News http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/4/0 en Genre-Fusing Del McCoury Discusses Taking Bluegrass to Bonnaroo and Beyond http://www.guitarworld.com/del-mccoury-still-spreading-bluegrass-message <!--paging_filter--><p>Del McCoury has been writing, recording and performing bluegrass music for more than 50 years. </p> <p>At 75, he continues touring, making albums and doing session work, bringing the traditional music that he loves to longtime fans and new generations. </p> <p>McCoury sings and plays lead guitar in his band. Joining him are fiddle player Jason Carter, bassist Alan Bartram, and sons Rob McCoury on banjo and Ronnie McCoury on mandolin.</p> <p>In this interview, Del McCoury discusses how he has crossed bluegrass music into new genres, how technology has affected tradition and why it makes sense to bring bluegrass to rock's concert and festival scenes.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: Very few artists can say they have a foot in every genre of music. Are you able to stand outside of this and realize how much you've accomplished and the impact you have?</strong></p> <p>Not really, but it is kind of amazing. I’ve played with major jam bands like Phish, the String Cheese Incident and Leftover Salmon. We’ve played venues together, and the reason we’ve done that, I think, is because all music is related. Music is music. There’s good and bad, and that’s subject to taste. There are so many things I like that I heard through the years. </p> <p>I love listening to Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra; they were big when I was a kid. I was interested in Earl Scruggs and the banjo style he played. A lot of times these bands have been to my shows, and they call me and want us to play with them. That’s the way I get to be around all genres of music. </p> <p>When somebody calls me to record and I’m not sure I can do it, I go and try and see what happens. I’m always up for a challenge. I record with a lot of different people and it’s so much fun. I never have a set list onstage. I never know which songs I’m going to do. People request songs, and I try to get new songs if we’re promoting a new record, but mostly I play requests. I’ve got four guys with me, they do their thing, and when someone makes a request, if I’m lucky I remember the words! Otherwise, I’ll just take a solo while I confer with someone in the band about the next verse, and sometimes they give me the verse I just sang!</p> <p><strong>You’ve played every festival from Bonnaroo to Jazz Fest. When you look at someone like Johnny Cash, it took Rick Rubin to put him in front of young audiences and they adored him. Is there a tendency to underestimate the taste of the general public?</strong></p> <p>Exactly. You said it exactly right. I wonder the same kind of thing over and over. It’s exciting to hear something new and different, and the average person feels the same way. </p> <p>I remember the first time we played Bonnaroo. We were in California, and we had to go home and then travel there the next day. We lease our buses now and we were playing on Sunday. We were really worried about traffic and there was none. The road was open because everyone had gotten there on Thursday. I thought, Will they even know what we do? They got so loud; people were screaming requests, which surprised me. Somebody wrote a request down on a piece of cardboard with a Sharpie and held it up, and from there, people began holding up signs with their requests. That was my first experience with Bonnaroo, and it was fun. We played it every other year.</p> <p><strong>After all these years, are there times when you still feel you’re rediscovering the instruments?</strong></p> <p>Yeah, I sure do. You keep learning forever, you never stop. I learned G, C and D when I learned to play, and every song had that. That was bluegrass in the 1970s. Then I started doing different things than what most bluegrass bands do. This interviewer said to me once, “Most bluegrass songs have three or four chords, and one of yours has seven. What you think of that?” I said, “I never thought about it. I recorded it because I liked it, and the only way to do it was with seven chords in it.” </p> <p>Bluegrass people are often purists, and you have to grow. As a kid, the bluegrass banjo — especially Earl Scruggs’ three-finger playing style — excited me the most, but as I grew older my tastes widened. Everyone gets something from somewhere, and again, all music is related.</p> <p><strong>Bluegrass players are known for jam sessions. Do they still go on? Are musicians losing that because of technology and sending files?</strong></p> <p>I wonder about that. Years ago we would jam all night and do a show the next day because we love to play. You don’t see that as much as you used to. There are a lot of bluegrass fests, but I don’t see especially professional musicians getting out there after the show and playing. </p> <p>I used to see Bill Monroe do that when he was in his 60s. We played in Camp Springs, North Carolina, at a bluegrass fest one Labor Day weekend. One night it was real dark, they didn’t light up the places like they do now, and I was jamming with some guys. A guy came up behind me and said, “Don’t you think it’s time for you to be in bed?” </p> <p>Then he played a chord on his mandolin and I knew who it was — it was Bill. I left around 4 or 5 o’clock in the morning and he was still playing! You’re right, we used to do that. I don’t do it as much now because I need some rest, but jamming used to be the normal thing. We all looked forward to playing late at night with everybody else. </p> <p><em><a href="http://www.examiner.com/article/rewind-with-bluegrass-artist-del-mccoury-my-only-advice-is-don-t-give-up">Read more of Del McCoury’s interview here.</a></em></p> <p><em>Alison Richter interviews artists, producers, engineers and other music industry professionals for print and online publications. <a href="http://www.examiner.com/music-industry-in-national/alison-richter">Read more of her interviews right here.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/del-mccoury-still-spreading-bluegrass-message#comments Alison Richter Del McCoury Interviews News Features Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:09:40 +0000 Alison Richter http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22715 Jim Dunlop Effect Pedal Throwdown, Round 1: Way Huge Pork Loin Overdrive Vs. Way Huge Fat Sandwich Distortion http://www.guitarworld.com/jim-dunlop-effect-pedal-throwdown-round-1-way-huge-pork-loin-overdrive-vs-way-huge-301-fat-sandwich-distortion <!--paging_filter--><p>It's time to compare the mettle of Jim Dunlop pedals!</p> <p>In GuitarWorld.com's latest readers poll — the first annual Jim Dunlop Effect Pedal Throwdown — we're pitting Dunlop, MXR and Way Huge pedals against each other in a no-holds-barred shootout. </p> <p>Yes, we're pulling out all the stomps! Thirty-two stompboxes will go head to head — or toe to toe, if you prefer — culminating with the crowning of the king of Dunlop pedals.</p> <p>You can check out the beginning bracket — with all 32 competing pedals — in the <a href="https://www.scribd.com/">Scribd.com</a> window below (Be sure to click on the "full screen" button in the lower-right-hand corner to expand the bracket). </p> <p>The bracket will be updated after every matchup, and matchups will take place pretty much every day. Each competing pedal will accompanied by a demo video created by the Jim Dunlop company, and you'll always find a photo gallery of the competing pedals at the bottom of each matchup.</p> <h1>Today's Matchup</h1> <p>In today's matchup, the <strong>Way Huge WHE201 Pork Loin Overdrive</strong> goes foot to foot against the <strong>Way Huge WHE 301 Fat Sandwich Distortion</strong> pedal. Start voting below!