News http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/4/%3Ehttp%253.../www.sunflowerdead.com/shop en Get a Free 'Mastering Arpeggios Part 2' Lesson at the 'Guitar World Lessons' Store — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/get-free-mastering-arpeggios-part-2-lesson-guitar-world-lessons-store-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2,</em> an impressive compilation of nine instructional video lessons and tabs by Jimmy Brown, is now available through the Guitar World Lessons <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/EF57BA06-4DBD-DB72-635C-2E213E3A8004?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=arpeggios2">Webstore</a> and <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-world-lessons/id942720009?mt=8">App.</a></p> <p>It joins the ranks of the many lessons already available through <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/EF57BA06-4DBD-DB72-635C-2E213E3A8004?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=arpeggios2">Guitar World Lessons.</a></p> <p>To celebrate this new release, <em>Guitar World</em> is offering the first <em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2</em> lesson, "G Major Seven Arpeggios in Positions," as a FREE download! Note that all nine <em>Mastering Arpeggios, Part 2</em> lessons are available—as a package—for only $14.99.</p> <p>You can watch the trailer for <em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2</em> below.</p> <p><a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/EF57BA06-4DBD-DB72-635C-2E213E3A8004?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=arpeggios2">This new collection</a> is the 90-minute-plus follow-up to <em>Mastering Arpeggios</em>. It introduces and covers everything you need to know about the five essential seventh-chord arpeggio qualities: major seven, dominant seven, minor seven, minor-seven flat-five and diminished seven. </p> <p>Again focusing on the popular guitar key of G, your instructor, longtime GW Senior Music Editor Jimmy Brown, presents all possible fretboard positions and two-octave fingering patterns for these arpeggios and shows you ways to transpose them to any other key, either by progressing through the cycle of fourths/fifths or taking each shape you’ve learned and moving up or down the fretboard chromatically (in one-fret increments). </p> <p>Jimmy then shows you extended two-notes-per-string “monster” patterns that move diagonally up and across the neck, spanning three octaves. Also covered are the seven diatonic seventh-chord arpeggios that live in the key of G major, demonstrated in all positions, and interval patterns of fourths, fifths, sixths and sevenths applied to the arpeggios. The lesson product concludes with an entertaining performance of an original interpretation and tab arrangement of “Presto” from “Sonata 1 For Solo Violin” by Johann Sebastian Bach, which serves as an effective and musically satisfying practice piece.</p> <p><em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2</em> includes:</p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 1 (Part 1): G Major Seven Arpeggios in Positions</strong> his first part of Chapter 1 begins with a quick review of the G major scale and G major triad arpeggio, played up and down one string for purposes of illustration. Jimmy then demonstrates all of the fixed-position two-octave fingerings for a G major seven arpeggio between fourth and seventh positions, along the way showing you a bunch of useful “alternate picking shred cells” and a neat application for improvisation—playing Gmaj7 over an E bass note or Em or Em7 chord to create a cool, jazzy Em9 sound. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 1 (Part 2): G Major Seven Arpeggios in Positions (continued)</strong> This conclusion of Chapter 1 demonstrates all the remaining possible fretboard positions and fingerings for playing G major-seven arpeggios across two octaves, with additional “speed picking cells” presented along the way that reside within the larger patterns. Also covered are patterns in first and second position that combine open strings with fretted notes. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 2: G Dominant Seven and Minor Seven Arpeggios in Positions</strong> Using all the two-octave G major-seven shapes shown in the previous segment, this chapter shows you how to convert them to G dominant- and minor-seven shapes, by “flatting” the seventh and third. Necessary fingering adjustments are covered, as the shapes morph from major-seven to dominant-seven to minor-seven. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/L8Y3aXxGiwQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 3: G Minor Seven Flat-five and Diminished Seven Arpeggios in Positions</strong> Working off of all the G minor-seven shapes presented in the previous chapter, this lesson shows you how to go from minor-seven to minor-seven flat-five to fully diminished-seven, including any necessary fingering adjustments that need to be made to accommodate the lowering of certain notes by one fret. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 4: The Circle of Fifths/Fourths and Practicing Drills</strong> Before continuing with extended arpeggio shapes and applications, this chapter presents a concise review of what is called the “circle of fifths,” or “circle of fourths,” and demonstrates a couple of easy ways to visually remember the cycle on the fretboard and ways to use it to practice all arpeggio shapes learned thus far in all 12 keys. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 5: Two-notes-per-string Patterns</strong> This chapter shows you how to take the five seventh-chord arpeggio qualities covered in the previous chapters and expand them into extended “monster” runs that span three octaves by moving diagonally across the fretboard using two notes per string with quick position shifts. Different “launching points” are presented, starting on the root, third, fifth and seventh of any given arpeggio. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 6: Diatonic Seventh-chord Arpeggios in G</strong> This lesson offers some practical, useful music theory and technical studies by presenting a set of seven different seventh-chord arpeggios that live within the key of G major, consisting of Gmaj7, Am7, Bm7, Cmaj7, D7, Em7 and F#m7b5. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 7: Interval Patterns</strong> This chapter takes the two-octave shapes for the seven diatonic seventh-chord arpeggios from the previous lesson and shows you how to “scramble” the notes by playing them in melodic patterns of fourth and fifth intervals that have you continually crossing strings, which makes for a great alternate picking workout, as well as some neat sounds. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 8: “Presto,” from “Sonata 1 For Solo Violin” by Johann Sebastian Bach</strong> This final chapter presents a performance of Jimmy’s own guitar adaptation and fingering arrangement of a beautiful violin piece by legendary classical composer Johann Sebastian Bach called “Presto,” from “Sonata 1 for Solo Violin.” </p> <p><strong>For more information, visit the Guitar World Lessons <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/EF57BA06-4DBD-DB72-635C-2E213E3A8004?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=arpeggios2">Webstore</a> and download the <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-world-lessons/id942720009?mt=8">App</a> now.</strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-brown">Jimmy Brown</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/get-free-mastering-arpeggios-part-2-lesson-guitar-world-lessons-store-video#comments arpeggios Guitar World Lessons Jimmy Brown Videos News Features Lessons Wed, 01 Jul 2015 20:54:39 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24859 at http://www.guitarworld.com "Thrill" to the Sounds of Japanese Girl Band Band-Maid — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/thrill-sounds-japanese-girl-band-band-maid-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Those of us who keep a fairly close eye on social-media trends (and stuff like that) can't help but notice that a new girl band from Japan has been showing up more and more. And for good reason.</p> <p>They're called Band-Maid, they rock pretty convincingly—and play their own instruments (unlike at least one other Japanese girl band of note).</p> <p>And they dress up as maids! </p> <p>Below, you can check out the music video to one of their 2014 tracks, "Thrill," which is available on an EP called <em>Ai to Jounetsu no Matadore.</em> It was released last August.</p> <p>To pick up some of their music, including "Thrill," <a href="http://www.cdjapan.co.jp/product/DAKPPRC-10">head here.</a></p> <p><strong>For more about Band-Maid, follow them on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/bandmaid?_rdr">Facebook.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Uds7g3M-4lQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/thrill-sounds-japanese-girl-band-band-maid-video#comments Band-Maid Videos News Wed, 01 Jul 2015 19:19:51 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24283 at http://www.guitarworld.com Joe Satriani Premieres New Song, "If There Is No Heaven" http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-premieres-new-song-if-there-no-heaven <!--paging_filter--><p>Check out a brand-new Joe Satriani song, "If There Is No Heaven," below.</p> <p>The song is from Satriani's forthcoming album, and 15th solo disc, <em>Shockwave Supernova.</em></p> <p>Though the song is an instrumental, Satch says there is an emotional subtext embedded in the music.</p> <p>"This is about doubting, doubting everything, including life after death," he told <a href="http://www.wsj.com/">WSJ.com.</a> "The intro and outro are soundtracks to feeling lost and adrift. The body of the song reflects how one would struggle to accept such an idea that we are all here; for just a short time and then gone."</p> <p><strong>For more about Satriani and the new album, visit <a href="http://www.satriani.com/splash/">satriani.com.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5t8yn4WdALw" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="365" width="620"></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-premieres-new-song-if-there-no-heaven#comments Joe Satriani News Wed, 01 Jul 2015 18:38:42 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24858 at http://www.guitarworld.com The Top 10 Wedding Songs http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-wedding-songs <!--paging_filter--><p>As a member of a wedding band, you learn some valuable lessons, such as <em>it's not always about you</em>. </p> <p>You're on that stage to help fulfill the bride's ideal of a fairy-tale wedding. That means you'll likely be playing some pretty cheesy stuff. </p> <p>But that's all right. The job is to keep the guests on the dance floor and singing along to every tune. </p> <p>With the following set list in hand, everyone will live happily ever after—or at least until the bar runs dry.<br /> <br /><br /> <strong>10. Kool &amp; the Gang, "Celebration"</strong></p> <p>This Toyotathon jingle is insipidly gleeful. But if there's "a party going on right here"—like, say, at a wedding reception—chances are good you'll be asked to perform it. Cheer up, though, it could be worse—the bride's mother could demand "The Chicken Dance."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3GwjfUFyY6M" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>09. The Carpenters, "We've Only Just Begun"</strong></p> <p>This lovely ballad actually started out as a jingle for a bank commercial before Richard Carpenter contacted songwriter Paul Williams and asked him to flesh it out for a single. With lines specifically about weddings ("white lace and promises," etc.), it's now money in the bank for wedding bands. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/__VQX2Xn7tI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>08. Bonnie Tyler, "Total Eclipse of the Heart"</strong></p> <p>Many brides want their wedding day to be an epic pageant, flawless in every detail. Leave it to Jim Steinman, the man behind Meat Loaf, to capture that operatic quality in a power ballad. Forever immortalized in the reception scene of <em>Old School</em>, nothing says "I fuckin' need you more than ever" like this Tyler hit. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/lcOxhH8N3Bo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>07. The Psychedelic Furs, "Pretty in Pink"</strong></p> <p>Ever since John Hughes borrowed this song for his coming-of-age flick of the same name, most people associate it with romance and assume the chorus ("Pretty in pink, isn't she?") is literal. Which makes it fun for wedding bands, considering that the lyrics are actually about a party girl and "pink" is a metaphor for "nude." </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pqmTMiIMG74" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>06. KC &amp; the Sunshine Band, "Shake Your Booty"</strong></p> <p>It hasn't been cool to like KC &amp; the Sunshine Band since... well... <em>ever</em>. But break into this tune and every single wedding guest will bust out of the disco closet and onto the dance floor. Careful with that tempo, though- today's average booty is quite a bit larger than it was in KC's heyday. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xWxLc555sgU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>05. Outkast, "Hey Ya"</strong></p> <p>Keep those bodies shake, shake, shakin' like a Polaroid picture with this four-chord wonder. And wear 'em out with a protracted version of the call-and-response section: "Don't make me break this thing down for nothing, ladies!" </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PWgvGjAhvIw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>04. Aerosmith, "I Don't Want to Miss a Thing"</strong></p> <p>This Diane Warren-penned power ballad, from 1998, was Steven Tyler and crew's biggest hit in years. It's not exactly rock 'n' roll, but if you're playing a conservative affair, it might be the closest you can get. Hey, if badass Joe Perry can suck it up night after night, so can you. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JkK8g6FMEXE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>03. The Rolling Stones, "Wild Horses"</strong></p> <p>The authors of "Under My Thumb," "Stupid Girl" and "Bitch" probably aren't an obvious quarry of wedding material. But you can always give this one a shot: Mick and Keef's rare display of vulnerability will switch on the waterworks every time. