News http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/4/www.greatguitarescape.com/www.facebook.com/www.facebook.com/www.guitartv.com/artists en With 'Workingman’s Dead,' the Grateful Dead Shifted from Uncommercial Jam Band to One of the World's Most Popular Acts http://www.guitarworld.com/workingman-s-dead-grateful-dead-shifted-uncommercial-jam-band-one-worlds-most-popular-acts <!--paging_filter--><p>What a difference a year makes. In February 1969, the Grateful Dead recorded a series of shows at San Francisco’s Avalon Ballroom and Fillmore West in the hope of finally capturing on tape the psychedelic alchemy of their already legendary onstage interplay. </p> <p>The double album <em>Live Dead</em>, released in November that year, showcased the Dead at their adventurous and exploratory acid-peak best and cemented their reputation as the premier jamming band of the era. </p> <p>Yet exactly one year later, in February 1970, the group ambled into a recording studio and, in a single week, cut an album that was <em>Live Dead</em>’s polar opposite. </p> <p>With its concise songs, bright harmonies and folk and country trimmings, <em>Workingman’s Dead</em> felt almost like the work of a completely different band—a stylistic shift as radical as when the Beatles followed <em>Rubber Soul</em> with <em>Revolver</em>. </p> <p>It was made with little overt commercial intent, but <em>Workingman’s Dead</em> instantly became the best-selling album of the Dead’s five-year career, and it set the band on a course that would eventually make it one of the most popular acts America ever produced, with a devoted fan base second to none. </p> <p>Until <em>Workingman’s Dead</em>, the Grateful Dead’s studio output had been largely ignored by the record-buying public. That album’s immediate predecessor, <em>Aoxomoxoa</em>, released in June 1969, was a carefully crafted effort full of intricately arranged songs brimming with playful, colorful and at times impenetrable lyrics dense with hallucinatory imagery. </p> <p>The recording sessions were long and expensive, and though the album contained a few future Dead classics—most notably “St. Stephen” and “China Cat Sunflower”—in the end it never really found a wide audience. Compared to the group’s live performances, it felt stiff and mannered. </p> <p><em>Live Dead</em> addressed that dilemma beautifully and was still picking up steam in the winter and spring of 1970, winning new converts to the Dead’s uniquely trippy mélange, when suddenly a completely different-sounding Grateful Dead started popping out of a million radios. The song was “Uncle John’s Band,” and instead of molten electric guitars and bass in epic flight over the crashing and cracking drums and cymbals of two percussion powerhouses, the song had a warm and intimate acoustic glow. </p> <p>The voices of guitarists Jerry Garcia and Bob Weir and bassist Phil Lesh rose in bright harmony, and lyricist Robert Hunter’s words exuded a gentle homespun wisdom: “Well, the first days are the hardest days/Don’t you worry any more/’Cause when life looks like easy street/There is danger at your door…” </p> <p>Could this really be the notoriously off-key-singing and lyrically opaque Grateful Dead?</p> <p>It was, and much of the rest of the album that “Uncle John’s Band” kicked off, <em>Workingman’s Dead</em>, reinforced the group’s apparent transformation from blazing psychedelic astronauts to rootsy troubadours steeped in folk and country music. The infectious country-rock anthem “Casey Jones”— famous for its daring chorus: “Driving that train, high on cocaine, Casey Jones you better watch your speed”—would follow “Uncle John’s Band” as an FM radio hit that year, and both the rollicking country-bluegrass-rock fusion “Cumberland Blues” and the simmering rocker “New Speedway Boogie” were also popular radio numbers. After years of fringe success, the Dead had truly entered the rock mainstream.</p> <p>It was not, however, an overnight change in direction for the band.</p> <p>For one thing, the Dead already had strong roots in folk and country. In his pre-Dead days, Garcia had been in a succession of acoustic groups that played old-time country, bluegrass and traditional folk music, and Weir had been a fan of the popular folkies of the early Sixties, like the Kingston Trio and Joan Baez, and also learned to play some country blues. </p> <p>Their first group together, in 1964, Mother McCree’s Uptown Jug Champions, drew from those worlds and added a dash of acoustic rock and roll, while Ron “Pigpen” McKernan brought in a cool blues sensibility. When those three started an electric band, the Warlocks, in the spring of 1965—adding Bill Kreutzmann on drums and, fairly quickly, Lesh on bass—some of the old folk/country repertoire came with them, including “Cold Rain and Snow,” “I Know You Rider,” “Stealin’ ” and “Don’t Ease Me In.”</p> <p>Those types of songs stayed in the Dead’s repertoire during the group’s halcyon days in the San Francisco ballrooms. But as they developed their songwriting chops during the second half of 1967 and through 1968, their sound increasingly moved away from their original influences and toward more complex structures, unusual time signatures and open-ended jamming that drew more from Indian music (partly the influence of drummer Mickey Hart, who joined in the fall of 1967) and jazz. </p> <p>Short songs were few and far between as the Dead developed and perfected their uncanny ability to stitch songs and jams together with what sometimes seemed to be magic Day-Glo thread. The fall of 1968 through the spring of 1969 marks the Dead’s fiercest, most confident and accomplished psychedelic playing, reaching its apex around the time that Live Dead was recorded at the Avalon Ballroom and the Fillmore West. </p> <p>But changes were on the way. Perhaps the harbinger of the future direction was a song on <em>Aoxomoxoa</em> called “Dupree’s Diamond Blues,” Hunter and Garcia’s clever recasting of a popular story-song that originated in the early Twenties. It’s a relatively straight narrative song with roots in blues and early 20th century pop tunes, driven by acoustic guitars. </p> <p>“Hunter and I always had this thing where we liked to muddy the folk tradition by adding our versions of songs to the tradition,” Garcia told me in 1989. “We had our ‘Casey Jones’ song [on <em>Workingman’s Dead</em>]. We had our ‘Stagger Lee’ song [on <em>Shakedown Street</em>, 1978]. ‘Dupree’s Diamond Blues’ is another of those. It’s the thing of taking a well-founded tradition and putting in something that’s totally looped.” Musically, he added, “it has a kind of carnival or medicine show kind of feel, and also a ragtime feel.”</p> <hr /> By February 1969, Garcia and Weir occasionally broke out acoustic guitars onstage to perform “Dupree’s,” followed by another Aoxomoxoa tune based around acoustic guitar, “Mountain of the Moon.” But leave it to Garcia and the Dead to then figure a way to segue that second acoustic number right into the trans-galactic flow of that era’s grandest improvisational piece, “Dark Star.” <p>For his part, Hunter, who also had a deep background in older folk music styles, found himself being increasingly drawn to the Band. Their brilliant first two albums, 1968’s <em>Music from Big Pink</em> and 1969’s <em>The Band</em> (a.k.a. The Brown Album) had drawn from a multitude of early American music styles and fused them into an utterly distinctive and original rock amalgamation. </p> <p>As Hunter noted in an interview I did with him in 1988, “The direction [leader/songwriter Robbie Robertson] went with the Band was one of the things that made me think of conceiving Workingman’s Dead. I was very much impressed with the area Robertson was working in. I took it and moved it to the West, which is an area I’m familiar with…regional but not the South, because everyone was going back to the South for inspiration at that time.” </p> <p>It’s unclear to what degree the Dead’s turn in a country direction might have been influenced by their move out of San Francisco’s crumbling Haight-Ashbury district in mid 1968 to more rustic Marin County, north across the Golden Gate Bridge. Mickey Hart settled on a Novato ranch that had a barn and horses, and the others spread out in nearby towns. </p> <p>Hunter and Garcia (with his lady love, Mountain Girl) rented a large but modest house in the southern Marin town of Larkspur, and over the course of about a year, churned out one fantastic song after another. Hunter often typed lyrics day and night and fed them to Garcia, who would quickly set them to music, sometimes within hours of their delivery. This is where the songs for Workingman’s Dead were born—“glorious days,” as Hunter said.