</p> <p><Strong>YESTERDAY'S RESULTS</strong>: Yesterday, the <strong>MXR Uni-Vibe Chorus/Vibrato</strong> (80.08 percent) destroyed the <strong>MXR Micro Chorus</strong> (19.92 percent) and advanced to the next round! <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/jim-dunlop-effect-pedal-throwdown">To see all the matchups that have taken place so far, head HERE.</a> Thanks for voting!</p> <h1>Meet the Combatants</h1> <p><strong><a href="http://www.jimdunlop.com/product/Pork-Loin">Way Huge WHE201 Pork Loin Overdrive</a></strong></p> <p>Make room for one more Way Huge original! The Pork Loin incorporates two distinct tonal pathways that are blended together—a modern soft clipping overdrive and a modified classic British preamp for clean. At the heart of the Pork Loin’s overdrive path is a soft clipped BiFET overdrive gain stage with a passive Tone control, rounded out by a Curve function that gives the user freedom to fine-tune corner frequencies. </p> <p>The Volume control regulates the masses of pork power that exude from its space age circuitry, leaving room for the Clean control to blend in its warm glistening clean tones. Additionally, the Pork Loin has three internal mini controls: Filter and Voice deliver extensive tonal shaping possibilities, while the overdrive Mix control allows the Pork Loin to be run as a clean preamp. With a wide range of dynamic tones, the Pork Loin is the premier overdrive pedal on the market today!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/i-oPVBuIEvk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="http://www.jimdunlop.com/product/Fat-Sandwich">Way Huge WHE 301 Fat Sandwich Distortion</a></strong></p> <p>The Fat Sandwich represents a new era in pedal design for Way Huge. In addition to carrying on the Way Huge tradition of amazing tone, rugged construction and cool names, the Fat Sandwich delivers heaps of crunchy distortion goodness via its innovative multi-stage clipping circuit. Meticulously designed from the ground up, the passive tone stack was tuned to bring out the “sweet spot” with any guitar and amp combination. </p> <p>The Volume control produces tons of output, making it ideal for driving the headroom out of the most powerful tube amps. Additionally, the Fat Sandwich has two internal mini controls: the Curve knob lets the user fine-tune the corner frequency of the overdrive filtering and the Sustain control adjusts the gain of the final distortion stage. The Fat Sandwich is versatile and over the top—the consummate distortion pedal for any genre or playing style.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/0hSb3ncRXNo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <h1>Vote Now!</h1> <script type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8" src="http://static.polldaddy.com/p/8410530.js"></script><p><noscript><a href="http://polldaddy.com/poll/8410530/">Jim Dunlop Effect Pedal Throwdown, Round 1: Way Huge Pork Loin Overdrive Vs. Way Huge 301 Fat Sandwich Distortion</a></noscript></p> <p style=" margin: 12px auto 6px auto; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,Sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14px; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; -x-system-font: none; display: block;"> <a title="View Jim Dunlop on Scribd" href="https://www.scribd.com/doc/245004897/Jim-Dunlop" style="text-decoration: underline;" >Jim Dunlop</a></p> <p><iframe class="scribd_iframe_embed" src="https://www.scribd.com/embeds/245004897/content?start_page=1&amp;view_mode=scroll&amp;show_recommendations=true" data-auto-height="false" data-aspect-ratio="undefined" scrolling="no" id="doc_25508" width="100%" height="400" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jim-dunlop-effect-pedal-throwdown-round-1-way-huge-pork-loin-overdrive-vs-way-huge-301-fat-sandwich-distortion#comments Jim Dunlop Jim Dunlop Effect Pedal Throwdown Poll Polls Way Huge Effects News Features Gear Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:39:31 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22708 December 2014 Guitar World: Slipknot, Slash on 'Fire,' Joe Bonamassa, D'Angelico Jazz Box Phenomenon and More http://www.guitarworld.com/december-2014-guitar-world-slipknot-slash-fire-joe-bonamassa-dangelico-jazz-box-phenomenon-and-more <!--paging_filter--><p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/guitar-world-december-14-slipknot/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=GWDEC14">The all-new December 2014 issue of Guitar World is available now!</a></strong></p> <p>In the new issue, we feature <strong>Slipknot</strong>. Between the death and departure of various band members, Slipknot have had a rough few years. With <em>.5: The Gray Chapter</em>, they channel the energy of deceased bassist Paul Gray and return with a brutal but multifaceted album.</p> <p>Then, <em>Guitar World</em> focuses on <strong>Slash</strong>. Everyone's favorite hard-rocking riffmaster returns with <em>World on Fire</em>, his new searing-hot album with Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators.</p> <p>Next, to celebrate the release of his new album, <em>Different Shades of Blue</em>, <strong>Joe Bonamassa</strong> invites us over for a look at his ever-growing collection of vintage axes and amps.</p> <p>Later, <strong>Motionless in White</strong> have been one of metal's most outrageous and audacious bands. On <em>Reincarnate</em>, they bring their vision into focus and wind up with a killer album.</p> <p>Finally, read about <strong>Electric Wizard</strong>. They've been cursed with arrests, accidents and a recent breakup with their label. But with their latest album, <em>Time to Die</em>, the stoner-doomers prove they still have plenty of life left.</p> <p>PLUS: Tune-ups for <strong>Pierce the Veil, Royal Blood, Uncle Acid &amp; the Deadbeats, Lenny Kravitz, Archaon of 1349, Wovenwar, Parquet Courts, Crowbar's</strong> Set List, <strong>Mr. Big,</strong> New EQ The latest and greatest, Lace USA Sensor pickup, Man of Steel, Metal for Life, Acoustic Nation and much more!</p> <p><strong>Five Songs with Tabs for Guitar and Bass</strong></p> <p>• Blue Öyster Cult - “Cities On Flame with Rock and Roll"<br /> • Trivium - “Strife”<br /> • Joe Bonamassa - " The Ballad of John Henry"<br /> • W.A. Mozart - “Eine Kleine Nachtmusik"<br /> • Bad Company - "Can't Get Enough"</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/guitar-world-december-14-slipknot/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=GWDEC14">Head to the Guitar World Online Store now!</a></strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-10-07%20at%2010.21.37%20AM.png" width="620" height="807" alt="Screen Shot 2014-10-07 at 10.21.37 AM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/december-2014-guitar-world-slipknot-slash-fire-joe-bonamassa-dangelico-jazz-box-phenomenon-and-more#comments December 2014 News Features Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:38:53 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22579 Review: Ibanez ES2 Echo Shifter — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/review-ibanez-es2-echo-shifter-video <!