Brian Setzer http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/400/all en Dear Guitar Hero: Stray Cats' Brian Setzer Talks Gretsch Guitars, Joe Strummer, Vintage Cars, Jazz Lessons and More http://www.guitarworld.com/dear-guitar-hero-stray-cats-brian-setzer-talks-gretsch-guitars-joe-strummer-vintage-cars-jazz-lessons-and-more <!--paging_filter--><p><em>He revitalized rockabilly with the Stray Cats and revived swing and jump blues with the Brian Setzer Orchestra. But what </em>Guitar World<em> readers really want to know is …</em></p> <p> <strong>Your playing style is so incredible and immaculate. Did you start with any jazz guitar training or did you just learn how to play “Stairway to Heaven” like the rest of us? — Jon Rubin</strong></p> <p> [laughs] I’m not saying I didn’t play it. Hell, we all played it; it’s a classic. But I did take guitar lessons for about 10 to 12 years, with two different teachers. </p> <p>I took my first lesson when I was eight years old. I went through the Mel Bay books. Back then in Long Island, New York, there were mostly jazz players. </p> <p>So my first teacher was actually a saxophone player. After that I studied with this other jazz teacher, Ray Gogarty. He took me further into the jazz world: advanced chords, a little bit of the modes, scales and standards.</p> <p> <strong>I seem to remember reading that one of the cars on Stray Cats’ <em>Built for Speed</em> album cover was yours. Is that true? — Eric Smoot</strong></p> <p> Yeah, the ’56 Chevy on the cover of <em>Built for Speed</em> was mine. That Chevy actually got stolen from a parking spot years ago. I wish I still had it. I came back from doing what I was doing, and the car was gone. It broke my heart. </p> <p><strong>What first inspired you to play guitar? — Molly McAllister</strong></p> <p> I was a little kid, like six or seven years old, when the Beatles came out. I remember hearing their music and I couldn’t imagine where that sound was coming from. </p> <p>Then I saw a picture of the Beatles, and George [Harrison] had an electric guitar, and I was like “That’s it!” It was that sound—the sound of George’s guitar—that first captured me when I was really young. It all goes back to that sound.</p> <p><strong>What led you down the rockabilly path? — Steve</strong></p> <p> The real defining moment for me was when I heard [Gene Vincent’s] “Be-Bop-A-Lula” on the jukebox. Back in 1976 or ’77, we had this club in Manhattan called Max’s Kansas City. There was always punk music blasting, but for some reason one day “Be-Bop-A-Lula” came on the jukebox. It was as if a hand came across the bar and grabbed me, like, “Listen to me! Listen to how cool I am!” </p> <p>There was just something about the raw, back-to-basics sound that fit perfectly with the urgency of the punk movement I was in back then. To me, rockabilly music paralleled punk’s energy and feeling, but the players were much better. I’m telling you, I still remember Cliff Gallop’s solo coming out of the speaker. I went, “What the heck is that? Who’s playing this?”</p> <p><strong>I really dig your hair. What is your secret ingredient? Are you a Murray’s Pomade man? — Joe Barrios</strong></p> <p>[In radio-announcer voice] You’ve heard of Dapper Dan? Well, I’m a Murray’s man! [laughs] As my dad used to say, “You’ve got to train your hair.” And then once you’ve got it trained, you comb it in the position, throw in a little bit of Murray’s … and you’ll be a Murray’s man, too. [laughs]</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zk_WpqVFYZg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>What attracted you to using Gretsch hollowbodies as your main guitars? — Jeff Osgood</strong></p> <p>The first reason I wanted to play a Gretsch guitar is because Eddie Cochran played one. Believe me, when I was growing up, nobody knew who he was. I just stumbled across this record and I thought he looked cool. I had no idea he was that good. </p> <p>But once I popped on the record, it was exactly the guitar sound that I wanted: somewhere between a Fender and Gibson. To me, if you play a Fender straight through the amp without any effects, it’s a little thin sounding. And a Les Paul didn’t twang enough; it was just always on 11, you know?</p> <p>The Gretsch was right between those two. It had that twang, but you could really make it sing if you wanted. I guess it just fulfilled the sound I was hearing in my head.</p> <p><strong>I know you co-wrote some tracks with [late Clash singer and guitarist] Joe Strummer for your <em>Guitar Slinger</em> album, and I heard that you were friends with him, as well. Can you share any good stories? — Cole Slaugh</strong></p> <p> Oh, I’ve got a lot of great memories with Joe. Joe and I would spend the summers together because we were good friends and we both had children. So we’d throw the kids in the pool and have a good time. Joe had a very good, dry sense of humor, you know, and some of the things he would say were just…</p> <p> Well, let’s say he was very good at making fun and making light of a situation. If you were wound up or you were aggravated about something, Joe would say a couple words, and then you would laugh and realize how silly the whole thing was. He was a great guy, and a genius of our time.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/jV13bGmH7Fo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Which classic rockabilly artists would you recommend I check out to better understand the style? — Jimmy Vomvas</strong></p> <p> The definitive rockabilly album for me was Elvis Presley’s <em>The Sun Sessions</em>. Boy, oh boy. That probably has everything you need all wrapped up right there. Also pick up the first two Gene Vincent records: <em>Blue Jean Bop</em> and <em>Gene Vincent and the Blue Caps</em>. As a guitar player, you have to hear Cliff Gallup play with Gene Vincent and Scotty Moore play with Elvis Presley.</p> <p><strong>I love your live sound. But I’d like to know how you control feedback at stage volume. I have had this issue with hollowbody guitars in the past. — Eric A. Nay</strong></p> <p> I’ve actually never had any problems with the [Gretsch] 6120 with FilterTron pickups. The feedback that I get is kind of friendly feedback. It’s like a note, not a squeal. I love what happens on a hollowbody guitar when you’re too close to an amp. That sound comes back through the guitar and vibrates the body, like an old jalopy or something. That’s the most magical feeling to me. Once you figure it out, you can kind of control all of those feedback notes.</p> <p><strong>You’ve got an amazing sound. What is your main amp-and-effect setup? — Billy Wilson</strong></p> <p> I just use a ’63 Fender Bassman and a Roland Space Echo. I mean, my amps have been worked on, but they’re not modified—rather de-modified. Over the years people have put in the wrong tubes, cables and speakers. I try to get the Bassmans back to stock, and I like to use Celestion Vintage 30s for the speakers. I think they’re better matched to the power of the amplifier head.</p> <p> <strong>I’ve always been impressed by your right-hand picking technique. Could you give me any advice on how to refine mine? — Greg Terzian</strong></p> <p> Well, first of all, anyone that tells you “This is the only right way to do it” is wrong. Any way you feel comfortable fingerpicking…if it works for you, then do it. There’s not a wrong or a right way. </p> <p>When I fingerpick, I tuck my pick under my index finger; I’ll slip it down when I use the guitar pick, and then I tuck it up, and use my thumb, second, third and fourth fingers to fingerpick. I’ve never heard of anyone doing that, and I don’t know if you could call it correct, but that’s what works for me.</p> <p><strong>Do you ever get bored playing rockabilly-type stuff? If not, how do you keep your playing fresh within that style? — Justice Edwards</strong></p> <p> I always mix in new things, new influences. There are so many different styles you can play in that genre. I mean, I’m a rockabilly guitar player, but I’m influenced by all American musical styles, like jazz, blues, country and rock and roll. So the way to keep from getting bored from playing one particular genre of music is to mix in other styles.</p> <p><em>Photo: David Bowman</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/dear-guitar-hero-stray-cats-brian-setzer-talks-gretsch-guitars-joe-strummer-vintage-cars-jazz-lessons-and-more#comments 2011 Brian Setzer Dear Guitar Hero July 2011 Stray Cats July Interviews News Features Magazine Fri, 10 Apr 2015 15:41:31 +0000 Brad Angle 11071 at http://www.guitarworld.com Brian Setzer Demos and Discusses Gretsch Guitars — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-demos-and-discusses-gretsch-guitars-videos <!--paging_filter--><p>In this new video, created and posted in time for this year's Winter NAMM Show, longtime Gretsch signature artist Brian Setzer plays and discusses Gretsch guitars.</p> <p>He also describes his love affair with the brand and how guitarists like George Harrison and Eddie Cochran exposed him to Gretsch in his formative years.</p> <p>For more about Gretsch's Setzer models, visit <a href="http://gretschguitars.com/features/briansetzer2015">gretschguitars.com.