News http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/4/0 en Review: Jericho Avenger Long-Scale Electric Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/review-jericho-avenger-long-scale-electric-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p>Long-scale electric guitars are a logical choice for modern guitarists who crave more depth, resonance and sonic authority yet prefer to avoid the hand-cramping neck width of most seven- and eight-string axes. </p> <p>Studio engineers’ routinely utilize them to thicken anemic tracks, but onstage applications have understandably been limited by their typically larger bodies and equally unwieldy 28- to 30-inch-scale necks. Jericho Guitars is a relative newcomer that hopes to change this paradigm with its sleek and stylized Avenger. </p> <p>The Avenger is a 27-inch-scale guitar that looks and feels like any standard-scale guitar and is designed to complement the tonal curve of today’s high-gain super amps. </p> <p><strong>FEATURES </strong></p> <p>According to the old joke, guitar players are willing to try anything new, as long as it’s identical to what they’re currently using. Thus, with some careful design and construction choices, Jericho made the Avenger’s length and body size identical to those of any standard-scale guitar and kept its weight in the six-and-a-half-pound range. Specially selected mahogany from a reserve stock in British Columbia ensures that the body delivers the Avenger’s full range of tones, and the short headstock allows for the extra fretboard length without extending the instrument’s dimensions. </p> <p>In order for the Jericho’s neck to produce clear notes and still withstand the tension exerted by massive strings, Jericho affixes flat-sawn maple to the sides of a rock-solid quarter-sawn maple core and tops the neck with an ebony fretboard. The guitar’s hardware, likewise, is selected for musicality and stability. It includes a Graph Tech TUSQ XL nut, Grover tuners and a TonePros Tune-o-matic bridge. The pickups are Seymour Duncan’s Full Shred humbuckers, which are mated to a three-way switch and master controls for volume and tone. Although not expressly built for a baritone guitar, the pickups’ overwound gain, magnet strength and EQ curve are an ideal match for the Avenger’s weighty voice. </p> <p><strong>PERFORMANCE</strong> </p> <p>There’s no rule that says you have to string the Avenger with baritone-sized wires. In fact, Jericho encourages players to experiment with string gauge. I ultimately preferred it set up heavy on the lows and light on top. The Avenger is smooth, fast and highly responsive, with the conventional feel of low action paired to a C-shaped neck. When plugged into a high-gain amp channel—preferably one with enough power and damping to deliver the Avenger’s full spectrum of low-end tone—the Avenger delivers extreme levels of low-end thrust, yet it remains musical and expressive. The Full Shred pickups are less focused in the lows, so there’s no need to worry about blowing out your speakers. The highs, however, will scream off the ebony fretboard with tone that is fully developed and three-dimensional, unlike guitars with a higher resonant peak. </p> <p><strong>LIST PRICE</strong> $1,249 </p> <p><strong>MANUFACTURER</strong> Jericho Guitars, <a href="http://www.jerichoguitars.com/">jerichoguitars.com</a></p> <p><strong>Cheat Sheet</strong></p> <p>Flat-sawn sides and a quarter-sawn core ensure that the maple neck is stable enough to handle the strings’ higher tension, yet has enough bounce to produce organic tones. </p> <p>Seymour Duncan Full Shred humbuckers deliver their famously hot highs and control the lows without compromising clarity and dynamics. </p> <p><strong>THE BOTTOM LINE </strong></p> <p>Jericho’s 27-inch scale Avenger vastly expands the guitar’s range while maintaining the physical dimensions, feel and weight of more commonly scaled guitars, opening a new door into the realm of deep-toned musical expression. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2979990770001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2979990770001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-jericho-avenger-long-scale-electric-guitar#comments February 2014 Jericho Guitars Electric Guitars News Gear Magazine Mon, 21 Apr 2014 12:39:11 +0000 Eric Kirkland, Video by Paul Riario http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20103 The 50 Heaviest Rock Songs Before Black Sabbath — Songs 50 to 41 http://www.guitarworld.com/50-heaviest-songs-black-sabbath-50-41 <!--paging_filter--><p>The origin of heavy metal is a very fuzzy thing, but most historians and fans can agree that Black Sabbath’s eponymous 1970 debut was the first true heavy metal album. </p> <p>Its thunderous drums, sinister riffs and downright evil lyrics left little to be debated. But what we wanted to know was this: What was the heaviest song <em>before</em> Black Sabbath?</p> <p>We ranked the the following songs based on a variety of factors: distortion/fuzz, playing speed, "darkness," volume, shock value and, most importantly, the song had to have been released before mid-February 1970, when <em>Black Sabbath</em> was unleashed unto the universe. </p> <p>And sure, it would've been easy to list all the songs on the first two Led Zeppelin albums and call it a day, but we wanted to go deeper than that. We dug deep to find some hidden gems from the era of peace and love. </p> <p>NOTE: We will be presenting these songs in installments. Check out the first list of 10 below; we'll post the next 10 songs later this week! Until then, enjoy!</p> <p><strong>50. The Troggs, "Wild Thing" (1966)</strong></p> <p>This bit of caveman rock, written by Chip Taylor (actor Jon Voight’s brother), is the only song on this list to feature an ocarina solo.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Hce74cEAAaE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> </p> <hr /> <p><strong>49. The Yardbirds, “Happenings Ten Years Time Ago” (1966)</strong></p> <p>Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page teamed up on this elaborate, psychodramatic masterpiece to contribute slashing rhythm parts, zig-zagging lead lines and a witty imitation of a police car’s siren.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/0AF8yMx9SvE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>48. The Who, "My Generation" (1965)</strong></p> <p>Studio version not heavy enough for you? There’s always the explosive — literally — <em>Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour</em> version from 1967. Pete Townshend’s ears are still smarting from it. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/7xZOrWK6d4g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>47. Coven, "Pact With Lucifer" (1969)</strong></p> <p>Jinx Dawson was Doro before there was a Doro. Coven makes the list for their occult themes and evil-sounding song titles like “Pact With Lucifer,” “Choke, Thirst, Die” and “Dignitaries of Hell,” but ultimately the music just wasn’t that heavy. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/iK7-H-DX5Uw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>46. The Guess Who, “American Woman” (1970)</strong></p> <p>After luring in listeners with a sweet acoustic blues intro, Burton Cummings, Randy Bachman &amp; Co. hit the stompboxes and showed the world what Led Zeppelin would’ve sounded like if they were Canadian. This one came out in January 1970 — mere weeks before Black Sabbath would redefine heavy. </p> <object width="620" height="365"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/gkqfpkTTy2w?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" /><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/gkqfpkTTy2w?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always"></embed></object> <hr /> <p><strong>45. Pink Floyd, "Interstellar Overdrive" (1967)</strong></p> <p>The song that launched a thousand space-rock bands. </p> <object width="620" height="365"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/2iA7wdO00VI?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" /><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/2iA7wdO00VI?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always"></embed></object><hr /> <p><strong>44. The Count Five, "Psychotic Reaction" (1966)</strong></p> <p>The Count Five’s only hit single was this blatantly Yardbirds-inspired gem from 1966. The band, who were all between the ages of 17 and 19, split up a year later to pursue college degrees. Remember, kids, there’s nothing heavier than an education!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wseRJQdojIg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>43. The Wailers, “Out of Our Tree” (1966)</strong></p> <p>A fun, fuzzed-out offering from the Tacoma-based Wailers, one of the first American garage rock bands. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/LIAs-EBPNek" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>42. Sam Gopal, "Season of the Witch" (1969)</strong></p> <p>Sam Gopal was the first percussionist to bring tabla drums back from India and incorporate them into rock music. However, his 1969 album, <em>Escalator</em>, was a landmark in rock music for another reason: It featured, on vocals and guitar, a young Ian Kilmister. You may know him better as “Lemmy.” </p> <object width="620" height="365"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/0KGgOFFQxnY?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" /><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/0KGgOFFQxnY?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always"></embed></object><hr /> <p><strong>41. Cream, "Sunshine of Your Love" (1967)</strong></p> <p>This song was written by Cream bassist Jack Bruce in a burst of inspiration after watching a Jimi Hendrix concert. Hendrix would cover the song a year later, adding some burning guitar licks in place of the lyrics.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/RhzF2K2b7Xo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/cream">Cream</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/50-heaviest-songs-black-sabbath-50-41#comments 50 Heaviest Songs Before Black Sabbath Cream The Yardbirds Guitar World Lists News Features Mon, 21 Apr 2014 12:37:28 +0000 Damian Fanelli, Josh Hart http://www.guitarworld.com/article/10950 Thirty Guitar Legends — Including Eddie Van Halen, Dimebag Darrell and Jeff Beck — Choose the Song They'd Most Want to Be Remembered By, Part 1 http://www.guitarworld.com/thirty-guitar-legends-including-eddie-van-halen-dimebag-darrell-and-jeff-beck-choose-song-theyd-most-want-be-remembered-part-1 <!--paging_filter--><p><em>From the GW Archive: This feature originally appeared in the May 2002 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. The story has a "time capsule" theme: We asked several veteran guitarists to choose the one song they'd most want to be remembered by after many years. Here we are, 11 and a half years later (Does that qualify as "many"?), opening the time capsule to examine its contents! Enjoy!</em> </p> <p>A few decades ago, NASA sent a probe called <em>Voyager</em> straight out of the solar system. Its mission: to make contact with alien intelligence. </p> <p>The capsule was crammed with artifacts — including greetings in more than 50 languages — intended to convey information about Earth's cultures. But just in case those items failed to communicate across language barriers, NASA also included a recording of Chuck Berry performing his rock and roll masterpiece "Johnny B. Goode." </p> <p>For a while after <em>Voyager's</em> launch, the joke around the agency was that a reply had been received from an alien civilization: "Forget the scientific shit," went the message. "Send more rock and roll!" But what songs should be sent? We at <em>Guitar World</em> decided the logical place to start would be the musicians themselves. </p> <p>In a project that started almost five years ago (hence the inclusion of George Harrison), we began asking many of the most influential guitarists in rock, blues and metal one deceptively simple question: "If you had to put one of your songs in a time capsule to be opened sometime in the future, which would you choose, and why?" </p> <p><strong>Check out Part 1 of the story below.</strong><br /> <em>Look for Part 2 Monday, November 18.</em></p> <p><strong>Eddie Van Halen (Van Halen), "Jump"</strong><br /> <em>1984 (1984)</em></p> <p>"I'll probably be playing "Eruption" at every show for the rest of my life, but I guess my time capsule choice would have to be 'Jump.' At the time I really wanted to do something challenging. </p> <p><em>Diver Down</em>, the album just before <em>1984</em>, was half cover tunes, and I <em>hated</em> it. Our producer had told me his theory that if you redo a hit, you're halfway there. But I'd rather bomb with my own shit than make it with someone else's. </p> <p>So that's when I built my own studio, 5150, which was a major step for me — not to prove any point but just so I could be myself and experiment musically. People were telling me, 'You can't use keyboards, you're a guitar player!" So that's when I wrote 'Jump.' Musically, it was a real departure. We had the challenge of integrating the keyboards and synths with the guitar for the first time. </p> <p>"The word 'pop' comes from 'popular,' meaning a lot of people like it. Ninety-nine percent of the reason I make music is to, hopefully, touch people with it. And this one touched the most people — so far."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ap2J9RbXaP4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>Dimebag Darrell (Pantera), "Fucking Hostile"</strong><br /> <em>Vulgar Display of Power (1992)</em></p> <p>"I think the kind of music we play will stand the test of time for however long. But if I had to pick just one, I'd go with the powerful, off-the-cuff statement that is 'Fucking Hostile.' </p> <p>"When it came out it definitely set the tone and pace for what we were about. I also think our boy Philip [<em>Anselmo, vocals</em>] got it perfectly right lyrically and we got it perfectly right musically. </p> <p>"So I believe that if somebody heard this song 500 million years from now, they'd go, 'Goddamn, these motherfuckers knew what they were talking about and sure had their jamming skills down'. Plus, I think people will always be hostile, which is another reason I went with this one."