></strong>, one of its latest (and most popular) exponents, has even heard it referred to as banging, due to its practitioners’ tendency to rap, slap and knock their hands against the body of an acoustic guitar for percussive effect. </p> <p>Whatever you call it, there’s no doubt that this genre of acoustic guitar–based music is experiencing a major resurgence, thanks to the internet. In 2006, an unassuming-looking acoustic guitar teacher from Topeka, Kansas, named <strong><a href="http://www.andymckee.com/">Andy McKee</a></strong> uploaded to YouTube a handful of videos of himself playing some original and incredibly complex instrumental acoustic guitar compositions. </p> <p>Among the many techniques he employed in these performances was the use of unique alternate tunings, percussive knocks, two-handed tapping, over-the-fretboard playing, partial capos and natural and artificial harmonics. One video in particular, for a propulsive yet ethereal tune called “Drifting,” became one of YouTube’s first viral sensations—likely because it was both melodically appealing and visually stunning—and racked up millions of views on the then-new site. </p> <p>McKee has since become the figurehead of this style of playing, and scores of exceptionally talented guitarists have followed in his wake. Many of them, such as French-Canadian fingerstylist Antoine Dufour and British picker Mike Dawes, have recorded for the Wisconsin-based independent imprint CandyRat Records, which has become known as the leading purveyor of this music. </p> <p>Like McKee, Dufour and Dawes have found much success online, partly through elaborate solo reimaginings of full-band songs, in which they recreate rhythm, lead and vocal parts on acoustic guitar. (<a href="http://youtu.be/G1bzUaf_gvU">Dawes’ version of Gotye’s “Somebody That I Used to Know”</a> and <a href="http://youtu.be/gNPCI8y9avc">Dufour’s take on Imogen Heap’s “Hide and Seek”</a> have respectively registered 2.8 and 1.5 million YouTube views.) </p> <p>One of the newest and brightest entries in this realm is <strong><a href="http://www.darylkellie.com/">Daryl Kellie</a></strong> [pictured above], who created an online stir with an elegantly arranged version of Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody.” </p> <p>Then there is Britain’s Jon Gomm, who employs a dizzying combination of extended techniques that explore the outermost reaches of the acoustic guitar. Gomm tends to play in a fluid, eight-finger, above-the-fretboard manner, and seemingly manipulates every bit of his instrument, knocking his hand against the guitar’s top, back, sides and the fretboard, scratching his nails across bridge pins, twisting tuning pegs mid-song, and using an assortment of pickups and pedals. </p> <p>Like many of his peers, he has found his greatest success on YouTube, after his signature song, “Passionflower,” went viral in 2012.</p> <p>That the online world has proved to be a vital forum for these artists is understandable, given that there is an uncharacteristically prominent visual component to what they do. Each musician’s playing style is a marvel of not only creativity and ability but also coordination. “There’s a pretty interesting visual aspect to it, with all the wild techniques,” McKee says, “which is one of the reasons I think YouTube has been such a great arena to showcase the music.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Ddn4MGaS3N4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Guitar World</em> recently caught up individually with McKee, Gomm and Kellie to discuss their unique approaches to the acoustic guitar, as well as how each cultivated his impressive technique and style. Interestingly, they all share not only a love for Michael Hedges and his ilk but also a background in heavy-metal guitar. Says Gomm, “This new acoustic movement is almost like the unplugged version of shred.” </p> <p>Adds McKee, “I think what ties the two together is the complexity of the music. When all of us guys were first getting into the guitar and wanting to learn these different techniques, metal music was the place to go, because you had guitarists doing unbelievable things on their instruments. In a way, we’ve now transferred some of that over to the acoustic.”</p> <p><strong>Andy McKee</strong></p> <p>Perhaps no musician better represents the new progressive acoustic guitar movement than Andy McKee. The 34-year-old is so much the face of the scene that some call this form of music “ ‘Drifting’-style guitar,” a reference to his most famous composition, which has notched almost 50 million YouTube views since its 2006 debut.</p> <p>At the time, McKee was giving guitar lessons around his hometown of Topeka, Kansas, and recording for CandyRat. “[CandyRat label head] Rob Poland had this idea to shoot some performance videos for this new web site called YouTube,” he recalls. “He thought, Maybe we’ll get a few new fans. So we filmed, like, eight videos in one day and put them up.”</p> <hr /> <p>One of them, “Drifting,” went viral after being featured on YouTube’s homepage, and McKee became an online phenomenon. Soon, he was accepting offers to tour with Tommy Emmanuel and record with Josh Groban. </p> <p>“I went from teaching guitar in Kansas to playing guitar all over the planet,” he says. “Which is what I always wanted to do.”