News http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/4/all/%3Ehttp%3A/www.facebook.com/www.facebook.com/%27http%3A/www.kickstarter.com/projects/realmofobscura/www.facebook.com/casinomadrid en Photo Gallery: Top 10 Weirdest Custom Guitars http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-weirdest-custom-guitars-gallery <!--paging_filter--><p>Most guitarists at one point or another in their development have gone through some sort of “I want a custom guitar” phase. </p> <p>Whether it’s a funky paint job or a radical new shape, a custom ax presents the opportunity to express yourself. Or, in the opinion of some, the opportunity to say, “Hey, look at me, I’m a horse’s arse!” </p> <p>Here, we celebrate 10 such opportunities. We’ll let you categorize them as you see fit.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-weirdest-custom-guitars-gallery#comments Guitar World Lists Galleries News Fri, 18 Apr 2014 18:33:20 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/2744 The Ataris Tour Blog: The Mystery & Majesty of the American Truck Stop http://www.guitarworld.com/ataris-tour-blog-mystery-majesty-american-truck-stop <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The Ataris just wrapped a tour that reunited the classic lineup that created their 2003 major label debut</em> So Long, Astoria. <em>Guitarist John Collura documented this reunion. Check out the final installment of his report below.</em></p> <p>When truck stops were first being built around this country did the people who built them ever take into consideration how much these would mean to traveling musicians?</p> <p>Where else can one buy a 64-ounce Mountain Dew, a sandwich under a hot lamp, a bagged pickle and an alligator head under one roof? More over, why the fuck would you buy any of these items in the first place? I do not hold the answer to these questions but rest assured I have purchased one or more of these items.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Ataris-TacoTime.jpg" width="620" height="407" alt="Ataris-TacoTime.jpg" /></p> <p>What's really a phenomenon is that when the band enters these establishments we act as if we don't even know each other. We just aimlessly wonder through the aisles, rifling through useless shit. It's like our own version of <em>The Walking Dead</em>. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Ataris-NoLotLizards.jpg" width="620" height="411" alt="Ataris-NoLotLizards.jpg" /></p> <p>In my 15 years of touring I have seen my fair share of truck stops. I have slept in their parking lots, taken bird baths in their sinks, and gambled and ate their biscuits and gravy. These are truly American staples, the oasis for bands and the nightmare for tour managers and bus drivers...because it's near impossible to make it a 15 minute stop. I am now home from another U.S. tour but I feel myself wanting to just drive to the nearest truck stop so I can feel like I'm back on the road. "Number 17, your shower is now ready..."</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/ataris-tour-blog-mystery-majesty-american-truck-stop#comments John Collura The Ataris Blogs News Fri, 18 Apr 2014 16:12:04 +0000 John Collura http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21030 The 50 Heaviest Rock Songs Before Black Sabbath — Songs 50 to 41 http://www.guitarworld.com/50-heaviest-songs-black-sabbath-50-41 <!--paging_filter--><p>The origin of heavy metal is a very fuzzy thing, but most historians and fans can agree that Black Sabbath’s eponymous 1970 debut was the first true heavy metal album. </p> <p>Its thunderous drums, sinister riffs and downright evil lyrics left little to be debated. But what we wanted to know was this: What was the heaviest song <em>before</em> Black Sabbath?</p> <p>We ranked the the following songs based on a variety of factors: distortion/fuzz, playing speed, "darkness," volume, shock value and, most importantly, the song had to have been released before mid-February 1970, when <em>Black Sabbath</em> was unleashed unto the universe. </p> <p>And sure, it would've been easy to list all the songs on the first two Led Zeppelin albums and call it a day, but we wanted to go deeper than that. We dug deep to find some hidden gems from the era of peace and love. </p> <p>NOTE: We will be presenting these songs in installments. Check out the first list of 10 below; we'll post the next 10 songs later this week! Until then, enjoy!</p> <p><strong>50. The Troggs, "Wild Thing" (1966)</strong></p> <p>This bit of caveman rock, written by Chip Taylor (actor Jon Voight’s brother), is the only song on this list to feature an ocarina solo.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Hce74cEAAaE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> </p> <hr /> <p><strong>49. The Yardbirds, “Happenings Ten Years Time Ago” (1966)</strong></p> <p>Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page teamed up on this elaborate, psychodramatic masterpiece to contribute slashing rhythm parts, zig-zagging lead lines and a witty imitation of a police car’s siren.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/0AF8yMx9SvE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>48. The Who, "My Generation" (1965)</strong></p> <p>Studio version not heavy enough for you? There’s always the explosive — literally — <em>Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour</em> version from 1967. Pete Townshend’s ears are still smarting from it. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/7xZOrWK6d4g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>47. Coven, "Pact With Lucifer" (1969)</strong></p> <p>Jinx Dawson was Doro before there was a Doro. Coven makes the list for their occult themes and evil-sounding song titles like “Pact With Lucifer,” “Choke, Thirst, Die” and “Dignitaries of Hell,” but ultimately the music just wasn’t that heavy. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/iK7-H-DX5Uw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>46. The Guess Who, “American Woman” (1970)</strong></p> <p>After luring in listeners with a sweet acoustic blues intro, Burton Cummings, Randy Bachman &amp; Co. hit the stompboxes and showed the world what Led Zeppelin would’ve sounded like if they were Canadian. This one came out in January 1970 — mere weeks before Black Sabbath would redefine heavy. </p> <object width="620" height="365"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/gkqfpkTTy2w?