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/E929gqIcwwI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>John Paul Jones (Led Zeppelin) </strong> </p> <p><strong>"D'yer Mak'er,"</strong> <em>Houses of the Holy (1973)</em><br /> <strong>"Stairway To Heaven,"</strong> <em>Led Zeppelin IV (1971)</em></p> <p>"I'd put 'D'yer Mak'er' in a time capsule so I would never have to hear it again or have to explain how to pronounce the title. There were only two types of rhythms that Bonzo [<em>John Bonham, drums</em>] hated playing — shuffles and reggae. </p> <p>"We were jamming in the latter style at Stargroves, the house we rented from Mick Jagger, and John was going along with it out of politeness, I think. Unfortunately, the jam turning in to a proper song. He did play some marvelous fills, but for me, the whole thing was buttock-clenchingly embarrassing. </p> <p>"I would also include 'Stairway To Heaven,' but for more positive reasons. It contains all the classic Zep elements, from folk/Celtic through jazz and r&amp;b to hard rock. It also encapsulates the soft-to-heavy dynamics that the band was famous for. </p> <p>"As for my own performance, it made me smile when a journalist once told me that he considered the bass line at the end of the song one of the finest ever recorded. Unfortunately, it happens to be underneath one of the finest <em>guitar</em> solos ever recorded!"</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/5xmVEqp17DU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/w9TGj2jrJk8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>Kirk Hammett (Metallica), "Motorbreath"</strong><br /> <em>Kill 'Em All (1983)</em> <p>"I chose it because it has the breakneck tempo we were so fond of in our early days — plus the lyrics set the tone for our lives over the next 10 years. </p> <p>"And unlike the songs we wrote later, 'Motorbreath' is under four minutes long!"</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/pqjHsV1fkhg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>Robby Krieger (The Doors), "Light My Fire"</strong><br /> <em>The Doors (1967)</em></p> <p>“I feel that ‘Light My Fire’ encapsulates the feel of the 1967 Summer of Love. Being in San Francisco or anywhere in California that summer seemed to be the beginning of a whole new way of life. One day at rehearsal, Jim [Morrison, vocals] suggested we all try and write some songs. I went home that night and wrote ‘Light My Fire’—it was the first song I’d ever written. </p> <p>"The long solo section was based on the modal playing of jazz great John Coltrane. Up until Miles Davis did <em>Kind of Blue</em> and Coltrane recorded ‘My Favorite Things,’ jazz had been mainly bebop, which involved a lot of fast, tricky chord changes. </p> <p>"So these guys thought, It’s easy to play over a bunch of chords and sound cool—but what can you do over just one or two chords? Can you play something that’s not just pentatonic—that’s based on a mode, a scale—over one chord, and take it farther out than anybody else has gone? </p> <p>"That was the start of modal playing, which influenced many rock musicians. My long, modal solo in this song was done over the same two chords John Coltrane soloed over on his version of ‘My Favorite Things’—A minor and B minor. So ‘Light My Fire’ helped light a fire for a new generation and opened people’s minds to a new vision. Almost four decades later, the song seems to remain timeless.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/cq8k-ZbsXDI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Warren Haynes (Gov't Mule), "Mule"</strong><br /> <em>Gov't Mule (1995)</em></p> <p>"'Mule' is a uniquely Gov't Mule song. I've never hear another song that sounds similar to it. </p> <p>"There are riffs that could be traced back to some of our early influences — which stretch from Cream to Hendrix to Miles Davis and James Brown — but the way the thing is structured doesn't really remind me of another song. And that was always important to us — that most of our songs can't be traced directly back to other songs. </p> <p>"'Mule' was written at the last minute in rehearsal, right before recording, and it's a first take, so that solos were on the fly — totally spontaneous. It has an awesome bass like from Allen Woody and [Blues Traveler vocalist] John Popper guests on harmonica. </p> <p>"And it has a political message; the title refers to the fact that when the America slaves were free they were promised '40 acres and mule' by the U.S. government, which most never received. Here we used ti as a broader metaphor about social oppression in so many aspects of modern society."</p> <hr /> <p><strong>Joe Satriani, "Time"</strong><br /> <em>Live In San Fransisco (2001)</em></p> <p>“If we can assume that they have DVD players in the future, then I would pick ‘Time’ from the Live in San Francisco DVD, because, for better or worse, it captures what we actually do night after night around the world. </p> <p>"Although it’s near impossible for me to look at myself on a television screen, I’ve learned to accept that that’s what everyone’s been seeing and hearing for all these years, and I have not yet been thrown in prison for doing it.</p> <p>“The song is interesting to me, compositionally, because the verse is almost like a child’s melody played over the simplest riff. Then the second part of the song jumps into all of this complex harmony and a whole bunch of key changes. The solo section recreates the same scheme, and eventually the song changes meter. The song provides a wild journey of how to construct an interesting instrumental.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/jh-9il2Lw38?list=PL9F83FA973EEE68A2" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>Ace Frehley (Kiss), "Shock Me"</strong><br /> <em>Love Gun (1977)</em></p> <p>“I picked this song not only because it’s a well-known Kiss anthem but because it has deep personal significance for me. The song is based on an actual life-threatening experience I had onstage with Kiss in the Seventies in Lakeland, Florida. </p> <p>"At the beginning of the concert I was coming down the staircase and when my hand touched the railing I was electrocuted, thrown back and knocked out for about 10 seconds. </p> <p>"The roadies carried me down the rear staircase, behind the wall of Marshalls. I woke up with electrical burns on my hands and totally shaken. Paul [Stanley] announced what had happened, and the concert was delayed for approximately 10 minutes. The whole audience starting chanting ‘We want Ace, we want Ace!’</p> <p>“I was so disoriented from the incident that I really didn’t think I was going to be able to do the show. But when I heard 15,000 people chanting my name, my adrenaline started pumping and all I could think was, The show must go on! I continued, even though I had almost no feeling in my hand for the remainder of the concert. All I can say is thank God my guardian angel was hovering above me that evening.