News http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/4/all en Synth City: 10 Classic Guitar Synth Songs http://www.guitarworld.com/synth-city-10-classic-guitar-synth-songs <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's an ode to a piece of gadgetry rarely heralded on GuitarWorld.com, something that has brought a whole new world of sounds to guitarists' fingertips: the guitar synthesizer, aka the guitar synth.</p> <p>A guitar synth is a synth module whose input device is a guitar instead of a keyboard. To quote Norm Leet from Roland's UK website, "The most important part of a guitar synth system is the divided — or hexaphonic — pickup, which allows each string to be treated individually and for the attached synth to be able to detect finger vibrato and string bending." </p> <p>At first these systems were farily sizable, taking up so much space that they had to be housed in specially designed guitars that were part of the entire synth system. Today's synth systems, however, are tiny things that can fit into pretty much any guitar.</p> <p>Modern systems send the pitch information as MIDI to allow you to control external modules or keyboards. This also means that pitch information can be recorded by a MIDI sequencer. </p> <p>Countless artists have dipped their toes into the world of guitar synths -- everyone from Eric Clapton to Steve Hackett to Eric Johnson and Jeff Loomis — and some players made it a massive part of their sound, including Pat Metheny, Robert Fripp and Adrian Belew. Carlos Alomar even recorded an entire album for synth guitar — 1990's <em>Dream Generator</em>. </p> <p>Here are 10 classic songs that feature guitar synths. They demonstrate at least some of the many dreamy, bizarre sounds (or "soundscapes," as some people like to say in this context), these devices can create.</p> <p>10. <strong>"Stranger In a Strange Land," Iron Maiden, <em>Somewhere in Time</em>, 1986</strong></p> <p>After completing a masterful trilogy of albums with 1984's <em>Powerslave</em>, Iron Maiden took a turn for the progressive, unleashing a barrage of synth guitars on their listeners with with sixth studio album, <em>Somewhere in Time</em>. </p> <p>Easing their fans into the idea, the album's first single, "Wasted Years," was the only track on the album to feature no synthesizers at all. Its follow-up, "Stranger in a Strange Land" — the tale of an Arctic explorer frozen and lost in time — featured Adrian Smith and Dave Murray's guitars processed through synth effects, giving their dual guitar attack a distinctive larger-than-life chorus sound.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ry42FHfz67A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>09. <strong>"Never Make You Cry," Eric Clapton, <em>Behind the Sun</em>, 1985</strong></p> <p>By the mid-'80s, the guitar synth was officially a bandwagon, and even ol' Slowhand himself, Eric Clapton, hopped on — if only briefly.</p> <p>Clapton used a Roland guitar synth to record "Never Make You Cry" from his successful 1985 album, <em>Behind the Sun</em>, which was co-produced by Phil Collins of Genesis (a major guitar synth band, especially during the <em>Duke</em> tour). </p> <p>It's only fitting that Clapton experimented with cutting-edge technology on <em>Behind the Sun</em>, the album that kicked off a period of slick commercial releases by the venerable guitarist, including 1986's <em>August</em> and 1989's <em>Journeyman</em>. </p> <p>Before its release, he had been coasting along on a series of rootsy, laidback, Band- and J.J. Cale-inspired albums, from 1974's <em>461 Ocean Boulevard</em> to 1983's <em>Money and Cigarettes</em>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/E8nC6e4OI4w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>08. <strong>"Are You Going With Me?," Pat Metheny, <em>Offramp</em>, 1982</strong></p> <p>Over the decades, guitarist Pat Matheny has become closely associated with Roland guitar synths — especially the GR-300. But it all started with his 1982 album, <em>Offramp</em>, which featured his first documented use of the Roland GR-300.</p> <p>The album features the samba-based "Are You Going With Me?," which has since become a trademark Metheny song. Its lengthy, trancelike guitar solo is played on the Roland. Check it out below.</p> <p>Metheny still uses his GR-300, which has since been discontinued by the company.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/qY8z1w1JzMs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>07. <strong>"Who's to Blame," Jimmy Page, <em>Death Wish II,</em> 1982</strong></p> <p>In 1981, former Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page was asked to compose and record the <em>Death Wish II</em> soundtrack by his neighbor, director Michael Winner. </p> <p>It was just what Page needed — an opportunity to start creating music again, now that John Bonham (and with him, Led Zeppelin) was gone.</p> <p>Page mirrored the film's moodiness and edginess with a slew of new devices, including the Roland GR-505 guitar synth and TR-808 Rhythm Composer. The guitar synth can be heard on the entire soundtrack album, which was re-released on JimmyPage.com late last year in a "heavyweight vinyl package." Only 1,000 copies were made.</p> <p>Page continued experimenting with guitar synths and even appeared in several Roland print advertisements in the early to mid-'80s.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/jF8X0t-Fllw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>06. <strong>"Venus Isle," Eric Johnson, <em>Venus Isle</em>, 1996</strong></p> <p>Texas guitar great Eric Johnson started dabbling with guitar synths in the late '80s, but he didn't seriously record with them until his 1996 album, <em>Venus Isle</em>, an album full of what he calls "extra textures." </p> <p>Johnson uses a Roland guitar synth to create those textures on several tracks, including "Mountain," "Battle We Have Won," "When the Sun Meets the Sky" and the title track, which you can check out below.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/RypgfOTUNRI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>05. <strong>"Discipline," King Crimson, <em>Discipline</em>, 1981</strong></p> <p>If you were putting together a dream team of guitar synthists, you'd probably want King Crimson's Robert Fripp and Adrian Belew batting third and fourth in your lineup.</p> <p>The guitarists were among the most proficient guitar synth users of their generation, and Fripp continues to push the boundaries of synthetic sound with his mesmerizing Soundscapes shows.</p> <p>On King Crimson's <em>Discipline</em> album, Fripp and Belew made great and bountiful use of the Roland GR-300. On later albums, they moved into GR-700 territory.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_-dZNzXylVE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>04. <strong>"Racing in A," Steve Hackett, <em>Please Don't Touch,</em> 1978</strong></p> <p>The upbeat and catchy "Racing in A" is from Steve Hackett's <em>Please Don't Touch</em> album from 1978. </p> <p>It was the first solo album he recorded after leaving Genesis and his first album to feature his pioneering work with the Roland GR-500 guitar synth. </p> <p>"Racing in A" is a five-minute-long progressive-rock masterpiece that glides along for more than a minute with its almost-Yes-like rhythm before the vocals kick in (But Hackett keeps the spotlight squarely on the GR-500). </p> <p>As is the case with several other selections on this list, be sure to check out the entire <em>Please Don't Touch</em> album for more examples of Hackett's guitar synth work.</p> <p>By the way, that's Hackett's photo at the top of this page (and all the pages in this story). </p> <p><strong>NOTE: We've included a cool live performance of "Racing in A," plus (for the purists), the studio version.