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" /><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/gkqfpkTTy2w?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always"></embed></object> <hr /> <p><strong>45. Pink Floyd, "Interstellar Overdrive" (1967)</strong></p> <p>The song that launched a thousand space-rock bands. </p> <object width="620" height="365"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/2iA7wdO00VI?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" /><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/2iA7wdO00VI?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always"></embed></object><hr /> <p><strong>44. The Count Five, "Psychotic Reaction" (1966)</strong></p> <p>The Count Five’s only hit single was this blatantly Yardbirds-inspired gem from 1966. The band, who were all between the ages of 17 and 19, split up a year later to pursue college degrees. Remember, kids, there’s nothing heavier than an education!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wseRJQdojIg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>43. The Wailers, “Out of Our Tree” (1966)</strong></p> <p>A fun, fuzzed-out offering from the Tacoma-based Wailers, one of the first American garage rock bands. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/LIAs-EBPNek" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>42. Sam Gopal, "Season of the Witch" (1969)</strong></p> <p>Sam Gopal was the first percussionist to bring tabla drums back from India and incorporate them into rock music. However, his 1969 album, <em>Escalator</em>, was a landmark in rock music for another reason: It featured, on vocals and guitar, a young Ian Kilmister. You may know him better as “Lemmy.” </p> <object width="620" height="365"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/0KGgOFFQxnY?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" /><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/0KGgOFFQxnY?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always"></embed></object><hr /> <p><strong>41. Cream, "Sunshine of Your Love" (1967)</strong></p> <p>This song was written by Cream bassist Jack Bruce in a burst of inspiration after watching a Jimi Hendrix concert. Hendrix would cover the song a year later, adding some burning guitar licks in place of the lyrics.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/RhzF2K2b7Xo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/cream">Cream</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/50-heaviest-songs-black-sabbath-50-41#comments 50 Heaviest Songs Before Black Sabbath Cream The Yardbirds Guitar World Lists News Features Fri, 18 Apr 2014 13:34:30 +0000 Damian Fanelli, Josh Hart http://www.guitarworld.com/article/10950 The Top Ten Slow Guitar Solos http://www.guitarworld.com/top-ten-slow-guitar-solos <!--paging_filter--><p>Remember those old Bugs Bunny cartoons where a pompous Bugs would race a tortoise—and lose? The moral of the story: slow and steady wins the race. </p> <p>The same principle can hold true with guitar solos.Spitting out sixteenth notes at 200 beats per minutes isn’t always the most winning approach; sometimes, a lead calls for a little less hands and a little more heart. So let’s step back, take a breather and examine some of rock guitar’s greatest slow burns. </p> <p><strong>1) “’Cause We’ve Ended As Lovers” – Jeff Beck </strong><br /> Jeff Beck’s electric guitar work contains enough moments of sonic brilliance to fill up most any top ten list. For our purposes we’ll go with his take on this Stevie Wonder–penned instrumental, from 1975 <em>Blow By Blow</em>, on which Beck opens with a gently moaning major 2nd to root C interval that rises and falls like a caterwauling alley cat, setting up the fluid, vocal-like phrases that follow.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_o3CIa3nrZE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>2) “Something” – The Beatles</strong><br /> The “Quiet Beatle” steps out of Paul and John’s writing shadow and pens his first song to be released as an A-side on the Beatles’ 1969 <em>Come Together</em> single. George Harrison’s “Something” is lauded for its lush melody and tender lyricism, but guitarists will note Harrison’s deft guitar solo that follows the operatic bridge as a characteristic example of his reserved, yet highly tuneful style.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="465" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/IrW7dlDHH28" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>3) “The Messiah Will Come Again” – Roy Buchanan</strong><br /> An often duplicated, but distinctly underrated guitarist, Buchanan inspired no less than a few of rock’s most recognizable players, including Jeff Beck and Gary Moore. This haunting A-minor piece opens like Faustian theater, with gloomy organ and prophetic, spoken-word lyrics. When Buchanan finally unleashes on his Telecaster, the droning notes cut through the mix and wail with eerie vocalization. Check out the expert volume swells at 4:30, a Buchanan trademark.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="465" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/deeBQZ8Aklc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>4) “Brothers In Arms” – Dire Straits</strong><br /> The title track from Dire Strait’s chart-topping 1985 album is often overshadowed by the flashier “Money for Nothing” and “Walk of Life,” but this somber, G# minor track has found a place as background music in films such as <em>Spy Game</em>, and television shows <em>Miami Vice</em> and <em>The West Wing</em>. While Knopfler opens and closes the song with a tasteful indulgence of front-pickup soloing, it’s the longer, tone-soaked lead at the end that showcases his soulful, fingerpicked sound.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="465" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/au4MRhg5BHE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>5) “Parisienne Walkways” – Gary Moore </strong><br /> Moore is no slouch when it comes to burning a fretboard, and the Irish rocker does taper off unto some excessively speedy bits towards the end of this instrumental version of his 1979 U.K. hit (the long, descending trill at 6:15 is particularly note-worthy). The majority of this live version of “Walkways,” however, is laden with Moore’s subtle vibrato and stratospheric string bending. The song was intended to show off the former Thin Lizzy guitarist’s blues prowess, and has left few Moore detractors in its wake.