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/K-VUGeKT0M4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-demos-and-discusses-gretsch-guitars-videos#comments Brian Setzer FMIC Specialty Brands Gretsch Videos Electric Guitars News Gear Thu, 19 Feb 2015 19:08:52 +0000 Guitar World Staff 23547 at http://www.guitarworld.com NAMM 2015: Updated Gretsch Professional Collection Brian Setzer Guitars — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/namm-2015-updated-gretsch-professional-collection-brian-setzer-guitars <!--paging_filter--><p>Members of the <em>Guitar World</em> crew paid a visit to the Gretsch booth at the 2015 Winter NAMM Show in Anaheim, California.</p> <p>As you can see in the new video below, we got the run down on the company's new Gretsch Brian Setzer signature guitars. </p> <p>For more about Gretsch, visit <a href="http://gretschguitars.com/">gretschguitars.com.</a></p> <p><strong>For more NAMM 2015 coverage, visit <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/namm-2015">GuitarWorld.com's official NAMM 2015 Zone,</a> get updates on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/GuitarWorld">Facebook</a> and photos and more on <a href="https://twitter.com/GuitarWorld">Twitter</a> and <a href="http://instagram.com/guitarworldmagazine">Instagram.</a> It's like you're at the show!</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Yyaj8NpRp00" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/namm-2015-updated-gretsch-professional-collection-brian-setzer-guitars#comments Brian Setzer Gretsch NAMM 2015 NAMM 2015 video Videos Electric Guitars News Gear Fri, 23 Jan 2015 22:32:59 +0000 Guitar World Staff 23353 at http://www.guitarworld.com NAMM2015: Gretsch Releases Updated Professional Collection Brian Setzer Guitars http://www.guitarworld.com/namm2015-gretsch-releases-updated-professional-collection-brian-setzer-guitars <!--paging_filter--><p>Gretsch is proud to release the entirely new and updated Professional Collection Hollow Body Brian Setzer guitars, each built to Brian’s exacting specs.</p> <p>Gretsch Brian Setzer Nashville models are modeled on the guitars in his killer vintage collection. The trestle bracing matches that of Setzer’s favorite ’59, giving it a more solid feel and tons of sustain. </p> <p>Standard features include 1959 trestle bracing, dual TV Jones Brian Setzer "Signature" pickups, Schaller locking tuners and strap locks, pinned Adjusto-Matic bridge, nickel hardware and Bigsby B6CB vibrato tailpiece. Available with a three-ply maple body in Gloss Black Urethane and Vintage Orange Lacquer, or with a five-ply flame maple body in Orange Urethane or Orange Lacquer.</p> <p>Gretsch Brian Setzer Hot Rod Models are stripped down and now feature a striking assortment of new colors over a flame maple body. The single-cutaway bound hollow body has an arched top, 1959-style trestle bracing and f-holes; the maple neck has a bound ebony fingerboard with Neo-Classic thumbnail inlays. </p> <p>Other features include dual Brian Setzer "Signature" TV Jones pickups, three-position pickup switch, single master volume control, Schaller locking tuners, pinned Adjusto-Matic bridge and Bigsby B6C vibrato tailpiece. The flame maple body is available in Harbor Blue 2-Tone, Highland Green 2-Tone, Roman Red 2-Tone, Tuxedo Black 2-Tone, Tuxedo Black, Blonde and Green Sparkle finishes.</p> <p>The G6136SLBP Brian Setzer Black Phoenix is designed and built for speed. The single cutaway hollow body has an arched top and back, 1959 trestle bracing and oversized “F” holes; the maple neck has a 9.5”-radius ebony fingerboard with 22 medium frets and Mother-of-Pearl Neo-Classic “Thumbnail” inlays. </p> <p>Other features include dual TV Jones Brian Setzer "Signature" pickups, three-position pickup switch, jeweled single master volume control, silver-sparkle binding (body, fingerboard and headstock), silver plexi pickguard with Phoenix silhouette graphic, pinned Adjusto-Matic bridge and Bigsby B6C vibrato tailpiece, Schaller strap locks, Grover Imperial tuners and gloss black nitrocellulose lacquer finish.</p> <p>For more information, go to <a href="http://www.gretschguitars.com/">gretschguitars.com.</a></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Gretsch%20G6120SS%20Brian%20Setzer%20Nashville%20%281%29.jpg" width="620" height="234" alt="Gretsch G6120SS Brian Setzer Nashville (1).jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/namm2015-gretsch-releases-updated-professional-collection-brian-setzer-guitars#comments Brian Setzer FMIC Specialty Brands Gretsch NAMM 2015 Electric Guitars News Gear Fri, 23 Jan 2015 01:02:34 +0000 Guitar World Staff 23344 at http://www.guitarworld.com Brian Setzer Premieres "Lemme Slide" Lyric Video http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-premieres-lemme-slide-lyric-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Earlier today, the modern rockabilly king, Brian Setzer, premiered the lyric video for his new song, "Lemme Slide." </p> <p>The track features prominently on Setzer's new album, <em>Rockabilly Riot! All Original</em>, which was released today, August 12, via Surfdog Records. </p> <p>You can check out "Lemme Slide" below, and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments section below or on Facebook!</p> <p>Check out our new interview with Setzer <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/rockabilly-riot-brian-setzer-talks-new-album-gretsch-guitars-and-future-rockabilly">in this general area.</a> And, while you're at it, watch the official music video for "Let's Shake," another new song from the album, <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-premieres-lets-shake-music-video">right here.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/MC9RUSeqlAU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-premieres-lemme-slide-lyric-video#comments Brian Setzer Videos News Tue, 12 Aug 2014 22:06:43 +0000 Jackson Maxwell 22097 at http://www.guitarworld.com Brian Setzer Premieres "Let's Shake" Music Video http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-premieres-lets-shake-music-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Earlier today, everyone's favorite rockabilly cat, Brian Setzer, premiered his new music video over at <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/music/2014/07/31/brian-setzer-lets-shake-video-premiere/13393293/">USAToday.com.</a></p> <p>Lucky for you, you can check out "Let's Shake" below. </p> <p>As always, be sure to let us know what you think of it in the comments below or on Facebook!</p> <p>"Let's Shake" is the lead-off single from Setzer's new album, <em>Rockabilly Riot! All Original,</em> which will be released August 12 via Surfdog Records. You can check out our new interview with Setzer <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/rockabilly-riot-brian-setzer-talks-new-album-gretsch-guitars-and-future-rockabilly">right here.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/xQaSBw_LEtM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-premieres-lets-shake-music-video#comments Brian Setzer Videos News Thu, 31 Jul 2014 14:34:47 +0000 Damian Fanelli 21997 at http://www.guitarworld.com ‘Rockabilly Riot’: Brian Setzer Talks New Album, Gretsch Guitars and Future of Rockabilly http://www.guitarworld.com/rockabilly-riot-brian-setzer-talks-new-album-gretsch-guitars-and-future-rockabilly <!--paging_filter--><p>Following last year’s successful Christmas tour with his 18-piece orchestra, iconic guitarist, songwriter and three-time Grammy winner Brian Setzer entered the studio to get back to his rockabilly roots — with incredible results. </p> <p>Setzer’s new album, <em>Rockabilly Riot: All Original</em>, which will be released August 12 via Surfdog Records, is pure, straight-ahead rockabilly that features 12 new, original songs. Along with his trademark twang and fretboard fire, Setzer is backed by three musicians who are among the best at their craft — Mark Winchester (bass), Kevin McKendree (piano) and Noah Levy (drums).</p> <p>The album, which was recorded in Nashville, was produced by Peter Collins, who handled those same duties for Setzer’s <em>Vavoom!</em> and <em>The Dirty Boogie</em>. The result is a cross-mix of early Stray Cats and Setzer’s solo records, with an emphasis on a fresh, modern rockabilly sound.</p> <p>Setzer first captured the hearts of guitarists everywhere as founder and frontman of Stray Cats, whose signature songs “Rock This Town," “(She's) Sexy &amp; 17” and “Stray Cat Strut” introduced the sound and attitude of rockabilly to a new generation of rock fans in the early Eighties. </p> <p>I recently spoke to Setzer about <em>Rockabilly Riot: All Original</em> <a href="http://hifi247.com/brian-setzer-rockabilly-riot-all-original-cd-preorder.html">(which is available now for pre-order)</a>, his early days, guitars and what the future holds for rockabilly music.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: How would you describe the sound of <em>Rockabilly Riot</em>?</strong></p> <p>To me, it sounds a little bit like a mixture of an album I had called <em>Ignition</em> and the first Stray Cats album. The production of it is straight forward, but it really is songs first. Then I make them into rockabilly just by me playing them.