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/NDIj1plyU04" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wkxk4IAmWvs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>03. <strong>"Turbo Lover," Judas Priest, <em>Turbo</em>, 1986</strong></p> <p>"Turbos were all the rage, the in-thing," said Judas Priest bassist Ian Hill of the mid-1980s. "I'd even bought a vacuum cleaner because it had the word 'turbo' on it!"</p> <p>Perhaps this obsession with the super-charged is what lead the boys in Priest to experiment with guitar synthesizers on their 1986 classic "Turbo Lover." </p> <p>Taken from the album <em>Turbo</em> — easily among the most divisive albums for diehard fans — the song featured a whole new sonic palette for the band, with guitarists K.K. Downing and Glenn Tipton employing guitar synths and anything else they could get their hands on to give the song its distinctive futuristic, sci-fi feel.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/DdwuxoSHsSo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>02. <strong>"Don't Stand So Close to Me," The Police, <em>Zenyattà Mondatta</em>, 1980</strong></p> <p>"Don't Stand So Close to Me," which appeared on The Police's 1980 <em>Zenyattà Mondatta</em> album, features Andy Summers jamming away on an early Roland synth (He had a few models during the band's heyday, including a GR-707).</p> <p>"After Sting had put the vocals on 'Don't Stand So Close To Me,' we looked for something to lift the middle of the song," Summers said in 1981. "I came up with a guitar synthesizer. It was the first time we'd used it. I felt it worked really well."</p> <p>"I was sort of known for [guitar synth] then, and I was in a pretty high-profile band," Summer said in a more recent interview for Roland. "I was trying to fill out two hours with a trio, trying to keep it interesting all the way. The Roland synths blended in quite well."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/KNIZofPB8ZM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>01. <strong>"Ashes to Ashes," David Bowie, <em>Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps)</em>, 1980</strong></p> <p>It's Hammer time. Guitarist Chuck Hammer is an accomplished player and Emmy-nominated digital film composer who has recorded with Lou Reed, David Bowie and Guitarchitecture, to name just a few. </p> <p>But Hammer might be best known for his textural guitar synth work on "Ashes to Ashes" from Bowie's <em>Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps)</em> album. Hammer used a Roland GR-500 with an Eventide Harmonizer to get the synthetic string sound that can be heard in the video below. He actually used four multi-tracked guitar synths, each one playing opposing chord inversions. Be sure to check out the rest of album, which features a healthy dose of Hammer.</p> <p><em>Rolling Stone</em> put Hammer in the category of "musical pioneers" along with guys like Robert Fripp and Allan Holdsworth.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/CMThz7eQ6K0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eric-clapton">Eric Clapton</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/iron-maiden">Iron Maiden</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/judas-priest">Judas Priest</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eric-johnson">Eric Johnson</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/synth-city-10-classic-guitar-synth-songs#comments Adrian Belew Andy Summers David Bowie Iron Maiden Judas Priest King Crimson Robert Fripp Roland The Police Guitar World Lists News Features Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:21:33 +0000 Damian Fanelli, Josh Hart http://www.guitarworld.com/article/15794 Betcha Can't Play This: Bill Hudson's Lydian Cascade http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-bill-hudsons-lydian-cascade <!--paging_filter--><p>This is a scalar run based on the F Lydian mode [F G A B C D E], which is the fifth mode of C major. It incorporates several different lead-playing techniques and sounds cool when played over an F or F5 chord.</p> <p>I start off with an ascending F major triad [F A C] sweep across the top four strings, played in a rhythm of 16th-note triplets. </p> <p>Once I hit the high E string, I switch to legato phrasing, continuing the triplet rhythm and using all four fret-hand fingers, spread out wide, to perform "stacked" hammer-ons and pull-offs, capped off by a pick-hand tap with the middle finger.</p> <p> Once I come back down to the F note at the 13th fret, I skip over to the G string, where I play another legato sequence, this time incorporating a descending finger slide followed by two hammer-ons and three consecutive taps with the pick hand, using the first, second and fourth fingers.</p> <p> When performing this tapping sequence, I temporarily clamp the pick between my thumb and the top side of the fretboard. I then jump back up to the high E string and perform another ascending legato sequence, incorporating taps with the first and third fingers. </p> <p> After the last tapped note, I switch to straight alternate picking and play a descending sequence of cascading 16th notes and 16th-note triplets across the top four strings, followed by an ascending climb that finishes with a high bend. When practicing this lick, be mindful of the different rhythmic subdivisions used.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/9Btp369CEsg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-14%20at%201.08.38%20PM.png" width="620" height="379" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 1.08.38 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-bill-hudsons-lydian-cascade#comments Betcha Can't Play This Bill Hudson February 2011 Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:01:22 +0000 Bill Hudson http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21007 ESP LTD AS-1FM LB Alex Skolnick Signature Guitar — Review http://www.guitarworld.com/esp-ltd-1fm-lb-alex-skolnick-signature-guitar-review <!--paging_filter--><p>Alex Skolnick is among a few guitarists who have achieved multigenre success and acclaim, first as a wild young gun with the iconic metal thrash band Testament, and then as a tasteful and technically impressive jazzbo with the Alex Skolnick Trio. </p> <p>In recent years, he has become something of a vintage guitar enthusiast. So when ESP approached him about building a signature guitar with his name on it, Skolnick was skeptical that a modern company could create a guitar capable of matching the refined sounds of aged classics. </p> <p>ESP met this lofty challenge and, after rigorous testing by the man himself, is now offering the Alex Skolnick signature model. I tested the budget-friendly AS-1FM LB, which differs in some details to the high-end version but otherwise offers the same bold response, unblemished build quality and significant tonal versatility. </p> <p><strong>Features:</strong> Make no mistake, the Skolnick signature plank is absolutely a modern-built vintage guitar. Forget about weight-relieving contours and thin necks—this is a thick guitar. Elements of ESP’s Eclipse model are evident in the styling, but its design otherwise harkens back to the roots of great guitar building, demonstrating why it’s so hard to beat the tonal matchup of a thick, single-cut mahogany body topped with flamed maple and married to a beefy but oh-so-comfortable U-shaped mahogany neck. </p> <p>Contemporary performance-enhancing elements include a TonePros locking Tune-o-matic bridge and tailpiece, precise Grover tuners, Dunlop Straploks and extra-jumbo frets. The Seymour Duncan SH-4 (bridge) and SH-1 (neck) humbuckers have dedicated volume knobs but share the master tone pot, which can be pulled to coil split the neck pickup.