</p> <p>Country flavors had been creeping into rock and roll in general for quite some time. Buffalo Springfield had a strong country and folk undercurrent in some of their material, as did the Byrds, Moby Grape and, by 1968, the Rolling Stones on <em>Beggar’s Banquet</em>. That same year, Dylan went back to acoustic music on <em>John Wesley Harding</em>, followed in 1969 by the more overtly country <em>Nashville Skyline</em>. Meanwhile, the Flying Burrito Brothers and Poco had helped put country-rock on the map.</p> <p>Even though the Dead were playing some of their most challenging and adventurous psychedelic music during this period, offstage Garcia and Weir were listening to country music mostly. Garcia was increasingly being influenced by guitarists from the “Bakersfield school” of country music, such as Roy Nichols (of Merle Haggard’s group, the Strangers) and Don Rich (of Buck Owens’ Buckaroos), both tasteful and soulful string-benders. In March 1969, at the end of a tour, Garcia bought a Zane Beck pedal-steel guitar at a music store in Colorado, and it wasn’t long before he brought the pedal steel onto the stage. </p> <p>At first, Garcia backed a country music–loving singer and songwriter named John “Marmaduke” Dawson in a tiny club south of San Francisco. Then, the fearless Garcia played it occasionally with the Dead on a range of country songs. </p> <p>A few months later, Marmaduke and Garcia formed the country-rock New Riders of the Purple Sage, with Garcia on steel for the first year-plus. (Incidentally, with the Dead in this era, Garcia mostly played a mid-Sixties red Gibson SG—that’s his Live Dead ax—through his trusty Fender Twin Reverb amps, but also occasionally employed a sunburst Stratocaster. Weir favored a Gibson 335 or 345 through a pair of Twins.)</p> <p>In June ’69, the first three Hunter-Garcia songs that would eventually find a home on Workingman’s Dead were introduced. “Dire Wolf” came first, a dark but whimsical tale about a man who invites a wolf into his desolate cabin in the woods for a game of cards, possibly to determine whether the wolf will eat him or not. “Don’t murder me,” the storyteller begs, but the cards are clearly not falling his way. Musically, it’s a simple folk song, and some of the early live versions were sung by Weir, with Garcia adding steel accompaniment. </p> <p>Soon, though, Garcia reclaimed it, and on occasion in 1969 he would suggest that the crowd sing along on the chorus. “Casey Jones” was the next new tune to emerge from the Larkspur songwriting sessions, and though Garcia’s original acoustic guitar-voice demo from early June is strikingly similar to the way it ended up on <em>Workingman’s Dead</em>, the first several Grateful Dead versions in early summer ’69 have a different vibe. The main rhythm has an almost Motown feel to it (think “I Second That Emotion”), and there are a couple of fairly lengthy guitar extrapolations. It wouldn’t be too long, however, before the song found its finished form. </p> <p>A day after the debut of “Casey Jones” came “High Time,” a gorgeous bittersweet ballad that easily could have come from George Jones, Merle Haggard or any number of other country greats. Garcia once complained that he felt could never quite do the song justice as a singer, but from mid 1969 through mid 1970, it became an important cornerstone of the band’s repertoire, often serving as a nice, grounding contrast to spacey songs such “Dark Star” and “That’s It for the Other One,” or the spunky combo of “China Cat Sunflower” and “I Know You Rider.” </p> <p>The Pigpen-sung “Easy Wind,” written by Hunter alone, started turning up in August 1969. Pig is convincing as a hard-workin’, hard-drinkin’ road laborer “chippin’ them rocks from dawn ’til doom/While my rider hide my bottle in the other room.” From the outset, the song featured slashing guitar counterpoint lines from Weir and Garcia and a funky R&amp;B feel. It’s a perfect vehicle for Pig, who during this period mostly sang cover tunes, from Otis Redding’s “Hard to Handle” to the Olympics’ “Good Lovin’ ” to “Lovelight.” </p> <hr /> The final burst of new <em>Workingman’s Dead</em> songs arrived in November and December 1969, ironically, right after the release of Live Dead, which had virtually no overt country and folk textures. <p>Musically, Garcia described the spry and speedy “Cumberland Blues” (which he co-wrote with Phil Lesh) as a blend of Bakersfield country and up-tempo bluegrass. Lyrically, Hunter paints a picture of a coal miner’s woes in and out of the mines. Like the other new songs, it took the Dead’s fans to some completely new places that, miraculously, fit in with all the other, stranger spaces their earlier material occupied.</p> <p>“Black Peter” was a dire Hunter-Garcia folk blues about a man on his deathbed, while “Uncle John’s Band” was an upbeat anthem that became an instant favorite of everyone who heard it. The influence of Crosby, Stills &amp; Nash—friends of the Dead’s whose harmony-filled first album had been ubiquitous since the summer of 1969—was obvious, and though the Dead weren’t at that level as singers, they had an undeniable vocal chemistry, and that song, in particular, had a reassuring glow that drew listeners in, made them feel that they too were maybe part of “Uncle John’s Band.” </p> <p>The last Workingman’s song to be born was “New Speedway Boogie,” Hunter’s somewhat enigmatic commentary on the early December 1969 Altamont Speedway Free Festival. The event—a West Coast version of Woodstock—was marred by violence, including the death of concertgoer Meredith Hunter by a member of the Hells Angels, who were there to provide security. </p> <p>“New Speedway Boogie” rumbles along ominously—a modified shuffle/boogie—as Garcia sings in broad metaphorical terms about harsh realities, lessons learned (or not) and the broader takeaway: “One way or another, this darkness got to give…”</p> <p>By the time “Speedway” was introduced, the Dead had already decided to make an album in the winter of 1970, cutting at Pacific High Recording, a relatively new addition to the San Francisco recording landscape. They had spent many months and more than $100,000 of Warner Bros.’ money making <em>Aoxomoxoa</em>, so this time they were determined to take their relatively simple and straightforward new songs and record them as live as possible in the studio. </p> <p>“<em>Workingman’s Dead</em> was done very quickly,” producer/engineer Bob Matthews told me in 2004. (Matthews’ familiarity with the band extended all the way back to the Mother McCree’s days with Garcia, Weir and Pigpen.) “We went into the studio first and spent a couple of days rehearsing—performing—all the tunes, recording them onto two-track. When that was done, I sat down and spliced together the tunes—beginning of side one to end of side one, beginning of side two to end of side two. I got that idea from [the Beatles’] <em>Sgt Pepper’s</em>: ‘Before we even start, let’s have a concept of what the end product is going to feel like, sequencing-wise.’ </p> <p>They rehearsed some more in their rehearsal studio, and then they came in and recorded [on one of Ampex’s new 16-track machines]. But at all times there was the perspective of where we were in the album.” The Dead had further honed their chops by playing a series of acoustic sets during the winter of 1969–1970, mixing versions of their new songs among folk and country covers.</p> <p>The entire album was recorded and mixed in about 10 days. Overdubs included Garcia’s pedal-steel parts, Pigpen’s harmonica, various acoustic and electric guitar parts and, of course, the vocals, which were certainly at a level the Dead had never achieved before. The noted San Francisco poster artist Stanley Mouse and his partner Alton Kelley conceived of the now-iconic front cover: the band and Hunter in workingman’s duds standing on a nondescript street corner. When Warner Bros. boss Joe Smith first heard the finished record, he announced to all within earshot that, unbelievable as it might seem, the Dead had made a hit record.</p> <p>Smith was right. The album immediately took the Dead to a new level of popularity, and when they followed up <em>Workingman’s Dead</em> with the tonally similar and equally momentous American Beauty (“Ripple,” “Brokedown Palace,” “Sugar Magnolia,” “Truckin’ ”) just a few months later, they solidified their place among the great bands to survive the Sixties. </p> <p>The Dead never stopped playing long, jamming tunes, even as they continued to carve out one slice of distinctive Americana after another through the early Seventies. But <em>Workingman’s Dead</em> turned the Dead into a song band, and it was the launch pad for everything that came after it. It was a big gamble, a radical change in direction, but it paid off like a royal flush. </p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/grateful-dead">Grateful Dead</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/workingman-s-dead-grateful-dead-shifted-uncommercial-jam-band-one-worlds-most-popular-acts#comments Grateful Dead Jerry Garcia November 2013 The Grateful Dead Interviews News Features Magazine Sun, 05 Jul 2015 15:59:37 +0000 Blair Jackson 19647 at http://www.guitarworld.com Tab Book: Learn the 'Best of Scorpions,' Note for Note http://www.guitarworld.com/tab-book-learn-best-scorpions-note-note <!