</p> <p>Amazingly, “Drifting” is the first song McKee ever wrote in the style with which he has become so closely associated. He composed it when he was 18, just two years after hearing the percussive-heavy instrumental acoustic guitar work of Preston Reed. </p> <p>“When I was 16, my cousin took me to see Preston at a guitar workshop here in Kansas,” he recalls. “At the time, I was playing electric guitar and was way into Pantera and Dream Theater and Iron Maiden. Then I saw Preston and he was doing all these amazing things with just one acoustic. It blew my mind. I wanted to figure out how he was able to cover melodic, harmonic and rhythmic ideas all at once.”</p> <p>McKee also cites fingerstylists like Don Ross, Billy McLaughlin and Michael Hedges as primary influences. Of all his acoustic contemporaries, McKee’s style most closely mirrors that of Hedges, in both his use of the guitar’s body to add percussive elements and his tendency to create lush, harmonically rich soundscapes using altered tunings and droning open strings. On occasion, he plays a double-neck harp guitar, an instrument popularized by, and closely associated with, Hedges.</p> <p>Since the success of “Drifting,” McKee has become a force in the acoustic world. A few years back he created a tour called Guitar Masters, a sort of G3 for the acoustic set. He also performs upward of 100 dates each year on his own, and sometimes in front of enormous audiences, such as when John Petrucci invited him to open some arena gigs for Dream Theater in the U.S., Mexico and the Far East. </p> <p>Equally thrilling, and even more unexpected, in 2012 McKee received an offer to join Prince for a series of shows in Australia. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/JsD6uEZsIsU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>“He watched some of my videos, and one in particular, ‘Rylynn,’ [See the video above] really stood out to him,” McKee says. “He invited me to Minneapolis to jam with him and his band, and from there he brought me out on tour. And it was amazing. I would start the shows with an acoustic arrangement of ‘Purple Rain,’ and during Prince’s set I’d sit in with him and his band and we’d do a medley of his songs.”</p> <p>As for his own music, McKee has released a series of well-received albums, including his most recent, 2010’s <em>Joyride</em>. He also continues to seek out new avenues to explore with his own music. </p> <p>To that end, his new Razor &amp; Tie–issued EP, <em>Mythmaker</em>, features not only his distinct acoustic guitar playing but also a solo piano piece and an electric guitar–and-synth composition. “I’m trying some different things out and letting inspiration take me wherever it does,” McKee says. “I don’t feel like I have to write the next amazing acoustic-guitar song necessarily—I just want to write the next amazing piece of music.” </p> <p><strong>Andy McKee Axology</strong><br /> <strong>GUITARS</strong> Michael Greenfield G4.2 (fanned fret), Michael Greenfield G2B and G4B.2 (fanned fret) baritone, Michael Greenfield HG1.2 harp guitar<br /> <strong>PICKUPS</strong> K&amp;K Pure Mini<br /> <strong>EFFECTS</strong> None<br /> <strong>CAPOS</strong> Shubb S1 and S5 Deluxe (banjo)<br /> <strong>PREAMP</strong> D-TAR Solstice </p> <hr /> <p><strong>Jon Gomm</strong></p> <p>A few years back, Leeds, England–based singer-songwriter Jon Gomm was just another guitarist—albeit one with a devastatingly advanced extended technique—trying to carve out a musical career by gigging extensively across Europe.</p> <p>Then his life was changed by a single word: in early 2012, British actor and comedian Stephen Fry sent out a tweet consisting of “Wow” and a link to a video of Gomm playing his song “Passionflower” live. </p> <p>Today, that video has close to 6 million views, and Gomm has become one of the most talked-about players in the acoustic guitar scene, with fans ranging from David Crosby to Steve Vai to Lamb of God’s Randy Blythe. </p> <p>One look at any of Gomm’s many videos makes it easy to see why his playing has caused such waves. On the main melody of “Passionflower,” for example, he builds an entrancing and hypnotic rhythm pattern by, among other things, scratching, banging and knocking the body of his guitar, a Lowden he calls Wilma. </p> <p>He sounds notes, including harp harmonics, exclusively using eight-finger tapping and with both hands positioned over the fretboard, and he continually reaches behind the headstock to retune his two highest strings as they ring out, to create a synth-like effect. To top it off, he sings over the whole thing.</p> <p>But despite the practically acrobatic nature of his playing, Gomm insists that his music is not a gimmick. “Every song has to have a meaning and connect with people emotionally,” says the 36-year-old guitarist, who actually composes his lyrics first and adds instrumentation afterward. “And you can’t make that connection just by doing gymnastics.” He adds that his favorite thing about playing in this style is that “there are no boundaries. I can think in any genre I want and try to put that into the music.”