</p> <p><strong>Performance:</strong> If handed the ESP Skolnick guitar while blindfolded, I might easily assume it to be a true vintage piece, not just for the Fifties-style neck shape and overall weight but also because of its immediacy and loud acoustic response, which brings to my mind the last few chord blasts from the Who’s “Won’t Get Fooled Again.” It delivers equally powerful spikes in the low and high mids rather than the centered-midrange focus that makes so many all-mahogany guitars sound similar. This opens the top end beyond mahogany’s typically mellow range, making it highly capable of screaming treble harmonics, pick chirps and serious punch. </p> <p>Both Duncan pickups are well matched to the Skolnick’s tone, offering enhanced lows and searing treble from the bridge bucker and clear but warm neutrality from the neck pickup. Single-coil tones from the tapped neck pickup are surprisingly snappy and sparkling, yet sound almost like a smooth semihollow when the tone is rolled off. </p> <p><strong>List Price:</strong> $1,356<br /> <strong>Manufacturer:</strong> The ESP Guitar Company, <a href="espguitars.com">espguitars.com</a></p> <p><strong>Cheat Sheet:</strong><br /> The chunky 24 3/4–inch-scale mahogany neck is deep but not wide in the hand, with enough mass to transfer rich blasts of volume and resonance into the loud-ringing mahogany body.</p> <p>Pulling the tone pot taps the neck pickup into single-coil mode, ideal for blues, classic rock and old-time jazz tonalities. </p> <p><strong>The Bottom Line:</strong> Mirroring Alex Skolnick’s vast musical range and evolved taste, the economical ESP’s LTD AS-1FM LB signature guitar is a true multi-genre instrument that’s capable of delivering world-class acoustic response, impressive volume and versatility. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3578119067001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3578119067001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/alex-skolnick">Alex Skolnick</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/esp-ltd-1fm-lb-alex-skolnick-signature-guitar-review#comments Alex Skolnick ESP July 2014 LTD Videos Electric Guitars News Gear Magazine Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:26:57 +0000 Eric Kirkland, Video by Paul Riario http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21311 Vox Night Train NT50H-G2 Head — Review http://www.guitarworld.com/vox-night-train-nt50h-g2-head-review <!--paging_filter--><p>It’s been about five years since Vox introduced the 15-watt Night Train amp head, a diminutive lunch-box-format mini amp that packs an impressive punch. </p> <p>Since then, Vox has expanded the Night Train line, most recently with its next-generation G2 Series, which includes the 50-watt Night Train NT50H-G2 head. </p> <p>An upgrade of the previous NT50H head, the Night Train NT50H-G2 is the most powerful, gig-worthy and versatile Vox Night Train amp to date, providing several new features like digital reverb, an XLR speaker-emulated DI jack and more performance-friendly functionality than its predecessor.</p> <p><strong>Features:</strong> The Night Train NT50H-G2 is a 50-watt head driven by two EL34 (power amp) and three 12AX7 tubes (preamp). The amp provides two fully independent channels—Bright and Girth—each with its own set of gain, treble, middle and bass controls, while the Girth channel also includes a volume control. The thick switch now functions on both channels (not just the Bright channel as on its predecessors), and the master section includes reverb, tone cut and master volume controls. The rear panel offers a single 16-ohm and a pair of eight-ohm speaker output jacks, mono send and return jacks for the effect loop, a 1/4-inch footswitch jack for the optional Vox VFS2A footswitch and a new XLR speaker-emulated DI output.</p> <p>The main differences between the Generation 2 and its previous incarnation include its glossy black finish (which replaces the previous flashy chrome-plated housing), digital reverb, XLR DI, thick switch for both channels, and the deletion of the tight and effect loop bypass switches.</p> <p><strong>Performance:</strong> One of the most impressive features of the original mini Night Train amp was its stellar clean tone. The NT50H-G2’s Bright channel delivers similarly excellent clean tones that feature the distinctive Vox chime and the original Night Train’s bite and satisfyingly full body, but with significantly more clean headroom and output. Overdrive crunch emerges when the gain control is above 12 o’clock, but the clean character remains even at full gain. The Girth channel produces ballsy high-gain distortion with a crisp, harmonically complex crushed-glass sparkle, and when the thick switch is engaged it goes into modern metal territory.</p> <p>The built-in digital reverb pairs quite nicely with both clean and high-gain distortion tones, sounding lush and deep on the former and providing a sense of space while retaining clarity on the latter. The thick switch is like a built-in overdrive pedal, providing a preset gain and midrange boost that expands the amp’s tonal palette and functions like additional channels. </p> <p><strong>List Price:</strong> $978.60<br /> <strong>Manufacturer:</strong> Vox Amplification, <a href="voxamps.com">voxamps.com</a></p> <p><strong>Cheat Sheet:</strong><br /> The thick switch functions on both channels, providing the Bright channel with added crunch and bite and the Girth channel with fat sustain and impressive gain boost.</p> <p>Built-in digital reverb provides the Bright channel with lush, deep textures and the Girth channel with an added sense of space, while retaining clarity.</p> <p><strong>The Bottom Line:</strong> The Vox Night Train NT50H-G2 is a compact but versatile amp head that provides a wide variety of tones and impressive volume output that’s ideal for live gigs and the studio alike. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3578120454001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3578120454001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/vox-night-train-nt50h-g2-head-review#comments July 2014 VOX Amps News Gear Magazine Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:18:10 +0000 Chris Gill, Video by Paul Riario http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21310 A Clean and Sober Ace Frehley Discusses Kiss' Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Debacle and More http://www.guitarworld.com/clean-and-sober-ace-frehley-discusses-kiss-rock-and-roll-hall-fame-debacle-and-more <!--paging_filter--><p>This year started off innocently enough for Ace Frehley. </p> <p>Just one week prior to Christmas 2013, the former Kiss lead guitarist learned that he and his comrades in the original Kiss lineup—Gene Simmons, Paul Stanley and Peter Criss—were finally being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame after 15 years of eligibility (and 15 years of outcry from the Kiss Army). </p> <p>A cause for celebration, no doubt—and a golden opportunity for the four founding members of the legendary rock band to perform onstage together again for the first time since October 7, 2000, the final North American date of their Farewell Tour.</p> <p>And then, somehow, it all imploded. In the weeks preceding the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony on April 10 in Brooklyn, New York, Kiss became the primary focus of every public and private discussion surrounding the event after they announced that there would be no Kiss performance—let alone a Kiss reunion—that night. </p> <p>To make matters worse, the band members seized every opportunity to lambast one another in the press on a seemingly daily basis, effectively rendering what was supposed to be a triumphant reunion performance loaded with all the blood-spitting, fire-breathing, makeup-running pageantry that fans had been clamoring for all these years into a pitiful non-event. </p> <p>“I was like, Jesus Christ, after 40 years of support you can’t give the fans 10 minutes?” says a still worked-up Frehley over a cup of black tea at <em>Guitar World</em> headquarters in New York. “The fans wanted it, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame wanted it. But Gene and Paul didn’t. It’s sad. They definitely lost some fans because of this decision.