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/vkUpfw4Hf3w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>6) “Shine On You Crazy Diamond” – Pink Floyd </strong><br /> It took David Gilmour little more than a heavily compressed Stratocaster, some reverb and a mound of mourning for his detached former bandmate, Syd Barrett, to create the melancholic opening to the nine-part centerpiece from 1975’s <em>Wish You Were Here</em>. Supposedly, Barrett visited Abbey Road Studios in London during the album’s recording, but as the story goes Gilmour, along with the rest of his band, didn’t recognize the former Floyd leader due to his drastically altered appearance.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="465" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/X5Ka1uOP0Pg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>7) “Since I’ve Been Loving You” – Led Zeppelin </strong><br /> “Since I’ve Been Loving You” was outfitted in Zeppelin’s live set before the recording of <em>Led Zeppelin III</em> began and remained a staple of their show until the band’s dissolution in 1980. Though for the song’s main solo Jimmy Page delivers screaming C minor and C minor pentatonic runs, he opens the tune with a 45-second passage of beautifully restrained phrases.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="465" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_ZiN_NqT-Us" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>8) “The Thrill Is Gone” – B.B. King </strong><br /> Emotive solo work is the cornerstone of blues guitar, and it’s only appropriate King’s highest charting hit contains some of his most dark and chilling leads. The song, written by Rick Darnell and Roy Hawkins, showcases the most prominent techniques that made B.B. King a household name, including deep string bends and an impossibly wide vibrato.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/4fk2prKnYnI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>9) “Riviera Paradise” – Stevie Ray Vaughan </strong><br /> The final track on Vaughan’s final studio album with Double Trouble features some of his most delicate playing. Legend claims the album’s engineer noticed as the band was recording “Riviera Paradise” that the tape reel was about to run out. To no avail, he tried to warn the distracted band they might lose the recording. The song clocked in at nine minutes, finishing at the exact moment the reel of tape stopped.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="465" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/LUiYRxAns5A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>10) “Bell Bottom Blues” – Derek and the Dominos</strong><br /> A list of slow guitar solos wouldn’t be complete without the inclusion of Eric “Slowhand” Clapton himself. And while “Layla” garners most of the accolades on Derek &amp;the Dominos’ only studio album, “Bell Bottom Blues,” which features only Clapton on guitar (Duane Allman didn’t sign on until after the song’s recording), is a tour de force in its own right. Heavy-handed string bends and a pushed, as opposed to pulled, vibrato lend “Bell Bottom Blues” a gracefulness that counters the furious passion of “Layla,” and reaffirms Clapton as one of rock’s premier soloists.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/fZNL0wvIj78" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/top-ten-slow-guitar-solos#comments Top 10 Guitar World Lists News Fri, 18 Apr 2014 13:10:27 +0000 Tony Grassi http://www.guitarworld.com/article/3101 New Book: Learn to Play 26 Kiss Classics http://www.guitarworld.com/new-book-learn-play-26-kiss-classics <!--paging_filter--><p>We have a new book at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/the-best-of-kiss/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=BestOfKiss">Guitar World Online Store.</a></p> <p><em>The Best of Kiss</em> features transcriptions and tabs for 26 Kiss classics, including "Detroit Rock City," "Deuce," "Hard Luck Woman," "I Was Made for Lovin' You," "Lick It Up," "Love Gun," "Rock and Roll All Nite," "Shock Me," "Strutter" and many more.</p> <p>The 168-page book is available now for $24.95.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/the-best-of-kiss/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=BestOfKiss">For more information, visit the Guitar World Online Store.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Gcj34XixuYg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/new-book-learn-play-26-kiss-classics#comments News Features Fri, 18 Apr 2014 13:09:41 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20735 Wild Stringdom with John Petrucci: Moving Across the Fretboard in Unusual Ways to Produce Unique Runs http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-moving-across-fretboard-unusual-ways-produce-unique-runs <!--paging_filter--><p>Over the years, people have noticed that when I play certain runs, my fingers move in the opposite direction of the notes that they hear.</p> <p>For example, as my fret hand moves up the fretboard, the sequence of notes that is heard descends (and vice versa). For this month’s column, I’ve put together a few runs that demonstrate this unusual approach as applied to both ascending and descending patterns.