</p> <p>Gomm has played many genres over the years. Early on, he schooled himself using Steve Vai’s instructional book Shred Extravaganza and later studied at the Guitar Institute in London and earned a jazz degree from the Leeds College of Music. </p> <p>Thanks to his father’s career as a record and concert reviewer for a British newspaper, he received first-hand tips and pointers as a teenager from a famous players, including B.B. King, bluesman Walter Trout and the late steel-guitar virtuoso Bob Brozman, whom he credits with turning him onto the idea of using the guitar as a percussion instrument.</p> <p>“He would flip his guitar over and play drum solos on the back of the body, which was mind blowing to me,” Gomm says. “I also had a guitar teacher who was great at flamenco, and percussive playing is a big part of that style. So while a guy like Michael Hedges was huge for me, it was probably less for the percussion thing and more for his amazing way with altered tunings.”</p> <p>Altered tunings are a big part of Gomm’s style as well. For him, it serves as a way to further unleash his creativity. “I went to guitar school, and I learned a million scales,” he says. “But if I take the guitar and just twist a few pegs, all of a sudden everything is new. Sometimes the most creative thing you can do is tune your guitar wrong and let your ears, rather than your brain, do the work.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/nY7GnAq6Znw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Gomm also pushes his creative boundaries by using banjo pegs on his B and high E strings. The pegs can be set to toggle between two notes, allowing players to loosen and tighten a string’s tension to hit distinct pitches at will. </p> <p>The effect, as demonstrated by Gomm on songs like “Passionflower” and “Telepathy” (both of which appear on <em>Secrets Nobody Keeps</em>), is similar to bending a note on an electric guitar or playing with a synthesizer’s pitch wheel. On another composition, “Hey Child,” which features an overdrive-laced shredding solo, he uses the banjo pegs to create dive-bomb-like whammy-bar effects. </p> <p>“You can get really creative with them and bring your sound into so many different worlds,” Gomm says.</p> <p>Which, essentially, is how he feels about this acoustic guitar style. “There’s just so much you can do,” he says. “When I pick up an electric guitar now, it feels like a toy. The acoustic feels so much more powerful and free to me. It’s a beast of an instrument.”</p> <p><strong>Jon Gomm Axology</strong><br /> <strong>GUITAR</strong> Lowden O12-C (“Wilma”)<br /> <strong>PICKUPS</strong> Fishman Rare Earth Blend, Fishman Acoustic Matrix<br /> <strong>STRINGS</strong> Newtone signature super-heavy gauge (.014–.068)<br /> <strong>EFFECTS</strong> Three Boss PQ-3B Bass Parametric Equalizers, Boss OC-3 Super Octave, Boss DD-7 Digital Delay, Boss RV-5 Digital Reverb, Tech 21 SansAmp Character Series Blond, Line 6 Verbzilla, Line 6 Echo Park<br /> <strong>AMP</strong> Trace Elliot TA 200</p> <hr /> <p><strong>Daryl Kellie</strong></p> <p>In contrast to many of his contemporaries in the progressive fingerstyle world, Daryl Kellie’s musical proclivities and background lean more toward jazz and classical forms rather than the ethereal, percussive-heavy approach of Hedges and Reed. </p> <p>Which, in a sense, made Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” an ideal showcase for the 30-year-old’s abilities as a solo guitar arranger and performer. </p> <p>Kellie’s interpretation of the song is remarkably evocative of the original, with the guitarist employing complex chords, tapping, hammer-ons and plenty of harmonics (both natural and artificial), to great effect.</p> <p>Explains Kellie, “I’ve always come at this from a jazz-fingerstyle guitar angle, and the classical guitar thing is something I’ve always kept up as well. With that in mind, something like ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ is in a way similar to the kind of very dense arrangements you often find in classical guitar music. So arranging the song came pretty naturally to me.” </p> <p>In general, most any style of playing seems to come naturally to Kellie, who began his guitar life as a hard rock and metal fan. </p> <p>Growing up in Hampshire, England, he was an avowed acolyte of shredders like Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Eric Johnson and Eddie Van Halen (“I actually snapped the whammy bar off my Fender Squier trying to learn ‘Eruption,’ ” he says), and in his late teens he toured Britain as the lead guitarist in a “proggy, gothy” metal band named Season’s End. </p> <p>At the same time, he began cultivating an interest in jazz and classical solo guitar, studying the playing of everyone from Joe Pass to Lenny Breau (from whom he cultivated his skillful harp-harmonic technique) to Martin Taylor, who also served as his guitar teacher for a time. </p> <p>Then, in his early twenties, Kellie’s older brother gave him a copy of Andy McKee’s 2005 CandyRat effort, <em>Art of Motion</em>, which includes the songs “Drifting” and “Rylynn.” Recalls Kellie, “I thought it was amazing. I was already getting into the solo guitar thing through my jazz studies, so to see what Andy and some of the other CandyRat artists were doing, with the percussive element and all the interesting techniques, it felt like the next frontier. It was a style of guitar that seemed to be all encompassing, like you could go anywhere with it.”