</p> <p>“I think the reason they didn’t want to get together with the original members was because they’re afraid of history repeating itself. When we did <em>Unplugged</em> in 1995, you saw what happened: because the fans were so excited about me and Peter playing with those guys, they had to scrap their last record [with then-current members Bruce Kulick and Eric Singer] and do a reunion tour [with Frehley and Criss in 1996]. Although at this point I don’t think Peter could do a two-hour show and a full tour. But I still got the chops. I definitely blow [current Kiss guitarist] Tommy Thayer off the stage.”</p> <p>It’s obvious that Frehley is fired up, and with good reason. With the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame fiasco behind him, the clean-and-sober Spaceman is able to focus on the things in life that make him happy, like living in San Diego with his pretty, blond 47-year-old fiancé Rachael Gordon, writing books, working with Gibson on various signature guitars and recording new music. <em>Space Invader</em>, his first record since 2009’s top-notch <em>Anomaly</em>, is due out in a few weeks, and Ace couldn’t be more excited. </p> <p>“I haven’t had a drink in more than seven and a half years, and I feel great now,” says the 63-year-old guitarist. “I’m writing great songs and I’m singing great, and I’m super excited about this new album. It’s gonna be even better than <em>Anomaly</em>. I played some tracks for a couple of guys I was considering using for mixing, and the first thing out of their mouths was, ‘God, your voice sounds like it did on your 1978 solo record.’ Unlike some other people, whose voices aren’t maybe what they used to be. Not to name names, or anything.” </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/qGvz7FdUzOc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Your love affair with alcohol during Kiss’ heyday—and, well, all through the Eighties and Nineties—is well documented. Do you miss it? Are there days when you want a drink?</strong></p> <p>No. I haven’t had the urge to drink in a long time. And I don’t miss the hangovers, I don’t miss the smells, the late nights at the bars, or the people. I was hanging out with some pretty shady people in my heavy-drinking-and-coke years. I was in some situations that really could have gone sideways. I was just lucky. And you have to realize that my fans used to emulate my behavior when I was a crazy man—“Ace is a party animal, let’s go get loaded!” Then they’d go crash their car, and I’d feel terrible. </p> <p>Now it’s turned around. And when someone comes up to me and says that they haven’t had a drink in six months and that they’re doing well because I am, that makes my day. Maybe that’s one reason why God has kept me alive. By all rights I should have died a half dozen times already, so every day above ground I’m thrilled. </p> <p><strong>Did you think Kiss would ever be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame?</strong></p> <p>I knew that [the Hall] had to buckle to popular opinion. It was only a matter of time. We were first eligible 15 years ago, so I knew it would happen eventually. I mean, how can you exclude Kiss, one of the biggest American rock groups in history? Even though we didn’t perform, I’m still thrilled to be in it.</p> <p><strong>Where were you when you found out that you were being inducted?</strong></p> <p>I was at home in San Diego and got a call from my manager. Then, about a week later, I got the “congratulatory” call from Paul and Gene. And I could tell that there was some hesitancy on their part about the whole thing. I was asking them if we were gonna play, and Gene avoided the question by saying, “Well, we’re just looking forward to getting the four of us up there together and celebrating…whatever.” It was a noncommittal congratulatory call.</p> <p>Then, about a week later, I was told that the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame absolutely wants the four original members to reunite, and I said, “Great, I’ll do it.” And there was silence from Gene and Paul. And finally it was shot down. The next thing I heard is that Paul and Gene wanted to perform with the current Kiss lineup [with Tommy Thayer and Eric Singer]. And I said, Well, that’s kind of a slap in the face. I mean, they’re not even being inducted. I have to sit through a Kiss cover band when I’m receiving an award? I don’t think so. </p> <p>I also heard at one point that they wanted me to perform in makeup with Tommy at the same time. I really didn’t want to be onstage with Tommy, but I said I would do it, as long as I got to play the bulk of the songs and that I could wear the <em>Destroyer</em> costume. Then a few days later [it was], “No, we’re not gonna play at all.” It was almost like they were trying to bait me, so that if I said no to anything they would just blame me for there being no performance. I was almost going to boycott the whole thing.</p> <p><strong>The weeks leading up to the induction ceremony were filled with all sorts of public drama. A lot of negative comments were hurled back and forth in the press between the four original members of Kiss. Why do you think Gene and Paul are always so quick to disparage you publicly?</strong></p> <p>I don’t know. I think they’re just cranky. For years, when I was fucked up, Gene used to say that I was a drunk and a drug addict and that I was unemployable. Kick a guy when he’s down, right? But they can’t do that anymore, so it’s like they’re scratching their heads trying to come up with new ways to insult me. The most recent thing was that I’m anti-Semitic, that I’m a fucking Nazi. That’s just below the belt. Next I’ll be a member of the Ku Klux Klan. And my fiancé is Jewish! My whole life I’ve worked with Jewish people in all different capacities—my accountants, my attorneys, people on the road. Jesus Christ, I can’t believe the stuff that comes out of their mouths. But the truth is that I don’t want to be negative. I just want to keep everything light and be happy. </p> <p>Paul has been so goddamn cranky lately. I mean, what’s wrong, Paul, aren’t you happy? I know they must be frustrated because people are always writing about how Ace was the real guy or Ace was the real deal. It’s gotta rub them the wrong way. They would like nothing more than for me to start drinking again, start taking drugs again and end up as a bum on skid row. But that’s not gonna happen.</p> <p>Anybody who says anything bad about me is foolish, because a lot of people like me. You’re gonna make enemies when you put down Ace Frehley. And that’s because I’m a straight shooter—I tell it like it is. Gene is that way too. He’ll sit across from you in a room and say this or that and tell it like it is. Whether you like it or not, he lays it out, right to your face. Paul will tell you one thing, then walk out the door and stab you in the fucking back. That’s Paul Stanley. And now he’s trying to take credit for the fucking Kiss logo? Unbelievable. I designed the logo—all he did was draw straighter lines. </p> <p>And you know, I told Paul to wear the star on his eye. Do you know what his makeup was before he put the star on his eye? It was a round circle. He looked like the dog from the Little Rascals [Pete the Pup, a.k.a. Petey]. It told him it looked kinda silly and that he should put one star on his eye. But do I go around taking credit for that? No. I let him say he designed it. Who cares, you know? Let’s not be petty.</p> <p>You would think that if Gene and Paul had half a brain, they would realize what’s going on and start saying good things about Ace. I mean, keep bad-mouthing me. No one’s gonna show up at your fucking tour this summer.</p> <p><strong>Let’s talk about your upcoming solo album, <em>Space Invader</em>. It’s been five years since <em>Anomaly</em>. Why the delay?