</p> <p>This kind of “positional wizardry” can be used to generate interesting melodic patterns that can be used in a variety of ways. </p> <p> In <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I begin on the low E string in a high fretboard position and end on a high string in a lower position. The run is based on the A Aeolian mode (A B C D E F G), which is also known as the A natural minor scale and is intervallically spelled 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7. </p> <p> The overall concept behind this line is a consistent progression of six-note groups, or “cells,” that move to different areas of the fretboard while remaining diatonic to (within the scale structure of) A Aeolian. The run is played in a rhythm of even 16th notes, which, due to its inherent four-note grouping, results in a more unusual melodic “shape” than if I had played the pattern in a triplet or sextuplet rhythm. </p> <p> I begin by ascending through the first six notes—E F G A B C—then “backpedal” slightly and descend to the previous two notes, B and A, in alternating fashion. The next six-note phrase begins on G, two scale degrees higher than the previous starting note, and consists of the notes G A B C D E, played in ascending form. </p> <p>Once again, I alternate between the last two notes in the same way, which sets up the beginning of the next six-note phrase, starting on B on the fourth string’s ninth fret, which is two scale degrees higher than the previous starting point. This “up-six, back-two” pattern then repeats three more times, culminating on a high A root note. Be sure to use consistent alternate (down-up-down-up) picking throughout this figure, and, as always, strive for crystal-clear articulation.</p> <p> In <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, I begin on the high E string and work my way up the fretboard while descending gradually on each lower string, pitch-wise. Like <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, this run is also based on A Aeolian/natural minor and six-note “cells” played in a 16th-note rhythm. </p> <p> After descending through the first six notes—F E D C B A—I quickly shift up the fretboard to a note that is three scale degrees higher in the scale, D, and then repeat the descending six-note pattern. This second sequence ends on F (third string, 10th fret), so I begin the next six-note sequence three scale degrees higher, on B (third string, 16th fret). </p> <p>This process repeats three more times, culminating in a low A root note (sixth string, 17th fret). Again, alternate picking is utilized throughout, so strive for even and precise execution.</p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> provides a clearer picture of the shapes used in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> by illustrating them as eighth-note triplets. Here, one can more easily see how the six-note pattern descends through the notes of A natural minor across two beats at a time. When playing the run in a straight 16th-note rhythm (rather than in an eighth- or 16th-note-triplet rhythm), be cognizant of the difference in feel and where the downbeats fall.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2979782854001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2979782854001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-15%20at%202.25.01%20PM.png" width="620" height="644" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-15 at 2.25.01 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-moving-across-fretboard-unusual-ways-produce-unique-runs#comments Dream Theater February 2014 John Petrucci Wild Stringdom Artist Lessons Videos News Lessons Magazine Thu, 17 Apr 2014 20:21:46 +0000 John Petrucci http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20105 The Ataris Tour Blog: How I Learned to Stop Worrying & Love My Ovation Acoustic http://www.guitarworld.com/ataris-tour-blog-how-i-learned-stop-worrying-love-my-ovation-acoustic <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The Ataris just wrapped a tour that reunited the classic lineup that created their 2003 major label debut</em> So Long, Astoria.<em> Guitarist John Collura documented this reunion. Check out the second installment of his report below.</em></p> <p>Let me just put this out there, I love my Martin. I'm the type of person that would want to keep my Martin in a glass case at all times. With that said when I go on the road I like to take an acoustic guitar with me to write. When traveling on a bus it's really easy to be able to carry an acoustic guitar on board and stow it away in a junk bunk or back lounge. </p> <p>But when traveling with a van and trailer it becomes more difficult. I know there are some really great road cases built specifically for acoustic guitars. SKB makes a really nice one, but with quality comes price. So on this latest tour, I opted not to bring my Martin because I was paranoid with leaving it in the trailer. My friend Jason at Fender/Ovation helped me out with an alternative solution. He sent me out an Elite T 2078TX Ovation guitar.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Ataris-Ovation-Martin.jpg" width="620" height="422" alt="Ataris-Ovation-Martin.jpg" /><br /> <strong>Collura's new Elite T 2078TX Ovation (left), and his beloved Martin</strong></p> <p>Yeah I know what you're thinking, I have a Martin and took out an Ovation instead. Well to my surprise this 2078TX has some serious tone, it's not your Uncle Rick's Ovation from his 1980's terrible cover band. And even more surprisingly, the guitar is built like a brick shit house. It's covered in a textured enamel, like the same as the back of a pickup truck. I'm not concerned with babying this guitar, it's built to be road worthy and the action and feel of the guitar is really comfortable.</p> <p>Does this mean I'm done with my Martin? Hell no. But I couldn't be happier to have a durable, great sounding acoustic that I can take on the road. </p> http://www.guitarworld.com/ataris-tour-blog-how-i-learned-stop-worrying-love-my-ovation-acoustic#comments John Collura The Ataris Blogs News Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:01:43 +0000 John Collura http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21029 Hear It Now: Mastodon Premiere New Song "High Road" http://www.guitarworld.com/hear-it-now-mastodon-premiere-new-song-high-road <!--paging_filter--><p>Atlanta's Mastodon have just premiered a new song, “High Road.” The song comes off <em>Once More Round the Sun</em>, their sixth studio album to be released this summer.</p> <p>Check it out below and let us know what you think in the comments.</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/145055304%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-kgi7V&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=true&amp;visual=true" height="360" width="630" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/hear-it-now-mastodon-premiere-new-song-high-road#comments Mastodon News Thu, 17 Apr 2014 15:34:00 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21037 Update: Malcolm Young "Taking a Break" from AC/DC http://www.guitarworld.com/update-malcolm-young-taking-break-acdc <!