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yE2B_kCfvss" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>02. Grand Funk Railroad, "Some Kind of Wonderful"</strong></p> <p>A man professing his love for his woman can be a truly touching thing. Or it can be totally embarrassing. You can make it a manly proposition with this rousing R&amp;B tune by Mark Farner and Grand Funk. Unlike Farner, however, you might want to leave your shirt on and forgo the headband. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/O7B5jXYRy3Q" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>01. Neil Diamond, "Sweet Caroline"</strong></p> <p>Neil Diamond rules. He wrote hits for the Monkees, perfected the sideburn comb-over, and, if you were born 40 or so years, probably soundtracked your conception—if not fathered you himself. And then there's this anthem, a slam dunk for any wedding band. "Sweet Caroline" will have guests actually believing that "good times never seemed so good." Well, "Sweet Caroline" and an open bar, anyway. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NsLyI1_R01M" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/aerosmith">Aerosmith</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-wedding-songs#comments Aerosmith GO June 2005 Guitar One Guitar World Lists News Features Wed, 01 Jul 2015 15:35:39 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24603 at http://www.guitarworld.com Meet ACPAD, the First Wireless MIDI Controller for Acoustic Guitar — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-acpad-first-wireless-midi-controller-acoustic-guitar-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Below, behold a video—published to YouTube June 3—that shows the ACPAD in action.</p> <p>The ACPAD is being billed as the world's first MIDI controller for acoustic guitars.</p> <p>And while we don't yet know a whole heck of a lot about this device, we know it's coming to Kickstarter soon. </p> <p>Here are some of its finer points, as finely pointed out by the makers of ACPAD:</p> <p>• It supports both Wireless MIDI and USB MIDI connections.<br /> • It is velocity sensitive with accurate triggering and no noticeable latency.<br /> • With its own internal rechargeable battery, ACPAD gives you complete freedom. For long studio sessions, it runs perfectly using USB.<br /> • With presets of two live loopers, effects and sounds using Ableton Live, you get unlimited sound effects.<br /> • Choose from wood grain, black and white designs. Customizable versions coming soon.</p> <p>For further reading, here's a bit of background from the <a href="http://acpad.com/">official ACPAD website:</a></p> <p>ACPAD was born out of necessity. A need for flexibility, live stability and creative freedom. Berlin musician Robin Sukroso needed a piece of equipment that would allow him to bring his love of electronic and acoustic music together; that could withstand playing every night, that was easy and intuitive to play, and that could let him explore an entirely new world of sound.</p> <p>The ACPAD began as an idea and a desire. After three years of research, development and a lot of trials, the ACPAD is finally ready for the world. Sukroso, along with his partners at IIT Bombay, created a new 2-mm thick interface having no wires or screws, a stick-on wireless MIDI controller that is powered by a rechargeable battery. ACPAD is a device with true portability and tonal versatility.</p> <p>The ACPAD allows players to blend both acoustic and electronic sounds with FX and assignable tap pads. Create whatever sound you want with ACPAD. It is strong, flexible and offers a new world of creativity you have been looking for. ACPAD is an electronic orchestra in your hands!</p> <p>For more information, visit <a href="http://acpad.com/">acpad.com</a> and watch the video below. Stay tuned for more details as we get them!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eJFfnTkyj-g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-acpad-first-wireless-midi-controller-acoustic-guitar-video#comments Acoustic Nation ACPAD MIDI News Videos Blogs Videos News Wed, 01 Jul 2015 14:28:08 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24630 at http://www.guitarworld.com Willie Dixon at 100: 10 Essential Willie Dixon Covers — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/10-ten-best-willie-dixon-songs-covers-essential <!--paging_filter--><p>Although you probably won't see too many "100 Years of Willie Dixon" celebrations online today, we felt we needed to say something about this incredibly important figure in Chicago blues and rock history.</p> <p>Dixon, who—as we've implied above—was born July 1, 1915, was primarily a bassist and singer (who also played guitar), but a bassist and singer who happened to write hundreds of incredible, often dark and eerie songs, several of which found their way into the catalogs of the biggest blues and rock artists of the Sixties, Seventies, Eighties and beyond.</p> <p>These include Stevie Ray Vaughan, Led Zeppelin, Jeff Beck, the Rolling Stones, Buddy Guy, Cream (and Eric Clapton), the Doors, the Grateful Dead, Gary Moore, George Thorogood, Muddy Waters, Koko Taylor and Howlin’ Wolf—<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_songs_written_by_Willie_Dixon">to name just a few.</a></p> <p>Today we'd like to celebrate Dixon's would-be 100th birthday by pointing out 10 noteworthy covers of his songs. In fact, let's make it 11. I say noteworthy, as opposed to best, because there's simply a staggering amount of recordings to consider (live and studio). Let's just say you can't possibly go wrong with these 11.</p> <p>Note that we've tried to include live versions of the songs, because they're a hell of a lot more fun to watch than audio-only YouTube "videos." Dixon died in 1992 at age 76.<br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Jeff Beck, "I Ain't Superstitious"</strong></p> <p>Although Howlin' Wolf recorded this Dixon tune in 1961, most rock fans made its acquaintance when Jeff Beck covered it on his first solo album, <em>Truth,</em> in 1968. </p> <p>The song recounts various superstitions, including a black cat crossing the pathway, so Beck imitates the sound of a cat with his guitar and wah pedal. It's just one of a multitude of sounds Beck can coax out of a guitar. That said, if my cats sounded like this, I'd rush them to the all-night animal hospital ASAP.</p> <p>Here's a live version from 2009, 41 years after it appeared on <em>Truth</em>. Beck even got the original vocalist, Rod Stewart, to sing it. That's Tal Wilkenfeld on bass. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/q3K2jwzpc0U" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Cream, "Spoonful"</strong></p> <p>Just as “Crossroads” introduced a new generation of music fans to the mystique of Robert Johnson, Cream’s “Spoonful” brought exposure to Dixon, who wrote the song, and Howlin’ Wolf, who originally recorded it in 1960.</p> <p>And while Howlin’ Wolf’s stark-and-dark version is haunting in its own right, Cream’s take on the song—driven by Clapton’s guitar and Jack Bruce’s heavy bass—moves it several steps further along.</p> <p>At Cream’s live shows, “Spoonful” gave the band members plenty of room to stretch out, as can be heard on the nearly 17-minute-long version on Cream’s <em>Wheels of Fire.</em> Below is another great live version, complete with pro-shot footage of Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce and Ginger Bruce in action. And just like the second season of <em>F Troop,</em> this video is in color.