</p> <p><strong>What makes rockabilly so special?</strong></p> <p>It’s based in the blues, which is kind of the basis of it all. Rock and roll, rockabilly, country, swing, jazz — it all started from the blues. Anything that seems to come from something honest works for me. I like to say that rockabilly is like the bad brother who goes out late and doesn’t come back [laughs]. It was probably too risqué for its time and never really gained the traction it should have.</p> <p><strong>Do you consider this album a sequel of sorts to <em>Ignition</em>, considering both have songs about roosters and chickens</strong>?</p> <p>Well, Mark Winchester [bass] says that any song about barn yard animals is fine by him. I guess it was inspired by Mark’s “Rooster Rock." [laughs]</p> <p><strong>Speaking of Mark, you’re joined by some amazing players on this album. Can you speak to what it’s like working with Mark, Kevin McKendree and Noah Levy?</strong></p> <p>It reminds me of watching the All-Star Game in baseball. You know that anything you throw at them, they’re going to catch or going to hit. It’s fun making a record with guys like that, just like it was with Jim and Lee from the Stray Cats or the big band. They’re all top players, so you know you’re going to get a great performance. Once you sit down and play, work on the songs and gel, it all comes together and you’ve got a first-place team.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/155136713&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> <p><strong>What was the writing process like for this album?</strong></p> <p>It’s interesting. When you start writing, you really have to get a spark or something to light the fuse. The first song I wrote for this album was “Vinyl Records,” and the spark was my daughter listening to songs on her iPod. She had the little peas in her ear and I pulled them out and listened and said, “Ah, I really don’t like that. It doesn’t sound good.”</p> <p>That’s when she said, “Well, that’s just because you don’t like the band.” I said, “No, it’s not about the music.” Then I showed her a stereo I had sitting at home. I pulled out an old record and put it on so she could hear what it sounded like. She flipped, and it was a victory for Dad! Now, she and her friends go out and hunt down vinyl records. That was the spark that really got that song going for me lyrically. Musically, I had this riff lying around that I thought was cool. It was just a blues riff in C but it counts down all of the notes in the blues scale. It was something I hadn’t really heard anybody do yet. Once I had those two things, it just kind of snowballed from there.</p> <p><strong>The song “Rockabilly Blues” has an autobiographical theme to it. Was that your intention?</strong></p> <p>Yeah, that’s right. I was just sitting there finger picking a blues/rockabilly thing on a guitar that I’ve had for 40 years. I started thinking about the idea of making it personal and decided to write the song about the guitar and me.</p> <p><strong>What was the recording process like?</strong></p> <p>It was a no-stress record. To go in with Peter [Collins] was like going in with a buddy. We recorded it in Nashville, and what I did differently this time was arrange all of the songs together beforehand. We recorded all of the tracks and arranged them and then I gave the guys a CD and had them listen to it and live with it for a month and half. Then right after our Christmas tour, we all went straight into the studio. It was easier and more fun to have everything ready and then just go in and rock it out. There are no overdubs on this album except for the vocal. </p> <p><strong>What inspired you to first pick up the guitar?</strong></p> <p>The first real inspiration I had was George Harrison. I remember when I first heard the Beatles on a jukebox. At the time, I was so young I didn’t even really know what was making the sound that I liked. Then there was a record store on the corner with a picture hanging up that said “The Beatles." Once I saw George holding his guitar, I said, “Wow! So cool!” That was the first spark.</p> <p>Then later on, after it had cemented itself in place, I was really blown away by Eddie Cochran. I remember in the late Seventies no one really knew who he was. But once I saw his record (the black and white <em>Legendary Masters Series</em>), I knew I wanted to look like him. And after I had heard the songs, that just completed it for me. I said, “That’s it! [laughs]. </p> <p><strong>Did the Stray Cats find it difficult finding its niche in those early years?</strong></p> <p>I remember people used to think, “What the heck are these guys doing?” [laughs]. It’s kind of like Fifties rock and roll, but it’s not. This was the guitar-based, bad-ass cousin of that. But we built it up just like any other band. Whether you were in a blues band or a punk band at the time, everyone had to pay their dues and bang around in the back of a van. There was no instant overnight thing. It was a good learning experience climbing the ropes. </p> <p><strong>What’s your setup like these days?</strong></p> <p>I don’t use pedals. I just use the Roland Space Echo and mess around with the settings. If I want more of a “rock” sound, I’ll just turn the volume up. Then when I want the “billy” sound, I’ll turn the volume down to get it a little more twangy and then add a bit more delay on it. That’s really the only thing that I use. </p> <p><strong>Tell me a little about your guitars.</strong></p> <p>I have three that play really well. I’ve got the Stray Cat Gretsch, another ’59 that is pretty much my main guitar, and then my friends at TV Jones just found me a wicked one. I think it’s a ‘60 model that really just has the stuff. I’ve also got my new line of Gretsch guitars that I always take with me on the road.</p> <p><strong>What first attracted you to the Gretsch?</strong></p> <p>I had always wanted one because of George and Eddie. I just loved their sound and my ear was drawn to that sound rather than to a Les Paul. Back in the Seventies, you couldn’t really find a 6120 because they had stopped making them. But when I did find one and plugged it in, I was smitten. It was exactly what I was looking for. </p> <p><strong>Can you tell me the origin of the Stray Cats song “Rock This Town”?</strong></p> <p>We were all tired of the whole disco era and one night, me and Slim Jim [Phantom] snuck into a bar. I remember we looked at the jukebox and saw that it was all still disco and we were both really pissed off about it. I think that was the spark that got it off the ground and helped me to write something that was rock and roll instead of something that was dominating the airwaves. </p> <p><strong>What do you think the future holds for rockabilly music?</strong></p> <p>If you follow history, it always seems to stick its head above water, sees what the world is like and then goes back under. It had its spike in the Fifties, then the Stray Cats brought it back, and now you’ve got people like Imelda May who are having success with it. I think rockabilly will always be there because it’s so good and just keeps regenerating itself. Whether it’s in the public eye or not, people will always know it’s there.</p> <p><strong><em><a href="http://hifi247.com/brian-setzer-rockabilly-riot-all-original-cd-preorder.html">'Rockabilly Riot' is available now for pre-order.</a></em></strong></p> <p><em>James Wood is a writer, musician and self-proclaimed metalhead who maintains his own website, <a href="http://gojimmygo.net/">GoJimmyGo.net</a>. His articles and interviews are written on a variety of topics with passion and humor. You can follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/JimEWood">Twitter @JimEWood.</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/rockabilly-riot-brian-setzer-talks-new-album-gretsch-guitars-and-future-rockabilly#comments Brian Setzer Gretsch James Wood Interviews News Features Tue, 22 Jul 2014 21:08:46 +0000 James Wood 21882 at http://www.guitarworld.com Brian Setzer Premieres New Song, "Let's Shake" — Listen http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-premieres-new-song-lets-shake-listen <!--paging_filter--><p>Brian Setzer has premiered a new song — "Let's Shake" — from his upcoming all-rockabilly album, <em>Rockabilly Riot: All Original.</em></p> <p>The album will be released August 12 via Surfdog Records. </p> <p>“Yeah, ‘Let’s Shake,’ how come no one has thought of that title yet?" Setzer says. "We’ve been making rock and roll now for 60 years and no one has come up with ‘Let’s Shake?’ And I came up with it and I went, ‘Wow…Let’s Shake!’ You know, oh god, it’s just so simple it’s magic! </p> <p>"It’s got a really great guitar solo in it, just rock and roll sounding…it’s not really ‘billy’ sounding, it’s more rock and roll… again, it’s the simplest songs that are the hardest to write.”