--paging_filter--><p>When it comes to echo and delay pedals, guitarists have a choice of analog or digital, each of which has its pros and cons. </p> <p>While analog units typically create the most natural-sounding repeats, they dull the fidelity of the source signal and don’t provide precise control over the timing of the repeated signal. Digital units, on the other hand, offer more finite control and pristine sound processing but lack warmth and are known to inject digital artifacts. </p> <p>Ibanez’s ES2 Echo Shifter combines the best of both worlds by mating a superb, no-compromises, all-analog audio path to a digital control circuit. Better still, the Echo Shifter features unique oscillation and modulation circuits that add greater versatility, letting you create everything from subtle to extreme sonic weirdness. </p> <p><strong>Features:</strong> There’s a lot to love about the Echo Shifter, from its Seventies-style wood-and-stamped-steel housing to its well-placed controls and classic and clean styling. The smooth mixing-console-style center slider governs the delay time (30 to 1,000ms), the feedback control sets the the number of repeats, the mix knob balances the ratio of wet/dry signal, and two clicks of the tap button sets the delay’s tempo/speed through an ultra-accurate digital circuit. </p> <p>So far, it’s pretty familiar stuff, but the Echo Shifter’s oscillation control takes things into an entirely different dimension. Activating it pumps the delay gain by 15db, allowing the Echo Shifter to feedback infinitely and produce extreme and otherworldly delay effects, drones and dissonance. There’s also a modulation feature that can add subtle chorusing, vibrato-like flutters or slow groaning siren sweeps, depending on the depth control setting. The Echo Shifter features 1/4-inch mono input and output jacks and is powered by a nine-volt battery or adapter. </p> <p><strong>Performance:</strong> Hats off to Ibanez for the pure sonic integrity of the ES2 Echo Shifter. It’s one of very few under-$1,000 delay units that doesn’t degrade the signal, add compression or produce changes in feel or response. Whether placed in the effect loop or in front of the amp, the pedal sits in the mix as well as a good tube reverb tank. Whacked-out space effects are easily obtained when you engage the oscillation and modulation switches and venture into the controls’ upper ranges. Serious musicians will also appreciate how the ES2 preserves their signal and note attack, regardless of their amp’s gain setting. </p> <p><strong>List Price:</strong> $214.28<br /> <strong>Manufacturer:</strong> Ibanez guitars, <a href="ibanez.co.jp">ibanez.co.jp</a></p> <p><strong>Cheat Sheet:</strong>The all-analog signal path creates organic, accurate repeats from 30 to 1,000ms.</p> <p>Deep layers of unique delay responses are achievable through the oscillation and modulation circuits in combination with the depth control. </p> <p><strong>The Bottom Line:</strong> Ibanez’s multidimensional ES2 Echo Shifter is the tone purists’ budget delay pedal, offering phenomenal sound quality that competes with professional rack units and adds unique oscillation and modulation features. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/WsolHDI7ahI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-ibanez-es2-echo-shifter-video#comments August 2014 Ibanez Videos Effects News Gear Thu, 30 Oct 2014 14:41:29 +0000 Eric Kirkland, Video by Paul Riario http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21589 How to Adjust Your Guitar's Truss Rod — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/how-adjust-your-guitars-truss-rod-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In this new <em>Guitar World</em> video, GW's tech editor, Paul Riario, shows you how to make basic adjustments to your guitar's truss rod. </p> <p>In the clip, which you can check out below, Riario is joined by an Epiphone ES-339 PRO and a Fender Road Worn Strat.</p> <p>Fear no more, folks! You can do this!</p> <p><strong>For the latest and greatest guitar accessories, visit <a href="https://www.amplifiedparts.com/">amplifiedparts.com</a>.</strong></p> <p>P.S.: If you just can't get enough of Paul Riario telling you what to do, check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-guitar-worlds-guide-building-pedal-board">Guitar World's Guide to Building a Pedal Board — Video.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_jchVLCzZF0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/how-adjust-your-guitars-truss-rod-video#comments Paul Riario Videos News Gear Lessons Thu, 30 Oct 2014 14:28:39 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22698 Reverend Guitars and Monster Music Collaborate on Exclusive Sensei HB FM http://www.guitarworld.com/reverend-guitars-and-monster-music-collaborate-exclusive-sensei-hb-fm <!--paging_filter--><p>Reverend Guitars and Monster Music have collaborated on an exclusive Sensei HB FM model.</p> <p>From Reverend: </p> <p>The Reverend Sensei HB FM is a Flame Maple Gloss Rock Machine with raw, midrange warmth for authentic rockers. The Monster Music Exclusive is a Gloss Turquoise Burst with an ebony fretboard. </p> <p>A double-cutaway outfitted with Reverend’s own Classic H Humbuckers, the iconoclastic Korina body is capped with a flame maple top. Like all Reverends, the Reverend Sensei HB FM features Reverend’s bass contour, pin-lock tuners and a graphite nut, all for maximum performance. </p> <p>This model was a natural choice for the exclusive Monster Music Reverend guitar. </p> <p>Ken Haas of Reverend Guitars and Brian Reardon of Monster Music have forged a long-standing business relationship and friendship based on their warm, yet no-nonsense sales style. </p> <p>The Reverend Sensei HB FM in Gloss Turquoise Burst is available only at Monster Music, 3068 Hempstead Turnpike, Levittown, New York. Visit <a href="http://www.monstermusicny.com/">monstermusicny.com</a> for more information.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/reverend-guitars-and-monster-music-collaborate-exclusive-sensei-hb-fm#comments Reverend Guitars Electric Guitars News Gear Wed, 29 Oct 2014 21:57:43 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22710 PRS Guitars Adds Three All-Mahogany “S2 Standard” Models to Lineup http://www.guitarworld.com/prs-adds-three-all-mahogany-s2-standard-models-lineup <!--paging_filter--><p>Weeks before announcing its 2015 lineup, PRS Guitars has introducing three new all-mahogany S2 Series guitars: the S2 Standard 24, S2 Standard 22 and S2 Singlecut Standard. </p> <p>From the company:</p> <p>The original PRS Standard, introduced in 1987, evolved from Paul Reed Smith’s Pre-Factory all-mahogany instruments. Reimagined for the S2 Series, these guitars feature the subtle aesthetic of mahogany and pickguard-mounted electronics for a vintage vibe with modern versatility and playability that is perfect for the gigging musician. </p> <p>All three models have solid mahogany bodies, set mahogany necks, versatile electronics, and tried-and-true PRS quality.</p> <p>Known for its warm, woody tone, mahogany provides the S2 Standard models with a strong fundamental that has been built on to create guitars that play as well and sound as good plugged straight into an amp or run through a modern pedalboard setup. </p> <p>The set neck adds to the tone of these guitars by providing remarkable resonance and lasting sustain while the addition of PRS-designed pickups and push/pull tone controls gives players access to authentic singlecoil sounds in addition to strong, punchy humbucker tones.</p> <p>The only 24-fret model in the lineup, the Standard 24 is a classic PRS reimaged for players who prefer a stripped-down approach to their music. The Standard 22 goes in a more vintage direction, but remains a bare-bones workhorse for the player who needs to cover a lot of ground with their music. The Singlecut Standard boasts a classic body shape and control layout, with volume and tone controls for each pickup and a 3-way toggle pickup switch on the upper bout, giving payers plenty of options to dial in flawless tone.</p> <p>As with all S2 Series guitars, the Standard models feature S2 locking tuners, PRS-designed bridges, as well as PRS nuts, frets, and strings. This means PRS fit, finish, and attention to detail all at a more affordable price. With solid build quality and versatile electronics platform, the S2 Standard lineup can effortlessly go from high gain punk and metal to low, bassy blues, making these guitars a solid choice for players who prefer a straightforward approach to a variety of different musical styles.</p> <p>For full specifications and to see the rest of the S2 Series, visit <a href="http://www.prsguitars.com/">prsguitars.com.</a></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/prs-adds-three-all-mahogany-s2-standard-models-lineup#comments PRS Guitars Electric Guitars News Gear Wed, 29 Oct 2014 21:37:36 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22709 Devon Allman: 'Ragged & Dirty' and Loving It http://www.guitarworld.com/devon-allman-ragged-dirty-and-loving-it <!