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CgP7kfIwlE8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Muddy Waters, “I Just Want to Make Love to You”</strong></p> <p>Here's a live version of a powerful Dixon number that Muddy Waters made famous. This live version features Johnny Winter, Otis Blackwell, Eddie "Bluesman" Kirkland, Dave "Honeyboy" Edwards and Foghat, so you know it was filmed in the Seventies, which it was (1978). Let's not forget the Stones' sped-up version of this song, which is enjoyable in its own British way.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RUOYD3mu2l0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>The Doors, "Back Door Man"</strong></p> <p>"Back Door Man," a Chicago blues classic, was recorded by Howlin' Wolf in 1960 and released in 1961 by Chess Records as the B-side to Wolf's "Wang Dang Doodle." The Doors got to it a few years later, including it on their eponymous debut album. Doors drummer John Densmore said "Back Door Man" is "deeply sexual and got everyone moving."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sf3KG8VAtJg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Eric Clapton, "Third Degree"</strong></p> <p>When Clapton recorded his intense <em>From the Cradle</em> album, which was hailed as his "return to the blues," he was sure to include several Dixon compositions, including this one, which was co-written by Eddie Boyd. The other two were "Hoochie Coochie Man" and the dramatic and greasy “Groaning the Blues.”</p> <p>By the way, in a 2011 GuitarWorld.com poll, <em>From the Cradle</em> was voted Clapton’s fourth-best guitar album, sandwiched between Cream’s <em>Wheels of Fire</em> (Number 5) and <em>Disraeli Gears</em> (Number 3). </p> <p>Anyway, check out this fine mid-Nineties live version of "Third Degree" featuring Clapton playing a very nice Gibson. We wish he would play this guitar more often. OK, "we" is me.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AjqcMaDJGmo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Muddy Waters, "Hoochie Coochie Man"</strong></p> <p>This song was recorded or performed by a huge list of name-brand artists, including Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Phish, the New York Dolls, Dixon himself, the Allman Brothers Band and more. But <em>the</em> version belongs to Muddy Waters, who initially recorded it in 1954. It became one of Waters' most popular and identifiable songs and helped secure Dixon's role as Chess Records' chief songwriter.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NV_ZhBcNiQQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>The Rolling Stones, "Little Red Rooster"</strong></p> <p>Can you believe the Stones took this song to Number 1 on the U.K. singles charts in late 1964? I think it's the only time (ever) that a pure blues song has claimed the top spot on the U.K. charts.</p> <p>"[This] was [Brian Jones'] masterpiece, his inspired guitar howling like a hound, barking like a dog, crowing like a rooster," said Rolling Stones biographer Stephen Davis. As former Stones bassist Bill Wyman added, "I believe 'Rooster' provided Brian Jones with one of his finest hours."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OfJVeHKVcE8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble, "Let Me Love You Baby"</strong></p> <p>This upbeat Dixon tune, a highlight of Vaughan's 1989 <em>In Step</em> album, also was covered by Buddy Guy in ancient times. Check out this fan-filmed live version from November 11, 1989, at New York City's Madison Square Garden. I was actually at this show. A drunk guy threw up directly behind me, but my brother and my friend didn't tell me. Good times!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6ci0Fk14Y7s" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>The Small Faces, "You Need Loving"</strong></p> <p>I love including the Small Faces on these lists, because in 2015, they just don't get the love they deserve. I also like what happens at exactly 3:35 in the YouTube player below. Be sure to head to that spot. Does it remind you of anything? Remember it was recorded in 1966.</p> <p>When Dixon wrote this tune, it was called "You Need Love." The song was, um, "borrowed" a few times after that.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tp0jZ4BGuDw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Led Zeppelin, "I Can't Quit You Baby"</strong></p> <p>Here's the powerful, echo-filled <em>Coda</em> version of Dixon's "I Can't Quit You Baby" as performed by Led Zeppelin. This is actually one of my favorite officially released Led Zeppelin recordings of all time. I love how Jimmy Page intentionally jumps the gun on the turnaround chords <em>because he knew it would sound exciting if he did.</em> And it did.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9jzGulTn6N8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Buddy Guy, "When My Left Eye Jumps"</strong></p> <p>Buddy Guy's version of this Dixon/Al Perkins tune features some great singing and guitar playing. It also includes the line: "When my left eye get to jumpin', and my flesh begin to crawl / I know you got some other mule, that's kickin' in my stall." Genius! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/TEMcudqynnc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em><a href="https://soundcloud.com/damian-fanelli/mister-neutron-super-1">Damian Fanelli</a> is the online managing editor at </em>Guitar World<em> and </em><a href="http://www.guitaraficionado.com/">Guitar Aficionado</a><em>. His New York-based band, <a href="https://soundcloud.com/damian-fanelli/the-blue-meanies-heart-full-of">the Blue Meanies,</a> has toured the world and elsewhere. Fanelli, a former member of Brooklyn jump-blues/rockabilly band <a href="http://www.thegashousegorillas.com/">the Gas House Gorillas</a> and New York City surf-rock band <a href="http://www.cdbaby.com/Artist/MisterNeutron">Mister Neutron,</a> writes GuitarWorld.com's <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/next-bend-clarence-white-inspired-country-b-bender-lick-video">The Next Bend,</a> a column dedicated to <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/next-bend-10-essential-b-bender-guitar-songs-damian-fanelli">B-benders.</a> His latest liner notes can be found in Legacy's </em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/The-Complete-Epic-Recordings-Collection/dp/B00MJFQ24W">Stevie Ray Vaughan: The Complete Epic Recordings Collection.</a><em> Follow him on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/damianfanelliguitar">Facebook,</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/damianfanelli">Twitter</a> and/or <a href="https://instagram.com/damian_fanelli/">Instagram.</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/doors-0">The Doors</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jeff-beck">Jeff Beck</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eric-clapton">Eric Clapton</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/cream">Cream</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/stevie-ray-vaughan">Stevie Ray Vaughan</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/buddy-guy">Buddy Guy</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/10-ten-best-willie-dixon-songs-covers-essential#comments 10 Best Songs blues Buddy Guy Cream Damian Fanelli Eric Clapton Essential Listening Jeff Beck Stevie Ray Vaughan The Doors Top 10 Willie Dixon Guitar World Lists Videos Blogs News Features Wed, 01 Jul 2015 14:11:07 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24855 at http://www.guitarworld.com August Burns Red Premiere "Identity" Playthrough Video — Exclusive http://www.guitarworld.com/august-burns-red-premiere-identity-playthrough-video-exclusive <!