</p> <p>On the new album, which was recorded in Nashville and produced by Peter Collins, Setzer is backed by Mark Winchester (bass), Kevin McKendree (piano) and Noah Levy (drums). </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/155136713&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-premieres-new-song-lets-shake-listen#comments Brian Setzer News Fri, 27 Jun 2014 21:26:32 +0000 Damian Fanelli 21692 at http://www.guitarworld.com Brian Setzer Discusses His New Album, 'Rockabilly Riot: All Original' http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-discusses-his-new-album-rockabilly-riot-all-original <!--paging_filter--><p>Brian Setzer will release a new studio album, <em>Rockabilly Riot: All Original</em> — a straight-ahead rockabilly album from start to finish — August 12 via Surfdog Records.</p> <p>The album is the followup to 2011's <em>Setzer Goes Instru-Mental!</em></p> <p>The album, which features Mark Winchester (bass), Kevin McKendree (piano) and Noah Levy (drums), was recorded in Nashville and produced by Peter Collins.</p> <p>“They seem to know what it should sound like," Setzer says about the crew that worked on the new album. "Peter Collins is experienced and an accomplished producer, he’s done a lot of records, but he loves rockabilly music and he knows what it should sound like. </p> <p>“I think this album sounds to me a little bit like the first Stray Cats record…it's rockabilly songs. It’s not just blues songs in the rockabilly style. People like to call it ‘neo-billy,’ I suppose, which is some invented word somebody came up with, but if that’s the word they want to use, I’d like to go with that because it sounds to me like it’s very modern and fresh-sounding rockabilly.”</p> <p>Here's a quick Q&amp;A with Setzer:</p> <p><strong>Congratulations on the new album. There's something gloriously uncomplicated about rockabilly. It’s both badass and uplifting. How do you describe rockabilly?</strong></p> <p>Rockabilly music should be up there in regards with blues music. It should be playing in arenas. And, I think, it’s better than the blues because it has a style to it, it has accomplished musicians playing it and it’s totally American. So I think it’s very underrated music that should be more in the forefront of our culture. </p> <p><strong>Can you talk about the joy you had creating this specific rockabilly album?</strong></p> <p>You know, when my guitar and my amp and my echo unit are playing perfectly and in tune the way they do there’s no reason to turn it off. I was on the road for two months. I had given the songs I’d written to all the band members and we hadn’t arranged them. So this record was different where we didn’t have to sit down and labor over arrangements, everything was learned, and my guitar sound sounded so good I just made the record. We didn’t need to change guitars, amps, microphones—we just cut a rockabilly record—there’s no overdubs there’s no splicing there’s no auto tuning; what you hear is what you get. It’s pretty much us making live music. </p> <p><strong>Tell us about the chemistry in the studio between you, producer Peter Collins and the musicians who joined you on the album.</strong></p> <p>I think the only way you can make a better rockabilly record is if you get Elvis to sing…because Mark Winchester Kevin McKendree and Noah Levy are the best in their craft. Nobody plays a better slap bass than Mark. Kevin McKendree calls himself a “rockabilly piano player,” I’ve never heard anybody say that. And Noah just has a very swampy, groovy feel, which makes the whole thing sound kinda loose. Peter Collins…it’s funny how English people seem to have a more sensibility about what rockabilly music is, even though it was invented in the South…they seem to know what it should sound like. Peter Collins is experienced and an accomplished producer, he’s done a lot of records, but he loves rockabilly music and he knows what it should sound like. </p> <p><strong>What do you feel ultimately separates this album from your previous ones?</strong></p> <p>I’ve made a lot of records. I think this album is pretty similar to two albums I’ve cut in the past. It sounds to me a little be like <em>Ignition</em>: Part 2 and also like the first Stray Cats record. It’s rockabilly songs. It’s not just blues songs in the rockabilly style. People like to call it “neo-billy,” I suppose, which is some invented word that somebody came up with, but if that’s the word they want to use, I’d like to go with that because it sounds to me like it’s very modern and fresh-sounding rockabilly. </p> <p><strong>“Let’s Shake” is a burning up-tempo tune, a perfect setup for the rest of the album and a terrific single. Can you talk about this song’s mojo?</strong></p> <p>Yeah, “Let’s Shake” — how come no one has thought of that title yet? We’ve been making rock ‘n roll now for 60 years and no one has come up with “Let’s Shake”? And I came up with it and I went, “Wow…Let’s Shake!” You know, oh god, it’s just so simple it’s magic. It’s got a really great guitar solo in it, just rock ‘n roll sounding…it’s not really “billy” sounding it’s more rock and roll. And, you know, there’s a difference. The rockabilly has a more of a slap back hillbilly sound and the rock and roll is more tough. Oh god, it’s got that great, I think it’s from 1928 piano. It’s a Steinway. Again, it’s the simplest songs that are the hardest to write. </p> <p><strong>Another highlight of the album is “Vinyl Records.” Speaking of which, what are your three favorite vinyl records you own or once owned?</strong></p> <p>Gene Vincent, <em>Blue Jean Bop</em>; Eddie Cochran, <EM>Greatest Hits</em>, and Elvis Presley, <em>The Sun Sessions.</em></p> <p><strong><em><em>Rockabilly Riot: All Original</em> Track Listing:</em></strong></p> <p>01. Let’s Shake<br /> 02. Rockabilly Blues<br /> 03. Vinyl Records<br /> 04. Lemme Slide<br /> 05. Nothing Is a Sure Thing<br /> 06. What’s Her Name<br /> 07. Calamity Jane<br /> 08. The Girl With the Blues in Her Eyes<br /> 09. Stiletto Cool<br /> 10. I Should Have Had a V8<br /> 11. Blue Lights Big City<br /> 12. Cock-a-Doodle Don’t</p> <p><strong>For more information about Setzer, visit <a href="http://www.briansetzer.com/">briansetzer.com</a> and <a href="https://www.facebook.com/briansetzerofficial">www.facebook.com/briansetzerofficial</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-discusses-his-new-album-rockabilly-riot-all-original#comments Brian Setzer Interviews News Features Mon, 19 May 2014 17:25:09 +0000 Guitar World Staff 21290 at http://www.guitarworld.com Actor/Musician Drake Bell Discusses 'Ready Steady Go!,' His New Album with Brian Setzer http://www.guitarworld.com/actormusician-drake-bell-discusses-ready-steady-go-his-new-album-brian-setzer <!--paging_filter--><p>Guitarist Drake Bell wasn't made for these times. </p> <p>The actor/musician, best known for his work as teenage rocker Drake Parker on the Nickelodeon TV show <em>Drake &amp; Josh</em>, actually grew up listening to the likes of Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, the Beatles and Stray Cats.</p> <p>On Bell's new album, <em>Ready Steady Go!</em>, he pays homage to those roots by teaming with one of his biggest musical influences — Brian Setzer — for a tastefully inspired collection of classic rockabilly favorites and new material.</p> <p>In addition to Bell's catchy original, "Bitchcraft" are his take on songs like "Crazy Little Thing Called Love (Queen)", "Still Rock And Roll To Me (Billy Joel)" and a haunting version of Setzer's own "I Won't Stand In Your Way".</p> <p>I recently spoke to Bell about <em>Ready Steady Go!</em>, his guitar work and more.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: What made you decided to do a project like this?</strong></p> <p>This is the music I grew up on. My first guitar was a Gretsch 6120, and I just loved listening to artists like Elvis, Chuck Berry and Stray Cats. But when I wanted to go make records, it was hard. I couldn't really be on the show [<em>Drake &amp; Josh</em>] and then go in and do a three-piece rockabilly-type record of Fifties music.</p> <p><strong>How did the collaboration with Brian Setzer come about?</strong></p> <p>I've been a fan of Brian's for such a long time and had the opportunity to go backstage and meet him from time to time. It got to the point to where I started becoming a familiar face backstage. I still remember when I first presented the idea for this album to him. He was confused at first and said, "Wait a minute — you mean you want to make a rockabilly record?" [laughs]. I said "Yeah, this is what I've always wanted to do!"</p> <p><strong>What was your criteria for choosing songs for ‘<em>Ready Steady Go!</em>’?</strong></p> <p>It was really about songs I loved playing and singing growing up. What's really cool is that younger audiences seem to think that a lot of these songs are new. It's given me the opportunity to introduce this great music to a new generation without them thinking I'm just trying to play them their grandparents' music. They're embracing it as their own.</p> <p><strong>What was it like working with Brian?</strong></p> <p>It's hard to explain the feeling. It was breathtaking. Just to be sitting there playing a song I wrote and having Brian there with his gear in the room playing live with us was unreal.</p> <p><strong>What's the origin of the song "Bitchcraft"?