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/3slccS4nslI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>Jeff Beck, "Where Were You"</strong><br /> <em>Jeff Beck's Guitar Shop (1989)</em></p> <p>“This is probably the best thing I ever wrote, and it’s a milestone in my playing. It’s where I began to forge a unique new style. The key thing was discovering how I could use bent harmonics. </p> <p>"That’s basically taking false harmonics and, by bending the whammy bar, constructing melodies and tunes with it—which is something I took even farther on my last album, <em>You Had It Coming</em>. The inspiration for ‘Where Were You’ was the Bulgarian female choir record <em>Mystere des Voix Bulgares</em>. It’s so astonishing when you hear it—it’s like a religious experience. </p> <p>"When these women all hit a note together, it’s the most amazing sound you’ve ever heard. They sing these kind of broken scales with quarter-tone intervals. It’s extremely emotional music. I realized this was another tonal palette I could experiment with, because the guitar is capable of doing that, particularly with bent harmonics and the whammy bar.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/NomkmxUgzps" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>Michael Schenker (M56) "Lipstick Traces"</strong><br /> <em>UFO-Phenomenon (1974)</em></p> <p>“This is one of the first songs I did with UFO, when I was just 18 years old. I’m sure I could pick it apart and find places where a bend is out of tune or something, but the song itself has always been magical for me. </p> <p>"I have always had very good technique and that has been important to me, but it is not an end in itself—it is a means of expressing just what you want to say, and I feel I did that with this beautiful melody. </p> <p>"I express every emotion I have through my music—from the darkest and angriest to the most passionate and joyful—but ultimately I have to pick the song that gives me the biggest sense of calm and pace. Because when it comes down to it, I am a romantic guy.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/az6SKfnf3QA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>Tom Morello (Rage Against The Machine), "Killing in the Name"</strong><br /> <em>Rage Against The Machine (1992)</em></p> <p>“ ‘Killing in the Name’ contains some of my favorite elements of guitar playing: it’s got the huge riff, the propulsive chorus and the ‘angry insect’ guitar solo. </p> <p>"The song also features a dissonant breakdown, followed by the ‘cavalry charge’ outro, which makes for a fine rocking time all around. These are all things that I enjoy, and that was the very first time they all came together in one song. ‘Killing in the Name’ was RATM’s first single, and it launched our sound as a band as well as my sound as a guitarist in a defining way. </p> <p>"I have two parallel voices in my guitar playing—the quirky-noises-as-musical-passages concept and the anthemic riffage—and they are well-represented in this song.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/munNQPuhX3g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>Joe Strummer (The Clash), "If Music Could Talk"</strong><br /> <em>Sandinista! (1980)</em></p> <p>“On my recent album, <em>Global a Go-Go</em>, I had this breakthrough where I was able to do the album from my intuition rather than from my intellect. Me and the band just turned up every day, and it was like the music was telling us what to play. Music, lyrics, solos—it was all of one piece, done in the moment. </p> <p>"When I think back, the only similar experience happened when the Clash hit New York after touring, and we went right into the Sandinista! sessions. It was very similar in that we had nothing prepared, and a lot of the album just took off by itself. On ‘If Music Could Talk’ I recorded two vocals: one on the left side of the stereo mix, and the other on the right side. And the two vocals were done one right after the other. </p> <p>"I just love hearing those vocals, even though it doesn’t fuckin’ work that well, because I can hear myself extemporizing, straight off the bat, on my feet, in the moment. And as I was reminded on my last album, music really can talk—to us and through us.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/RwxNLgAkOq4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>George Harrison (The Beatles), "While My Guitar Gently Weeps"</strong><br /> <em>The Beatles (1968)</em></p> <p>“When we actually started recording this song it was just me playing the acoustic guitar and singing it [this version appears on the Beatles’ <em>Anthology 3</em>—GW Ed.], and nobody in the group was interested. Well, Ringo [Starr, drums] probably was, but John [Lennon, guitar/vocals] and Paul [McCartney, bass/vocals] weren’t. </p> <p>"When I went home that night I was really disappointed. I thought, Well, this is really quite a good song—it’s not as if it’s shitty! The next day I happened to drive back into London with Eric Clapton, and while we were in the car I suddenly said, ‘Why don’t you come and play on this track?’ </p> <p>And he answered, ‘Oh, I couldn’t do that—the others wouldn’t like it.’ Eric was reluctant because there hadn’t ever been any prominent musicians on our records. Finally, I said, ‘Well, sod them! It’s my song and I’d like you to come down to the studio.’ </p> <p>"So Eric showed up, and suddenly everybody started behaving and not fooling around so much. And the song came together nicely. Eric didn’t think his playing sounded ‘Beatles-ish’ enough. So we put the ‘wobbler’ on it, which is what we called ADT [Artificial Double Tracking, the basis of flanging—GW Ed.] </p> <p>"When I played it in concert with Eric over the years he would play it differently every night. Gary Moore did some shows with me and he also played exceptionally well on this one. I think guitar players like this song because it was structured in a way that gives them the greatest excuse to just wail away.” </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/YXdE9wxg8YI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Stay tuned for PART TWO of "One for the Ages" Monday, November 18.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/thirty-guitar-legends-including-eddie-van-halen-dimebag-darrell-and-jeff-beck-choose-song-theyd-most-want-be-remembered-part-1#comments Articles Dimebag Darrell Eddie Van Halen GW Archive Jeff Beck John Paul Jones May 2002 Interviews News Features Magazine Mon, 21 Apr 2014 12:36:56 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19473 'Dale Turner's Guide to Acoustic Rock Guitar' Parts 1 and 2 — Ultimate DVD Guides for Acoustic Rock Guitarists http://www.guitarworld.com/dale-turners-guide-acoustic-rock-guitar-parts-1-and-2-ultimate-dvd-guides-acoustic-rock-guitarists <!--paging_filter--><p>Save almost 17 percent by buying <em><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/combo-offer-dale-turners-guide-to-acoustic-rock-guitar-part-1-2-dvd/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=AcousticDVDpack">Dale Turner's Guide to Acoustic Rock Guitar Parts 1 and 2</a></em> together in this awesome combo pack. </p> <p>With more than four hours of total instruction, this combo pack makes up the ultimate DVD guide for acoustic rock guitar players!