--paging_filter--><p>Today we bring you an exclusive playthrough video of “Identity,” featuring August Burns Red guitarist JB Brubaker.</p> <p>The clip, which you can check out below, was filmed—using a Go Pro camera—during the <a href="http://vanswarpedtour.com/dates/washington-d-c-3">2015 Vans Warped Tour.</a></p> <p>“Identity” can be found on the band's new album, <em>Found in Far Away Places,</em> which is <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/found-in-far-away-places-deluxe/id981302602">available now on iTunes.</a></p> <p>August Burns Red—Jake Luhrs (vocals), JB Brubaker (guitar), Brent Rambler (guitar), Matt Greiner (drums) and Dustin Davidson (bass)—are on the main stage of the Vans Warped Tour all summer long.</p> <p><strong>For more about August Burns Red, visit <a href="http://augustburnsred.com/">augustburnsred.com.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/TpRj_wz5vx8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/august-burns-red-premiere-identity-playthrough-video-exclusive#comments August Burns Red Guitar Playthrough JB Brubaker Warped Tour Videos News Wed, 01 Jul 2015 14:05:33 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24853 at http://www.guitarworld.com Queen's Brian May Provides "Rude Awakenings" on New Kalinich and Tiven Album http://www.guitarworld.com/queens-brian-may-provides-rude-awakenings-new-kalinich-and-tiven-album <!--paging_filter--><p>Today, GuitarWorld.com presents <a href="http://www.popmatters.com/post/194951-kalinich-and-tiven-each-soul-has-a-voice-album-stream-premiere/">"Rude Awakenings,"</a> a new song by Kalinich and Tiven that features a somewhat unorthodox guitar solo by Queen's Brian May.</p> <p>The track is from Kalinich and Tiven's new album, <em>Each Soul Has a Voice,</em> which will be released July 3 by MsMusic.</p> <p>Stephen Kalinich and Jon Tiven have racked up some impressive credits since the Sixties and Seventies. Kalinich collaborated with the Beach Boys, co-writing “Little Bird” with Dennis Wilson, and Tiven has worked with everyone from the Rolling Stones and Alex Chilton to Alabama Shakes.</p> <p>“Brian [May] and I have been good friends for over 40 years, and [the] last time he came through New York he came over and we had a few jam sessions, which we recorded in case something good could come from them," Tiven told <em><a href="http://www.glidemagazine.com/136237/song-premiere-stephen-kalinich-jon-tiven-rude-awakenings/">Glide Magazine</a></em>. </p> <p>"I added a few instruments and sent it to Brian, who was shocked at the shape it had taken, quite delighted actually, and insisted on fixing a few things on his original guitar track. But the essence of the original inspiration is intact and very much the soul of the song. </p> <p> "Brian plays all over the track, not just the solo. He's the dominant guitar [on the song]. I play slide on it, plus horns, bass and drums, but I let him take the front seat!"</p> <p><em>Each Soul Has a Voice</em> is the result of songwriting sessions that yielded a hard-to-imagine 700 compositions. Only the 14 best were selected for the new album.</p> <p>“We write a song a day, generally speaking,” Tiven said. “Stevie sends me a lyric and I either write something fresh or use a music track that I’ve managed to compose on a day off. During this process we achieved a closeness as a team that you cannot get unless you write that many songs as a team. </p> <p>"You put two semi-geniuses together and over time they can become one great mind."</p> <p><strong>For more about Kalinich and Tiven and/or the new album, visit <a href="http://yomamamusic.net/">yomamamusic.net</a> and <a href="http://www.foothillrecords.com/">foothillrecords.com.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202834733&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-may">Brian May</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/queen">Queen</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/queens-brian-may-provides-rude-awakenings-new-kalinich-and-tiven-album#comments Brian May Kalinich and Tiven Queen News Wed, 01 Jul 2015 14:04:59 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24854 at http://www.guitarworld.com The 25 Things Every Guitarist Should Know http://www.guitarworld.com/25-things-every-guitarist-should-know <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Many people believe that possessing talent alone is enough to guarantee an artist success in the music business. Nothing could be further from the truth. In a perfect world, the best musicians—the best guitarists—would be amply rewarded for their abilities. The music business, however, is far from perfect. </em></p> <p>And unless you're one of the blessed few (such as Eddie Van Halen) who can single-handedly change the course of guitar history, the harsh reality is that killer chops and perfect time impress only other guitarists, not the people who hire you or buy the records.</p> <p>Talent, of course, is any artist's basic bread and butter, but whether you're a fingerpicker or a two-handed tapper, in order to survive the music business and distinguish yourself from the thousands of other guitarists who are after your gig, you must boast some other essential qualities. </p> <p>These range from good people skills to practical, common-sense approaches to your business (Fact it, that's what it is), both of which will help you stand out from the pack—and believe me, there's nothing more frightening that a pack of hungry, feral guitarists. </p> <p>For your edification, I have crunched these qualities—the many do's and don'ts of guitar existence—into 25 hardheaded, clearly wrought maxims. Learn them, memorize them, master them and imbibe. You'll be a better person for it, a better guitarist, and you just may make your way from the garage to the arena stage.</p> <p><strong>01. Nobody likes an asshole</strong></p> <p>Reality check: Most musicians don't give a damn whether you're the second coming of Jimi, Eddie or Buck Dharma. They just want someone with a good attitude who will play the parts correctly. And since most of your time is spent offstage, relating with the other musicians on a personal level becomes as important as relating to them musically. Remember-no one is indispensable. Just ask David Lee Roth.</p> <p><strong>02. Having a great feel is your most important musical asset</strong></p> <p>No one will want to play with you if you have bad time. You must have a great feel-it's that simple. By "great feel" I mean the ability to lock in with the rhythm section and produce a track that grooves. If there's one thing I would recommend you to constantly work on, it's developing your groove. Listen to the greats to learn how grooves should be played: from rock (Led Zeppelin's "Whole Lotta Love" to 16th-note funk (James Brown's "Sex Machine") to blues shuffle ("Pride and Joy" by Stevie Ray Vaughan). Tape yourself (with a metronome) playing them-you'll be able to isolate and work on your problem areas. Or pick up the excellent JamTrax series (Music Sales), a series of play-along tapes covering everything from blues to alternative to metal, to stay in shape. This is the one area where you should be most brutal in your self-assessment. You'll be a much better player for it.