</strong></p> <p>I grew up loving and playing this music but had never attempted to write in this style before. I remember I was listening to some old Django [Reinhardt] and Glenn Miller and just jamming around when the lick came to me. I don't think it's about anyone specifically. It's just an amalgamation of the relationships I've been through. But it was my first attempt at writing that jazzy, swing-influenced rockabilly.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/rQYBVPVeQn0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Do you have plans to tour?</strong></p> <p>We're working on a few things outside of the country right now as well as doing some mall dates and children's hospitals here in the U.S. Then we'll be gearing up to tour sometime this summer.</p> <p><strong>Tell me a little about your musical background.</strong></p> <p>I started playing music when I was around 10. I always wanted to be in a band, so I started out by playing drums. I played with a few groups but always remember wanting to be performing out in front of the band.</p> <p><strong>What inspired you to make the switch to guitar?</strong></p> <p>I had the opportunity to do a movie with Roger Daltrey of the Who. In the movie, I played a guitar student. Since I had to learn how to play somewhat for the movie, I was introduced to the guitar. When I picked up the guitar for the first time, it opened up a whole new world for me. I became obsessed with writing and playing. That's really how it started.</p> <p><strong>Who were some of your influences?</strong></p> <p>In addition to Brian, I love George Harrison, Carl Perkins, Brian May, Danny Gatton and Stevie Ray Vaughan. My dad was also a huge influence on me growing up. I remember we would sit in front of the TV and he would show me all of this classic stuff: The Beatles on Ed Sullivan and Elvis on Milton Berle. Then we'd get in the car and would listen to the Beach Boys, Beatles and Buddy Holly. I fell in love with that style of music and culture. It opened up my whole musical world.</p> <p><strong>What other projects are you working on?</strong></p> <p>I have a movie coming out for Nickelodeon called <em>A Fairly Odd Summer</em>. It's the third installment of the Fairly Oddparents movies. We've been taking the cartoon and making it live action.</p> <p><strong>You also do the voice of Peter Parker on the animated <em>Ultimate Spider-Man</em>. What's that like?</strong></p> <p>It's amazing. I get to go in and work alongside some of the greatest vocal talents of all time. People I grew up listening to. Then to have a legend like Stan Lee come in to do voice overs with us is just unbelievable. </p> <p><strong>What satisfies you the most about <em>Ready Steady Go!</em>?</strong></p> <p>Honestly, it’s got to be putting the record on and listening to "I Won't Stand In Your Way" with Brian's guitar up against my vocal. I still remember listening to his original version on vinyl as a kid and just wearing the needle out by playing it over and over. </p> <p>We recently pressed the new album to vinyl and I just got a test copy. Since I still have the same record player I had when I was 15, I set it down, put the needle on and started listening to "I Won't Stand in Your Way." It was a surreal moment. If you had told me back then that this was going to happen one day, I never would have believed it. Having the opportunity to go to Nashville and make a record with one of my biggest influences is a dream come true.</p> <p>For more information, visit:</p> <p><strong>Drake Bell Official Website:</strong> <a href="http://drakebell.com/">drakebell.com</a><br /> <strong>Facebook:</strong> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/bell.drake">facebook.com/bell.drake</a> </p> <p><em>Photo Credit: Drake Bell</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/actormusician-drake-bell-discusses-ready-steady-go-his-new-album-brian-setzer#comments Brian Setzer Drake Bell James Wood Interviews News Features Wed, 23 Apr 2014 21:55:18 +0000 James Wood 21080 at http://www.guitarworld.com Name Recognition: 10 Essential Signature Model Guitars http://www.guitarworld.com/name-recognition-10-essential-signature-model-guitars <!--paging_filter--><p>Ah, how young and innocent we all were when Fender introduced its first signature model — the Eric Clapton Stratocaster — in 1988.</p> <p>Of course, Chet Atkins' name appeared on several Gretsch models (the Tennessean, for example) long before then, and let's not forget that Les Paul — the name that appears on millions of guitar headstocks across the world — was actually a person.</p> <p>Today, new signature models seem to be popping up daily, each one "designed according to the artist's specifications." Almost every major manufacturer makes them for a host of artists from every genre of guitar-based music. This, of course, leaves players with a wealth of choices.</p> <p>Below, however, is a list of 10 high-quality signature-model electric guitars that the respective artists can proudly sign their name to — 10 models that get it right.</p> <p>As always, this list was compiled by a group of <em>Guitar World</em> editorial staffers including Technical Editor Paul Riario, the guy who tries out every piece of gear that arrives at <em>Guitar World</em>. The gear in this story is presented in no particular order. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.evhgear.com/gear/subpage/?partno=5107900868">EVH Wolfgang USA Stealth</a></strong></p> <p>Short of committing an act of grand theft Frankenstrat, the Wolfgang USA Stealth from EVH is the be-all, end-all Van Halen guitar for that moment you decide to try your hand at "Eruption." </p> <p>Of the guitars on this list, the Wolfgang USA Stealth features, by far, the most responsive Floyd Rose system. (It should be noted that the EVH-branded Floyd Rose isn't a floating setup, so it can only be used for diving.)</p> <p>As <em>Guitar World</em> reviewer Chris Gill wrote in our April 2012 issue, "Whether you're a metal shredder who wants super-sonic speed and nothing-but-black aesthetics or an EVH aficionado who craves the ultimate Van Halen playing experience, the EVH Stealth delivers like no other Wolfgang.</p> <p><strong>What does it sound like?</strong> </p> <p>Eddie used the EVH Wolfgang USA Stealth throughout Van Halen's North American tour this year, but in case you missed them, here's our own Paul Riario to give you a demo:</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/ETAd43hMKhs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>MSRP: $3,999.99 | Visit <a href="http://www.evhgear.com/gear/subpage/?partno=5107900868">EVHGear.com</a> to learn more about this guitar.</em></p> <p><strong>From its humble origins in the back of a small music store in London, Marshall Amplification has defined the sound of rock for generations of guitarists around the world. <em>The History of Marshall Amps: The First Fifty Years</em> by Michael Doyle and Nick Bowcott tells the story of Jim Marshall's remarkable life and documents the many innovations of Marshall amplifiers, from the famous “stack” to the most current offerings. <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-aficionado/products/the-history-of-marshall-amps/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=SignatureGuitars">It's available at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></strong></p> <hr /> <p><strong><a href="http://www.ibanez.com/ElectricGuitars/model-FRM100">Ibanez Paul Gilbert FRM100</a></strong></p> <p>Ibanez's Paul Gilbert model, the FRM100 (the TR often seen in the name refers to Translucent Red) takes the "signature" theme to a new level. After all, Gilbert pretty much designed this guitar himself. </p> <p>"I designed the Fireman on my computer by taking a photo of an Ibanez Iceman and turning it upside-down in Adobe Photoshop," <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-guitarist-paul-gilbert-discusses-his-new-online-rock-guitar-school">Gilbert told GuitarWorld.com in May</a>. "Then I just worked out the extra details like adding the lower cutaway, angling the pickups, designing the pickguard shape and asking for a big, beefy neck joint. Ibanez brought the idea to life in their custom shop, and I fell in love with the guitar. The production model is killer. I used a factory sample for the whole Mr. Big tour last year."</p> <p>The neck on Fireman is different than the previous RG shapes in the Gilbert signature series. It's thicker and fatter -- 22mm at the first fret and 24mm at the 12th fret. The three-piece mahogany/maple/mahogany neck offers a fat, tight sound and a solid grip. The pickups are DiMarzio Injectors in the bridge and neck and a DiMarzio Area '67 in the middle; they are designed with hum-cancelling construction to eliminate the noise but retain single-coil tone.</p> <p>Other features include a mahogany body, medium frets and a Tight Tune bridge.</p> <p><strong>What does it sound like?</strong> </p> <p>Here's an official Ibanez video starring Gilbert and the Fireman in action:</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/3m16qpehaIA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>MSRP: $1,199.99 | <a href="http://www.ibanez.com/ElectricGuitars/model-FRM100">Visit Ibanez.com for more info about this guitar.