</strong></p> <p>I don’t know. [laughs] I’m not disciplined, and I can only create when I’m in the zone. I get preoccupied with other things—moving, family stuff, whatever—and then years go by. I had two record labels courting me, and I decided to go with E1 Music because of their reputation in the business and because they offered me more money. And when someone writes you a check, you gotta make the record! [laughs] The truth is, I work better when there’s a deadline. And I usually have to extend the deadline. But the end result is usually quality.</p> <p><strong>Do you enjoy the whole process of writing and recording?</strong></p> <p>Yes. I’m actually enjoying writing and recording more than ever, because I’ve become a lot more comfortable with Pro Tools, which means I can edit my own solos now. And that’s just fun. I prefer having an engineer there, but if there’s not one around, I can do my own editing and not have to depend on anyone else. Vocals too. I can do it all myself.</p> <p><strong>Which is quite different from recording with Kiss in the early Seventies.</strong></p> <p>With Kiss we used to do a slave reel. We’d mix down on two-inch tape, 24 tracks. [Producer] Eddie Kramer would mix down a stereo track of drums, and he’d give me a whole reel just to do solos. And Eddie was great at editing tape. But the flexibility you get nowadays with Pro Tools is just night and day compared to those days. Digital editing is a dream.</p> <p><strong>What was the songwriting process like for <em>Space Invader</em>?</strong></p> <p>You know, all my life I’ve never had a formula for writing songs. Sometimes it starts with a guitar riff, sometimes it’s a lyrical idea or just a melody. Sometimes I wake up with an idea. There’s no rhyme or reason. Sometimes I write on an acoustic, sometimes on a bass. There’s a song on the new album called “Into the Vortex.” It’s a riff song, but I wrote it on a bass guitar. Why? Because I write differently with a bass guitar in my hand than an acoustic guitar or an electric guitar. When I feel creative, I just sit down and start playing. </p> <p><strong>Did you write differently in the early days of Kiss?</strong></p> <p>Yes. I wasn’t as structured as I am now. Even though I’m not really structured—I’m at least cognizant of what’s going on. [laughs] Back then it was more hit or miss—and when I hit, I hit big. You know, I go back and listen to my 1978 solo record, and it still holds up. My whole body of work that I’ve created over the years has withstood the test of time. I know that I still have the goods. And when this record gets released, everybody’s gonna say, “Well, Ace did it again.” </p> <p><strong>Were there things about <em>Anomaly</em> that you wanted to change with <em>Space Invader</em>?</strong></p> <p>I know that everyone is hoping that this album is heavier than the last one, and it is. I’m also doing an instrumental this time, called “Starship,” that isn’t slow. It’s a departure from the “Fractured Mirror” style. It’s more fast paced and has a lot of transitions in it. </p> <p><strong>You cover the Steve Miller song “The Joker” on the new album. How did that come about?</strong></p> <p>It was the record company’s idea, to be honest. And I was a little resistant when it first came up. But then I thought back to my 1978 solo record, when Eddie Kramer’s assistant said to me, “Why don’t you try this song?” And it was “New York Groove.” At first I said, “I don't want to do that,” and it turned out to be my biggest hit. So maybe history can repeat itself. </p> <p><strong>Where was <em>Space Invader</em> recorded?</strong></p> <p>I did most of the recording at my friend’s studio in Turlock, California, called the Creation Lab. Turlock is in the middle of nowhere—it’s like a farming community—and that’s why I loved it. I have Attention Deficit Disorder, and there are absolutely no distractions when working at this place. You record for eight or 10 or 12 hours, then you go back to the hotel and go to sleep. You wake up and go back to the studio. </p> <p>There’s nothing else to do there, which means it’s the perfect place for me to record. Plus, I like working with the least amount of people, and this studio is great because it’s quiet and there aren’t all kinds of people walking through. I did most of this record with just me and a drummer, Matt Starr. For a couple of songs I brought in Chris Wyse from the Cult to play bass. </p> <p><strong>What guitars and amps are you using on the album?</strong></p> <p>I’m using a big variety of guitars. I have 35 or 40 different guitars hanging on the wall, and I just grab different ones. There’s a seven-string on one song, a Dobro, some 12-string acoustics… Sometimes I get the urge to use the double-neck. I like flexibility. The more variety, to me, the better. As for amps, it’s basically the same stuff I used on Anomaly: Marshalls and Voxes and Fenders. </p> <p><strong>The “Budokan” Les Paul replica guitar you did with Gibson in 2012 was a huge success. Are you planning another signature model?</strong></p> <p>I remember when I first did that deal and I went to the Gibson office to sign a bunch of the guitars, I said to [Gibson senior VP] Rick Gembar, “How are they selling?” And he said, “What do you mean, ‘How are they selling?’ They’re already sold. They were already sold before we put them out. Ace, anything you do turns to gold.” </p> <p>That was a good feeling. I’m trying to figure out what to do next. I keep asking people what they think, and some say to do the three-pickup black Les Paul; some say to do the first one I had, the sunburst Standard. But I don’t have to make that decision today, so I’m not worrying about it. But Gibson does an amazing job with these guitars. I don’t know how they make guitars that look 30 or 40 years old, right down to the screws and scratches and little details.</p> <p>I’m working on a design for a new amp right now that I think is just going to be too cool. I can’t talk about it yet because I haven’t finished the prototype. I also have a prototype guitar in the works that’s gonna be revolutionary. But that deal’s not done, so I can’t talk about that either. Amp and guitar—both completely different from anything else on the market. I’m always coming up with new ideas. I invented an electric guitar, like, 20 years ago. [laughs] My father was an inventor. It’s in my blood. I also have an idea for a really cool clock. But I can’t even talk about it because it’s so brilliant.</p> <p><em>Photo: Jimmy Hubbard</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ace-frehley">Ace Frehley</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/kiss">Kiss</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/clean-and-sober-ace-frehley-discusses-kiss-rock-and-roll-hall-fame-debacle-and-more#comments Ace Frehley July 2014 Kiss Interviews News Features Magazine Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:14:02 +0000 Jeff Kitts http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21338 2015 Guitar World Buyer's Guide: Nonstop Gear Plus Playboy Playmates Nikki Leigh, Gemma Lee Farrell and Dani Mathers http://www.guitarworld.com/2015-guitar-world-buyers-guide-nonstop-gear-plus-playboy-playmates-nikki-leigh-gemma-lee-farrell-and-dani-mathers <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>Guitar World Buyer's Guide 2015 is <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/guitar-world-buyers-guide-2015/?&amp;utm_source=facebook&amp;utm_medium=daily_ad&amp;utm_campaign=BuyersGuide15">available NOW at the Guitar World Online Store!</a></strong></p> <p><em>Guitar World's</em> 2015 Buyer's Guide issue features more than 1,000 products and photos. </p> <p>The 2015 Buyer's Guide features more brands and models than any other guide and includes electrics, acoustics, basses, amps, effects and accessories modeled by <em>Playboy</em> Playmates Nikki Leigh, Gemma Lee Farrell and Dani Mathers.