--paging_filter--><p>On one hand, you can say Devon Allman comes by his musical talents naturally, being Gregg Allman’s son. </p> <p>But the fact of the matter is, Devon’s parents were divorced when he was a baby—and he was brought up in a world that was well-insulated from the savage highs, lows, glories and turmoils of the Allman Brothers Band.</p> <p>As you’ll read below, Devon’s musical interests developed organically. Translating his passion for the music he was listening to on the radio into garage band roar, Devon was already forging his own sound by the time he met his famous father. And though their musical and personal paths have crossed over the years since, Devon’s path is truly his own, along with his sound, style and career.</p> <p>Most interesting may be Devon’s evolution as a guitar player: Though he first strapped on a six-string in his early teens, he was into his thirties before circumstance inspired him to get serious about his lead playing (as he explains in our conversation that follows).</p> <p>Devon’s latest solo album, <em>Ragged &amp; Dirty</em>, is a solid showcase of his talents—from powerful, soulful vocals to dig-in-and-let-fly guitar work. Working with producer (let alone killer drummer) Tom Hambridge, Allman has crafted a collection of tunes that spans the gamut from shake-the-speaker-out-of-the-dashboard rock roar to starlit blues jam. His originals nestle comfortably alongside covers such as the Spinners’ “I’ll Be Around” and Otis Taylor’s “Ten Million Slaves." </p> <p>Allman and his core band of bassist Felton Crews, Marty Sammon on keys and guitarist Giles Cory cover a lot of ground over <em>Ragged &amp; Dirty</em>’s dozen tracks—but every inch is a natural fit.</p> <p>Devon’s insistence that Bobby Schneck Jr. (who plays guitar in Devon’s current touring band) take a fat-toned lead on the cut “Leavin’” tells you a lot about the man. “It’s my duty to let the younger players be heard,” he told me. “That’s how this is supposed to go, man.”</p> <p>Meet Devon Allman—funky, soulful and real as hell.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: Devon, what music really grabbed you as a kid?</strong></p> <p>I was listening to Seventies rock radio; it’s called “classic rock” now, but it was cutting edge then. I was very much into Santana, the Beatles, the Stones and the Doors, you know? Eventually, I branched out into other stuff: hardcore blues, heavy metal, jazz, alternative … everything. Once I started to play guitar, I wanted to hear all the different styles: “I want to hear this guy play it this way …”</p> <p><strong>Was the guitar the first thing you picked up?</strong></p> <p>I actually started on violin, and I was horrible, man. [laughter] Truly horrible … but it didn't last long.</p> <p><strong>How old were you?</strong></p> <p>11, I think. The guitar came at 13.</p> <p><strong>I’m guessing you didn't pick up the violin on your own.</strong></p> <p>It was forced onto me, bro … it was forced onto me.</p> <p><strong>But you reached out for the guitar.</strong> </p> <p>I did, yeah. I went to my buddy Jason’s house one day after school—eighth grade. I saw this guitar in the corner of his room, and I said, “Dude, you play guitar?” And he was, like, “Oh, yeah, man … I can play.” </p> <p><strong>So I said, “Play it, then.”</strong></p> <p>He picked it up and fumbled his way through a Def Leppard song or something. And in my mind, I was thinking, “This is horrible …” [laughter] But it was the first time I'd ever watched someone play from just a few feet away, you know? And I thought, “I can do that.”</p> <p>I went home and said, “Ma, I want to play guitar.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/EzvfHijMj68" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>And what could she say?</strong></p> <p>Well, the thing was, she’d actually tried to get me to play guitar from the age of 5 or 6; tried and tried but I just didn't have any interest. I guess I didn’t think I'd be any good. When I came to her finally after seeing this kid play, she was ecstatic. She handed me her Mexican flamenco guitar that we had; she actually took lessons and played when she was a teenager.</p> <p>Of course that was impossible to play—the catgut strings, the baseball bat neck—but she said, “If you get good enough on this, I’ll buy you an electric guitar. I learned some tunes; she was impressed; and I had an electric guitar in, like, a month.</p> <p><strong>And that first electric?</strong></p> <p>A piece-of-shit Martin Stinger. [laughs]</p> <p><strong>A Stinger?</strong></p> <p>Yeah: a Strat body and it had an Eddie Van Halen paint job, or something close to it. I think I had that for six months before I got a B.C. Rich Strat body. That was my baby through high school. [laughs] We were all kids at one point. [laughter]</p> <p><strong>So once you started playing rather than just listening, how did that change things? Who were your guitar heroes early on?</strong></p> <p>Early on? Jimi Hendrix. Jimmy Page was right up there … Eddie Van Halen … all the guys from the Steely Dan records. The fact is, I really just picked up the guitar to have something to write songs with. I was just a rhythm player. I didn’t start playing lead until I was 32. I don't know … I was frightened of anything past the seventh fret. </p> <p><strong>I have to ask: Was part of it the Allman name? Was there an intimidation factor for you?</strong></p> <p>I don't think so … I mean, I was a singer out of the gate. I was the only one in the garage bands when I was a kid that kind of had the balls to go to the mic and sing, you know? I thought I should spend my time becoming a better singer and rhythm guitar player. </p> <p><strong>What was the tipping point that got you playing lead?</strong></p> <p>In 2006, my band Honeytribe really hit the road hard and started touring all over America and Europe. And that’s when our lead guitarist hit me up with, “Hey, man, touring life isn't for me. I’m leaving the band. I love ya, but I can't do this.”</p> <p>At that point, I was playing one guitar solo in the set per night, you know? It was a ballad; I could play really slow; I had this melodic, Santana kind of approach to it … and I really liked it. But it was the only one I really had any confidence in playing.</p> <p>When he left, I was like, “OK, I can replace him, or I can try and play all the guitar solos.” I gave myself six months: “All right, practice your ass off for six months; if by then you’re not cutting it, be honest with yourself and hire a hotshot guitar player.” I think about two or three months into it, I had a really breakout night on stage where everything worked … I really got a lot of confidence from that. And that was it.</p> <p><strong>Listening to <em>Ragged &amp; Dirty</em>, it’s obvious you have a wicked set of pipes. I’m thinking some folks who are new to your music might not realize that’s you doing the leads, because your voice is so damn strong.</strong></p> <p>Aw, man—thanks.</p> <p><strong>No, it’s not a compliment; it’s a statement of fact. [laughter]</strong></p> <p>Well … thank you.</p> <p><strong>But you have your own thing going on. And to me, that’s the message about this album: it's your thing. Whether we’re talking about family or your influences over the years, you’ve made your own way with your vocal and your picking. Maybe it was better that you held off on lead playing until you were 32, you know?</strong></p> <p>And that’s the crazy thing. Everything happens for a reason: and there was a reason I didn’t grow up around my Pops, you know? I got to forge my own path through music organically and I wasn’t around the insanity that was happening in those days. </p> <p>By not touching lead guitar until later on in life, I had a chance to become a good singer before I started worrying about guitar, as well … I got to take things in stages and really work at becoming a songwriter and a singer first.