</p> <p>With these two DVDs, you'll learn the acoustic rock secrets of:</p> <p>• Randy Rhoads<br /> • Zakk Wylde<br /> • John Mayer<br /> • Eric Clapton<br /> • Dave Matthews<br /> • Neil Young<br /> • Steve Morse<br /> ... and many more!</p> <p>You'll also be taught:</p> <p>• Basic and Intermediate Soloing<br /> • Tapped &amp; Slapped Harmonics<br /> • Basic Strumming Patterns<br /> • Acoustic Blues<br /> • Economy &amp; Hybrid Picking<br /> • Arpeggiated Chords<br /> • Travis Picking<br /> ... and much more! </p> <p>Your instructor, Dale Turner, is a teacher at Hollywood's legendary Musicians Institute and a <em>Guitar World</em> magazine columnist. Turner also is the author of more than 50 instructional books, including <em>Power Plucking- A Rocker's Guide to Acoustic Fingerstyle Guitar</em>. You can hear his masterful playing on his album <em>Mannerisms Magnified</em>, available through Amazon.com.</p> <p><strong>NOTE: This DVD includes a .pdf file with tabs. To access the .pdf file insert the DVD into your computer. Windows users should access the DVD drive through the 'Computer' folder on their task bar. The DVD name will appear in the DVD drive of this folder. Right click the DVD name and select Open to access the .pdf file with tabs.</strong></p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/combo-offer-dale-turners-guide-to-acoustic-rock-guitar-part-1-2-dvd/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=AcousticDVDpack">Check out these DVDs now at the Guitar World Online Store!</a></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/dale-turners-guide-acoustic-rock-guitar-parts-1-and-2-ultimate-dvd-guides-acoustic-rock-guitarists#comments Dale Turner News Features Mon, 21 Apr 2014 12:34:59 +0000 Guitar World http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20965 Photo Gallery: Top 10 Weirdest Custom Guitars http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-weirdest-custom-guitars-gallery <!--paging_filter--><p>Most guitarists at one point or another in their development have gone through some sort of “I want a custom guitar” phase. </p> <p>Whether it’s a funky paint job or a radical new shape, a custom ax presents the opportunity to express yourself. Or, in the opinion of some, the opportunity to say, “Hey, look at me, I’m a horse’s arse!” </p> <p>Here, we celebrate 10 such opportunities. We’ll let you categorize them as you see fit.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-weirdest-custom-guitars-gallery#comments Guitar World Lists Galleries News Fri, 18 Apr 2014 18:33:20 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/2744 The Ataris Tour Blog: The Mystery and Majesty of the American Truck Stop http://www.guitarworld.com/ataris-tour-blog-mystery-majesty-american-truck-stop <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The Ataris just wrapped a tour that reunited the classic lineup that created their 2003 major label debut</em> So Long, Astoria. <em>Guitarist John Collura documented this reunion. Check out the final installment of his report below.</em></p> <p>When truck stops were first being built around this country did the people who built them ever take into consideration how much these would mean to traveling musicians?</p> <p>Where else can one buy a 64-ounce Mountain Dew, a sandwich under a hot lamp, a bagged pickle and an alligator head under one roof? More over, why the fuck would you buy any of these items in the first place? I do not hold the answer to these questions but rest assured I have purchased one or more of these items.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Ataris-TacoTime.jpg" width="620" height="407" alt="Ataris-TacoTime.jpg" /></p> <p>What's really a phenomenon is that when the band enters these establishments we act as if we don't even know each other. We just aimlessly wonder through the aisles, rifling through useless shit. It's like our own version of <em>The Walking Dead</em>. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Ataris-NoLotLizards.jpg" width="620" height="411" alt="Ataris-NoLotLizards.jpg" /></p> <p>In my 15 years of touring I have seen my fair share of truck stops. I have slept in their parking lots, taken bird baths in their sinks, and gambled and ate their biscuits and gravy. These are truly American staples, the oasis for bands and the nightmare for tour managers and bus drivers...because it's near impossible to make it a 15-minute stop. I am now home from another U.S. tour but I feel myself wanting to just drive to the nearest truck stop so I can feel like I'm back on the road. "Number 17, your shower is now ready..."</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/ataris-tour-blog-mystery-majesty-american-truck-stop#comments John Collura The Ataris Blogs News Fri, 18 Apr 2014 16:12:04 +0000 John Collura http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21030 The Top Ten Slow Guitar Solos http://www.guitarworld.com/top-ten-slow-guitar-solos <!--paging_filter--><p>Remember those old Bugs Bunny cartoons where a pompous Bugs would race a tortoise—and lose? The moral of the story: slow and steady wins the race. </p> <p>The same principle can hold true with guitar solos.Spitting out sixteenth notes at 200 beats per minutes isn’t always the most winning approach; sometimes, a lead calls for a little less hands and a little more heart. </p> <p>So let’s step back, take a breather and examine some of rock guitar’s greatest slow burns. </p> <p><strong>01. “’Cause We’ve Ended As Lovers” — Jeff Beck </strong></p> <p>Jeff Beck’s electric guitar work contains enough moments of sonic brilliance to fill up most any top ten list. For our purposes we’ll go with his take on this Stevie Wonder–penned instrumental, from 1975 <em>Blow By Blow</em>, on which Beck opens with a gently moaning major 2nd to root C interval that rises and falls like a caterwauling alley cat, setting up the fluid, vocal-like phrases that follow.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_o3CIa3nrZE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>02. “Something” — The Beatles</strong></p> <p>The “Quiet Beatle” steps out of Paul and John’s writing shadow and pens his first song to be released as an A-side on the Beatles’ 1969 <em>Come Together</em> single. George Harrison’s “Something” is lauded for its lush melody and tender lyricism, but guitarists will note Harrison’s deft guitar solo that follows the operatic bridge as a characteristic example of his reserved, yet highly tuneful style.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/IrW7dlDHH28" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>03. “The Messiah Will Come Again” — Roy Buchanan</strong></p> <p>An often duplicated, but distinctly underrated guitarist, Buchanan inspired no less than a few of rock’s most recognizable players, including Jeff Beck and Gary Moore. </p> <p>This haunting A-minor piece opens like Faustian theater, with gloomy organ and prophetic, spoken-word lyrics. When Buchanan finally unleashes on his Telecaster, the droning notes cut through the mix and wail with eerie vocalization. Check out the expert volume swells at 4:30, a Buchanan trademark.