</a></em></p> <hr /> <p><strong><a href="http://www.espguitars.com/guitars/signature/kh-2-vintage.html">ESP KH-2 Kirk Hammett Signature Model</a></strong></p> <p>Kirk Hammett adopted a Strat-style ESP between the recording of <em>...And Justice For All</em> and the band's mega-selling self-titled album, ditching the '74 Gibson Flying V he had relied so heavily on in the band's early years. "I used that V on every album prior to this one," Hammett told <em>Guitar World</em> in 1991, "but the ESP just sounded a bit rounder."</p> <p>At Winter NAMM 2012, ESP introduced several new models to commemorate 25 years of partnership with Metallica's lead guitarist. In those 25 years, the essential Hammett signature model has to be the KH-2, which comes in a sleek black finish or the "vintage" look, which comes complete with "Caution: Hot" and "Kirk's Guitar" stickers.</p> <p>The KH-2 also features a set of EMG pickups, a Floyd Rose Original bridge and a specially contoured neck that's perfect for nimble players.</p> <p><strong>What does it sound like?</strong> </p> <p>There isn't an official video demo for the KH-2, but the nice thing about signature guitars is you can point to the artists themselves as examples. In this case, pop in a copy of the Black Album and you'll hear why Kirk fell in love with these guitars.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/espkh2.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p><em>MSRP: $3,285.00 | <a href="http://www.espguitars.com/guitars/signature/kh-2-vintage.html">Visit ESPGuitars.com for more on this guitar.</a></em></p> <hr /> <p><strong><a href="http://www.prsguitars.com/santana/">PRS Guitars Santana Signature</a></strong></p> <p>This model might be at the higher end of the price spectrum as far as this list is concerned, but it truly is a work of art. The guitar, the product of a longstanding creative partnership between Paul Reed Smith and Carlos Santana, comes standard with a maple top, mahogany back, rosewood fretboard, 24-fret mahogany neck, 24 1/2-inch-scale length and PRS tremolo.</p> <p>The guitar also features PRS' relatively new V12 finish, a thin, hard and clear finish that doesn't crack or react with thinners. "PRS models with this new finish feel like old instruments," said Paul Reed Smith of the finish, which is halfway between acrylic and nitro.</p> <p>Other features include a carved, figured maple top; inlaid purfling strips; custom bird inlays; a bound rosewood fretboard, nickel hardware; and a rosewood headstock veneer with an inlaid eagle. The pickups are specially designed Santana Treble and Bass models.</p> <p><strong>What does it sound like?</strong> </p> <p>If you have some time, <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTqbfWJVUDw">check out this Musician's Friend video featuring Santana and Paul Reed Smith</a> discussing guitar playing in general, Santana's thoughts about PRS, his signature model and other topics. </p> <p>In terms of a helpful demo video, there are no videos available from PRS or <em>Guitar World</em>, and YouTube is particularly skimpy on the subject. Note that most of the available PRS Santana demo videos refer to the lower-priced SE model, and you can check out <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDyikttVXR0">Paul Riario's review of the SE right here.</a> Here's hoping PRS produces a video that explores the features of the higher-end signature model.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/PRS.jpg" width="620" height="222" alt="PRS.jpg" /></p> <p><em>MSRP: $5,000 | <a href="http://www.prsguitars.com/santana/">Visit prsguitars.com for more info about this guitar.</a></em></p> <hr /> <p><strong><a href="http://www.epiphone.com/Products/Les-Paul/Slash-Appetite-Les-Paul-Standard.aspx">Epiphone Limited Edition Slash Appetite Les Paul Standard</a></strong></p> <p>Limited to just 3,000 copies, the limited-edition Slash "Appetite" Les Paul Standard is a more-affordable alternative to the Gibson model of the same name. </p> <p>Modeled after the Kris Derrig-made Les Paul copy used by Slash on Guns N' Roses' classic <em>Appetite for the Destruction</em> album, the Slash Appetite Les Paul comes with two Seymour Duncan Slash Alnico II Pro humbuckers, a LockTone Tune-o-matic bridge and a neck profile created especially for the mad hatter himself.</p> <p>“All things considered, with the original one, it just happened to have a certain sort of unique tone unto itself,” Slash said in a video from Gibson. “The new <em>Appetite for Destruction</em> guitar is about as close as anybody could get to the original.”</p> <p><strong>What does it sound like?</strong> </p> <p>For a look at just how this guitar performs, check out <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c829NqdnX1o&amp;feature=plcp">this video</a> from Rainbow Music in Carlisle, England.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/epiphoneslash.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p><em>MSRP: $1,525 | <a href="http://www.epiphone.com/Products/Les-Paul/Slash-Appetite-Les-Paul-Standard.aspx">Visit Epiphone.com to learn more about this guitar</a></em></p> <hr /> <p><strong><a href="http://www.deanguitars.com/dimebag_seriesML.php">Dimebag Dean From Hell CFH</a></strong></p> <p>Like Eddie Van Halen, Dimebag Darrell has no shortage of worthy signature models to choose from. And while you can't go wrong with any axe from Dean's ML series, we had to pick just one, and the Dean From Hell CFH model gets the nod.</p> <p>Featuring a set mahogany V-neck and all-black hardware (because bad guys wear black), the Dean From Hell's lightning-bolt graphic is pure, vintage Dime, a fitting reproduction of the guitar that graces the cover of Pantera's breakout album, <em>Cowboys From Hell</em>.</p> <p>The Dean From Hell is equipped with a Floyd Rose Special bridge and Bill Lawrence XL500 pickups, making it a high-output monster perfect for shredders of all stripes. Getcha pull!</p> <p><strong>What does it sound like?</strong> </p> <p>Paired with your preferred high-gain amp, the Dean from Hell chugs, wails and squeals just like a Dime signature guitar should.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/deanfromhell.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p><em>MSRP: $1,135.88 | <a href="http://www.deanguitars.com/dimebag_seriesML.php">Visit DeanGuitars.com to learn more about this guitar.</a></em></p> <hr /> <p><strong><a href="http://www.fender.com/products/johnnymarrjaguar">Fender Johnny Marr Jaguar</a></strong></p> <p>The ultra-cool Fender Jaguar never really got the widespread, mainstream appreciation it deserves; perhaps that's because of the model's supposedly confusing control layout. Get ready to throw that excuse out the window and give the Jag another shot. This new model developed by Fender for Johnny Marr (The Smiths, The Cribs, Modest Mouse) features some terrific updates.</p> <p>For starters, it features a four-position blade-style pickup switch (bridge; bridge and neck in parallel; neck, bridge, and neck in series), plus two upper-horn slide switches that control pickup brightness. The pickups are custom-wound, Bare Knuckle Johnny Marr single-coil neck and bridge models. The maple neck is custom-shaped maple neck with a rosewood fingerboard that's based on Marr’s '65 Jag.</p> <p>Other features include nylon bridge post inserts for improved stability, a “taller” tremolo arm with arm-sleeve nylon insert to prevent arm swing, 22 vintage-style frets; a 24-inch-scale neck, chrome hardware and a vintage-style truss rod.</p> <p><em>Guitar World</em> gear reviewer Chris Gill calls it "the best Jaguar that the company has ever produced" — and there's no denying this guitar looks killer in Olympic White.</p> <p><strong>What does it sound like?</strong> </p> <p>Here are two videos that'll fill in the blanks about this guitar. The first one is an official Fender video featuring Marr; the second one features GW's Paul Riario.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/sPoUB9qBdg4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1886474980001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1886474980001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <em>MSRP: $4,100 | <a href="http://www.fender.com/products/johnnymarrjaguar">Visit fender.com for more info about this guitar.</a></em></p> <hr /> <p><strong><a href="http://www.music-man.com/instruments/guitars/jp12.html">Ernie Ball Music Man John Petrucci JP12</a></strong></p> <p>The latest guitar to spring from Music Man's longstanding partnership with Dream Theater's John Petrucci, the JP12 is a road-ready guitar featuring a veritable shredder's toolbox of features.</p> <p>The JP-12 (which we should also mention comes in a 7-string model) comes stock with a custom John Petrucci Music Man Piezo floating tremolo. A DiMarzio Crunch Lab pickup sits in the bridge position with a DiMarzio Liquifire pickup in the neck position, giving you loads of clarity and output. </p> <p>The guitar's ebony fretboard plays fast for ultra-fluid legato work and clean sweeps, making the only limitation on the JP12 how fast your hands can move while playing <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/romancing-fretboard-chopin-arranged-guitar-part-1">Chopin's Piano Concerto in A minor, Opus No. 2</a>.