--paging_filter--><p>A new tab book, <em>Best of Scorpions</em>, is available now at the Guitar World Online Store.</p> <p>The book features note-for-note transcriptions with tab for 14 favorites from these Hanover hard rockers. </p> <p>It includes their mega-hit “Rock You like a Hurricane” plus: </p> <p>• Big City Nights<br /> • Blackout<br /> • Coming Home<br /> • Holiday<br /> • I Can't Explain<br /> • Loving You Sunday Morning<br /> • No One like You<br /> • Passion Rules the Game<br /> • Rhythm of Love<br /> • Send Me an Angel<br /> • Still Loving You<br /> • Wind of Change<br /> • The Zoo</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/best-of-scorpions/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=BestofScorpions">This 128-page book is available now for $19.99. Head to the Guitar World Online Store now.</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/scorpions">Scorpions</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/tab-book-learn-best-scorpions-note-note#comments Scorpions News Features Sun, 05 Jul 2015 15:58:37 +0000 Guitar World Staff 20930 at http://www.guitarworld.com Pettyjohn Electronics Announces the PettyDrive Deluxe, a Studio-Grade Dual-Channel Analog Overdrive Pedal — Demo Video http://www.guitarworld.com/pettyjohn-announces-pettydrive-studio-grade-dual-channel-analog-overdrive-pedal-demo-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Pettyjohn Electronics has announced the PettyDrive Deluxe, a studio-grade dual-channel analog overdrive pedal that's engineered to deliver the powerful tone and dynamic feel of boutique tube amps pushed to the edge of breakup.</p> <p>The two fully independent channels are uniquely voiced to compliment each other and provide a wide range of sounds that range from thick, saturated American iron and growl to harmonically rich British-like chime. </p> <p>Only the highest-possible quality audiophile components are used to ensure the lowest noise, years of reliability and the most articulate tone possible. The PettyDrive is a serious tool for tone, built for the modern working guitarist in mind with a balance of advanced tone shaping features, general ease-of-use and tone that truly inspires.</p> <p><strong>MSRP:</strong> $399 (Deluxe, pictured), $317 (Standard)</p> <p><strong>For more information about the PettyDrive, check out the videos and specs below and visit <a href="http://pettyjohnelectronics.com/shop/pettydrive-pedal-deluxe/">pettyjohnelectronics.com.</a> Follow Pettyjohn Electronics on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pettyjohnelectronics?fref=ts&amp;ref=br_tf">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/pettyjohnelec">Twitter.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hBN0Yr0YSYs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Unique Features:</strong></p> <p>• Hot-Rodded Chrome Knobs<br /> • Professional Studio-Grade Discrete Opamp Input Buffer Chip<br /> • Channel 2 is equipped with all Burr-Brown chips for maximum clarity and transparency.<br /> • Silver Nameplate</p> <p><strong>Main Features:</strong></p> <p>• Two Fully Independent, Stackable Overdrive Circuits<br /> • Channel 1/2 Order Flip<br /> • Unique Parallel Effects Loop on Channel 2 for New Pedal Combinations<br /> • Available with Standard or Deluxe Chip Set<br /> • Built with Highest Possible Quality, Audiophile Components for Excellent Reliability and Performance<br /> • Symmetrical Control Layout<br /> • Always-On Studio Grade Input Buffer for Zero-Loss Bypassed Tone<br /> • Internal True-Bypass Switching<br /> • Internal Charge Pump for Extra High Headroom<br /> • Easily Powered by Standard Pedal Power 9v-15v DC (-)<br /> • Current Draw: 100 mA<br /> • Cool Red Jewel Light Indicators<br /> • Made in the USA<br /> • Channel 1: Chime Drive</p> <p>• A unique preamp circuit that can be configured as a Boost or Low Gain Drive<br /> • Tilt EQ tone knob with Orange Drop Filter Caps for Sweet Tone Shaping<br /> • 3-Way Clipping/Headroom Mini-Toggle<br /> • 3-Way Low Cut Mini-Toggle<br /> • Use Independently or Stack with Channel 2<br /> • Channel 2: Iron Drive</p> <p>• Low to Medium Gain Overdrive voiced for Thick, Smoothly Saturated Tone<br /> • Clean Mix Knob for Enhanced Feel and Dynamics<br /> • Parallel Effects Loop for Combining Other Pedals in Totally New Ways!!<br /> • 3-Way Clipping Mini-Toggle gives access to Asymmetrical Silicone, LED and MOSFET clipping sections, Chosen for Their Unique Tonal Qualities.<br /> • 3-Way Low Cut Mini-Toggle<br /> • High-Cut Tone Knob for Taming Harsh High Frequencies</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MR0lbLErIHw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/pettyjohn-announces-pettydrive-studio-grade-dual-channel-analog-overdrive-pedal-demo-video#comments PettyDrive Deluxe Pettyjohn Electronics Videos Effects News Gear Thu, 02 Jul 2015 18:22:41 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24865 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jerry Garcia’s Tiger and Rosebud: A Look at the Last Guitars He Played Onstage http://www.guitarworld.com/jerry-garcia-s-tiger-and-rosebud-look-last-guitars-he-played-onstage <!--paging_filter--><p>This weekend, the Grateful Dead will reunite for what is being billed as their final concerts. </p> <p>From July 3 through 5, guitarists Bob Weir, bassist Phil Lesh, and drummers Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart will reunite, along with Phish guitarist Trey Anastasio, for three shows at Chicago’s Soldier Field, the site of the band’s last concert with legendary Dead cofounder Jerry Garcia on July 9, 1995. </p> <p>With Grateful Dead’s last stand on the horizon, we thought this was a good time to celebrate the genius of Garcia, that band’s heart and soul. </p> <p>We could talk about Jerry’s playing, but instead we want to look at a pair of instruments that were near and dear to him: the Doug Irwin creations Tiger and Rosebud. These were the last two guitars Garcia played onstage, when he made what would be his final performance 20 years ago at Soldier Field.</p> <p><strong>Tiger (1979)</strong></p> <p>In 1972, Garcia began a long association with Irwin when he purchased a guitar called Eagle from the luthier. Garcia liked the guitar so much that he placed a custom order with Irwin. That guitar—dubbed Wolf, for the cartoon wolf sticker Garcia had originally applied below its bridge—was completed in 1973. When Garcia went to pick it up, he was so impressed by it that he placed an order for another custom guitar before leaving. </p> <p>Wolf became Garcia’s main instrument for the next four years, during which time he asked Irwin to make several modifications, including a buffered effect loop that let him wire his effect pedals to the guitar and bypass them with a switch. Eventually, though, Wolf was replaced by the guitar that Garcia had ordered back in 1973, when he’d received Wolf. That guitar was Tiger, which he received in July 1979.</p> <p>Garcia had given Irwin total freedom with Tiger, and he was not disappointed. The guitar was beautiful, with contrasting layers of tone woods, including cocobolo, maple and vermillion. Detailed pearl inlays on the body’s back and fretboard heightened the guitar’s status as a work of art. </p> <p>But Tiger was also a testament to Irwin’s technical innovation. The guitar’s coil-tap switches, five-position pickup selector, unity gain buffer, effect loop and other controls gave Garcia the freedom to craft a broad range of tones from the DiMarzio pickups, which included Dual Sound humbuckers in the middle and bridge positions and an SDS-1 in the neck (the Dual Sounds were replaced in 1982 with DiMarzio Super IIs).</p> <p>“There are 12 discrete possible voices that are all pretty different,” Garcia said of Tiger’s electronics. That tonal power is the reason Tiger was his main guitar for the next 11 years, a continuous run longer than that of any other guitar Garcia played.