</p> <p>Kellie threw himself wholeheartedly into this new style, and in 2010 he self-released his first EP, <em>Don’t Expect Much</em> and <em>You Won’t Be Disappointed</em>. But it is his growing online catalog of inventively arranged cover songs that has been garnering him the most attention. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_fxbx0-O8kY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/exclusive-video-lesson-bohemian-rhapsody-tutorial-daryl-kellie">Exclusive Video Lesson: "Bohemian Rhapsody" Tutorial by Daryl Kellie</a></strong></p> <p>A quick search on YouTube brings up videos of Kellie tackling songs in a variety of genres, from rock classics like the Beatles’ “When I’m Sixty-Four” and the White Stripes’ “Seven Nation Army” to Tetris and Super Mario Bros video-game music and pop hits like Beyoncé’s “Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It),” which appears, along with “Bohemian Rhapsody” on Kellie’s new, self-released full-length effort, <em>Wintersong.</em> </p> <p>“I like the idea of doing something that’s unexpected,” he explains. “If it’s the first time someone’s been to one of my gigs, they might be like, ‘Is that freakin’ Beyoncé that he’s playing?’ And I also want to show that these are great songs and there’s some interesting things going on in them.”</p> <p>The success of his “Bohemian Rhapsody” arrangement has inspired Kellie to create more covers. “I’ve been considering some Nirvana arrangements, using lots of artificial harmonics and that type of thing,” he says. “And it’d be fun to do something really ‘outside,’ like a Megadeth song, perhaps.” </p> <p>Ultimately, his goal is to keep pushing his acoustic-guitar technique into new realms. “I want to continue to learn and try new things,” he says. “I would love to incorporate techniques like tapping and harp harmonics into jazz and jazz improvisation pieces, which I don’t feel is done very much, particularly on the acoustic. I think that would be really interesting.”</p> <p><strong>Daryl Kellie Axology</strong><br /> <strong>GUITARS</strong> Gibson L-50, Taylor 810 custom, 110ce and 310ce<br /> <strong>PICKUPS</strong> Fishman Rare Earth Blend<br /> <strong>EFFECTS</strong> Electro-Harmonix Holy Grail Reverb Nano, Boss RC-30 Loop Station<br /> <strong>PREAMP</strong> BBE Acoustimax </p> <p><em>Photo (Daryl Kellie): Alex Flahive</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-fingerstylists-andy-mckee-jon-gomm-daryl-kellie-style-percussive-alternate-tuned-shred#comments Acoustic Nation Andy McKee April 2014 Daryl Kellie GW Archive Jon Gromm News Interviews Interviews News Features Magazine Thu, 02 Jul 2015 14:24:13 +0000 Richard Bienstock 21084 at http://www.guitarworld.com July 4 Sale: Take 35 Percent Off Everything at the Guitar World Online Store! http://www.guitarworld.com/july-4-sale-take-35-percent-everything-guitar-world-online-store <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>Save big for Independence Day!</strong></p> <p>Take 35 percent off everything at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=35FOURTH15">Guitar World Online Store!</a></p> <p>Just be sure to use code <strong>35FOURTH15</strong> at checkout.</p> <p>Once again, that's <strong>35FOURTH15.</strong></p> <p><strong>This sale ends 11:59 p.m. Sunday, July 5, 2015, so <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=35FOURTH15">head to the Guitar World Online Store now!</a></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/july-4-sale-take-35-percent-everything-guitar-world-online-store#comments News Features Thu, 02 Jul 2015 14:14:24 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24862 at http://www.guitarworld.com Rututu App Brings Rare Stringed Instruments to Your iPad http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-rututu-app-brings-rare-stringed-instruments-your-ipad <!--paging_filter--><p>If you’ve ever wondered what it would be like to make music with rare stringed instruments from around the world, you’re in for a treat.</p> <p>A new app coming from EarthMoments promises to dish out sound samples meticulously collected from an impressive variety of unique instruments that most of us will never lay a hand on.</p> <p>The app, named Rututu, collects these samples into libraries and inserts them into loops. Users can drag and drop these loops into Rututu’s cool “playground” where you can manipulate them in a variety of ways. The loops automatically sync, so things never sound off, making this a fun way for both kids and adults to get into music-making.</p> <p>One of the coolest aspects is the ability to mesh ancient instrument sounds with very current musical styles. Sitar hip-hop anyone? Go for it!