</p> <p>I’m not a shredder, though; I wasn’t formally schooled or anything. It's all by touch and feel and ear. The thing is, I'd much rather be able to play five notes and have someone know who I am than play 50 notes really fast. </p> <p><strong>I’ll take heart over technique any day. Heart has its own technique.</strong></p> <p>You got it, man.</p> <p><strong>I think of you as a Gibson guy . Is that true on <em>Ragged &amp; Dirty</em>?</strong> </p> <p>Absolutely. I played Strats for years, but when I switched to lead guitar, I needed a thicker voice. I went to Gibson and within a year I signed an endorsement deal with them. I’ve been a loud, proud Gibson guy for a long time now. I did pick up a Strat for the instrumental “Midnight Lake Michigan” on this record. That’s a very Strat kind of thing.</p> <p><strong>So, the primary guitar for the bulk of the tracks was …?</strong></p> <p>The same one I’ve used for the last ten years. A ’59 Cherry Sunburst Les Paul, a Custom Shop Historic that Les Paul himself signed. That’s been my baby for 10 years. It's on probably 80 percent of the record, and it’s what I play on stage most of the time.</p> <p><strong>And how about amps on this album?</strong></p> <p>You know, I’m an endorser of Fuchs; they released a Devon Allman signature amp a few years back. That’s my live rig that I’m so proud of. But for this record—believe it or not—all of my leads were done on a 15-watt 1x12 Victoria. Every single lead was done on a little tiny amp.</p> <p><strong>I remember when I discovered the secret to Duane and Clapton’s sound on <em>Layla</em> years ago: Fender Champs. Little pisspot amps that sounded as big as the world.</strong></p> <p>Absolutely, man. If you mic it right and throw a mic into the room to catch the ambience, you can mix the two. It doesn't take volume in the studio—it takes tone. </p> <p><strong>You tap into some effects along the way but you don't rely on them a lot on this album. There is one tune, “Traveling,” where you do some really tasty wah work. Who’s your wah hero?</strong></p> <p>I think when I first started playing lead, I leaned on the wah quite a bit; it was something to hide behind. But now that I’m confident as a lead player, I use it a lot less … more for texture than a gimmick. I loved all the Hendrix wah stuff. That’s my go-to.</p> <p><strong>The one track I wanted to make sure we talked about specifically is “Midnight Lake Michigan”: nine minutes and 30 seconds of sultry blues guitar porn. There are a lot of players who would’ve dug into some go-to blues clichés in an instrumental that long, but you definitely find your own way as you go.</strong></p> <p>That’s my favorite track on the record, and it was the last thing we cut. We had the album in the can as far as the basic tracks.</p> <p>I asked Tom, “Would you let me do a mood piece?”</p> <p>And he said, “What do you have in mind?”</p> <p>I told him I wanted to do a slow, spooky blues in B minor; just have the band percolate, slowly boil on the I, like, forever, like a Coltrane thing. I said, “Let me lead the band and when we get to a certain point, I’ll give the signal and we’ll go from the V to the IV and then drop right back down to the I. We’ll hold that pattern and repeat it, running through it three times. It’ll be, like, 10 minutes long.”</p> <p>Tom thought the record was strong enough where this would be a really cool artistic statement. “Let's do it,” he said.</p> <p>We went in there, played it once—and that was it. </p> <p><strong>Really?</strong></p> <p>We didn't play it a second time. What you hear is completely live; the only overdub is Marty going back to put some spooky, percussive piano wire stuff. Everything else is totally live. </p> <p>I appreciate you saying I didn't fall into any blues clichés, as I wanted to do an instrumental without doing a main head; a main melody. I wanted it to be spooky and open-ended and let it land where it wanted to land.</p> <p><strong>And that’s what it feels like: Here’s the empty wall and you’re coming in and splashing on the colors as you see fit.</strong></p> <p>Definitely—a Jackson Pollock approach. [laughs]</p> <p><strong>So why the Strat on that one?</strong></p> <p>You know … I really don't know. [laughter] I guess because I wanted the guitar to talk, you know? You can make a Les Paul sing—that violin-like, woody tone—but you can make a Strat talk. </p> <p><strong>Well, as I said earlier: that tune, and this album as a whole, is such a great example of you having your own thing going on. I mean no disrespect to the family name.</strong></p> <p>I hear you and I appreciate that. I think at the end of the day, that’s not disrespectful – I think it’s the most respectful thing to my family to have made my own way and made my own name. Sure, the music falls in the same category – the same genre - but you really do have to be your own person; you have to do your own work; you have to make your own art.</p> <p>To have a personal stamp on it has always been my goal … and I think it does my family proud to have that.</p> <p><strong>If you were a cook, I’d tell you not to mess with the recipe.</strong></p> <p>[laughs] Thank you, man—thanks so much.</p> <p><em>A former offshore lobsterman, Brian Robbins had to wait a good four decades or so to write about the stuff he wanted to when he was 15. Today he’s a freelance scribe, cartoonist, photographer and musician. His home on the worldwide inner tube is at <a href="http://brian-robbins.com/">brian-robbins.com</a> (And there’s that <a href="https://www.facebook.com/BrianRobbinsWords">Facebook</a> thing too.)</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/devon-allman-ragged-dirty-and-loving-it#comments Brian Robbins Devon Allman Interviews News Features Wed, 29 Oct 2014 17:36:27 +0000 Brian Robbins http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22707 Eric Clapton’s Favorite R&B Guitar Solo — Duane Allman Guests on Wilson Pickett's Cover of "Hey Jude" http://www.guitarworld.com/listen-eric-clapton-s-favorite-rb-guitar-solo-duane-allman-guests-wilson-picketts-cover-hey-jude <!--paging_filter--><p>"I remember hearing 'Hey Jude' by Wilson Pickett and calling either Ahmet Ertegun or Tom Dowd and saying, 'Who's that guitar player?'" says Eric Clapton in the top video below.</p> <p>It turns out that guitar player was a 22-year-old guitarist named Duane Allman, aka "Skydog."</p> <p>"I just filed it away," Clapton adds. "To this day, I've never heard better rock guitar playing on an R&amp;B record. It's the best." </p> <p>In November 1968, Wilson Pickett showed up at Rick Hall's Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, hoping to record, but with no material or ideas. Allman, who was working for Hall (as one of several lead guitarists), suggested they record a version of a then-hot single by the Beatles, "Hey Jude."</p> <p>Hall and Pickett thought it was an insane idea; after all, the Beatles' version of the song was literally climbing the charts as they spoke. Somehow, however, Allman convinced the duo (Perhaps he mentioned the fact that the composition was already a proven hit), and you can hear the complete track in the bottom video (and most of it in the top video). </p> <p>The result? A sublime vintage R&amp;B recording by one of the masters — and one of Clapton's all-time favorite guitar solos. </p> <p>Of course, after a year-plus of success with the Allman Brothers Band, Allman found himself in the same studio as Clapton, recording yet another classic set of tracks, 1970's <em>Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs</em>. <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-14-layla-eric-clapton-duane-allman">Head here to read our ode to Clapton and Allman's epic solo on "Layla,"</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/XJNoUYSiZmg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/0y8Q2PATVyI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Damian Fanelli is the online managing editor at </em>Guitar World. He often wears shoes to the office.