</p> <p><strong>03. Develop your own sound </strong></p> <p>There's no better way to learn how to play than to cop licks from your favorite guitarists. The problem to watch out for is when you start sounding too much like your favorite player. Remember, rules, especially musical rules, are made to be broken.</p> <p><strong>04. Be on time</strong></p> <p>You wouldn't believe how many musicians don't believe that punctuality is important. It is crucial.</p> <p><strong>05. Listen, listen, listen!</strong></p> <p>When you're on stage or in the studio, don't be in your own world-listen and interact with the other musicians you're working with. React to what they're playing. Don't play too loud or get in the way when someone else is soloing. Put their egos ahead of yours-your number will always be called if the other musicians feel that you made them sound better.</p> <hr /> <p><strong>06. Know what you want to be</strong></p> <p>The most successful people in the music business are totally focused-they have specific goals in mind and do whatever is necessary to achieve them. The simple realization that you don't have to be a musician to be a rock star and don't have to be a rock star to be a musician can spare you years of cynicism and bitterness.</p> <p><strong>07. Play for the song, not for yourself</strong></p> <p>It's imperative to play what's idiomatically correct. For example, don't play Yngwie licks on Bush's "Glycerine" or a noodly jazz solo on Soundgarden's "Outshined," no matter how much it impresses you. I learned this the hard way while auditioning for a punk singer. I thought I'd show her what a good, well-rounded musician I was and ended a thrash song in A with an Am(add9) chord, instead of a more appropriate A5. I was promptly shown the door.</p> <p><strong>08. Play with musicians who are better (and better known) than you</strong></p> <p>There's no faster way to improve and jump up to the next level than to play with great musicians. You'll learn the tricks of the trade, and pick up on their years of experience in the trenches, as well. But if you want to be a star, there's no better way to kick-start your career than by ingratiating yourself with someone famous and be seen sycophantically swilling drinks with him or her at the coolest bar in town.</p> <p><strong>09. Less is more</strong></p> <p>Most players you hear or read about pay lip service to what has become the guitardom's ultimate cliché. The fact is, though, what's glibly easy to say is not necessarily easy to do. I learned this on a gig backing up a singer on a cruise ship (It was the actual "Love Boat!"). Back then, I couldn't read music or play over changes very well, so during the first show, in abject fear, I played very sparsely-only what I was sure would work. After the show, the singer told me she had never worked with so sensitive an accompanist.</p> <p><strong>10. Image does matter</strong></p> <p>This is one of the sad truths about the music business. The good news, however, is that not every musical situation calls for the same image. So use some common sense-if you're going to be auditioning for a wimpy jangle band, don't come dressed like a Marilyn Manson cast-off.</p> <hr /> <p><strong>11. It's essential to have a great touch, or vibrato</strong></p> <p>There are players who say it took them 10-15 years to develop a great vibrato. They're the lucky ones-most never find it. Your touch is like your fingerprints-it's what distinguishes your blues playing, for instance, from that of countless other guitarists. Think of B.B. King or Jimi Hendrix-they are instantly recognizable. There are two main types of vibrato: one generated by the wrist (a la Hendrix and B.B. King) and the other from the fingers (favored more by classical guitarists). To determine which type works for you, check out your favorite guitarists' vibratos and try to imitate them. You can also pick up B.B. King's video <em>Bluesmaster</em> (Volume 1) to see his unique "bee-sting" vibrato demonstrated in-depth.</p> <p><strong>12. Get your sound/tone together</strong></p> <p>I can't emphasize enough how important this is. Know your gear well enough so that it works for you, not against you. For example, if you're looking for a Stevie Ray tone, you won't get it with a Les Paul going through a Marshall. You'll need a Strat running through a Fender Bassman (with an Ibanez Tube Screamer for extra punch). Unless you're a studio tech-head, a great guitar and amp (with an overdrive or chorus pedal) will probably sound 10 times better than a refrigerator full of rack-mounted shit (believe me, I've been there).</p> <p><strong>13. Practice what you don't know, not what you do know</strong></p> <p>In order to improve, you must practice. That sounds frightening, but let me reassure you that good practicing doesn't necessarily entail sitting grimly in a basement (while the other kids are outside playing), mindlessly running scales and arpeggios-you can get all the technique you need by learning licks from your favorite guitarists. For example, Eric Johnson's intro to "Cliffs of Dover" is a veritable lexicon of minor-pentatonic ideas. Here are the three axioms of good practicing:</p> <p>A. Master small bits of music first (no more than four to eight notes at a time), then connect them to form longer passages.</p> <p>B. Start out playing new ideas at a slow tempo (this builds muscle memory), then gradually work up to speed. It's much better to play slow and clean than fast and sloppy.</p> <p>C. Always practice with a metronome</p> <p><strong>14. Get your business chops together</strong></p> <p>Business chops are just as important as musical ones, if not more so. If you want to make money as a musician, you have to start seeing yourself as a business and your music as a product. Acting against the stereotype of a musician (you know—stupid, drunk and gullible), as hard as that may be, will show club owners and record execs that you're not a pushover.</p> <p><strong>15. Be fluent with both major and minor pentatonic scales</strong></p> <p>In rock, pop, blues or country situations, knowing these scales will enable you to get by 80 percent of the time. I heartily recommend my book <em>Practical Pentatonics</em> (Music Sales)-a nifty little volume that covers just about all you need to know to be comfortable using the pentatonic scale in real-life gigging situations.</p> <hr /> <p><strong>16. As soon as you learn something cool, apply it immediately to a real-life musical situation</strong></p> <p>Many guitarists learn tons of licks that sound great when played in the practice room. But the minute they get on stage, they have a hard time integrating this new material into their playing. Before you learn something new, you should have an idea where you could fit it in.</p> <p><strong>17. Learn as many melodies as you can</strong></p> <p>Not only does learning melodies to tunes (any tunes) increase your repertoire, it also (subconsciously) gives you an incredibly distinct edge in developing your phrasing. Ideally, you should be able to duplicate any melody you hear.