</p> <p>The app currently has a Kickstarter campaign running for its completion. You can check it out and <a href="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/kkarra/rututu-music-playground">join here>></a></p> <p>Check out some demos of the sounds and loops here:<br /> <iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/85320152&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> <p>The folks at EarthMoments have a track record for unique collections of high quality samples and a space to explore unique sounds and signatures from around the world. Their Zen Pad sample and loop libraries for Ableton are world-renowned. The EarthMoments team includes producers and engineers with over twenty years' experience, internationally acclaimed musicians and top industry professionals.

</p> <p>The EarthMoments studios utilize state-of-the-art analog and digital equipment combined with a passion for quality to produce the pristine quality samples.
EarthMoments is a division of EarthSync, a world music record label, and producer of award-winning audio and visual productions that brings together traditional and contemporary music in unique, high quality productions.</p> <p>Here’s a preview shot of Rututu:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Ipad%20app%20620.jpg" width="620" height="454" alt="Ipad app 620.jpg" /></p> <p>Find out more at <a href="http://rututuapp.earthmoments.com">rututuapp.earthmoments.com</a>
 and check out the gallery of some of the instruments they sampled below!</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-rututu-app-brings-rare-stringed-instruments-your-ipad#comments Acoustic Nation EarthMoments Gear Blogs Blogs News Thu, 02 Jul 2015 13:30:46 +0000 Acoustic Nation 24861 at http://www.guitarworld.com Get a Free 'Mastering Arpeggios Part 2' Lesson at the 'Guitar World Lessons' Store — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/get-free-mastering-arpeggios-part-2-lesson-guitar-world-lessons-store-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2,</em> an impressive compilation of nine instructional video lessons and tabs by Jimmy Brown, is now available through the Guitar World Lessons <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/EF57BA06-4DBD-DB72-635C-2E213E3A8004?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=arpeggios2">Webstore</a> and <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-world-lessons/id942720009?mt=8">App.</a></p> <p>It joins the ranks of the many lessons already available through <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/EF57BA06-4DBD-DB72-635C-2E213E3A8004?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=arpeggios2">Guitar World Lessons.</a></p> <p>To celebrate this new release, <em>Guitar World</em> is offering the first <em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2</em> lesson, "G Major Seven Arpeggios in Positions," as a FREE download! Note that all nine <em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2</em> lessons are available—as a package—for only $14.99.</p> <p>You can watch the trailer for <em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2</em> below.</p> <p><a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/EF57BA06-4DBD-DB72-635C-2E213E3A8004?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=arpeggios2">This new collection</a> is the 90-minute-plus follow-up to <em>Mastering Arpeggios</em>. It introduces and covers everything you need to know about the five essential seventh-chord arpeggio qualities: major seven, dominant seven, minor seven, minor-seven flat-five and diminished seven. </p> <p>Again focusing on the popular guitar key of G, your instructor, longtime GW Senior Music Editor Jimmy Brown, presents all possible fretboard positions and two-octave fingering patterns for these arpeggios and shows you ways to transpose them to any other key, either by progressing through the cycle of fourths/fifths or taking each shape you’ve learned and moving up or down the fretboard chromatically (in one-fret increments). </p> <p>Jimmy then shows you extended two-notes-per-string “monster” patterns that move diagonally up and across the neck, spanning three octaves. Also covered are the seven diatonic seventh-chord arpeggios that live in the key of G major, demonstrated in all positions, and interval patterns of fourths, fifths, sixths and sevenths applied to the arpeggios. The lesson product concludes with an entertaining performance of an original interpretation and tab arrangement of “Presto” from “Sonata 1 For Solo Violin” by Johann Sebastian Bach, which serves as an effective and musically satisfying practice piece.</p> <p><em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2</em> includes:</p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 1 (Part 1): G Major Seven Arpeggios in Positions</strong> his first part of Chapter 1 begins with a quick review of the G major scale and G major triad arpeggio, played up and down one string for purposes of illustration. Jimmy then demonstrates all of the fixed-position two-octave fingerings for a G major seven arpeggio between fourth and seventh positions, along the way showing you a bunch of useful “alternate picking shred cells” and a neat application for improvisation—playing Gmaj7 over an E bass note or Em or Em7 chord to create a cool, jazzy Em9 sound. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 1 (Part 2): G Major Seven Arpeggios in Positions (continued)</strong> This conclusion of Chapter 1 demonstrates all the remaining possible fretboard positions and fingerings for playing G major-seven arpeggios across two octaves, with additional “speed picking cells” presented along the way that reside within the larger patterns. Also covered are patterns in first and second position that combine open strings with fretted notes. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 2: G Dominant Seven and Minor Seven Arpeggios in Positions</strong> Using all the two-octave G major-seven shapes shown in the previous segment, this chapter shows you how to convert them to G dominant- and minor-seven shapes, by “flatting” the seventh and third. Necessary fingering adjustments are covered, as the shapes morph from major-seven to dominant-seven to minor-seven. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/L8Y3aXxGiwQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 3: G Minor Seven Flat-five and Diminished Seven Arpeggios in Positions</strong> Working off of all the G minor-seven shapes presented in the previous chapter, this lesson shows you how to go from minor-seven to minor-seven flat-five to fully diminished-seven, including any necessary fingering adjustments that need to be made to accommodate the lowering of certain notes by one fret. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 4: The Circle of Fifths/Fourths and Practicing Drills</strong> Before continuing with extended arpeggio shapes and applications, this chapter presents a concise review of what is called the “circle of fifths,” or “circle of fourths,” and demonstrates a couple of easy ways to visually remember the cycle on the fretboard and ways to use it to practice all arpeggio shapes learned thus far in all 12 keys. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 5: Two-notes-per-string Patterns</strong> This chapter shows you how to take the five seventh-chord arpeggio qualities covered in the previous chapters and expand them into extended “monster” runs that span three octaves by moving diagonally across the fretboard using two notes per string with quick position shifts. Different “launching points” are presented, starting on the root, third, fifth and seventh of any given arpeggio. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 6: Diatonic Seventh-chord Arpeggios in G</strong> This lesson offers some practical, useful music theory and technical studies by presenting a set of seven different seventh-chord arpeggios that live within the key of G major, consisting of Gmaj7, Am7, Bm7, Cmaj7, D7, Em7 and F#m7b5. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 7: Interval Patterns</strong> This chapter takes the two-octave shapes for the seven diatonic seventh-chord arpeggios from the previous lesson and shows you how to “scramble” the notes by playing them in melodic patterns of fourth and fifth intervals that have you continually crossing strings, which makes for a great alternate picking workout, as well as some neat sounds. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 8: “Presto,” from “Sonata 1 For Solo Violin” by Johann Sebastian Bach</strong> This final chapter presents a performance of Jimmy’s own guitar adaptation and fingering arrangement of a beautiful violin piece by legendary classical composer Johann Sebastian Bach called “Presto,” from “Sonata 1 for Solo Violin.” </p> <p><strong>For more information, visit the Guitar World Lessons <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/EF57BA06-4DBD-DB72-635C-2E213E3A8004?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=arpeggios2">Webstore</a> and download the <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-world-lessons/id942720009?mt=8">App</a> now.</strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-brown">Jimmy Brown</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/get-free-mastering-arpeggios-part-2-lesson-guitar-world-lessons-store-video#comments arpeggios Guitar World Lessons Jimmy Brown Videos News Features Lessons Wed, 01 Jul 2015 20:54:39 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24859 at http://www.guitarworld.com "Thrill" to the Sounds of Japanese Girl Band Band-Maid — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/thrill-sounds-japanese-girl-band-band-maid-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Those of us who keep a fairly close eye on social-media trends (and stuff like that) can't help but notice that a new girl band from Japan has been showing up more and more. And for good reason.</p> <p>They're called Band-Maid, they rock pretty convincingly—and play their own instruments (unlike at least one other Japanese girl band of note).</p> <p>And they dress up as maids! </p> <p>Below, you can check out the music video to one of their 2014 tracks, "Thrill," which is available on an EP called <em>Ai to Jounetsu no Matadore.