</p> <p>The best guitar Buyer's Guide ever — we've got reviews on all the gear:</p> <p> • Electrics<br /> • Acoustics<br /> • Basses<br /> • Amps<br /> • Effects<br /> • Accessories<br /> • and many more!</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/guitar-world-buyers-guide-2015/?&amp;utm_source=facebook&amp;utm_medium=daily_ad&amp;utm_campaign=BuyersGuide15">For more information, head to the Guitar World Online Store now!</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/MRVRzaQ0I0s" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-07-02%20at%2012.25.57%20PM.png" width="620" height="812" alt="Screen Shot 2014-07-02 at 12.25.57 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/2015-guitar-world-buyers-guide-nonstop-gear-plus-playboy-playmates-nikki-leigh-gemma-lee-farrell-and-dani-mathers#comments Buyer's Guide News Features Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:07:46 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21833 Metallica: Official Footage from Warsaw Show — Rehearsal, "For Whom the Bell Tolls" and "The Call of Ktulu" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/metallica-official-footage-warsaw-show-rehearsal-whom-bell-tolls-and-call-ktulu-video <!--paging_filter--><p>The gang over at MetallicaTV has posted official, pro-hot video from the band's July 11 show in Warsaw, Poland.</p> <p>The footage, which you can watch below, shows the band rehearsing and then performing "For Whom the Bell Tolls" and "The Call of Ktulu" at the actual show.</p> <p>The Basel show was one of the final shows of the band's "By Request" European tour, which ended July 13 in Istanbul, Turkey.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/FV9zNP0lJM8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/metallica-official-footage-warsaw-show-rehearsal-whom-bell-tolls-and-call-ktulu-video#comments Metallica Videos News Thu, 24 Jul 2014 14:41:57 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21918 Michael Amott of Arch Enemy Discusses 'Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols' — The Record That Changed My Life http://www.guitarworld.com/michael-amott-arch-enemy-discusses-never-mind-bollocks-heres-sex-pistols-record-changed-my-life <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Michael Amott of Arch Enemy chooses (and discusses) the record that changed his life.</em></p> <p><strong>Sex Pistols</strong><br /> <em>Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols</em> (1977)</p> <p>“I grew up with my parents’ record collection, and they listened largely to classical, along with some jazz, blues, Motown, Stevie Wonder and David Bowie. </p> <p>"I had a good foundation. When I first found my own music, it was Kiss. They were massive in Scandinavia. I wasn’t playing guitar yet, but I loved their music and image—especially <em>Destroyer</em> and ‘Detroit Rock City,’ with the harmonized guitar. </p> <p>"Later, when I was about 11 and had started playing music, my friend came over one day after school and said, ‘Mike, we’re gonna be punks now.’ And I was like, ‘Okay! What’s that?’ He showed me a magazine with a picture of the Sex Pistols and played me their first album, <em>Never Mind the Bollocks</em>, on cassette tape. I loved it! And we started a band that day.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ooIz_Di2w3g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/arch-enemy">Arch Enemy</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/sex-pistols">Sex Pistols</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/michael-amott-arch-enemy-discusses-never-mind-bollocks-heres-sex-pistols-record-changed-my-life#comments Arch Enemy July 2014 Michael Amott Never Mind the Bollocks Here's the Sex Pistols Sex Pistols The Record that Changed My Life Interviews News Features Thu, 24 Jul 2014 14:30:18 +0000 Michael Amott http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21901 Trigger Hippy Premiere New Song, "Rise Up Singing" — Exclusive http://www.guitarworld.com/trigger-hippy-premiere-new-song-rise-singing-exclusive <!--paging_filter--><p>Today, GuitarWorld.com presents the exclusive premiere of "Rise Up Singing," a new track by Trigger Hippy. </p> <p>"Rise Up Singing" is the first single from the band's self-titled debut album, which will be released September 30 through Rounder Records.</p> <p>Trigger Hippy was founded by the Black Crowes' Steve Gorman and features Joan Osborne and guitarist Jackie Greene on vocals, Nashville first-call session guitarist (and MusicRow's Guitarist of the Year) Tom Bukovac and bassist Nick Govrik. </p> <p>As always, check out the song below and let us know what you think in the comments below or on Facebook!</p> <p>For more about Trigger Hippy, visit <a href="http://triggerhippy.net/">triggerhippy.net</a>.</p> <p><strong><em>Trigger Hippy</em> Track Listing:</strong></p> <p>01. “Rise Up Singing”<br /> 02. “Turpentine”<br /> 03. “Heartache On The Line”<br /> 04. “Cave Hill Cemetery”<br /> 05. “Tennessee Mud”<br /> 06. “Pretty Mess”<br /> 07. “Pocahontas”<br /> 08. “Dry County”<br /> 09. “Nothing New”<br /> 10. “Ain’t Persuaded Yet”<br /> 11. “Adelaide</p> <p><strong>Trigger Hippy Tour Dates:</strong></p> <p>7/25 Watermark / New York, NY<br /> 7/26 State Theatre / New Brunswick, NJ<br /> 7/27 Xponential Festival / Camden, NJ<br /> 7/29 Infinity Hall / Norfolk, CT<br /> 7/30 Fairfield Theatre / Fairfield, CT<br /> 8/03 3rd &amp; Lindsley / Nashville, TN<br /> 8/15 The Peach Music Festival / Scranton, PA<br /> 8/16 The Ardmore Music Hall / Ardmore, PA<br /> 8/17 Birchmere / Alexandria, VA</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/157710395%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-keeqd&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true">></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/trigger-hippy-premiere-new-song-rise-singing-exclusive#comments Trigger Hippy News Thu, 24 Jul 2014 14:24:38 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21914 Gig Review: Richie Sambora Pays Tribute to Les Paul at the Iridium http://www.guitarworld.com/gig-review-richie-sambora-pays-tribute-les-paul-iridium <!--paging_filter--><p>Back in the late Eighties, Bon Jovi’s Richie Sambora was considered to be one of the true guitar heroes of the day. While less flashy than, say, Jake E. Lee or George Lynch, Sambo was generally acknowledged to be one of rock’s most tasteful and melodic players.</p> <p>However, as time went on and Bon Jovi became more of a pop band, his role changed. He became less of a spotlighted soloist and more of a talented colorist, adding just the right notes and textures to the band’s radio-ready songs. While his skill was still undeniable, there was clearly less opportunity for him to solo and strut his stuff. </p> <p>A series of impressive solo albums, including the underrated 2012 <em>Aftermath of the Lowdown</em>, attempted to remedy the situation. But last night’s (July 22) warmup performance at New York City's Iridium—which was filmed for a PBS <em>Front and Center</em> special that will air this fall—was guitarist’s real bid to show he still has the chops to be considered one of the greats. </p> <p>The show started on a dramatic note, with Sambora crooning Leon Russell’s intimate “Song For You,” but soon heated up with a huge riff rocker titled “Burn the Candle Down.” With his hat cocked over one eye and wearing a shirt proclaiming that he was just a “Working Class Hero,” the New Jersey rocker traded lightning-fast licks with talented co-guitarist Orianthi for an ending that brought the audience to its feet. </p> <p>While the show was meant to be mark the late Les Paul’s birthday, who was something of a mentor to Sambora, the 90-minute concert was equally a tribute his other classic rock influences: Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck and Johnny Winter, to name a few. Playing several beautiful Les Pauls, including a white one Paul personally present to the guitarist, through a custom-made Freidman combo amp, Richie summoned the gigantic tones of the Seventies as he performed songs primarily from his solo albums, with a few Bon Jovi classics sprinkled in for good measure. </p> <p>Highlights included an arena-sized version of “Stranger in This Town” and a thundering “Seven Years Gone,” featuring exciting fretwork from Sambora and Orianthi. While Ori gave Richie most of spotlight, she wasn’t shy when it was her turn to solo. Her incredible technique and more trebly, biting tone lit a fire under the ass of the frontman, who clearly enjoyed being challenged. </p> <p>It is rumored that the two guitarists are working on an album together. If it comes to pass, it should be a corker. At one point in the show, Sambora said, “Les Paul is the reason we all have jobs.” I’m sure somewhere Les is smiling and saying in that gruff voice of his, “Hey, Sambora—job well done.”