</p> <p>A. Listen to how singers interpret melodies and try to mimic their phrasing on the guitar.</p> <p>B. Try to play back any, and I mean any, melody you hear-be it a TV commercial, nursery rhyme or the Mister Softee ice cream truck theme.</p> <p>C. Always learn a melody on more than one place on the guitar neck. You want to play the melody, not have the melody play you.</p> <p><strong>18. Know your place</strong></p> <p>When a bandleader asks you to play something a certain way, smile and do it! Don't argue. Don't pout. Don't think you know better. Don't be an asshole. You'll have plenty of time to be in charge when your three-disk epic rock opera adaptation of The Jeffersons gets picked up.</p> <p><strong>19. Contrary to popular belief, taking lessons and listening to other styles of music doesn't hurt</strong></p> <p>It never hurts to broaden your scope, no matter how great a player you already are or how much you think you've already learned all there is to know. Opening your mind to other styles and techniques makes you a better, more well-rounded musician. Period. A great teacher can inspire and enable you to develop as a creative, exciting player.</p> <p><strong>20. Learn as many tunes as possible, from start to finish</strong></p> <p>It doesn't matter what style you like to play in, the more tunes you know, the easier it is to get a gig or kick ass on a jam session. And there's no excuse for not doing it-even if you're not at the point where you can learn tunes off the recording, you can avail yourself of the hundreds of transcription books out there. Heck, you can learn five new tunes a month just by reading <em>Guitar World</em>!</p> <hr /> <p><strong>21. Develop authority as a player</strong></p> <p>You have to get to the point where you feel as creatively comfortable in front of hundreds of people as you do in front of your sister and the dog. And the only way you can attain that authority is by putting in the time. Playing at home only gets you so far-it's imperative that you play out as soon as you can. Attend jam sessions. Take less-than-ideal gigs, just for the experience. Take any gigs, for that matter-it's the experience that counts!</p> <p><strong>22. Hang out with other musicians</strong></p> <p>The best way to get contacts and gigs is to be seen and heard. How can anyone recommend you if they don't know who you are? As unpleasant and greasy as this may sound, do your best to befriend other guitarists. Though there's intense competition amongst players, most of your work will come as a result of recommendations made by other guitarists.</p> <p><strong>23. Know the fundamentals</strong></p> <p>Being able to hear common chord changes will help you learn tunes off the radio faster. Knowing a little basic theory will help you with your songwriting and your ability to intuitively come up with rhythm parts. For example, knowing that the harmonic structure of most blues tunes is I-IV-V (C-F-G) and that early rock ballads were usually built on I-vi-IV-V progressions (C-Am-F-G) will help you to play just about any tune in those genres or compose one of your own. One more plug: you also might want to check out my book <em>The Advanced Guitar Case Chord Book</em> (Music Sales) to get an idea of how to apply cool chord voicings to common progressions in all types of music.</p> <p><strong>24. Be careful out there</strong></p> <p>As soon as you or your band become somewhat popular, all sorts of characters are going to start crawling out of the gutter with designs on you. Have fun, but don't go overboard. And always keep an eye on your equipment-it's your life's blood. And try to save some cash.</p> <p><strong>25. Don't shit where you eat</strong></p> <p>Don't fuck the singer. Don't fuck the drummer's girlfriend. Don't fuck the drummer's dog. Don't fuck the drummer. Don't backstab your bandmates. Don't pocket tips. Don't be an asshole!</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/25-things-every-guitarist-should-know#comments GW Archive Guitar World Lists News Features Magazine Wed, 01 Jul 2015 09:35:11 +0000 Askold Buk 11121 at http://www.guitarworld.com August 2015 Guitar World: B.B. King's Greatest Guitar Moments, PRS Guitars Anniversary, Frank Marino and More http://www.guitarworld.com/august-2015-guitar-world-tribute-bb-king-his-10-greatest-guitar-moments-between-buried-and-me-prs-30th-anniversary-frank-marino <!--paging_filter--><p><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/guitar-world-august-15-b-b-king/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=GWAUG15/"><strong>The all-new August 2015 issue of Guitar World is available now!</strong></a></p> <p><em>Guitar World</em>’s August 2015 issue pays tribute to American legend <strong>B.B. King</strong>, who influenced generations of electric blues guitarists. We also take a critical look at King’s 10 greatest guitar moments.</p> <p>Then, North Carolina tech-metallers <strong>Between the Buried and Me</strong> solidify their status as one of prog-metal’s most forward-thinking groups with their new album, <em>Coma Ecliptic</em>.</p> <p>Also, <strong>PRS Guitars</strong> celebrates its 30th anniversary as one of the leading manufacturers of U.S.-made electrics. Take an in-depth look at the shapely six-string stunner known as the S2.</p> <p>Later, legendary Mahogany Rush guitarist <strong>Frank Marino</strong> sets the record straight about his mysterious career, his disdain for the music industry and how the guitar saved his life.</p> <p>Finally, there's our new <strong>string roundup</strong>! <em>Guitar World</em> selects the best and the brightest strings to keep you in tune and playing longer.</p> <p>PLUS: Tune-ups, including <strong>Megadeth</strong> in the studio, <strong>Armored Saint</strong>, Playlist with <strong>Hinder</strong>, Dear Guitar Hero with <strong>Todd Rundgren, Thy Art is Murder,</strong> and more. Soundcheck gear reviews include <strong>Bogner's</strong> Burnley, Harlow and Wessex pedals, the <strong>Vox</strong> Custom Series AC10C1 amp, <strong>Music Man</strong> StingRay Neck Through bass, the <strong>John Page Classic</strong> Ashburn electric guitar and more!</p> <p><strong>Five Songs with Tabs for Guitar and Bass:</strong></p> <p>• B.B. King - "Sweet Little Angel" (live)<br /> • In This Moment - "Whore"<br /> • Five Finger Death Punch - "House of the Rising Sun"<br /> • Death - "Spirit Crusher"<br /> • Ed Sheeran - "Thinking Out Loud"</p> <p><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/guitar-world-august-15-b-b-king/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=GWAUG15/"><strong>The all-new August 2015 issue of Guitar World is available now at the Online Store!</strong></a></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-06-16%20at%201.14.12%20PM.png" width="620" height="804" alt="Screen Shot 2015-06-16 at 1.14.12 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/bb-king">B.B. King</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/august-2015-guitar-world-tribute-bb-king-his-10-greatest-guitar-moments-between-buried-and-me-prs-30th-anniversary-frank-marino#comments August 2015 B.B. King News Features Wed, 01 Jul 2015 09:33:44 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24814 at http://www.guitarworld.com Lamb of God Premiere New Song and Music Video, “Overlord” http://www.guitarworld.com/lamb-god-premiere-new-song-and-music-video-overlord <!