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/duane-allman">Duane Allman</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/listen-eric-clapton-s-favorite-rb-guitar-solo-duane-allman-guests-wilson-picketts-cover-hey-jude#comments Damian Fanelli Duane Allman Eric Clapton Wilson Pickett Blogs News Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:56:19 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19809 In Deep: Tribute to the Musical Genius and Signature Lead Guitar Style of Duane Allman http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-tribute-musical-genius-and-signature-lead-guitar-style-duane-allman <!--paging_filter--><p>A true original, the late, great virtuoso guitarist Duane Allman led the Allman Brothers Band into rock history with his ferocious, deeply expressive and trailblazing guitar work. </p> <p>Rounder Records offers ample testimony to the beauty as well as the breadth of Duane’s recorded work in the new, beautifully compiled box set <em>Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective</em>. In this edition of In Deep, we will examine some of the key elements of Duane’s signature style as a lead guitarist. </p> <p>One of the best examples of the genius of Duane Allman can be found on the timeless, classic live album, At Fillmore East (1971), which captures the Allman Brothers Band live in concert at the peak of their powers. </p> <p>Duane’s razor-sharp articulation and masterful touch abound, starting with the slide guitar tour de force “Statesboro Blues,” through the smoldering slow blues “Stormy Monday” and continuing through the fiery, aggressive solos performed on “Whipping Post,” “You Don’t Love Me” and other great tracks.</p> <p>Duane’s rich, warm tone was achieved via his main ax, a 1958 tobacco sunburst Gibson Les Paul Standard, played through Marshall<br /> “Plexi” 50- and 100-watt heads, usually running two 4x12 Marshall bottoms. For additional distortion, he very occasionally used a Dallas-Arbiter Fuzz Face, usually in the studio. </p> <p>A key to Duane’s virtuosity was the fact that, like Jimi Hendrix, he had extensive experience as a session guitarist, working closely alongside R&amp;B greats like Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin and King Curtis. Through his studio work, Duane had developed a great sense of rhythm as well as a keen understanding of economy, in terms of phrasing.</p> <p>This understanding resulted in improvised solos that remained cohesive and conversational no matter how long they stretched out or how far they roamed from the original starting point. For this column, let’s use two of Duane’s signature songs, “Stormy Monday” and “Whipping Post,” as our points of focus.</p> <p>“Stormy Monday,” written and originally recorded by blues great T-Bone Walker, is played in the key of G. For soloing, Duane relied primarily on a few standard “bluesapproved” scales. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates a scale most guitar players are well familiar with, G minor pentatonic (G Bf C D F), as played in third position. <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> illustrates the G blues scale, which is the same as G minor pentatonic but additionally includes the flatted fifth (f5), Df.</p> <p>Most blues players move alternately between minor and major pentatonic scales based on the same root note. Eric Clapton and B.B. King are two great examples of guitarists whose solos are almost always based on a combination of these two scales. <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> illustrates the G major pentatonic scale (G A B D E) in an extended pattern that diagonally traverses the fretboard from third to 12th positions.</p> <p>Duane often used a soloing device that can be traced to B.B. King, one of his biggest influences. King’s signature soloing approach combines the notes of minor and major pentatonic scales in a very specific fretboard pattern, or “shape.” The pattern, known as “B.B.’s box,” is illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>. </p> <p>This small handful of notes can be ordered and phrased in nearly an infinite number of ways, resulting in many great blues licks. <strong>FIGURES 5–8</strong> offer four different ways in which Duane would use this shape as a jumping off point to improvised solo ideas.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/1%20to%207.png" width="620" height="615" alt="1 to 7.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/8%20to%20something.png" width="620" height="389" alt="8 to something.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/8%20part%202.png" width="839" height="504" alt="8 part 2.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART ONE OF THREE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243315216001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243315216001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><hr /> <p>Now let’s focus on soloing over a 12-bar slow blues form along the lines of “Stormy Monday” and in the style of Duane Allman, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 9</strong>. </p> <p>I begin in bars 1 and 2 with a melodic idea based on G major pentatonic, but in bar 3, I morph into G minor pentatonic by overbending the second, A, up and step and a half to the fourth, C. At the end of bar 4 into bar 5, I apply the overbending technique to E, the sixth, bending that note all the way up to the G root note, repeating the melodic motif into bar 6. </p> <p>When performing these bends, line up additional fingers behind the fretting finger—for example, reinforcing the ring finger with the middle finger or both the middle and index—to help it push the string. Doing so will give you better pitch control and stability when bending. The same is true for bend vibratos.</p> <p>Throughout the remainder of the example, I limit my movement to the eighth and 10th positions to demonstrate that a great amount of melodic invention can be found without moving up and down the fretboard. The intent here is to create lines that are expressive and vocal-like while also evoking a bit of the Duane-like focused intensity.</p> <p>For his “Whipping Post” solo, Duane drew primarily from the A Dorian mode (A B C D E Fs G), two fretboard patterns of which are shown in <strong>FIGURES 10 and 11</strong>. Both patterns are very useful for soloing, so you’ll want to memorize them thoroughly.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 12</strong> offers an eight-bar solo along the lines of Duane’s “Whipping Post” solo. The song is played in 12/8 meter, which affords a lot of room for rhythmic creativity, and Duane made the most of the opportunity every time he played it. I begin this solo with a wholestep bend from the A root up to the second, B, followed by subtle movement down through the notes of the A Dorian mode. </p> <p>In bar 2, I play a quick repeated hammer/pull phrase that emphasizes two notes of a G major triad (G and B) before moving into a line based on A minor pentatonic (A C D E G).</p> <p>Bar 5 offers a unique rhythmic superimposition that Duane used often. Another classic Duane-ism is illustrated in bar 7, as quick pulloffs on the top three strings alternate back and forth in an ascending-and-descending manner.</p> <p>Try using your index and ring fingers to execute this phrase as well as your index and middle fingers and index and pinkie, or a combination of any of these. The aim should be, as always, clarity in execution.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/end.png" width="620" height="651" alt="end.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243315196001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243315196001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>PART THREE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243325650001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243325650001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><img src="/files/imce-images/8%20part%202_0.png" width="620" height="372" alt="8 part 2_0.