</p> <p><strong>Rosebud (1990)</strong></p> <p>Rosebud was Tiger’s replacement, and Garcia considered it to be Irwin’s masterpiece. While it bore similarities to Tiger, it featured a very different complement of electronic components. These included three humbuckers and a Roland GK-2 hexaphonic guitar synth pickup. Irwin mounted the GK-2’s MIDI and synth controls on the guitar for ease of use. The guitar also had hollow body cavities that reduced its weight by two pounds.</p> <p>Rosebud’s MIDI features were key to its versatility. Garcia had begun using guitar synths in the Eighties when he installed a Roland hexaphonic pickup on his Wolf guitar. In Rosebud, Garcia finally had one instrument with all the features he’d sought, allowing him to play a broad range of guitar tones as well as external sounds via MIDI.</p> <p>Rosebud was eventually succeeded by a replica of Tiger called Lightning Bolt, built by luthier Stephen Cripe. The guitar takes its name from the Grateful Dead lightning bolt, which adorns the cover plate below the bridge. But when it came time for the Dead to play Soldier Field in Chicago on July 9, 1995—Garcia’s last gig with the group—Lightning Bolt was in the shop for repairs. In its place was Rosebud. When the guitar began to suffer technical problems midway through the show, Garcia pulled out Tiger, playing his last notes onstage with the guitar that had been with him longer than any other instrument. </p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/grateful-dead">Grateful Dead</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/jerry-garcia-s-tiger-and-rosebud-look-last-guitars-he-played-onstage#comments Grateful Dead Jerry Garcia News Gear Thu, 02 Jul 2015 17:23:10 +0000 Christopher Scapelliti 24864 at http://www.guitarworld.com Stevie Ray Vaughan, Steve Vai, Yngwie Malmsteen, Slash and More Play "The Star-Spangled Banner" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/video-eight-solo-guitar-versions-star-spangled-banner <!--paging_filter--><p>Happy Independence Day, everyone!</p> <p>In honor of this week's holiday, I originally—and simply—wanted to share a grainy, vintage video of my all-time favorite guitarist, Stevie Ray Vaughan, performing "The Star-Spangled Banner" in ancient times. </p> <p>But then I noticed Steve Vai's particularly awesome version of the song ... and Yngwie Malmsteen's recent version ... and Eric Johnson's version—and then I found versions by Slash and Dave Mustaine ... and, of course, there's the granddaddy of them all, Jimi Hendrix at Woodstock.</p> <p>So I figured the more, the merrier! I could've kept on going (There's always Cliff Burton's version, and a commenter mentioned Neal Schon), but I think eight versions of the same song gets the point across, and this represents a nice mix of styles. </p> <p>Feel free to complain, compare and contrast! Enjoy your holiday! </p> <p><strong>TED NUGENT</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/NepNJO2nwU0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>STEVE VAI</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/tyCRSZjtYBI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>YNGWIE MALMSTEEN</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/anWu1WUwnSk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>SLASH</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/hKco_PvmUHw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>DAVE MUSTAINE</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/D8GHCpjlpwY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>ERIC JOHNSON</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/rCKCbdLxBoQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>STEVIE RAY VAUGHAN</strong> </p> <p>Note: This video needs to be edited!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/UnyvPZSvLW8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>JIMI HENDRIX</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sjzZh6-h9fM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Damian Fanelli is the online managing editor at Guitar World.</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ted-nugent">Ted Nugent</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/eric-johnson">Eric Johnson</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-eight-solo-guitar-versions-star-spangled-banner#comments Damian Fanelli Dave Mustaine Eric Johnson Jimi Hendrix Slash Steve Vai Stevie Ray Vaughan Ted Nugent Zakk Wylde Blogs News Thu, 02 Jul 2015 16:33:38 +0000 Damian Fanelli 11505 at http://www.guitarworld.com Smooth Jazz Version of Metallica's "Enter Sandman" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/smooth-jazz-version-metallicas-enter-sandman-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Today we bring you a very well-done smooth jazz version of Metallica's "Enter Sandman."</p> <p>The video, which was created and posted a few Februarys ago, is the handiwork of YouTube user <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzk0m5Ibzv-JDJHRrNNbGyw">Andy Rehfeldt</a>, who adds:</p> <p>"All instruments were arranged, played and recorded by me. YouTube doesn't pay me anything, so please <a href="https://www.paypal.com/us/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_flow&amp;SESSION=K-M1nwxZHPojwsaUfUBi-Zg9r50jyHEXutc4BmcnCOKAR60sjdbKnBmr2VO&amp;dispatch=5885d80a13c0db1f8e263663d3faee8de62a88b92df045c56447d40d60b23a7c">Buy me a Beer!</a></p> <p>Whether or not you buy Rehfeldt a drink, be sure to check out this video!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OBmM79YadYM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/smooth-jazz-version-metallicas-enter-sandman-video#comments Andy Rehfeldt Metallica Videos News Thu, 02 Jul 2015 16:09:46 +0000 Damian Fanelli 23631 at http://www.guitarworld.com Betcha Can't Play This: Ethan Brosh's Cascading Harmonics — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-cascading-harmonics-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In this new edition of Betcha Can't Play This, guitarist Ethan Brosh demonstrates his way of playing cascading harmonics.</p> <p>You'll notice this video is much longer than the typical Betcha Can't Play This video, since it goes into greater left- and right-hand detail—and into greater detail across the board. You'll also notice there's no tab included (Again, the longer video explains the fret positions and a whole lot more).</p> <p>For two other Betcha Can't Play This columns by Brosh, check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-guitarist-ethan-brosh-lays-down-challenge">Betcha Can't Play This: Guitarist Ethan Brosh Lays Down the Challenge</a> and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-diminished-madness-guitarist-ethan-brosh">Betcha Can't Play This: Diminished Madness with Guitarist Ethan Brosh</a>. You'll find a third one under RELATED CONTENT, below the photo.</p> <p><strong>For more about Brosh, visit <a href="http://ethanbrosh.com/">ethanbrosh.com</a>.</strong></p> <p>As always, good luck! We have more on the way!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/-VIGjUeI8uw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-cascading-harmonics-video#comments Betcha Can't Play This Ethan Brosh Videos Betcha Can't Play This News Lessons Thu, 02 Jul 2015 14:51:14 +0000 Guitar World Staff 22094 at http://www.guitarworld.com Betcha Can't Play This: Nita Strauss Solo Lick from Alice Cooper Tour http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-nita-strauss-solo-lick-alice-cooper-tour <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's a brand-new edition of Betcha Can't Play This featuring Alice Cooper guitarist Nita Strauss, who recently visited <em>Guitar World</em> HQ.</p> <p>Last time, she played a <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-nita-strauss-descending-legato-lick-video">Descending Legato Lick.</a> This time, she demonstrates a lick from her solo spotlight section from her shows with Cooper.</p> <p>As with the other <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-cascading-harmonics-video">new "Betcha Can't Play This" videos</a>, this is an expanded version of the usually brief "Betcha" videos on GuitarWorld.com.</p> <p>Also, note that there are no tabs, since Strauss explains key left- and right-hand techniques in the clip. </p> <p>For other recent Betcha Can't Play This columns, check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-guitarist-ethan-brosh-lays-down-challenge">Betcha Can't Play This: Guitarist Ethan Brosh Lays Down the Challenge</a> and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-diminished-madness-guitarist-ethan-brosh">Betcha Can't Play This: Diminished Madness with Guitarist Ethan Brosh</a>. </p> <p>As always, good luck! We have more on the way!