--paging_filter--><p>It seems there's some sad truth behind the <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/report-acdc-call-it-quits-due-malcolm-youngs-illness">speculation</a> surrounding AC/DC's imminent breakup due to Malcolm Young's health issues.</p> <p>The classic hard rock band may not be breaking up, but their rhythm guitarist is, for the moment, stepping down to deal with health issues.</p> <p>Here's the official statement from the band, which appeared earlier today on their <a href="https://www.facebook.com/acdc">official Facebook page</a>: </p> <p>"After forty years of life dedicated to AC/DC, guitarist and founding member Malcolm Young is taking a break from the band due to ill health. Malcolm would like to thank the group’s diehard legions of fans worldwide for their never-ending love and support.</p> <p>"In light of this news, AC/DC asks that Malcolm and his family’s privacy be respected during this time. The band will continue to make music."</p> <p>Our thoughts go out to Malcolm and his family.</p> <p>We'll keep you posted as we hear more.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/acdc">AC/DC</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/update-malcolm-young-taking-break-acdc#comments ACDC Malcolm Young News Thu, 17 Apr 2014 11:34:44 +0000 Brad Angle http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21028 Pantera Combo Offer: Get New Pantera Issue of Revolver and Limited 'Far Beyond Driven' T-Shirt for $24.99 http://www.guitarworld.com/pantera-combo-offer-get-new-pantera-issue-revolver-and-limited-far-beyond-driven-t-shirt-2499 <!--paging_filter--><p>There's a new combo offer at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/revolvers-may-june-pantera-issue-and-far-beyond-driven-t-shirt/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=FarBeyondDrivenCombo">Guitar World Online Store!</a></p> <p>Get <em>Revolver</em> magazine's April/May 2014 Pantera issue and a limited <em>Far Beyond Driven</em> T-shirt for $24.99! </p> <p>The cover story of the newsstand edition of the latest issue of <em>Revolver</em> tells the story behind Pantera's <em>Far Beyond Driven</em>. The album, which still stands as the heaviest record to debut at Number 1 on the charts, turns 20 this year.</p> <p>In commemoration of that anniversary, <em>Revolver</em> also has created a highly limited-edition T-shirt paying tribute to the album. Only 250 T-shirts have been printed, so take advantage of this issue AND T-shirt combo offer before they sell out!</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/revolvers-may-june-pantera-issue-and-far-beyond-driven-t-shirt/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=FarBeyondDrivenCombo">Head to the Guitar World Online Store now!</a></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/pantera-combo-offer-get-new-pantera-issue-revolver-and-limited-far-beyond-driven-t-shirt-2499#comments News Thu, 17 Apr 2014 11:32:48 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21023 Listen: Rare Soundgarden "Black Hole Sun" Demo http://www.guitarworld.com/listen-rare-soundgarden-black-hole-sun-demo <!--paging_filter--><p>Soundgarden are celebrating the 20th anniversary of their hit record <em>Superunknown</em> with a couple special reissue packages, available on June 3, 2014 via A&amp;M Records/UME. The Deluxe Edition is a 2-CD package featuring the remastered album along with disc two consisting of demos, rehearsals, B-sides and more.</p> <p>The Super Deluxe Edition is a 5-CD package featuring the remastered album, additional demos, rehearsals and B-sides and the fifth disc is the album mixed in Blu-ray Audio 5.1 Surround Sound. The Super Deluxe Edition is incredibly packaged in a hardbound book with a lenticular cover, liner notes by David Fricke and newly reimagined album artwork designed by Josh Graham. It also features never before seen band photography by Kevin Westenberg. A 2-LP gatefold of the original 16 vinyl tracks remastered on 200-gram vinyl in a gatefold jacket will also be made available. In addition, the Superunknown singles and associated b-sides with newly interpreted artwork sleeves by Josh Graham will be reissued on Record Store Day, April 19th, as a set of five limited edition 10″ vinyl records.</p> <p>Give a listen to their "Black Hole Sun" Demo, from this new release, below.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/143824508&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/listen-rare-soundgarden-black-hole-sun-demo#comments Soundgarden News Wed, 16 Apr 2014 20:23:07 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21031 The Ataris Tour Blog: "Tubes? We Don't Need No Stinking Tubes!" http://www.guitarworld.com/ataris-tour-blog-tubes-we-dont-need-no-stinking-tubes <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The Ataris just wrapped a tour that reunited the classic lineup that created their 2003 major label debut </em>So Long, Astoria<em>. Guitarist John Collura documented this reunion. Check out the first installment of his report below.</em></p> <p>I just got home form being out on The Ataris, "So Long, Astoria Reunion Tour". Prior to leaving for tour I was debating which amp I would take with me. We performed our record <em>So Long, Astoria</em> in its entirety so I was consciously making an effort to take the most versatile amp that I own. </p> <p>I have been playing in bands for almost 18 years and I've become a bit of tone snob. I currently own four different amp heads and all of them are amazing tube amps. The problem is, they are all great at producing their own tone. Doesn't sound like a problem until you have to perform an entire record that was produced using multiple types of amplifiers.</p> <p>Weeks before I left for tour I was extremely lucky to be introduced to the fine folks at Blackstar. They had me come down to their showroom and try out all types of wonderful amps, all of them being tube heads. The last amp that we tried out was the Blackstar ID 100 TVP head. When we fired this baby up everyone in the room turned their heads with their mouths open.