--paging_filter--><p>Lamb of God have premiered a new song and music video, “Overlord.” </p> <p>Check it out below and let us know what you think in the comments or on Facebook.</p> <p>The band's new album, <em>VII: Sturm Und Drang,</em> hits stores July 24 via Epic Records.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RNRsvFsY9qk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/lamb-god">Lamb of God</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/lamb-god-premiere-new-song-and-music-video-overlord#comments Lamb of God Videos News Tue, 30 Jun 2015 17:29:16 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24850 at http://www.guitarworld.com Pantera's "Cowboys from Hell" Played on Ukulele — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/panera-ukulele-cover-cowboys-hell-video <!--paging_filter--><p>By now, most GuitarWorld.com visitors should be familiar with Chicago-based multi-instrumentalist Rob Scallon, the guy who covers Slayer and Cannibal Corpse songs with banjos and ukuleles 'n' such. </p> <p>He also has played all the parts to <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/metallicas-and-justice-all-played-entirely-bass-video">Metallica's '...And Justice for All' album on bass—and only bass.</a> </p> <p>In the brand-new clip below (posted to <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/sketchshe-perform-queens-bohemian-rhapsody-bohemian-carsody-video">the YouTubes</a> June 29), Scallon covers Pantera’s <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-video-finds-panteras-cowboys-hell-performed-violin-and-cello">“Cowboys from Hell”</a> on ukulele. Check out the video below and let us know what you think in the comments or on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/GuitarWorld?fref=ts">Facebook.</a></p> <p><strong>For more videos by Scallon (who should probably visit GW the next time he's in NYC), follow him on <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyDZai57BfE_N0SaBkKQyXg">YouTube.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eDgqTqLsXK8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/pantera">Pantera</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/panera-ukulele-cover-cowboys-hell-video#comments Pantera Rob Scallon ukulele Videos News Tue, 30 Jun 2015 16:46:33 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24849 at http://www.guitarworld.com Yngwie Malmsteen Shreds with Alcatrazz in 1984 — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/video-yngwie-malmsteen-shreds-alcatrazz-1984 <!--paging_filter--><p>For today's flashback video, we're dropping in on a young Yngwie Malmsteen, circa-1984.</p> <p>Fans who got to see the Graham Bonnet-led Alcatrazz perform in the early to mid-Eighties were treated to bits and pieces of Malmsteen's mastery in pretty much every song—but especially when he took his extended solo breaks.</p> <p>Below, you can check out one such break, recorded during Alcatrazz's 1984 tour of Japan. </p> <p>After some mind-blowing, scalloped-fretboard hijinx, Malmsteen launches into his interpretation of Bach's "Bouree." </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/KcbXcZLd6zo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/yngwie-malmsteen">Yngwie Malmsteen</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-yngwie-malmsteen-shreds-alcatrazz-1984#comments Alcatrazz Yngwie Malmsteen Videos News Features Tue, 30 Jun 2015 15:40:32 +0000 Damian Fanelli 18269 at http://www.guitarworld.com Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody": Kanye West Vs. Freddie Mercury — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/queens-bohemian-rhapsody-kanye-west-vs-freddie-mercury-video <!--paging_filter--><p>For some reason, Kanye West decided to perform Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" at last weekend’s Glastonbury Festival.</p> <p>He didn't do a very good job, and he should probably avoid the song in the future. Hey, it's true.</p> <p>Regardless, someone took the time to edit Kanye’s performance with archival footage of Mercury looking on and laughing. Eventually, the clip cuts to Mercury belting out the song as West, well, doesn't laugh at all.</p> <p>"Hey, this has nothing to do with guitars!" </p> <p>True, but remember that "Bohemian Rhapsody" made <em>Guitar World's</em> list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time several years ago, <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100_greatest_guitar_solos_20_quotbohemian_rhapsodyquot_brian_may">coming in at Number 20.</a></p> <p>The tune also is a huge favorite with acoustic fingerstylists—as seen in <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/exclusive-video-lesson-bohemian-rhapsody-tutorial-daryl-kellie">this exclusive GW tutorial by Daryl Kellie.</a></p> <p>And if you really like this classic song, be sure to check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/sketchshe-perform-queens-bohemian-rhapsody-bohemian-carsody-video">this interesting version—renamed "Bohemian Carsody"—by the women of SketchShe.</a></p> <p><strong>Although we're not permitted to embed the video into this story, just CLICK ON THE PHOTO BELOW, and you'll be taken to the clip ASAP. Enjoy!</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nwN6dPNXklg"><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-06-30%20at%2011.10.14%20AM.png" width="620" height="348" alt="Screen Shot 2015-06-30 at 11.10.14 AM.png" /></a></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/queen">Queen</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/queens-bohemian-rhapsody-kanye-west-vs-freddie-mercury-video#comments Freddie Mercury Kanye West Queen Videos News Tue, 30 Jun 2015 15:24:24 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24846 at http://www.guitarworld.com Learn the Heart and Soul of Country with 'The Best of Johnny Cash Songbook' http://www.guitarworld.com/learn-heart-and-soul-country-best-johnny-cash-songbook <!--paging_filter--><p>Learn all your favorite Johnny Cash songs with <em>The Best of Johnny Cash Songbook</em> (Second Edition), which is <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/tab-books/products/the-best-of-johnny-cash-songbook/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=BestJohnnyCash">available now at the Guitar World Online Store</a>. </p> <p>The book features 27 songs from the heart and soul of country, including "A Boy Named Sue," "Folsom Prison Blues," "Ring of Fire" and "I Walk the Line."</p> <p>All the songs are in easy arrangements with notes and tabs. </p> <p>Songs Include:</p> <p>• "A Boy Named Sue"<br /> • "Cry, Cry, Cry"<br /> • "Daddy Sang Bass"<br /> • "Folsom Prison Blues"<br /> • "(Ghost) Riders in the Sky"<br /> • "I Walk the Line"<br /> • "It Ain't Me Babe"<br /> • "Jackson"<br /> • "Orange Blossom Special"<br /> • "Ring of Fire"<br /> • "Sunday Mornin' Comin' Down"<br /> • "Understand Your Man"</p> <p>The 64-page book is <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/tab-books/products/the-best-of-johnny-cash-songbook/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=BestJohnnyCash">available now for $16.99 at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/johnny-cash">Johnny Cash</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/learn-heart-and-soul-country-best-johnny-cash-songbook#comments Johnny Cash News Features Tue, 30 Jun 2015 14:45:43 +0000 Guitar World Staff 16273 at http://www.guitarworld.com