</p> <p><em>Brad Tolinski is the editor-in-chief at </em>Guitar World.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/orianthi">Orianthi</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/gig-review-richie-sambora-pays-tribute-les-paul-iridium#comments Brad Tolinski Iridium Orianthi Review Richie Sambora Blogs News Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:41:07 +0000 Brad Tolinski http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21916 How to Change the Speaker in a Guitar Amp — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/how-change-speaker-guitar-amp-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Sometimes you just need to make a change! </p> <p>With that in mind, we asked our very own Paul Riario to create a video showing you how to change the speaker in your guitar amp.</p> <p>In the video below, which is presented by Celestion and <em>Guitar World</em>, Riario installs a Celestion G12 V-Type 70-Watt speaker into a Blackstar combo. </p> <p>You'll also notice Yngwie Malmsteen makes a brief appearance (which is starting to be normal around here)! Regardless, check out the clip and let us know what you think in the comments below or on Facebook.</p> <p>For more information about Celestion speakers, check out <a href="http://celestion.com/">celestion.com</a>.</p> <p>And if you like this sort of thing, be sure to check out Riario's first feature film, <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-guitar-worlds-guide-building-pedal-board">How to Build a Pedal Board,"</a> which features a brief appearance by Mick Mars. Enjoy!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/u32N272kkD4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/how-change-speaker-guitar-amp-video#comments Celestion install Paul Riario Videos Amps News Gear Wed, 23 Jul 2014 18:47:41 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21875 Orianthi Discusses Santana's 'Sacred Fire: Live in South America' — The Record That Changed My Life http://www.guitarworld.com/orianthi-discusses-santanas-sacred-fire-live-south-america-record-changed-my-life <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Orianthi chooses (and discusses) the record that changed her life.</em></p> <p><strong>Santana</strong><br /> <em>Sacred Fire: Live In South America</em> (1993)</p> <p>“There’s just so much wonderful soloing throughout that entire concert—really inspired soloing—and that inspired me to want to play electric guitar. I had been playing since I was six, but I was studying classical guitar and just strumming at that point. </p> <p>"When I was around 11, my dad took me to see Santana live, and then I got <em>Sacred Fire</em>, and everything changed for me. My dad is actually an amazing guitarist, and he always had an incredible record collection, which is how I discovered things like Jimi Hendrix and Santana. I’ll always be grateful for that.</p> <p>“Everything about that album and the concert, which I had on video tape, changed my life. The band was amazing; the energy of the crowd was incredible. It’s just a really special performance. I actually wore out the video from pausing it so many times because I was trying to learn all of his solos.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/lPekBJ47BnM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/orianthi">Orianthi</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/carlos-santana">Carlos Santana</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/orianthi-discusses-santanas-sacred-fire-live-south-america-record-changed-my-life#comments July 2014 Orianthi Santana The Record that Changed My Life Interviews News Features Magazine Wed, 23 Jul 2014 18:35:47 +0000 Orianthi http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21890 Crown the Empire Guitarist Bennett Vogelman's 2014 Summer Tour Survival Guide — Warped Tour http://www.guitarworld.com/crown-empire-guitarist-bennett-vogelmans-2014-summer-tour-survival-guide-warped-tour <!--paging_filter--><p><em>In this new feature from the August 2014 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>, the guitarists of Avenged Sevenfold, Morbid Angel, Trivium and other metal acts tell how they'll beat the heat and tame the crowds on the season's biggest tours.</em></p> <p><strong><em>TODAY: Crown the Empire Guitarist Bennett Vogelman — WARPED TOUR</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Your sweatiest concert ever?</strong></p> <p>The sweatiest concert we ever played was at the Speak Easy Lounge in Lake Worth, Florida, on our first headlining tour. It was so hot, you could literally see everyone’s perspiration in the air. We walked into the venue before our set and within maybe 30 seconds, we were completely drenched in sweat. By the end of the set, all of us could barely breathe.</p> <p><strong>Tips for playing in extreme heat?</strong></p> <p>The obvious one is to make sure that you have water onstage for each person. Wear short sleeves, and depending on how hot it is, you might want to tone down how intense you play onstage—which is something we never do.</p> <p><strong>One item you’ll carry with you at all times this summer?</strong></p> <p>My phone and a water bottle. That’s about it.</p> <p><strong>Considerations when playing an outdoor show versus an indoor show?</strong></p> <p>Basically, the deal with outdoor shows is there are no lights in the afternoon, so you have to make up for it with how you interact with the crowd. You also have to account for any weather that you might encounter, like rain, lightning, thunder, wind and dust storms. Plus, with some outdoor shows, you’re really far away from the crowd because of the barricade, which makes it a little hard to get up close and personal with the fans.</p> <p><strong>Primary gear you’ll be playing this summer?</strong></p> <p>Right now we’re actually looking into switching over to running things all digital. We'll have a computer that runs a standalone guitar plug-in—probably Line 6’s POD Farm—that emulates a guitar tone very similar to the one used on the actual song.</p> <p><strong>Tips for winning over a tough crowd?</strong></p> <p>That’s tricky. We’ve had our fair share of tough crowds over the last few years, and it’s really a different animal every time. What we normally do is make sure we’re confident. We’re at that show playing it for a reason, and understanding that helps keep our morale high, even when the crowd sounds like crickets chirping. We talk to the crowd and tell them we need to see more action and then make sure we give it our all so the crowd sees we’re not just fucking around up there. </p> <p><strong>Highlight of your band’s set list?</strong></p> <p>For me, it’s either playing “Makeshift Chemistry,” which has a lot of energy to it, or doing our “wall of death" during “Children of Love.”</p> <p><strong>Advice for a band just starting to play live?