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/f7W24uUt4Qo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/alice-cooper">Alice Cooper</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-nita-strauss-solo-lick-alice-cooper-tour#comments Alice Cooper Betcha Can't Play This Nita Strauss Videos News Lessons Thu, 02 Jul 2015 14:49:02 +0000 Guitar World Staff 22935 at http://www.guitarworld.com The 30 Best Albums of 2015 — So Far http://www.guitarworld.com/25-best-albums-2015-so-far <!--paging_filter--><p>Well, we've come to the halfway point of the year—and then some. </p> <p>It's time to look back at what has, so far, been a strong year for music, one in which the guitar has been pushed to new creative peaks on new albums in an array of genres. </p> <p>From Sleater-Kinney's nervy punk to JD McPherson's fierce roots rock to Periphery's always-impressive technical metal, the guitar has had quite a year already. And forget we have another six months of releases coming our way. You'll find those in our year-end-wrap-up stories in December.</p> <p>On that note, let's have a look at 30 of the year's best albums (so far). </p> <p><strong>NOTE: This list is presented in alphabetical order, not from worst to best or best to worst. So there's no order of preference. Enjoy!</strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/25-best-albums-2015-so-far#comments Charlie Thompson JD McPherson Pokey LaFarge Whitey Morgan year end 2015 News Features Thu, 02 Jul 2015 14:27:38 +0000 Guitar World Staff, Intro by Jackson Maxwell 24815 at http://www.guitarworld.com Acoustic Fingerstylists Andy McKee, Jon Gomm and Daryl Kellie Are Blazing a Daring Style of Percussive, Alternate-Tuned Shred http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-fingerstylists-andy-mckee-jon-gomm-daryl-kellie-style-percussive-alternate-tuned-shred <!--paging_filter--><p>In the Eighties, radical fingerstylists like Michael Hedges and Preston Reed pioneered an acoustic guitar style based on an alternate-tuned, percussion-heavy, new age–tinged sound. </p> <p>Kaki King explored it further in the new millennium beginning with her 2002 debut, <em>Everybody Loves You</em>.</p> <p>Some people have dubbed the style “progressive acoustic guitar,” while others prefer “modern fingerstyle.” </p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.jongomm.com/">Jon Gomm</a></strong>, one of its latest (and most popular) exponents, has even heard it referred to as banging, due to its practitioners’ tendency to rap, slap and knock their hands against the body of an acoustic guitar for percussive effect. </p> <p>Whatever you call it, there’s no doubt that this genre of acoustic guitar–based music is experiencing a major resurgence, thanks to the internet. In 2006, an unassuming-looking acoustic guitar teacher from Topeka, Kansas, named <strong><a href="http://www.andymckee.com/">Andy McKee</a></strong> uploaded to YouTube a handful of videos of himself playing some original and incredibly complex instrumental acoustic guitar compositions. </p> <p>Among the many techniques he employed in these performances was the use of unique alternate tunings, percussive knocks, two-handed tapping, over-the-fretboard playing, partial capos and natural and artificial harmonics. One video in particular, for a propulsive yet ethereal tune called “Drifting,” became one of YouTube’s first viral sensations—likely because it was both melodically appealing and visually stunning—and racked up millions of views on the then-new site. </p> <p>McKee has since become the figurehead of this style of playing, and scores of exceptionally talented guitarists have followed in his wake. Many of them, such as French-Canadian fingerstylist Antoine Dufour and British picker Mike Dawes, have recorded for the Wisconsin-based independent imprint CandyRat Records, which has become known as the leading purveyor of this music. </p> <p>Like McKee, Dufour and Dawes have found much success online, partly through elaborate solo reimaginings of full-band songs, in which they recreate rhythm, lead and vocal parts on acoustic guitar. (<a href="http://youtu.be/G1bzUaf_gvU">Dawes’ version of Gotye’s “Somebody That I Used to Know”</a> and <a href="http://youtu.be/gNPCI8y9avc">Dufour’s take on Imogen Heap’s “Hide and Seek”</a> have respectively registered 2.8 and 1.5 million YouTube views.) </p> <p>One of the newest and brightest entries in this realm is <strong><a href="http://www.darylkellie.com/">Daryl Kellie</a></strong> [pictured above], who created an online stir with an elegantly arranged version of Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody.” </p> <p>Then there is Britain’s Jon Gomm, who employs a dizzying combination of extended techniques that explore the outermost reaches of the acoustic guitar. Gomm tends to play in a fluid, eight-finger, above-the-fretboard manner, and seemingly manipulates every bit of his instrument, knocking his hand against the guitar’s top, back, sides and the fretboard, scratching his nails across bridge pins, twisting tuning pegs mid-song, and using an assortment of pickups and pedals. </p> <p>Like many of his peers, he has found his greatest success on YouTube, after his signature song, “Passionflower,” went viral in 2012.</p> <p>That the online world has proved to be a vital forum for these artists is understandable, given that there is an uncharacteristically prominent visual component to what they do. Each musician’s playing style is a marvel of not only creativity and ability but also coordination. “There’s a pretty interesting visual aspect to it, with all the wild techniques,” McKee says, “which is one of the reasons I think YouTube has been such a great arena to showcase the music.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Ddn4MGaS3N4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Guitar World</em> recently caught up individually with McKee, Gomm and Kellie to discuss their unique approaches to the acoustic guitar, as well as how each cultivated his impressive technique and style. Interestingly, they all share not only a love for Michael Hedges and his ilk but also a background in heavy-metal guitar. Says Gomm, “This new acoustic movement is almost like the unplugged version of shred.” </p> <p>Adds McKee, “I think what ties the two together is the complexity of the music. When all of us guys were first getting into the guitar and wanting to learn these different techniques, metal music was the place to go, because you had guitarists doing unbelievable things on their instruments. In a way, we’ve now transferred some of that over to the acoustic.”</p> <p><strong>Andy McKee</strong></p> <p>Perhaps no musician better represents the new progressive acoustic guitar movement than Andy McKee. The 34-year-old is so much the face of the scene that some call this form of music “ ‘Drifting’-style guitar,” a reference to his most famous composition, which has notched almost 50 million YouTube views since its 2006 debut.</p> <p>At the time, McKee was giving guitar lessons around his hometown of Topeka, Kansas, and recording for CandyRat. “[CandyRat label head] Rob Poland had this idea to shoot some performance videos for this new web site called YouTube,” he recalls. “He thought, Maybe we’ll get a few new fans. So we filmed, like, eight videos in one day and put them up.”</p> <hr /> <p>One of them, “Drifting,” went viral after being featured on YouTube’s homepage, and McKee became an online phenomenon. Soon, he was accepting offers to tour with Tommy Emmanuel and record with Josh Groban. </p> <p>“I went from teaching guitar in Kansas to playing guitar all over the planet,” he says. “Which is what I always wanted to do.”</p> <p>Amazingly, “Drifting” is the first song McKee ever wrote in the style with which he has become so closely associated. He composed it when he was 18, just two years after hearing the percussive-heavy instrumental acoustic guitar work of Preston Reed. </p> <p>“When I was 16, my cousin took me to see Preston at a guitar workshop here in Kansas,” he recalls. “At the time, I was playing electric guitar and was way into Pantera and Dream Theater and Iron Maiden. Then I saw Preston and he was doing all these amazing things with just one acoustic. It blew my mind. I wanted to figure out how he was able to cover melodic, harmonic and rhythmic ideas all at once.”</p> <p>McKee also cites fingerstylists like Don Ross, Billy McLaughlin and Michael Hedges as primary influences. Of all his acoustic contemporaries, McKee’s style most closely mirrors that of Hedges, in both his use of the guitar’s body to add percussive elements and his tendency to create lush, harmonically rich soundscapes using altered tunings and droning open strings. On occasion, he plays a double-neck harp guitar, an instrument popularized by, and closely associated with, Hedges.