</em> It was released last August.</p> <p>To pick up some of their music, including "Thrill," <a href="http://www.cdjapan.co.jp/product/DAKPPRC-10">head here.</a></p> <p><strong>For more about Band-Maid, follow them on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/bandmaid?_rdr">Facebook.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Uds7g3M-4lQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/thrill-sounds-japanese-girl-band-band-maid-video#comments Band-Maid Videos News Wed, 01 Jul 2015 19:19:51 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24283 at http://www.guitarworld.com Joe Satriani Premieres New Song, "If There Is No Heaven" http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-premieres-new-song-if-there-no-heaven <!--paging_filter--><p>Check out a brand-new Joe Satriani song, "If There Is No Heaven," below.</p> <p>The song is from Satriani's forthcoming album, and 15th solo disc, <em>Shockwave Supernova.</em></p> <p>Though the song is an instrumental, Satch says there is an emotional subtext embedded in the music.</p> <p>"This is about doubting, doubting everything, including life after death," he told <a href="http://www.wsj.com/">WSJ.com.</a> "The intro and outro are soundtracks to feeling lost and adrift. The body of the song reflects how one would struggle to accept such an idea that we are all here; for just a short time and then gone."</p> <p><strong>For more about Satriani and the new album, visit <a href="http://www.satriani.com/splash/">satriani.com.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5t8yn4WdALw" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="365" width="620"></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-premieres-new-song-if-there-no-heaven#comments Joe Satriani News Wed, 01 Jul 2015 18:38:42 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24858 at http://www.guitarworld.com The Top 10 Wedding Songs http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-wedding-songs <!--paging_filter--><p>As a member of a wedding band, you learn some valuable lessons, such as <em>it's not always about you</em>. </p> <p>You're on that stage to help fulfill the bride's ideal of a fairy-tale wedding. That means you'll likely be playing some pretty cheesy stuff. </p> <p>But that's all right. The job is to keep the guests on the dance floor and singing along to every tune. </p> <p>With the following set list in hand, everyone will live happily ever after—or at least until the bar runs dry.<br /> <br /><br /> <strong>10. Kool &amp; the Gang, "Celebration"</strong></p> <p>This Toyotathon jingle is insipidly gleeful. But if there's "a party going on right here"—like, say, at a wedding reception—chances are good you'll be asked to perform it. Cheer up, though, it could be worse—the bride's mother could demand "The Chicken Dance."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3GwjfUFyY6M" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>09. The Carpenters, "We've Only Just Begun"</strong></p> <p>This lovely ballad actually started out as a jingle for a bank commercial before Richard Carpenter contacted songwriter Paul Williams and asked him to flesh it out for a single. With lines specifically about weddings ("white lace and promises," etc.), it's now money in the bank for wedding bands. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/__VQX2Xn7tI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>08. Bonnie Tyler, "Total Eclipse of the Heart"</strong></p> <p>Many brides want their wedding day to be an epic pageant, flawless in every detail. Leave it to Jim Steinman, the man behind Meat Loaf, to capture that operatic quality in a power ballad. Forever immortalized in the reception scene of <em>Old School</em>, nothing says "I fuckin' need you more than ever" like this Tyler hit. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/lcOxhH8N3Bo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>07. The Psychedelic Furs, "Pretty in Pink"</strong></p> <p>Ever since John Hughes borrowed this song for his coming-of-age flick of the same name, most people associate it with romance and assume the chorus ("Pretty in pink, isn't she?") is literal. Which makes it fun for wedding bands, considering that the lyrics are actually about a party girl and "pink" is a metaphor for "nude." </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pqmTMiIMG74" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>06. KC &amp; the Sunshine Band, "Shake Your Booty"</strong></p> <p>It hasn't been cool to like KC &amp; the Sunshine Band since... well... <em>ever</em>. But break into this tune and every single wedding guest will bust out of the disco closet and onto the dance floor. Careful with that tempo, though- today's average booty is quite a bit larger than it was in KC's heyday. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xWxLc555sgU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>05. Outkast, "Hey Ya"</strong></p> <p>Keep those bodies shake, shake, shakin' like a Polaroid picture with this four-chord wonder. And wear 'em out with a protracted version of the call-and-response section: "Don't make me break this thing down for nothing, ladies!" </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PWgvGjAhvIw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>04. Aerosmith, "I Don't Want to Miss a Thing"</strong></p> <p>This Diane Warren-penned power ballad, from 1998, was Steven Tyler and crew's biggest hit in years. It's not exactly rock 'n' roll, but if you're playing a conservative affair, it might be the closest you can get. Hey, if badass Joe Perry can suck it up night after night, so can you. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JkK8g6FMEXE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>03. The Rolling Stones, "Wild Horses"</strong></p> <p>The authors of "Under My Thumb," "Stupid Girl" and "Bitch" probably aren't an obvious quarry of wedding material. But you can always give this one a shot: Mick and Keef's rare display of vulnerability will switch on the waterworks every time. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yE2B_kCfvss" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>02. Grand Funk Railroad, "Some Kind of Wonderful"</strong></p> <p>A man professing his love for his woman can be a truly touching thing. Or it can be totally embarrassing. You can make it a manly proposition with this rousing R&amp;B tune by Mark Farner and Grand Funk. Unlike Farner, however, you might want to leave your shirt on and forgo the headband. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/O7B5jXYRy3Q" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>01. Neil Diamond, "Sweet Caroline"</strong></p> <p>Neil Diamond rules. He wrote hits for the Monkees, perfected the sideburn comb-over, and, if you were born 40 or so years, probably soundtracked your conception—if not fathered you himself. And then there's this anthem, a slam dunk for any wedding band. "Sweet Caroline" will have guests actually believing that "good times never seemed so good." Well, "Sweet Caroline" and an open bar, anyway. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NsLyI1_R01M" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/aerosmith">Aerosmith</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-wedding-songs#comments Aerosmith GO June 2005 Guitar One Guitar World Lists News Features Wed, 01 Jul 2015 15:35:39 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24603 at http://www.guitarworld.com Meet ACPAD, the First Wireless MIDI Controller for Acoustic Guitar — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-acpad-first-wireless-midi-controller-acoustic-guitar-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Below, behold a video—published to YouTube June 3—that shows the ACPAD in action.</p> <p>The ACPAD is being billed as the world's first MIDI controller for acoustic guitars.</p> <p>And while we don't yet know a whole heck of a lot about this device, we know it's coming to Kickstarter soon. </p> <p>Here are some of its finer points, as finely pointed out by the makers of ACPAD:</p> <p>• It supports both Wireless MIDI and USB MIDI connections.<br /> • It is velocity sensitive with accurate triggering and no noticeable latency.<br /> • With its own internal rechargeable battery, ACPAD gives you complete freedom. For long studio sessions, it runs perfectly using USB.<br /> • With presets of two live loopers, effects and sounds using Ableton Live, you get unlimited sound effects.<br /> • Choose from wood grain, black and white designs. Customizable versions coming soon.</p> <p>For further reading, here's a bit of background from the <a href="http://acpad.com/">official ACPAD website:</a></p> <p>ACPAD was born out of necessity. A need for flexibility, live stability and creative freedom. Berlin musician Robin Sukroso needed a piece of equipment that would allow him to bring his love of electronic and acoustic music together; that could withstand playing every night, that was easy and intuitive to play, and that could let him explore an entirely new world of sound.</p> <p>The ACPAD began as an idea and a desire. After three years of research, development and a lot of trials, the ACPAD is finally ready for the world. Sukroso, along with his partners at IIT Bombay, created a new 2-mm thick interface having no wires or screws, a stick-on wireless MIDI controller that is powered by a rechargeable battery. ACPAD is a device with true portability and tonal versatility.</p> <p>The ACPAD allows players to blend both acoustic and electronic sounds with FX and assignable tap pads. Create whatever sound you want with ACPAD. It is strong, flexible and offers a new world of creativity you have been looking for. ACPAD is an electronic orchestra in your hands!</p> <p>For more information, visit <a href="http://acpad.com/">acpad.com</a> and watch the video below. Stay tuned for more details as we get them!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eJFfnTkyj-g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-acpad-first-wireless-midi-controller-acoustic-guitar-video#comments Acoustic Nation ACPAD MIDI News Videos Blogs Videos News Wed, 01 Jul 2015 14:28:08 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24630 at http://www.guitarworld.com