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Blackstar-Comp.jpg" width="620" height="422" alt="Blackstar-Comp.jpg" /></p> <p>The power, bite and bottom end out of this amp was incredible. It was then brought to my attention that this is not a tube amp, it's all digital. I couldn't believe it so I needed to test it out some more. I was already sold on the massive amount of distortion and gain the amp had but I needed to see if this thing could produce some natural breakup. Here's where things get really interesting.</p> <p>The amp is basically a tube emulator, it models 6 different types of tubes (EL84, 6V6, EL34, KT66, 6L6, KT88) which they call True Valve Power or TVP. The ID 100 also has 6 different voicing features Clean Warm, Clean Bright, Crunch, Super Crunch, OD1, OD2. I tried the Super Crunch channel matched with the KT66 and pushed the gain to about 1 o'clock and now the amp sounds like a Vox on steroids! </p> <p>The possibilities are endless and there's no shortage of tone or versatility, there's just no tubes. I asked Blackstar for one amp and they gave me 36! I challenge anyone to a blind test that you will never believe this amp is all digital. Sorry you elitist tube snobs, the Blackstar ID 100TVP is the real deal.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/ataris-tour-blog-tubes-we-dont-need-no-stinking-tubes#comments John Collura The Ataris Blogs News Wed, 16 Apr 2014 16:02:53 +0000 John Collura http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21022 Dog Camp: Richie Kotzen and Mike Portnoy Discuss the Winery Dogs' Immersive New Camp for Musicians http://www.guitarworld.com/dog-camp-richie-kotzen-and-mike-portnoy-discuss-winery-dogs-immersive-new-camp-musicians <!--paging_filter--><p>If you've ever wanted to get up close and personal with three of rocks' most talented musicians, here’s your opportunity. </p> <p>Richie Kotzen, Billy Sheehan and Mike Portnoy — better known as the Winery Dogs — have announced Dog Camp, their first-ever immersive program for aspiring musicians of all ages and levels.</p> <p>The event is set for July 21 to 25, 2014, at Full Moon Resort in Big Indian, New York.</p> <p>Attendees will be able to take part in instrument specific clinics and will learn about songwriting mechanics and the music industry. They'll even get to enjoy intimate performances by the Winery Dogs.</p> <p>If you’re a guitarist, bassist or drummer, there’s a course path for you to follow. But Dog Camp promises to be a deeper experience; the campers will be living, hanging out and jamming together. You’ll also be able to ask the hosts as many questions as as you want — and Kotzen, Sheehan and Portnoy will initiate one-on-one and group sessions to help you realize your goals as a player.</p> <p>I recently spoke to Kotzen and Portnoy about Dog Camp and what’s next for the band.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: What was the reason behind the inaugural Dog Camp?</strong></p> <p><strong>Kotzen</strong>: It was something that was brought to our attention by our manager. Billy and I have done our fair share of clinics and have also participated in Rock and Roll Fantasy Camp. The idea of being in a position where you can actually sit and talk and play with people who are buying your records or are listening to what you do is inspiring.</p> <p><strong>What will a typical day be like?</strong></p> <p><strong>Kotzen</strong>: There will be a lot of one-on-one time and in groups. We’ll also have opportunities to play together, but not just cover songs. I really want to address improvisation and being able to unlock yourself and play with other people. </p> <p>I also like getting involved in what I call “concepts." Asking yourself, “Why am I learning the instrument and what are my goals and objectives?” Then we can start talking about how you can get there. For me, I use the guitar as a creative outlet to express myself; my biggest ongoing goal is to make the connection between me the person and the music that you hear.</p> <p><strong>Portnoy</strong>: We plan to do a lot of things individually and collectively. The "collectively" being the Winery Dogs doing special intimate shows and situations where the three of us will be open to question-and-answer sessions and playing unique things people won’t normally get at a traditional concert. </p> <p>Individually, we’ll be doing classes where we talk about our instruments, the business and industry and jamming with fellow musicians and campers. It’s going to be a very unique experience.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/IhClnCPoLeU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>What would you like campers to take away from this experience?</strong></p> <p><strong>Kotzen</strong>: The feeling of growth and knowing that you’ve learned something. This camp is an opportunity to share ideas and music and to grow as a musician and as a person. We may be the ones being asked the questions, but sometimes during the reveal I’ll gain a new found perspective on myself. I’m really looking forward to that.</p> <p><strong>Portnoy</strong>: I think it’s important for campers to remember that making music is not just about playing a drum solo in your bedroom or concentrating solely on technique. It’s about communicating with other musicians. For me, the interest is getting into it with other musicians and talking about it in a band scenario.</p> <p><strong>What can you tell me about the new <em>Special Edition Winery Dogs</em> compilation?</strong></p> <p><strong>Portnoy</strong>: <em>The Winery Dogs Special Edition</em> is a two-disc CD set that has a re-issue of the album on the first disc. The second disc contains 10 live tracks from Japan, including several covers and unreleased songs. It also has an expanded booklet with live shots. </p> <p>We also have the <em>Dog Treats</em> box set, which, in addition to the <em>Special Edition</em> set, includes a bonus disc of all of the demos we did in 2012 (before the album), a DVD with the music videos and interviews, a big booklet with my studio diary from the making of the record and little “treats” like a dog patch and dog tag.</p> <p><strong>Mike, why did you decide to include a studio diary?