</p> <p>Since the success of “Drifting,” McKee has become a force in the acoustic world. A few years back he created a tour called Guitar Masters, a sort of G3 for the acoustic set. He also performs upward of 100 dates each year on his own, and sometimes in front of enormous audiences, such as when John Petrucci invited him to open some arena gigs for Dream Theater in the U.S., Mexico and the Far East. </p> <p>Equally thrilling, and even more unexpected, in 2012 McKee received an offer to join Prince for a series of shows in Australia. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/JsD6uEZsIsU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>“He watched some of my videos, and one in particular, ‘Rylynn,’ [See the video above] really stood out to him,” McKee says. “He invited me to Minneapolis to jam with him and his band, and from there he brought me out on tour. And it was amazing. I would start the shows with an acoustic arrangement of ‘Purple Rain,’ and during Prince’s set I’d sit in with him and his band and we’d do a medley of his songs.”</p> <p>As for his own music, McKee has released a series of well-received albums, including his most recent, 2010’s <em>Joyride</em>. He also continues to seek out new avenues to explore with his own music. </p> <p>To that end, his new Razor &amp; Tie–issued EP, <em>Mythmaker</em>, features not only his distinct acoustic guitar playing but also a solo piano piece and an electric guitar–and-synth composition. “I’m trying some different things out and letting inspiration take me wherever it does,” McKee says. “I don’t feel like I have to write the next amazing acoustic-guitar song necessarily—I just want to write the next amazing piece of music.” </p> <p><strong>Andy McKee Axology</strong><br /> <strong>GUITARS</strong> Michael Greenfield G4.2 (fanned fret), Michael Greenfield G2B and G4B.2 (fanned fret) baritone, Michael Greenfield HG1.2 harp guitar<br /> <strong>PICKUPS</strong> K&amp;K Pure Mini<br /> <strong>EFFECTS</strong> None<br /> <strong>CAPOS</strong> Shubb S1 and S5 Deluxe (banjo)<br /> <strong>PREAMP</strong> D-TAR Solstice </p> <hr /> <p><strong>Jon Gomm</strong></p> <p>A few years back, Leeds, England–based singer-songwriter Jon Gomm was just another guitarist—albeit one with a devastatingly advanced extended technique—trying to carve out a musical career by gigging extensively across Europe.</p> <p>Then his life was changed by a single word: in early 2012, British actor and comedian Stephen Fry sent out a tweet consisting of “Wow” and a link to a video of Gomm playing his song “Passionflower” live. </p> <p>Today, that video has close to 6 million views, and Gomm has become one of the most talked-about players in the acoustic guitar scene, with fans ranging from David Crosby to Steve Vai to Lamb of God’s Randy Blythe. </p> <p>One look at any of Gomm’s many videos makes it easy to see why his playing has caused such waves. On the main melody of “Passionflower,” for example, he builds an entrancing and hypnotic rhythm pattern by, among other things, scratching, banging and knocking the body of his guitar, a Lowden he calls Wilma. </p> <p>He sounds notes, including harp harmonics, exclusively using eight-finger tapping and with both hands positioned over the fretboard, and he continually reaches behind the headstock to retune his two highest strings as they ring out, to create a synth-like effect. To top it off, he sings over the whole thing.</p> <p>But despite the practically acrobatic nature of his playing, Gomm insists that his music is not a gimmick. “Every song has to have a meaning and connect with people emotionally,” says the 36-year-old guitarist, who actually composes his lyrics first and adds instrumentation afterward. “And you can’t make that connection just by doing gymnastics.” He adds that his favorite thing about playing in this style is that “there are no boundaries. I can think in any genre I want and try to put that into the music.”</p> <p>Gomm has played many genres over the years. Early on, he schooled himself using Steve Vai’s instructional book Shred Extravaganza and later studied at the Guitar Institute in London and earned a jazz degree from the Leeds College of Music. </p> <p>Thanks to his father’s career as a record and concert reviewer for a British newspaper, he received first-hand tips and pointers as a teenager from a famous players, including B.B. King, bluesman Walter Trout and the late steel-guitar virtuoso Bob Brozman, whom he credits with turning him onto the idea of using the guitar as a percussion instrument.</p> <p>“He would flip his guitar over and play drum solos on the back of the body, which was mind blowing to me,” Gomm says. “I also had a guitar teacher who was great at flamenco, and percussive playing is a big part of that style. So while a guy like Michael Hedges was huge for me, it was probably less for the percussion thing and more for his amazing way with altered tunings.”</p> <p>Altered tunings are a big part of Gomm’s style as well. For him, it serves as a way to further unleash his creativity. “I went to guitar school, and I learned a million scales,” he says. “But if I take the guitar and just twist a few pegs, all of a sudden everything is new. Sometimes the most creative thing you can do is tune your guitar wrong and let your ears, rather than your brain, do the work.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/nY7GnAq6Znw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Gomm also pushes his creative boundaries by using banjo pegs on his B and high E strings. The pegs can be set to toggle between two notes, allowing players to loosen and tighten a string’s tension to hit distinct pitches at will. </p> <p>The effect, as demonstrated by Gomm on songs like “Passionflower” and “Telepathy” (both of which appear on <em>Secrets Nobody Keeps</em>), is similar to bending a note on an electric guitar or playing with a synthesizer’s pitch wheel. On another composition, “Hey Child,” which features an overdrive-laced shredding solo, he uses the banjo pegs to create dive-bomb-like whammy-bar effects. </p> <p>“You can get really creative with them and bring your sound into so many different worlds,” Gomm says.</p> <p>Which, essentially, is how he feels about this acoustic guitar style. “There’s just so much you can do,” he says. “When I pick up an electric guitar now, it feels like a toy. The acoustic feels so much more powerful and free to me. It’s a beast of an instrument.”</p> <p><strong>Jon Gomm Axology</strong><br /> <strong>GUITAR</strong> Lowden O12-C (“Wilma”)<br /> <strong>PICKUPS</strong> Fishman Rare Earth Blend, Fishman Acoustic Matrix<br /> <strong>STRINGS</strong> Newtone signature super-heavy gauge (.014–.068)<br /> <strong>EFFECTS</strong> Three Boss PQ-3B Bass Parametric Equalizers, Boss OC-3 Super Octave, Boss DD-7 Digital Delay, Boss RV-5 Digital Reverb, Tech 21 SansAmp Character Series Blond, Line 6 Verbzilla, Line 6 Echo Park<br /> <strong>AMP</strong> Trace Elliot TA 200</p> <hr /> <p><strong>Daryl Kellie</strong></p> <p>In contrast to many of his contemporaries in the progressive fingerstyle world, Daryl Kellie’s musical proclivities and background lean more toward jazz and classical forms rather than the ethereal, percussive-heavy approach of Hedges and Reed. </p> <p>Which, in a sense, made Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” an ideal showcase for the 30-year-old’s abilities as a solo guitar arranger and performer. </p> <p>Kellie’s interpretation of the song is remarkably evocative of the original, with the guitarist employing complex chords, tapping, hammer-ons and plenty of harmonics (both natural and artificial), to great effect.</p> <p>Explains Kellie, “I’ve always come at this from a jazz-fingerstyle guitar angle, and the classical guitar thing is something I’ve always kept up as well. With that in mind, something like ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ is in a way similar to the kind of very dense arrangements you often find in classical guitar music. So arranging the song came pretty naturally to me.” </p> <p>In general, most any style of playing seems to come naturally to Kellie, who began his guitar life as a hard rock and metal fan. </p> <p>Growing up in Hampshire, England, he was an avowed acolyte of shredders like Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Eric Johnson and Eddie Van Halen (“I actually snapped the whammy bar off my Fender Squier trying to learn ‘Eruption,’ ” he says), and in his late teens he toured Britain as the lead guitarist in a “proggy, gothy” metal band named Season’s End. </p> <p>At the same time, he began cultivating an interest in jazz and classical solo guitar, studying the playing of everyone from Joe Pass to Lenny Breau (from whom he cultivated his skillful harp-harmonic technique) to Martin Taylor, who also served as his guitar teacher for a time. </p> <p>Then, in his early twenties, Kellie’s older brother gave him a copy of Andy McKee’s 2005 CandyRat effort, <em>Art of Motion</em>, which includes the songs “Drifting” and “Rylynn.” Recalls Kellie, “I thought it was amazing. I was already getting into the solo guitar thing through my jazz studies, so to see what Andy and some of the other CandyRat artists were doing, with the percussive element and all the interesting techniques, it felt like the next frontier. It was a style of guitar that seemed to be all encompassing, like you could go anywhere with it.”