</p> <p><strong>What does it sound like?</strong> </p> <p>In the below video, Petrucci shows off the capabilities of his newest signature model:</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/6VZEa8O1Hns" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>MSRP: $3,500 | <a href="http://www.music-man.com/instruments/guitars/jp12.html">Visit Music-Man.com to learn more about this guitar</a></em></p> <hr /> <p><strong><a href="http://www.gretschguitars.com/products/index.php?partno=2400112809">Gretsch G6120TV Brian Setzer Hot Rod</a></strong></p> <p>Gretsch makes a slew of beautiful Brian Setzer signature models, most of which are variations of a traditional 6120 Nashville. And then there's the Brian Setzer Hot Rod model, which is basically the Nashville's evil, mean twin, a guitar with a one-track mind. This is a Gretsch that's ready for rockin' right out of the box.</p> <p>As Gretsch puts it, the Hot Rod is stripped down and built for speed. You get one three-position pickup switch, a single master-volume control and two TV Jones-designed Hot Rod Filter’Tron pickups that crank out some fiery tones. </p> <p>Other features include a full 16-inch single-cutaway, bound, hollow body; a 1959-style trestle bracing and F holes; a two-piece rock maple neck with a bound ebony fingerboard; Sperzel locking tuners; pinned Adjusto-Matic bridge; chrome hardware and a Bigsby B6C vibrato tailpiece. </p> <p><strong>What does it sound like?</strong> </p> <p>Once again, here's our own Paul Riario in a GW video from 2007:</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="465" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/bnvV4AUfeWw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>MSRP: $3,600 | <a href="http://www.gretschguitars.com/products/index.php?partno=2400112809">Visit gretschguitars.com for more info about this guitar.</a></em></p> <hr /> <p><strong><a href="http://www.schecterguitars.com/Products/guitar/synyster-gates-Custom.aspx">Schecter Synyster Gates Custom</a></strong></p> <p>The Synyster Gates Custom is a mean-looking guitar with an original body shape, an eye-catching headstock and a cool "deathbat" inlay. </p> <p>But what really makes the guitar stand out are the Seymour Duncan Custom Syn Invaders pickups, which produce the heaviest tones a passive pickup can produce. They feature three ceramic magnets, over-wound coils and 12 chrome cap screws. Sustainiac Driver/Pickup produces solid humbucker tones when the Sustain switch is off and works as the Sustainiac Driver when switched on.The Sustainiac Driver creates an infinite feedback sustain of string vibrations by electromagnetic feedback. </p> <p>And then there's the ebony fretboard. According to Schecter Guitar Research, "Ebony has a snappy, crisp attack with the density of maple, but with more brittle grains, oilier pores and a stronger fundamental tone than maple. It has a tremendous amount of percussive overtones in the pick attack, that mute out shortly thereafter to foster great, long, sustain."</p> <p>Other features include a mahogany body, a 25.5-inch-scale three-piece mahogany neck, 24 extra-jumbo frets, a Floyd Rose 100 Series bridge and Grover tuners. It's an axe worthy of the Avenged Sevenfold guitarist.</p> <p><strong>What does it sound like?</strong> </p> <p>Although <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&amp;v=oCktx_pDWoI">this video wasn't created by Schecter Guitar Research</a> or <em>Guitar World</em>, it does an OK job of demonstrating the guitar's many features — especially if you skip to around 2:06.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Gates620.jpg" width="620" height="224" alt="Gates620.jpg" /></p> <p><em>MSRP: $1,649 | <a href="http://www.schecterguitars.com/Products/guitar/synyster-gates-Custom.aspx">Visit schecterguitars.com for more info about this guitar.</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/paul-gilbert">Paul Gilbert</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/carlos-santana">Carlos Santana</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dimebag-darrell">Dimebag Darrell</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slash">Slash</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/eddie-van-halen">Eddie Van Halen</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/name-recognition-10-essential-signature-model-guitars#comments Brian Setzer Carlos Santana Fender Gretsch Ibanez Johnny Marr Kirk Hammett Paul Gilbert Paul Reed Smith PRS Schecter Schecter Guitars Synyster Gates Electric Guitars News Features Gear Mon, 28 Jan 2013 11:19:39 +0000 Damian Fanelli, Josh Hart 16975 at http://www.guitarworld.com Stray Cats 'Live At Montreux 1981' Coming to DVD November 6 http://www.guitarworld.com/stray-cats-live-montreux-1981-coming-dvd-november-6 <!--paging_filter--><p>Eagle Rock Entertainment will release a new Stray Cats DVD, <em>Live At Montreux 1981</em> on November 6.</p> <p>The concert, which has been restored with DTS Surround Sound, Dolby Digital 5.1 and Dolby Digital Stereo, features 15 songs, almost equally divided between original compositions and vintage rockabilly classics from 1956 to '61. </p> <p>Of the 15, nine were on the Stray Cats’ first album, and some of the others were released as B-sides and EP tracks. Some of the tracks have never appeared on official releases.</p> <p>When the Stray Cats rolled into Montreux, they were coming off three hit singles (“Rock This Town,” “Stray Cat Strut,” and “Runaway Boys”), a UK Top 10 album and a string of headlining concerts. </p> <p>Relocating from New York City to London in 1980, just a year after their formation, with a combination of covers and originals, performed with punk enthusiasm yet true to the genre’s roots, they were an instant smash, garnering such high profile fans as Jeff Beck, Robert Plant and members of the Rolling Stones. </p> <p>The crowd in Montreux reacted with near-hysterical excitement (inciting three encores); something rarely seen in what is usually a polite and reserved audience.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="326" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/H7mfA48KJ8o" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="326" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/rew8n-MrLrw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>TRACK LISTING</strong></p> <p>01. Sweet Love On My Mind<br /> 02. Double Talking Baby<br /> 03. Rumble In Brighton<br /> 04. My One Desire<br /> 05. Ubangi Stomp<br /> 06. Drink That Bottle Down<br /> 07. Storm The Embassy<br /> 08. Stray Cut Strut<br /> 09. Fishnet Stockings<br /> 10. Important Words<br /> 11. Rock This Town<br /> 12. Runaway Boys<br /> 13. Be Bop A Lula<br /> 14. Somethin’ Else<br /> 15. Pretty Pretty Baby</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/stray-cats-live-montreux-1981-coming-dvd-november-6#comments Brian Setzer Stray Cats News Thu, 13 Sep 2012 17:10:34 +0000 Guitar World Staff 16729 at http://www.guitarworld.com The Latest Buzz: Ode to Brian Setzer, the Not-So-Stray Cat http://www.guitarworld.com/latest-buzz-ode-brian-setzer-not-so-stray-cat <!--paging_filter--><p>Every boy has a hero, someone they want to be like and spend numerous hours trying to emulate. </p> <p>In 1991, I was invited by my girlfriend to see a band she thought I would enjoy. I was very into 1950s rock 'n' roll. I wore blue jeans and rolled-up white T-shirts and I had just bought myself a 1956 Buick Special, red with a white top, four doors, a little rusty but the original tube radio still worked…I was sold.</p> <p>She bought tickets for my birthday to see a band that was playing at the Bacchanal, an old club that existed off of Claremont Mesa Boulevard. The band was called the Stray Cats. I had a recollection of them from the early '80s, but did not know much about them. </p> <p>My girlfriend and I went into the club early and got a great place right in front of the stage. When the show began, three lonely musicians took the stage. An upright bass, a very small drum setup, and a guitar and amp were the all the back line provided for this tiny trio. I don’t know exactly what happened after that, all I can say was that I was rocked out of my socks. </p> <p>That night struck a chord in me that has never stopped ringing. I dropped out of school the next day and set out to start my own group. My friends were studying to be doctors, lawyers and responsible business people. I wanted to start my own version of the Stray Cats, but more importantly, I wanted to be Brian Setzer.</p> <p>Setzer was born on April 10, 1959, in Massapequa, New York, and raised in Long Island. In 1979 Brian formed a rockabilly cover band with his brother Gary on drums and Bob Beecher on bass, calling themselves the Tom Cats. Brian left in early 1980 to join school pals Jim McDonald and Lee Drucker to form the Stray Cats. </p> <p>By the summer they left the U.S. and headed to Britain where they thought people might be hipper to their sound. Following a gig at London's The Venue, they encountered Dave Edmunds in their dressing room. Famed as both a performer and producer, Edmunds told them he'd like to work with them before a record label or manager (that probably didn't know what they were doing) screwed them all up. </p> <p>They signed to Arista Records and over five days in October they recorded their first album at the Eden and Jam Studios in London. The following month, “Runaway Boys” was released as their first single, and the rest his history.