</strong></p> <p><strong>Portnoy</strong>: I’ve always been a stickler for detail and documenting things and organizing facts. When I was doing the studio diary, I wanted to get very specific about how a song came together. It’s interesting to read it and see the history behind every song. Like which ones came from Richie or which ones we came with on the spot or which songs morphed from other songs and demos. It’s a cool insight into not only the making of the record, but also the very beginning of the relationship of the guys in the band.</p> <p><strong>Can you give us an update on your tour plans and new Winery Dogs music?</strong></p> <p><strong>Portnoy</strong>: We’ll be out on the road April to August and plan on getting the follow-up album out in 2015. We’ve already written one new song that’s going to be in the live set.</p> <p><strong>You’ve all been involved in other bands and projects over the years. What do you enjoy most about being in the Winery Dogs?</strong></p> <p><strong>Kotzen</strong>: I really enjoy the notion of being in a band where everyone is able to share the load. It’s kind of like being on a really strong basketball team in the sense that you have three guys who are all capable of putting up points instead of just relying on one guy. That’s my favorite aspect of all.</p> <p><strong>Portnoy</strong>: For me, it’s about working with Billy and Richie. They’re musicians I have the utmost respect for and am a huge fan of. Stylistically, I enjoy being able to play something that is straight-up classic rock. I love prog and am the ambassador to prog music for this generation, but my musical taste is very broad. Every once in a while, it’s nice to get into Zeppelin, Who and Beatles mode, and I get to do that with the Winery Dogs.</p> <p><Strong>For more information on Dog Camp, visit <a href="http://winerydogcamp.com/">winerydogcamp.com</a>. For more about the Winery Dogs, visit <A href="http://www.thewinerydogs.com/">thewinerydogs.com</a>.</strong></p> <p><em>James Wood is a writer, musician and self-proclaimed metalhead who maintains his own website, <a href="http://gojimmygo.net/">GoJimmyGo.net</a>. His articles and interviews are written on a variety of topics with passion and humor. You can follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/JimEWood">Twitter @JimEWood.</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/richie-kotzen">Richie Kotzen</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/dog-camp-richie-kotzen-and-mike-portnoy-discuss-winery-dogs-immersive-new-camp-musicians#comments Mike Portnoy Richie Kotzen The Winery Dogs Videos Interviews News Features Wed, 16 Apr 2014 10:38:15 +0000 James Wood http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21018 May 2014 Guitar World: Zakk Wylde & Joe Satriani, How to Build a Pedal Board, John Frusciante, Death Angel, Tabs, Lessons and More http://www.guitarworld.com/may-2014-guitar-world-zakk-wylde-joe-satriani-how-build-pedal-board-john-frusciante-death-angel-tabs-lessons-and-more <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>The all-new May 2014 issue of Guitar World is <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/guitar-world-may-14-zakk-wylde-joe-satriani/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=GWMAY14">available now!</a></strong></p> <p>In the new May issue, <strong>Zakk "The Beast" Wylde</strong> and <strong>Joe "The Professor" Satriani</strong> meet up to riff on their craziest concert moments, Jimmy Page, and the state of rock guitar in 2014. Also, in an excerpt from his new autobiography, <em>Strange Beautiful Music: A Musical Memoir</em>, Satriani recalls the making of tracks from his breakthrough album, <em>Surfing with the Alien</em>.</p> <p>In addition, learn how <strong>Death Angel</strong> was poised to be metal's next big thing, until a horrific accident brought their ascent to a halt. Guitarist Rob Cavestany looks back at the group's rise and fall, and the rebirth that has brought them hard-won success.</p> <p>Later on, <strong>John Frusciante</strong>, the former Red Hot Chili Pepper, keeps the home fires burning with his latest solo effort, <em>Enclosure</em>, and tells why his performing days are behind him.</p> <p>Finally, want to master speed, precision and control in your guitar playing? An in-depth guide to hybrid picking will have you playing like a pro in no time.</p> <p>PLUS: <strong>Mastodon, Memphis May Fire, George Lynch, Skaters, Donovan</strong> and much more!</p> <p><strong>Five Songs with Tabs for Guitar and Bass</strong></p> <p> • Joe Satriani - "Summer Song"<br /> • Darius Rucker - "Wagon Wheel"<br /> • Red Hot Chili Peppers - "Dani California"<br /> • Black Label Society - "Stillborn"<br /> • Of Mice &amp; Men - "You're Not Alone"</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/guitar-world-may-14-zakk-wylde-joe-satriani/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=GWMAY14">The May 2014 issue of Guitar World is available now at the Guitar World Online Store!</a></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/may-2014-guitar-world-zakk-wylde-joe-satriani-how-build-pedal-board-john-frusciante-death-angel-tabs-lessons-and-more#comments May 2014 News Features Wed, 16 Apr 2014 10:37:13 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20938 Guitarist Rob Cavestany Looks Back at the Rise, Fall and Rebirth of Death Angel http://www.guitarworld.com/guitarist-rob-cavestany-looks-back-rise-fall-and-rebirth-death-angel <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This is an excerpt from the May 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the rest of this story, plus features on Zakk Wylde &amp; Joe Satriani, John Frusciante, how to build a pedal board, a complete finger picking lesson, columns, tabs and reviews of new gear from Line 6, Ibanez, Strymon, G&amp;L, Ernie Ball and Orange, <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-14-zakk-wylde-joe-satriani/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=ZakkJoeExcerpt">check out the May 2014 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <p><strong>Blood Sacrifice: <em>In 1990, Death Angel were poised to be as big as Metallica until a horrific accident brought their ascent to a halt. Guitar Rob Cavestany looks back at the group’s rise and fall, and the rebirth that has brought them hard-won success.