</p> <p>Kellie threw himself wholeheartedly into this new style, and in 2010 he self-released his first EP, <em>Don’t Expect Much</em> and <em>You Won’t Be Disappointed</em>. But it is his growing online catalog of inventively arranged cover songs that has been garnering him the most attention. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_fxbx0-O8kY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/exclusive-video-lesson-bohemian-rhapsody-tutorial-daryl-kellie">Exclusive Video Lesson: "Bohemian Rhapsody" Tutorial by Daryl Kellie</a></strong></p> <p>A quick search on YouTube brings up videos of Kellie tackling songs in a variety of genres, from rock classics like the Beatles’ “When I’m Sixty-Four” and the White Stripes’ “Seven Nation Army” to Tetris and Super Mario Bros video-game music and pop hits like Beyoncé’s “Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It),” which appears, along with “Bohemian Rhapsody” on Kellie’s new, self-released full-length effort, <em>Wintersong.</em> </p> <p>“I like the idea of doing something that’s unexpected,” he explains. “If it’s the first time someone’s been to one of my gigs, they might be like, ‘Is that freakin’ Beyoncé that he’s playing?’ And I also want to show that these are great songs and there’s some interesting things going on in them.”</p> <p>The success of his “Bohemian Rhapsody” arrangement has inspired Kellie to create more covers. “I’ve been considering some Nirvana arrangements, using lots of artificial harmonics and that type of thing,” he says. “And it’d be fun to do something really ‘outside,’ like a Megadeth song, perhaps.” </p> <p>Ultimately, his goal is to keep pushing his acoustic-guitar technique into new realms. “I want to continue to learn and try new things,” he says. “I would love to incorporate techniques like tapping and harp harmonics into jazz and jazz improvisation pieces, which I don’t feel is done very much, particularly on the acoustic. I think that would be really interesting.”</p> <p><strong>Daryl Kellie Axology</strong><br /> <strong>GUITARS</strong> Gibson L-50, Taylor 810 custom, 110ce and 310ce<br /> <strong>PICKUPS</strong> Fishman Rare Earth Blend<br /> <strong>EFFECTS</strong> Electro-Harmonix Holy Grail Reverb Nano, Boss RC-30 Loop Station<br /> <strong>PREAMP</strong> BBE Acoustimax </p> <p><em>Photo (Daryl Kellie): Alex Flahive</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-fingerstylists-andy-mckee-jon-gomm-daryl-kellie-style-percussive-alternate-tuned-shred#comments Acoustic Nation Andy McKee April 2014 Daryl Kellie GW Archive Jon Gromm News Interviews Interviews News Features Magazine Thu, 02 Jul 2015 14:24:13 +0000 Richard Bienstock 21084 at http://www.guitarworld.com July 4 Sale: Take 35 Percent Off Everything at the Guitar World Online Store! http://www.guitarworld.com/july-4-sale-take-35-percent-everything-guitar-world-online-store <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>Save big for Independence Day!</strong></p> <p>Take 35 percent off everything at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=35FOURTH15">Guitar World Online Store!</a></p> <p>Just be sure to use code <strong>35FOURTH15</strong> at checkout.</p> <p>Once again, that's <strong>35FOURTH15.</strong></p> <p><strong>This sale ends 11:59 p.m. Sunday, July 5, 2015, so <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=35FOURTH15">head to the Guitar World Online Store now!</a></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/july-4-sale-take-35-percent-everything-guitar-world-online-store#comments News Features Thu, 02 Jul 2015 14:14:24 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24862 at http://www.guitarworld.com Rututu App Brings Rare Stringed Instruments to Your iPad http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-rututu-app-brings-rare-stringed-instruments-your-ipad <!--paging_filter--><p>If you’ve ever wondered what it would be like to make music with rare stringed instruments from around the world, you’re in for a treat.</p> <p>A new app coming from EarthMoments promises to dish out sound samples meticulously collected from an impressive variety of unique instruments that most of us will never lay a hand on.</p> <p>The app, named Rututu, collects these samples into libraries and inserts them into loops. Users can drag and drop these loops into Rututu’s cool “playground” where you can manipulate them in a variety of ways. The loops automatically sync, so things never sound off, making this a fun way for both kids and adults to get into music-making.</p> <p>One of the coolest aspects is the ability to mesh ancient instrument sounds with very current musical styles. Sitar hip-hop anyone? Go for it!</p> <p>The app currently has a Kickstarter campaign running for its completion. You can check it out and <a href="https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/kkarra/rututu-music-playground">join here>></a></p> <p>Check out some demos of the sounds and loops here:<br /> <iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/85320152&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> <p>The folks at EarthMoments have a track record for unique collections of high quality samples and a space to explore unique sounds and signatures from around the world. Their Zen Pad sample and loop libraries for Ableton are world-renowned. The EarthMoments team includes producers and engineers with over twenty years' experience, internationally acclaimed musicians and top industry professionals.

</p> <p>The EarthMoments studios utilize state-of-the-art analog and digital equipment combined with a passion for quality to produce the pristine quality samples.
EarthMoments is a division of EarthSync, a world music record label, and producer of award-winning audio and visual productions that brings together traditional and contemporary music in unique, high quality productions.</p> <p>Here’s a preview shot of Rututu:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Ipad%20app%20620.jpg" width="620" height="454" alt="Ipad app 620.jpg" /></p> <p>Find out more at <a href="http://rututuapp.earthmoments.com">rututuapp.earthmoments.com</a>
 and check out the gallery of some of the instruments they sampled below!</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-rututu-app-brings-rare-stringed-instruments-your-ipad#comments Acoustic Nation EarthMoments Gear Blogs Blogs News Thu, 02 Jul 2015 13:30:46 +0000 Acoustic Nation 24861 at http://www.guitarworld.com Get a Free 'Mastering Arpeggios Part 2' Lesson at the 'Guitar World Lessons' Store — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/get-free-mastering-arpeggios-part-2-lesson-guitar-world-lessons-store-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2,</em> an impressive compilation of nine instructional video lessons and tabs by Jimmy Brown, is now available through the Guitar World Lessons <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/EF57BA06-4DBD-DB72-635C-2E213E3A8004?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=arpeggios2">Webstore</a> and <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-world-lessons/id942720009?mt=8">App.</a></p> <p>It joins the ranks of the many lessons already available through <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/EF57BA06-4DBD-DB72-635C-2E213E3A8004?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=arpeggios2">Guitar World Lessons.</a></p> <p>To celebrate this new release, <em>Guitar World</em> is offering the first <em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2</em> lesson, "G Major Seven Arpeggios in Positions," as a FREE download! Note that all nine <em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2</em> lessons are available—as a package—for only $14.99.</p> <p>You can watch the trailer for <em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2</em> below.</p> <p><a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/EF57BA06-4DBD-DB72-635C-2E213E3A8004?