</strong></p> <p>The most important thing for me is making sure you’re playing your parts as solidly as you can. We do a lot of choreography live, and we’ve had to learn how to play and move around aggressively at the same time. Play the songs correctly first, go crazy second.</p> <p>Check out the video for "Makeshift Chemistry" here: </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/PoMJ0VkGG1c" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/crown-empire-guitarist-bennett-vogelmans-2014-summer-tour-survival-guide-warped-tour#comments 2014 Summer Tour Survival Guide August 2014 Bennett Vogelman Crown the Empire Interviews News Features Magazine Wed, 23 Jul 2014 18:25:55 +0000 Jeff Kitts http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21712 Miss May I Guitarist Justin Aufdemkampe's 2014 Summer Tour Survival Guide — Mayhem Fest http://www.guitarworld.com/miss-may-i-guitarist-justin-aufdemkampes-2014-summer-tour-survival-guide-mayhem-fest <!--paging_filter--><p><em>In this new feature from the August 2014 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>, the guitarists of Avenged Sevenfold, Morbid Angel, Trivium and other metal acts tell how they'll beat the heat and tame the crowds on the season's biggest tours.</em></p> <p><strong><em>TODAY: Miss May I Guitarist Justin Audemkampfe — MAYHEM FEST</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Your sweatiest concert ever?</strong></p> <p>It was in Louisville, Kentucky, at this place called Uncle Pleasant’s, back in 2010. The show was amazing and there were a lot of people inside this small place, so the combination of the heat outside, the heat coming off people inside, the lights, and the fact that the ceilings were eight feet high just trapped the heat. I specifically remember, about mid set, I was so hot that I thought I might pass out. I ran out of water about halfway through playing, so I just had to tough it out. After we played the last note, I darted for the back door. I was beyond dizzy at that point and getting outside was such a godsend.</p> <p><strong>Tips for playing in extreme heat?</strong></p> <p>Sometimes when it’s really humid outside and there’s a lot of condensation, wrapping your in-ear monitor pack and guitar wireless pack in plastic can help protect them from moisture. If those things go out, I can’t hear what I’m playing or my guitar signal will go out.</p> <p><strong>One item you’ll carry with you at all times this summer?</strong></p> <p>Sunglasses. I get headaches if I squint for too long. The combination of a headache and being dehydrated is the worst feeling, so sunglasses and a water bottle are a must in the summer heat. </p> <p><strong>Considerations when playing an outdoor show versus an indoor show?</strong></p> <p>One of the biggest problems I ran into playing on Warped in 2011 and 2012 was the dust getting into my gear. I really like my guitar rig and guitars to be clean. Almost every day there was some sort of dirt on both of them, and it’s something you cannot help. The wind carries it, and it can be a real pain in the ass for you or your tech. </p> <p><strong>Primary gear you’ll be playing this summer?</strong></p> <p>I recently started playing EVH 5150 III heads, which I’m falling in love with more and more with every tour that passes. I’ll be running a pretty standard pedal setup at the front of the stage as well: a Boss TU-3 tuner into a Maxon OD808 Overdrive pedal to an ISP Decimator noise-reduction pedal and after that to a Boss DD-7 Digital Delay. All of these are in my guitar chain and run straight into my head. We’ll be using Orange cabs too. We’ve been using them for a couple of years, and they’re really the only things in my rig that have stayed the same. As far as guitars, I’ll be using the Charvel San Dimas Style guitars for all of the festivals this summer. </p> <p><strong>Tips for winning over a tough crowd?</strong></p> <p>Sometimes it’s as simple as one song or one thing your singer says between songs that gets a crowd going. When I went to shows as a kid, it always made me more comfortable when I saw the guitarist moving around onstage. It let me know that I could just let loose and have a good time. So now, at every show, I give my all for the fans that have paid to see our band play, but even when playing in front of the worst crowds, I try to move around as much as possible. Playing in front of a bad crowd actually fuels me. </p> <p><strong>Highlight of your band’s set list?</strong></p> <p>My favorite songs to play are “Hey Mister,” “Refuse to Believe,” “Our Kings,” “Relentless Chaos” and “Echoes.”</p> <p><strong>Advice for a band just starting to play live?</strong></p> <p>Just go up there and have as much fun as possible. I was so nervous at Miss May I’s first show seven years ago, which was also my first show. I kept thinking, Do I remember my parts? What am I going to look like in front of people? Am I going to mess up? I ended up having one of the best experiences of my life. When I walked offstage, I said to myself, I could do this for the rest of my life. </p> <p>Check out the video for "Hey Mister" here: </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ZUaQtfnMzdw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Photo: Julien Esteban Pretel</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/miss-may-i-guitarist-justin-aufdemkampes-2014-summer-tour-survival-guide-mayhem-fest#comments 2014 Summer Tour Survival Guide August 2014 Justin Audemkampfe Miss May I Interviews News Features Magazine Wed, 23 Jul 2014 18:18:16 +0000 Jeff Kitts http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21717 John Petrucci of Dream Theater Discusses Rush's '2112' — The Record That Changed My Life http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-dream-theater-discusses-rushs-2112-record-changed-my-life <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Dream Theater guitarist John Petrucci chooses (and discusses) the record that changed his life.</em></p> <p><strong>Rush</strong><br /> <em>2112</em> (1976)</p> <p>“If I had to pick a favorite band of all time, it would be Rush. </p> <p>"As a teenager, I was already familiar with the group and its albums like <em>Moving Pictures</em> and <em>Signals</em>. But once I discovered <em>2112</em>, it opened me up to this whole concept that rock music could be bigger than just a tune—that it could be used as a vehicle to tell a story or to transport you to some other world. </p> <p>"The idea of a big piece like that being broken down into numbered sections like they were chapters in a book was just unbelievable to me, and it’s a technique that I continue to use to this day.</p> <p>“I have so much respect for [Rush drummer] Neil Peart, especially as a lyricist. And <em>2112</em> was the first time I heard something where, lyrically, it didn’t have to just be about the typical rock and roll topics, that it could be about something more heady or esoteric, something that makes you think. That really influenced me as a lyricist.</p> <p>“I was also blown away by how a three-piece band could sound so majestic and huge and play in a style that’s inherently rock and roll yet still pushes the boundaries of what they’re doing musically—this idea of being experimental, using different time signatures and not really being concerned about song length and traditional constraints. I can’t tell you how huge of an impact that had on me. <em>2112</em> basically set the course for my musical career and how I approached Dream Theater.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/QnATFkU-we8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/rush">Rush</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-dream-theater-discusses-rushs-2112-record-changed-my-life#comments Dream Theater John Petrucci July 2014 Rush The Record that Changed My Life Interviews News Features Magazine Wed, 23 Jul 2014 18:04:35 +0000 John Petrucci http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21897