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/duane-allman">Duane Allman</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-tribute-musical-genius-and-signature-lead-guitar-style-duane-allman#comments Allman Brothers Band Andy Aledort Duane Allman In Deep May 2013 In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:54:36 +0000 Andy Aledort http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18091 Book Review: Joe Perry’s 'Rocks' — Yes, It Does http://www.guitarworld.com/book-review-joe-perry-s-rocks-yes-it-does <!--paging_filter--><p>There’s something to be said for the fact that by the time you reach the last page of Joe Perry’s new autobiography, <em>Rocks</em>, you still like the guy. Heck, you respect him, even. </p> <p>I mean, this is after darn near 400 pages’ worth of the good, the bad and the really, really ugly side of Perry’s 64 years on this planet (more than 40 of them as a founding member of Aerosmith). You’re left realizing that the man has worked hard to be the best he could be at his chosen craft — and he’s struggled to figure out how to handle all that comes with it.</p> <p>In the process, we learn about Perry’s early years: a shy misfit and a loner, his boyhood heroes were oceanographic pioneer Jacques Cousteau and Chuck Berry, who Perry describes at one point as “the Ernest Hemingway of rock and roll. He was strong, simple and manly, a force of nature who created a musical lexicon all his own.”</p> <p>Perhaps if Perry’s academic career had been more successful, he might’ve ended up exploring the world’s oceans rather than playing the world’s stages; but after struggling through high school with undiagnosed ADHD, Perry walked out of his senior year in a dispute with his teachers over the length of his hair. </p> <p>Without the focus of music, it’s hard to say what might’ve become of Perry. But no matter: What did happen makes for an excellent read. If it was fiction, you might shake your head and say, “No way” — but this is Joe Perry’s life.</p> <p>The wildly-colored thread otherwise known as Aerosmith lead singer Steven Tyler is woven throughout Perry’s story, of course. Tyler has been part of Perry’s world since their paths first crossed at Lake Sunapee, New Hampshire, in the late Sixties (He was known as Steven Tallarico back then). There are times when Perry’s descriptions of Tyler’s interactions with himself and others are laced with near-hatred and disgust … but there also the moments when you realize that if Shakespeare had ever written a play about rock ‘n’ roll blood brothers, the two male leads would’ve been Joe Perry and Steven Tyler.</p> <p>For all the horrible blowups, dope-fueled horrorshows, and twisted mind games described in <em>Rocks</em>, the one Perry/Tyler moment that will stick with you the longest is from 1972, the morning after the Stones played Boston Garden. A very young Aerosmith was actually using the Garden locker room as a practice space (part of the story of the legendary Frank Connelly, an early band benefactor). Perry describes the scene, after having watched the Stones perform the night before:</p> <p>“The next day when we returned to the Garden to rehearse in the locker room, Steven and I first walked out into the arena. All of the Stones’ equipment was gone. We climbed up onstage and lay on our backs for a few minutes, side by side. Looking up into that cavernous arena, we said the same words at practically the same time: ‘One day …’”</p> <p><em>Rocks</em> is damn near inspirational, as Perry’s story is one of putting your head down and living out a dream, told without preaching, excuses or hyperbole. There’s yin-yang supreme: focused determination challenged by roadblocks created from Perry’s own actions; mountains of dollars and empty pockets; the love/hate Aerosmith brotherhood as a whole; and Perry’s own struggle between the rock ‘n’ roll lifestyle and family. </p> <p>In the end, <em>Rocks</em> is the story of how Joe Perry has managed to pull off the unique balancing act of being “Joe Fuckin’ Perry” and a human being at the same time.</p> <p>Rock on, sir.</p> <p><em>A former offshore lobsterman, Brian Robbins had to wait a good four decades or so to write about the stuff he wanted to when he was 15. Today he’s a freelance scribe, cartoonist, photographer and musician. His home on the worldwide inner tube is at <a href="http://brian-robbins.com/">brian-robbins.com</a> (And there’s that <a href="https://www.facebook.com/BrianRobbinsWords">Facebook</a> thing too.)</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-perry">Joe Perry</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/aerosmith">Aerosmith</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/book-review-joe-perry-s-rocks-yes-it-does#comments Aerosmith book review Brian Robbins Joe Perry Reviews Blogs News Features Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:48:52 +0000 Brian Robbins http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22706 Carlos Santana and Son Perform National Anthem at World Series Game 4 — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/carlos-santana-and-son-perform-national-anthem-world-series-game-4-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Last Saturday, October 25, Carlos Santana performed the national anthem prior to Game 4 of the 2014 World Series at AT&amp;T Park in San Francisco.</p> <p>For the performance, Santana was joined by another successful Santana — his Grammy-winning, keyboard-playing song, Salvador, who happens to be a lifelong San Francisco Giants fan.</p> <p>By the way, the Giants beat the Kansas City Royals that night, 11-4.</p> <p>What do you think of their performance?</p> <p>P.S.: Thanks to MLB for the video!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/kLxsqGejmFc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/carlos-santana">Carlos Santana</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/carlos-santana-and-son-perform-national-anthem-world-series-game-4-video#comments Carlos Santana Salvador Santana Videos News Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:32:22 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22705 Guitarist Arrested for Performing in NYC Subway — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-guitarist-arrested-for-performing-in-nyc-subway-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Here’s a video that’s recently caused an uproar around the internet, especially among musicians. </p> <p>Watch as New York City musician Andrew Kalleen is arrested for busking in the NYC Subway. </p> <p>According to section 1050.6(c) of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s rules of conduct, “artistic performances, including the acceptance of donations” are permitted. Even after reading this section aloud, the officer tells Kalleen that he needs to leave “by force, or you’re gonna go out on your own.” </p> <p>Kalleen is eventually ejected from the subway system by a group of officers while singing Crosby, Stills, Nash &amp; Young’s 1970 protest song, “Ohio.” </p> <p>The video has received more than 1.2 million views since being uploaded October 18. What are your thoughts? Tell us in the comments below or on Facebook.</p> <p>BTW: Kalleen is a member of the Brooklyn-based band <a href="http://lawrenceandleigh.com">Lawrence &amp; Leigh</a>. Check out one of their videos at the bottom of this story.</p> <p>As a side note, why do people shoot vertical videos? </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="500" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/PEBZReXChoA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_dD1n-h9hFw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-guitarist-arrested-for-performing-in-nyc-subway-video#comments Acoustic Nation Andrew Kalleen Videos Blogs Videos News Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:01:56 +0000 Acoustic Nation http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22700 Hammer Jammer Key-Hammering Device for Guitars Available for Preorder — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/hammer-jammer-key-hammering-device-guitars-available-preorder-through-new-kickstarter-program-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Gear lovers might might remember when <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-hammer-jammer-new-percussive-device-electric-and-acoustic-guitars">we posted a story (with a video) about a device called the Hammer Jammer</a>.