</p> <p>“Runaway Boys” is a neo-rockabilly classic. It was perfect for the time and helped generate a new band of followers for the group and the genre. They returned to the U.S. and with the strength generated from their first hit in England, they charted in the U.S. as well with “Runaway Boys” and had even greater success with songs such as “Rock this Town” and “Stray Cat Strut,” which went to number three in 1983. </p> <p>Brian, Lee, and Jim had successfully and single-handedly brought back the rockabilly sound reminiscent of the days of Elvis Presley, Buddy Holly and Eddie Cochran.</p> <p>After many years of success, Brian and the Stray Cats went their separate ways. Setzer had a few solo album releases but eventually went on to his next idea. Brian had a huge love for jazz standards and big band music. He decided to form his own big band and do standards and originals lead by an electric guitar. Brian put together The Brian Setzer Orchestra, aka BSO. </p> <p>BSO originally got signed to Hollywood Records. They had moderate success with the first album release but because of the great expense of a 17-piece orchestra and no major hit, the label dropped Setzer. Brian shelled a large portion of his own money into the project. He was still making quite a bit off of his royalties with the Stray Cats, but it was depleting fast. </p> <p>Nevertheless, he believed in the project and kept it afloat. When it seemed as though he would run out of money, BSO got signed to Interscope Records. This major label gave the group the marketing push that it needed. “Jump, Jive, and Wail,” a tune made famous by Louie Prima, made the top 40 list and in 1999, Brian Setzer received two Grammy awards: Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal for “Jump, Jive, and Wail” and Best Pop Instrumental Performance for “Sleepwalk," a catchy instrumental penned and performed originally by Santo &amp; Johnny. </p> <p>Once again, Brian Setzer had done the impossible. He had brought back the “big band” sound to a mainstream level. The jazz music genre, which at first was reluctant to the greasy rock and roller, accepted Brian and credited him for helping get mainstream folks back into jazz music.</p> <p>I met Brian at the NAMM show in California for the first time in 1993, two years after I saw him perform with the Stray Cats. I gave him the first album release of my group, Hot Rod Lincoln. I had dedicated the album to him for inspiring me to form the group and chase my own dreams. </p> <p>I met him six months later at a press appearance for his orchestra on 91X, the San Diego-based radio station. Brian told me that he really enjoyed the album and thanked me for the dedication. It was then that I had the opportunity of a lifetime. I thanked Brian personally for inspiring me and when we looked at each other, I almost broke down. He was touched by this and we have been friends ever since. </p> <p>Hot Rod Lincoln has opened for BSO many times. We even played a Christmas party at his private home. Brian wrote “Blue Café," the title track to my third record. The album won “best local recording” at the San Diego music awards in 1997.</p> <p>Brian Setzer, in my opinion, is one of the best guitarists in the world. He has single-handedly brought back two genres of music, regardless of the music going on at the time. His energy is incredible both on and off the stage.</p> <p>Aside from the style of his playing, Brian has taught me a couple of things that have become my own rule of thumb. Once he told me, “It is more important to take one note and hold it for the guy in the front row than to play a lot of great chops.” I have never forgotten that and always try to play to the audience rather than in front of them. </p> <p>The other was to be humble. I have never met a guy more humble than Brian. Anytime a fan wants to talk, I always make a point to stop and give them the time they deserve, just as Brian has done for his fans and did for me. I often wonder what I might be doing with my life if I had not seen Brian Setzer perform in 1991.</p> <p>I wanted to add that -- since this time (I wrote the above piece a while ago) -- I became lead guitarist for Lee Rocker, bassist of the Stray Cats, and also got to open for their tour of Europe in 13 countries during the summer of 2008. It’s been a fantastic ride and continues to be. I believe if one follows their heart and dreams, good things will come. </p> <p>Here’s a video of me playing with the Stray Cats the last night of the tour in Brussels in front of about 3,000 people. This was the pinnacle of my life, as far as dreams are concerned. Truly going full circle from being in the front row, to on stage with my favorite band ... an indescribable experience. </p> <p>Immediately after I got off the stage, I went to the dressing room along and stared at myself in the mirror for 10 minutes. I couldn’t believe it happened.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="450" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/JdwDcJmCpPc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Buzz Campbell, who is based in San Diego, plays guitar in the Lee Rocker Band and in Buzz Campbell &amp; Hot Rod Lincoln. <a href="http://www.buzzcampbell.com/home.cfm">Check out the new Buzz Campbell solo album, </a></em>Shivers &amp; Shakes.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/latest-buzz-ode-brian-setzer-not-so-stray-cat#comments Brian Setzer Buzz Campbell Stray Cats Blogs Wed, 05 Oct 2011 15:14:37 +0000 Buzz Campbell 13049 at http://www.guitarworld.com Guitar Aficionado: An Interview with Brian Setzer http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-aficionado-interview-brian-setzer <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following is an excerpt from </em>Guitar Aficionado<em>'s interview with the legendary Brian Setzer. You can read the full interview at <a href="http://www.guitaraficionado.com/from-the-magazine-brian-setzer.html">this location</a>.</em></p> <p><strong>In a career spanning more than four decades, Brian Setzer has made an indelible mark on rockabilly and big-band music. With his latest album, he’s now conquered instrumental music as well.</strong></p> <p>You won’t find many successful musicians forsaking Southern California’s balmy climes for Minneapolis’ frigid environs, but that’s just what Brian Setzer did. In 2005, the guitarist relocated to the city from Los Angeles, his home for two decades. The move apparently did nothing to slow him down. Since then, the former Stray Cats frontman has recorded several outstanding albums, including the rocking solo album 13 and his most recent studio effort with the Brian Setzer Orchestra, Songs from Lonely Avenue, a jazzy, sophisticated collection of self-penned material that many critics praised as some of the finest work in his 30-year career.</p> <p>“Minneapolis is a good place to be,” says Setzer, relaxing among an impressive assortment of vintage and custom Gretsch guitars and classic amps scattered about his downtown loft. “It’s really nice up here, if you don’t mind the cold weather. The people are great, it’s not crowded, and there is no rush-hour traffic. You can drive 15 minutes and go fishing or enjoy any variety of outdoor activities. There’s also a really good music scene downtown.”</p> <p><strong>Head <a href="http://www.guitaraficionado.com/from-the-magazine-brian-setzer.html">here</a> to read the full interview.</strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-aficionado-interview-brian-setzer#comments Brian Setzer Blogs Interviews Tue, 04 Oct 2011 20:45:55 +0000 Chris Gill 13040 at http://www.guitarworld.com Brian Setzer Offers Track-By-Track on New Album, 'Setzer Goes Instru-MENTAL' http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-offers-track-track-new-album-setzer-goes-instru-mental <!--paging_filter--><p>Brian Setzer has granted MusicRadar.com an exclusive track-by-track breakdown on his new album, <em>Setzer Goes Instru-MENTAL</em>.</p> <p>"I had about six or seven songs written," said Setzer of his new instrumental record. "Then I started fooling around with 'Blue Moon Of Kentucky' and it wound up being an instrumental record."</p> <p>On the album's first track, the aforementioned "Blue Moon Of Kentucky," Setzer said: "I was working off the Elvis version, the whole Scotty Moore thing. It’s a traditional bluegrass song, so I put some jazz chords behind it. All of a sudden, I had something unique. That’s what makes it worthy. You can’t do it better than Elvis!"</p> <p>For the full track-by-track breakdown of <em>Setzer Goes Instru-MENTAL</em>, head <a href="http://www.musicradar.com/news/guitars/brian-setzer-talks-setzer-goes-instru-mental-track-by-track-477704/1">here</a>.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-offers-track-track-new-album-setzer-goes-instru-mental#comments Brian Setzer News Tue, 12 Jul 2011 15:42:28 +0000 Josh Hart 11611 at http://www.guitarworld.com