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/deeBQZ8Aklc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>04. “Brothers In Arms” — Dire Straits</strong></p> <p>The title track from Dire Strait’s chart-topping 1985 album is often overshadowed by the flashier “Money for Nothing” and “Walk of Life,” but this somber, G# minor track has found a place as background music in films such as <em>Spy Game</em>, and television shows <em>Miami Vice</em> and <em>The West Wing</em>. While Knopfler opens and closes the song with a tasteful indulgence of front-pickup soloing, it’s the longer, tone-soaked lead at the end that showcases his soulful, fingerpicked sound.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/au4MRhg5BHE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>05. “Parisienne Walkways” — Gary Moore </strong> </p> <p>Moore is no slouch when it comes to burning a fretboard, and the Irish rocker does taper off unto some excessively speedy bits towards the end of this instrumental version of his 1979 U.K. hit (the long, descending trill at 6:15 is particularly note-worthy). The majority of this live version of “Walkways,” however, is laden with Moore’s subtle vibrato and stratospheric string bending. The song was intended to show off the former Thin Lizzy guitarist’s blues prowess, and has left few Moore detractors in its wake.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/vkUpfw4Hf3w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>06. “Shine On You Crazy Diamond” — Pink Floyd </strong></p> <p>It took David Gilmour little more than a heavily compressed Stratocaster, some reverb and a mound of mourning for his detached former bandmate, Syd Barrett, to create the melancholic opening to the nine-part centerpiece from 1975’s <em>Wish You Were Here</em>. </p> <p>Supposedly, Barrett visited Abbey Road Studios in London during the album’s recording, but as the story goes Gilmour, along with the rest of his band, didn’t recognize the former Floyd leader due to his drastically altered appearance.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/X5Ka1uOP0Pg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>07. “Since I’ve Been Loving You” — Led Zeppelin </strong></p> <p>“Since I’ve Been Loving You” was outfitted in Zeppelin’s live set before the recording of <em>Led Zeppelin III</em> began and remained a staple of their show until the band’s dissolution in 1980. Though for the song’s main solo Jimmy Page delivers screaming C minor and C minor pentatonic runs, he opens the tune with a 45-second passage of beautifully restrained phrases.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_ZiN_NqT-Us" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>08. “The Thrill Is Gone” — B.B. King </strong></p> <p>Emotive solo work is the cornerstone of blues guitar, and it’s only appropriate King’s highest charting hit contains some of his most dark and chilling leads. </p> <p>The song, written by Rick Darnell and Roy Hawkins, showcases the most prominent techniques that made B.B. King a household name, including deep string bends and an impossibly wide vibrato.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/4fk2prKnYnI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>09. “Riviera Paradise” — Stevie Ray Vaughan </strong></p> <p>The final track on Vaughan’s final studio album with Double Trouble features some of his most delicate playing. Legend claims the album’s engineer noticed as the band was recording “Riviera Paradise” that the tape reel was about to run out. To no avail, he tried to warn the distracted band they might lose the recording. The song clocked in at nine minutes, finishing at the exact moment the reel of tape stopped.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/LUiYRxAns5A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>10. “Bell Bottom Blues” — Derek and the Dominos</strong></p> <p>A list of slow guitar solos wouldn’t be complete without the inclusion of Eric “Slowhand” Clapton himself. </p> <p>And while “Layla” garners most of the accolades on Derek &amp;the Dominos’ only studio album, “Bell Bottom Blues,” which features only Clapton on guitar (Duane Allman didn’t sign on until after the song’s recording), is a tour de force in its own right. </p> <p>Heavy-handed string bends and a pushed, as opposed to pulled, vibrato lend “Bell Bottom Blues” a gracefulness that counters the furious passion of “Layla,” and reaffirms Clapton as one of rock’s premier soloists.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/fZNL0wvIj78" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/top-ten-slow-guitar-solos#comments Top 10 Guitar World Lists News Features Fri, 18 Apr 2014 13:10:27 +0000 Tony Grassi http://www.guitarworld.com/article/3101 New Book: Learn to Play 26 Kiss Classics http://www.guitarworld.com/new-book-learn-play-26-kiss-classics <!--paging_filter--><p>We have a new book at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/the-best-of-kiss/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=BestOfKiss">Guitar World Online Store.</a></p> <p><em>The Best of Kiss</em> features transcriptions and tabs for 26 Kiss classics, including "Detroit Rock City," "Deuce," "Hard Luck Woman," "I Was Made for Lovin' You," "Lick It Up," "Love Gun," "Rock and Roll All Nite," "Shock Me," "Strutter" and many more.</p> <p>The 168-page book is available now for $24.95.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/the-best-of-kiss/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=BestOfKiss">For more information, visit the Guitar World Online Store.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Gcj34XixuYg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/new-book-learn-play-26-kiss-classics#comments News Features Fri, 18 Apr 2014 13:09:41 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20735 Wild Stringdom with John Petrucci: Moving Across the Fretboard in Unusual Ways to Produce Unique Runs http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-moving-across-fretboard-unusual-ways-produce-unique-runs <!--paging_filter--><p>Over the years, people have noticed that when I play certain runs, my fingers move in the opposite direction of the notes that they hear.</p> <p>For example, as my fret hand moves up the fretboard, the sequence of notes that is heard descends (and vice versa). For this month’s column, I’ve put together a few runs that demonstrate this unusual approach as applied to both ascending and descending patterns.