</em></strong></p> <p>Sitting in his home studio in Oakland, California, on a bright, breezy afternoon this past January, Cavestany appears to have come through Death Angel’s tribulations having regained a bit of his youthful optimism. </p> <p>The 45-year-old guitarist looks fit and nonchalantly rocks a timeless thrasher look that includes a full head of long black hair, a sleeveless shirt and tattooed arms. He’s also beaming with smiles and, in charming Cali fashion, is <em>hella stoked</em> to explain how a group of teenage cousins won over the Eighties Bay Area thrash scene, imploded, rebuilt and now—30 years later—sound better than ever. </p> <p>We’re soon joined by Cavestany’s six-string wingman, Aguilar, and his affable black lab, London. Over a plate of fresh fruit and cheese (the latter a particular favorite of London’s), Cavestany begins the Death Angel story at a familiar place for many budding rockers who came of age in the Seventies.</p> <p>“Kiss were the main reason why we got into music,” he says between sips of beer. “We had posters all over and we worshipped them. The original lineup of Death Angel were all cousins, so we would give lip-sync performances at family functions.”</p> <p>The jump from lip-syncing to really playing came after Cavestany and Dennis Pepa’s mothers took the boys to Kiss’ 1979 performance at the Cow Palace, outside of San Francisco. Witnessing the larger-than-life set lit a fire under the 11-year-old Cavestany, who made the decision then and there to play an instrument. He started off on drums, but it wasn’t until he picked up his father’s old acoustic guitar that he found his calling. He soon graduated to electric guitar and began exploring even heavier music.</p> <p>“When I started to play guitar, at the very first it was Sabbath, Zeppelin and AC/DC,” Cavestany says. “Then came Priest, Maiden and Scorpions, then Accept, Tygers of Pan Tang, along with Eddie Van Halen, and Randy Rhoads of course, who would have to be my all-time hero.” </p> <p>By 1983, when Cavestany was all of 15, Death Angel—at that time a four-piece featuring Galeon, Gus and Dennis Pepa, and Cavestany on both vocals and guitar—cut their first four-song demo, Heavy Metal Insanity, which reflected their classic metal and NWOBHM inspirations. Cavestany credits his discovery of Metallica as being the turning point when Death Angel’s style evolved into the manic thrashing sound they would become known for. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/GS2x1nqJgkY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>“Seeing Metallica play was the next thing after we saw Kiss, when we’re all like, Oh shit! We’ve got to change our style. We’ve got to get heavier and faster,” Cavestany says.</p> <p>Metallica would play a pivotal role in the Death Angel story in more ways than one. After attending a Metallica in-store signing, the guys unexpectedly hit it off with Kirk Hammett. Over the next few years, as Death Angel continued to gig and refine their sound, they would pass their boom-box demos to the guitarist whenever they would run into him at local metal shows. Their persistence paid off when Hammett agreed to produce their second batch of songs, which would become their 1986 <em>Kill as One</em> demo.</p> <p>“Kirk was really nice and always really supportive of us,” Cavestany recalls. “Eventually he heard enough potential to get himself involved, which was very major for us.”</p> <p>Kill as One benefited from Hammett’s production insights as well as the addition of singer Mark Osegueda (another of Cavestany’s cousin), whose style gave the music a fresh thrash flavor and edge that was missing from the old-school sounds on Heavy Metal Insanity. Kill as One became popular among the tape-trading scene, and Death Angel scored key gigs opening for bands like Slayer. Soon, indie label Enigma approached the group with a contract for a full-length record.</p> <p>“I’m sure the novelty is what first got people’s attention,” Cavestany says with a laugh. “Like, These guys are way young, they’re all cousins, and they look like small Chinese girls going crazy onstage!”</p> <p>Riding a wave of youthful exuberance and unwavering confidence, Death Angel blazed through the recording of the songs that would become their debut album, 1987’s <em>The Ultra-Violence</em>. Tracked in three days and mixed in two, their fierce debut confirmed that these kids weren’t a novelty—this was serious thrash on par with many of the older more experienced bands of the scene. It had the speed of early Metallica, the unhinged quality of Slayer and the brazen attack of Anthrax. </p> <p>“We didn’t really second-guess too many things that we were doing,” Cavestany says. “We just went at it relentlessly. We thought it was amazing. Now if I try to play along to that CD, I almost can’t do it because we are so out of control. [laughs] It’s so off, and everyone’s crazy. But it’s got that rawness.”</p> <p>While Death Angel may have managed to get a full-length pressed and catch some people’s attention, they certainly weren’t living on easy street. The guys were still toiling at their day jobs and relying on their families’ support.</p> <p>“I was working at Tower Records when <em>The Ultra-Violence</em> came out,” Cavestany recalls. “And my dad was my main roadie for the first couple of years, buying me equipment and driving me around. Our families couldn’t understand the kind of music we were trying to play, but they were proud of us. My grandmother would come to our shows, and my mom would be there wearing her Death Angel shirt.”</p> <p><em><strong>For the rest of this story, plus features on Zakk Wylde &amp; Joe Satriani, John Frusciante, how to build a pedal board, a complete finger picking lesson, columns, tabs and reviews of new gear from Line 6, Ibanez, Strymon, G&amp;L, Ernie Ball and Orange, <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-14-zakk-wylde-joe-satriani/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=ZakkJoeExcerpt">check out the May 2014 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></strong></em></p> <p><em>Photos: Jimmy Hubbard</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/death-angel">Death Angel</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitarist-rob-cavestany-looks-back-rise-fall-and-rebirth-death-angel#comments Death Angel May 2014 Interviews News Features Magazine Tue, 15 Apr 2014 20:53:58 +0000 Brad Angle http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20948