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=arpeggios2">This new collection</a> is the 90-minute-plus follow-up to <em>Mastering Arpeggios</em>. It introduces and covers everything you need to know about the five essential seventh-chord arpeggio qualities: major seven, dominant seven, minor seven, minor-seven flat-five and diminished seven. </p> <p>Again focusing on the popular guitar key of G, your instructor, longtime GW Senior Music Editor Jimmy Brown, presents all possible fretboard positions and two-octave fingering patterns for these arpeggios and shows you ways to transpose them to any other key, either by progressing through the cycle of fourths/fifths or taking each shape you’ve learned and moving up or down the fretboard chromatically (in one-fret increments). </p> <p>Jimmy then shows you extended two-notes-per-string “monster” patterns that move diagonally up and across the neck, spanning three octaves. Also covered are the seven diatonic seventh-chord arpeggios that live in the key of G major, demonstrated in all positions, and interval patterns of fourths, fifths, sixths and sevenths applied to the arpeggios. The lesson product concludes with an entertaining performance of an original interpretation and tab arrangement of “Presto” from “Sonata 1 For Solo Violin” by Johann Sebastian Bach, which serves as an effective and musically satisfying practice piece.</p> <p><em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2</em> includes:</p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 1 (Part 1): G Major Seven Arpeggios in Positions</strong> his first part of Chapter 1 begins with a quick review of the G major scale and G major triad arpeggio, played up and down one string for purposes of illustration. Jimmy then demonstrates all of the fixed-position two-octave fingerings for a G major seven arpeggio between fourth and seventh positions, along the way showing you a bunch of useful “alternate picking shred cells” and a neat application for improvisation—playing Gmaj7 over an E bass note or Em or Em7 chord to create a cool, jazzy Em9 sound. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 1 (Part 2): G Major Seven Arpeggios in Positions (continued)</strong> This conclusion of Chapter 1 demonstrates all the remaining possible fretboard positions and fingerings for playing G major-seven arpeggios across two octaves, with additional “speed picking cells” presented along the way that reside within the larger patterns. Also covered are patterns in first and second position that combine open strings with fretted notes. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 2: G Dominant Seven and Minor Seven Arpeggios in Positions</strong> Using all the two-octave G major-seven shapes shown in the previous segment, this chapter shows you how to convert them to G dominant- and minor-seven shapes, by “flatting” the seventh and third. Necessary fingering adjustments are covered, as the shapes morph from major-seven to dominant-seven to minor-seven. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/L8Y3aXxGiwQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 3: G Minor Seven Flat-five and Diminished Seven Arpeggios in Positions</strong> Working off of all the G minor-seven shapes presented in the previous chapter, this lesson shows you how to go from minor-seven to minor-seven flat-five to fully diminished-seven, including any necessary fingering adjustments that need to be made to accommodate the lowering of certain notes by one fret. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 4: The Circle of Fifths/Fourths and Practicing Drills</strong> Before continuing with extended arpeggio shapes and applications, this chapter presents a concise review of what is called the “circle of fifths,” or “circle of fourths,” and demonstrates a couple of easy ways to visually remember the cycle on the fretboard and ways to use it to practice all arpeggio shapes learned thus far in all 12 keys. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 5: Two-notes-per-string Patterns</strong> This chapter shows you how to take the five seventh-chord arpeggio qualities covered in the previous chapters and expand them into extended “monster” runs that span three octaves by moving diagonally across the fretboard using two notes per string with quick position shifts. Different “launching points” are presented, starting on the root, third, fifth and seventh of any given arpeggio. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 6: Diatonic Seventh-chord Arpeggios in G</strong> This lesson offers some practical, useful music theory and technical studies by presenting a set of seven different seventh-chord arpeggios that live within the key of G major, consisting of Gmaj7, Am7, Bm7, Cmaj7, D7, Em7 and F#m7b5. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 7: Interval Patterns</strong> This chapter takes the two-octave shapes for the seven diatonic seventh-chord arpeggios from the previous lesson and shows you how to “scramble” the notes by playing them in melodic patterns of fourth and fifth intervals that have you continually crossing strings, which makes for a great alternate picking workout, as well as some neat sounds. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 8: “Presto,” from “Sonata 1 For Solo Violin” by Johann Sebastian Bach</strong> This final chapter presents a performance of Jimmy’s own guitar adaptation and fingering arrangement of a beautiful violin piece by legendary classical composer Johann Sebastian Bach called “Presto,” from “Sonata 1 for Solo Violin.” </p> <p><strong>For more information, visit the Guitar World Lessons <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/EF57BA06-4DBD-DB72-635C-2E213E3A8004?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=arpeggios2">Webstore</a> and download the <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-world-lessons/id942720009?mt=8">App</a> now.</strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-brown">Jimmy Brown</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/get-free-mastering-arpeggios-part-2-lesson-guitar-world-lessons-store-video#comments arpeggios Guitar World Lessons Jimmy Brown Videos News Features Lessons Wed, 01 Jul 2015 20:54:39 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24859 at http://www.guitarworld.com "Thrill" to the Sounds of Japanese Girl Band Band-Maid — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/thrill-sounds-japanese-girl-band-band-maid-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Those of us who keep a fairly close eye on social-media trends (and stuff like that) can't help but notice that a new girl band from Japan has been showing up more and more. And for good reason.</p> <p>They're called Band-Maid, they rock pretty convincingly—and play their own instruments (unlike at least one other Japanese girl band of note).</p> <p>And they dress up as maids! </p> <p>Below, you can check out the music video to one of their 2014 tracks, "Thrill," which is available on an EP called <em>Ai to Jounetsu no Matadore.</em> It was released last August.</p> <p>To pick up some of their music, including "Thrill," <a href="http://www.cdjapan.co.jp/product/DAKPPRC-10">head here.</a></p> <p><strong>For more about Band-Maid, follow them on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/bandmaid?_rdr">Facebook.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Uds7g3M-4lQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/thrill-sounds-japanese-girl-band-band-maid-video#comments Band-Maid Videos News Wed, 01 Jul 2015 19:19:51 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24283 at http://www.guitarworld.com Joe Satriani Premieres New Song, "If There Is No Heaven" http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-premieres-new-song-if-there-no-heaven <!--paging_filter--><p>Check out a brand-new Joe Satriani song, "If There Is No Heaven," below.</p> <p>The song is from Satriani's forthcoming album, and 15th solo disc, <em>Shockwave Supernova.</em></p> <p>Though the song is an instrumental, Satch says there is an emotional subtext embedded in the music.</p> <p>"This is about doubting, doubting everything, including life after death," he told <a href="http://www.wsj.com/">WSJ.com.</a> "The intro and outro are soundtracks to feeling lost and adrift. The body of the song reflects how one would struggle to accept such an idea that we are all here; for just a short time and then gone."</p> <p><strong>For more about Satriani and the new album, visit <a href="http://www.satriani.com/splash/">satriani.com.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5t8yn4WdALw" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="365" width="620"></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-premieres-new-song-if-there-no-heaven#comments Joe Satriani News Wed, 01 Jul 2015 18:38:42 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24858 at http://www.guitarworld.com