</p> <p>This kind of “positional wizardry” can be used to generate interesting melodic patterns that can be used in a variety of ways. </p> <p> In <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I begin on the low E string in a high fretboard position and end on a high string in a lower position. The run is based on the A Aeolian mode (A B C D E F G), which is also known as the A natural minor scale and is intervallically spelled 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7. </p> <p> The overall concept behind this line is a consistent progression of six-note groups, or “cells,” that move to different areas of the fretboard while remaining diatonic to (within the scale structure of) A Aeolian. The run is played in a rhythm of even 16th notes, which, due to its inherent four-note grouping, results in a more unusual melodic “shape” than if I had played the pattern in a triplet or sextuplet rhythm. </p> <p> I begin by ascending through the first six notes—E F G A B C—then “backpedal” slightly and descend to the previous two notes, B and A, in alternating fashion. The next six-note phrase begins on G, two scale degrees higher than the previous starting note, and consists of the notes G A B C D E, played in ascending form. </p> <p>Once again, I alternate between the last two notes in the same way, which sets up the beginning of the next six-note phrase, starting on B on the fourth string’s ninth fret, which is two scale degrees higher than the previous starting point. This “up-six, back-two” pattern then repeats three more times, culminating on a high A root note. Be sure to use consistent alternate (down-up-down-up) picking throughout this figure, and, as always, strive for crystal-clear articulation.</p> <p> In <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, I begin on the high E string and work my way up the fretboard while descending gradually on each lower string, pitch-wise. Like <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, this run is also based on A Aeolian/natural minor and six-note “cells” played in a 16th-note rhythm. </p> <p> After descending through the first six notes—F E D C B A—I quickly shift up the fretboard to a note that is three scale degrees higher in the scale, D, and then repeat the descending six-note pattern. This second sequence ends on F (third string, 10th fret), so I begin the next six-note sequence three scale degrees higher, on B (third string, 16th fret). </p> <p>This process repeats three more times, culminating in a low A root note (sixth string, 17th fret). Again, alternate picking is utilized throughout, so strive for even and precise execution.</p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> provides a clearer picture of the shapes used in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> by illustrating them as eighth-note triplets. Here, one can more easily see how the six-note pattern descends through the notes of A natural minor across two beats at a time. When playing the run in a straight 16th-note rhythm (rather than in an eighth- or 16th-note-triplet rhythm), be cognizant of the difference in feel and where the downbeats fall.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2979782854001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2979782854001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-15%20at%202.25.01%20PM.png" width="620" height="644" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-15 at 2.25.01 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-moving-across-fretboard-unusual-ways-produce-unique-runs#comments Dream Theater February 2014 John Petrucci Wild Stringdom Artist Lessons Videos News Lessons Magazine Thu, 17 Apr 2014 20:21:46 +0000 John Petrucci http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20105 The Ataris Tour Blog: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love My Ovation Acoustic http://www.guitarworld.com/ataris-tour-blog-how-i-learned-stop-worrying-love-my-ovation-acoustic <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The Ataris just wrapped a tour that reunited the classic lineup that created their 2003 major label debut</em> So Long, Astoria.<em> Guitarist John Collura documented this reunion. Check out the second installment of his report below.</em></p> <p>Let me just put this out there: I love my Martin. I'm the type of person that would want to keep my Martin in a glass case at all times. With that said, when I go on the road I like to take an acoustic guitar with me to write. When traveling on a bus it's really easy to be able to carry an acoustic guitar on board and stow it away in a junk bunk or back lounge. </p> <p>But when traveling with a van and trailer it becomes more difficult. I know there are some really great road cases built specifically for acoustic guitars. SKB makes a really nice one, but with quality comes price. So on this latest tour, I opted not to bring my Martin because I was paranoid with leaving it in the trailer. My friend Jason at Fender/Ovation helped me out with an alternative solution. He sent me out an Elite T 2078TX Ovation guitar.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Ataris-Ovation-Martin.jpg" width="620" height="422" alt="Ataris-Ovation-Martin.jpg" /><br /> <strong>Collura's new Elite T 2078TX Ovation (left), and his beloved Martin</strong></p> <p>Yeah I know what you're thinking, I have a Martin and took out an Ovation instead. Well to my surprise this 2078TX has some serious tone, it's not your Uncle Rick's Ovation from his 1980's terrible cover band. And even more surprisingly, the guitar is built like a brick shit house. It's covered in a textured enamel, like the same as the back of a pickup truck. I'm not concerned with babying this guitar, it's built to be road worthy and the action and feel of the guitar is really comfortable.</p> <p>Does this mean I'm done with my Martin? Hell no. But I couldn't be happier to have a durable, great sounding acoustic that I can take on the road. </p> http://www.guitarworld.com/ataris-tour-blog-how-i-learned-stop-worrying-love-my-ovation-acoustic#comments John Collura The Ataris Blogs News Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:01:43 +0000 John Collura http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21029 Hear It Now: Mastodon Premiere New Song "High Road" http://www.guitarworld.com/hear-it-now-mastodon-premiere-new-song-high-road <!--paging_filter--><p>Atlanta's Mastodon have just premiered a new song, “High Road.” The song comes off <em>Once More Round the Sun</em>, their sixth studio album to be released this summer.</p> <p>Check it out below and let us know what you think in the comments.</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/145055304%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-kgi7V&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=true&amp;visual=true" height="360" width="630" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/hear-it-now-mastodon-premiere-new-song-high-road#comments Mastodon News Thu, 17 Apr 2014 15:34:00 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21037 Update: Malcolm Young "Taking a Break" from AC/DC http://www.guitarworld.com/update-malcolm-young-taking-break-acdc <!--paging_filter--><p>It seems there's some sad truth behind the <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/report-acdc-call-it-quits-due-malcolm-youngs-illness">speculation</a> surrounding AC/DC's imminent breakup due to Malcolm Young's health issues.</p> <p>The classic hard rock band may not be breaking up, but their rhythm guitarist is, for the moment, stepping down to deal with health issues.