</p> <p>The Hammer Jammer is unique key-hammering percussive device that fits onto electric or acoustic six-string guitars, producing a different-sounding attack—something in the ballpark of a hammer dulcimer on speed.</p> <p>Our story and its video went viral, which led Ohio-based Big Walnut Productions, maker of the Hammer Jammer, to believe its product is, to say the least, ready for the guitar market.</p> <p>As a result, the device is available for preorder through Titl Open, <a href="https://hammerjammer.tilt.com/hammer-jammer--7">where you can order the Hammer Jammer for $60.</a> The projected shipping date is January 2015. </p> <p>Here's more information from the company:</p> <p>The Hammer Jammer was invented in the Nineties, with about 2,000 samples produced at that time that were never pushed into the mainstream guitar market for a number of reasons. However, Ken McCaw, inventor of the Hammer Jammer, who is also a film composer, used the Hammer Jammer on a trailer for a feature film released in Europe about five years ago. From that, interest for this invention began to grow around the world. </p> <p>The demonstration video below was posted on YouTube in January 2014 and went viral. It became obvious that this unique invention is now ready for the guitar market. All Hammer Jammer samples were sold within a couple of weeks, to players in 60 countries, many of them young guitarists. </p> <p>It has also been learned recently that the Hammer Jammer provides a legitimate and highly useful device for handicapped people and players with arthritis and other issues that make finger picking and standard picking technique prohibitive. </p> <p><strong>For more information, visit Big Walnut Productions <a href="http://www.bigwalnutproductions.com/">here</a>. To preorder the Hammer Jammer, head <a href="https://hammerjammer.tilt.com/hammer-jammer--7">here.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/HyzuzvWme_Y" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/TB88QLzR8wA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/hammer-jammer-key-hammering-device-guitars-available-preorder-through-new-kickstarter-program-video#comments Hammer Jammer Accessories Videos News Gear Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:57:28 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22704 Jim Dunlop Effect Pedal Throwdown, Round 1: MXR Micro Chorus Vs. MXR Uni-Vibe Chorus/Vibrato http://www.guitarworld.com/jim-dunlop-effect-pedal-throwdown-round-1-mxr-micro-chorus-vs-mxr-uni-vibe-chorusvibrato <!--paging_filter--><p>It's time to compare the mettle of Jim Dunlop pedals!</p> <p>In GuitarWorld.com's latest readers poll — the first annual Jim Dunlop Effect Pedal Throwdown — we're pitting Dunlop, MXR and Way Huge pedals against each other in a no-holds-barred shootout. </p> <p>Yes, we're pulling out all the stomps! Thirty-two stompboxes will go head to head — or toe to toe, if you prefer — culminating with the crowning of the king of Dunlop pedals.</p> <p>You can check out the beginning bracket — with all 32 competing pedals — in the <a href="https://www.scribd.com/">Scribd.com</a> window below (Be sure to click on the "full screen" button in the lower-right-hand corner to expand the bracket). </p> <p>The bracket will be updated after every matchup, and matchups will take place pretty much every day. Each competing pedal will accompanied by a demo video created by the Jim Dunlop company, and you'll always find a photo gallery of the competing pedals at the bottom of each matchup.</p> <h1>Today's Matchup</h1> <p>In today's matchup, the <strong>MXR M148 Micro Chorus</strong> goes foot to foot against the <strong>MXR M68 Uni-Vibe Chorus/Vibrato</strong> pedal. Start voting below!</p> <p><Strong>YESTERDAY'S RESULTS</strong>: Yesterday, the <strong>Way Huge Angry Troll Boost</strong> (53.09 percent) just barely defeated the <strong>Way Huge Swollen Pickle Jumbo Fuzz</strong> (46.91 percent) and advanced to the next round! <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/jim-dunlop-effect-pedal-throwdown">To see all the matchups that have taken place so far, head HERE.</a> Thanks for voting!</p> <h1>Meet the Combatants</h1> <p><strong><a href="http://www.jimdunlop.com/product/m148-micro-chorus">MXR M148 Micro Chorus</a></strong></p> <p>With its simple operation and stellar analog tone—the MXR Micro Chorus joins the ranks of MXR Classics such as the Phase 90, Dyna Comp and Micro Amp. This 80's reissue delivers a stunning range of rich chorus textures, from sparkly watery shimmers to intense rotating speaker simulation with a twist of the Rate control. </p> <p>The Micro Chorus is designed with old-school bucket brigade technology for warm analog tone and features true bypass for pure guitar tone when the pedal is off. Its road-worthy hardware and components are housed in a space saving Phase 90-sized box.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/5fr-VCS9HYY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="http://www.jimdunlop.com/product/mxr-uni-vibe">MXR M68 Uni-Vibe Chorus/Vibrato</a></strong></p> <p>The Uni-Vibe Chorus/Vibrato is one of the most iconic effects in music history. Since the late ’60s, groundbreaking guitar players have used it to expand the tonal and textural palette of the electric guitar. The MXR team has just remastered the classic effect for modern players. The MXR Chorus/Vibrato delivers the same chewy, Leslie-sounding goodness with a smaller footprint. </p> <p>With its simple three-knob interface, you can dial up the iconic effect to your taste in short order. First, use the VIBE switch to select either Chorus Mode—dry signal mixed with pitch-shifted signal—or Vibrato Mode—only pitch-shifted signal. Then, use the LEVEL control to set the effect volume, the SPEED control to set the sweep rate, and the DEPTH control to set overall intensity. The MXR Uni-Vibe Chorus/Vibrato comes in a Phase 90-sized housing—a fraction of the size and weight of the original Uni-Vibe pedal—and features true bypass switching. Perfect for taking this lush, swirly pedal out on the road.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/HKF3hpHAzD0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <h1>Voting Closed!</h1> <p>The <strong>MXR Uni-Vibe Chorus/Vibrato</strong> (80.08 percent) destroyed the <strong>MXR Micro Chorus</strong> (19.92 percent) and advanced to the next round! <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/jim-dunlop-effect-pedal-throwdown">To see the current matchup and all the matchups that have taken place so far, head HERE.</a> Thanks for voting!</p> <p style=" margin: 12px auto 6px auto; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,Sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14px; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; -x-system-font: none; display: block;"> <a title="View Karkwa on Scribd" href="https://www.scribd.com/doc/244796490/Karkwa" style="text-decoration: underline;" >Karkwa</a></p> <p><iframe class="scribd_iframe_embed" src="https://www.scribd.com/embeds/244796490/content?start_page=1&amp;view_mode=scroll&amp;show_recommendations=true" data-auto-height="false" data-aspect-ratio="undefined" scrolling="no" id="doc_55093" width="100%" height="600" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jim-dunlop-effect-pedal-throwdown-round-1-mxr-micro-chorus-vs-mxr-uni-vibe-chorusvibrato#comments Jim Dunlop Jim Dunlop Effect Pedal Throwdown MXR Poll Polls Effects News Features Gear Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:39:38 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22699