</p> <p>Here's the official statement from the band, which appeared earlier today on their <a href="https://www.facebook.com/acdc">official Facebook page</a>: </p> <p>"After forty years of life dedicated to AC/DC, guitarist and founding member Malcolm Young is taking a break from the band due to ill health. Malcolm would like to thank the group’s diehard legions of fans worldwide for their never-ending love and support.</p> <p>"In light of this news, AC/DC asks that Malcolm and his family’s privacy be respected during this time. The band will continue to make music."</p> <p>Our thoughts go out to Malcolm and his family.</p> <p>We'll keep you posted as we hear more.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/acdc">AC/DC</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/update-malcolm-young-taking-break-acdc#comments ACDC Malcolm Young News Thu, 17 Apr 2014 11:34:44 +0000 Brad Angle http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21028 Pantera Combo Offer: Get New Pantera Issue of Revolver and Limited 'Far Beyond Driven' T-Shirt for $24.99 http://www.guitarworld.com/pantera-combo-offer-get-new-pantera-issue-revolver-and-limited-far-beyond-driven-t-shirt-2499 <!--paging_filter--><p>There's a new combo offer at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/revolvers-may-june-pantera-issue-and-far-beyond-driven-t-shirt/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=FarBeyondDrivenCombo">Guitar World Online Store!</a></p> <p>Get <em>Revolver</em> magazine's April/May 2014 Pantera issue and a limited <em>Far Beyond Driven</em> T-shirt for $24.99! </p> <p>The cover story of the newsstand edition of the latest issue of <em>Revolver</em> tells the story behind Pantera's <em>Far Beyond Driven</em>. The album, which still stands as the heaviest record to debut at Number 1 on the charts, turns 20 this year.</p> <p>In commemoration of that anniversary, <em>Revolver</em> also has created a highly limited-edition T-shirt paying tribute to the album. Only 250 T-shirts have been printed, so take advantage of this issue AND T-shirt combo offer before they sell out!</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/revolvers-may-june-pantera-issue-and-far-beyond-driven-t-shirt/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=FarBeyondDrivenCombo">Head to the Guitar World Online Store now!</a></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/pantera-combo-offer-get-new-pantera-issue-revolver-and-limited-far-beyond-driven-t-shirt-2499#comments News Thu, 17 Apr 2014 11:32:48 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21023 Listen: Rare Soundgarden "Black Hole Sun" Demo http://www.guitarworld.com/listen-rare-soundgarden-black-hole-sun-demo <!--paging_filter--><p>Soundgarden are celebrating the 20th anniversary of their hit record <em>Superunknown</em> with a couple special reissue packages, available on June 3, 2014 via A&amp;M Records/UME. The Deluxe Edition is a 2-CD package featuring the remastered album along with disc two consisting of demos, rehearsals, B-sides and more.</p> <p>The Super Deluxe Edition is a 5-CD package featuring the remastered album, additional demos, rehearsals and B-sides and the fifth disc is the album mixed in Blu-ray Audio 5.1 Surround Sound. The Super Deluxe Edition is incredibly packaged in a hardbound book with a lenticular cover, liner notes by David Fricke and newly reimagined album artwork designed by Josh Graham. It also features never before seen band photography by Kevin Westenberg. A 2-LP gatefold of the original 16 vinyl tracks remastered on 200-gram vinyl in a gatefold jacket will also be made available. In addition, the Superunknown singles and associated b-sides with newly interpreted artwork sleeves by Josh Graham will be reissued on Record Store Day, April 19th, as a set of five limited edition 10″ vinyl records.</p> <p>Give a listen to their "Black Hole Sun" Demo, from this new release, below.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/143824508&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/listen-rare-soundgarden-black-hole-sun-demo#comments Soundgarden News Wed, 16 Apr 2014 20:23:07 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21031 The Ataris Tour Blog: "Tubes? We Don't Need No Stinking Tubes!" http://www.guitarworld.com/ataris-tour-blog-tubes-we-dont-need-no-stinking-tubes <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The Ataris just wrapped a tour that reunited the classic lineup that created their 2003 major label debut </em>So Long, Astoria<em>. Guitarist John Collura documented this reunion. Check out the first installment of his report below.</em></p> <p>I just got home form being out on The Ataris, "So Long, Astoria Reunion Tour". Prior to leaving for tour I was debating which amp I would take with me. We performed our record <em>So Long, Astoria</em> in its entirety so I was consciously making an effort to take the most versatile amp that I own. </p> <p>I have been playing in bands for almost 18 years and I've become a bit of tone snob. I currently own four different amp heads and all of them are amazing tube amps. The problem is, they are all great at producing their own tone. Doesn't sound like a problem until you have to perform an entire record that was produced using multiple types of amplifiers.</p> <p>Weeks before I left for tour I was extremely lucky to be introduced to the fine folks at Blackstar. They had me come down to their showroom and try out all types of wonderful amps, all of them being tube heads. The last amp that we tried out was the Blackstar ID 100 TVP head. When we fired this baby up everyone in the room turned their heads with their mouths open.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Blackstar-Comp.jpg" width="620" height="422" alt="Blackstar-Comp.jpg" /></p> <p>The power, bite and bottom end out of this amp was incredible. It was then brought to my attention that this is not a tube amp, it's all digital. I couldn't believe it so I needed to test it out some more. I was already sold on the massive amount of distortion and gain the amp had but I needed to see if this thing could produce some natural breakup. Here's where things get really interesting.</p> <p>The amp is basically a tube emulator, it models 6 different types of tubes (EL84, 6V6, EL34, KT66, 6L6, KT88) which they call True Valve Power or TVP. The ID 100 also has 6 different voicing features Clean Warm, Clean Bright, Crunch, Super Crunch, OD1, OD2. I tried the Super Crunch channel matched with the KT66 and pushed the gain to about 1 o'clock and now the amp sounds like a Vox on steroids! </p> <p>The possibilities are endless and there's no shortage of tone or versatility, there's just no tubes. I asked Blackstar for one amp and they gave me 36! I challenge anyone to a blind test that you will never believe this amp is all digital. Sorry you elitist tube snobs, the Blackstar ID 100TVP is the real deal.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/ataris-tour-blog-tubes-we-dont-need-no-stinking-tubes#comments John Collura The Ataris Blogs News Wed, 16 Apr 2014 16:02:53 +0000 John Collura http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21022