Videos http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/41/all en Beat It: A Guide to the Inspired Techniques of Percussive Acoustic Guitar Playing http://www.guitarworld.com/beat-it-guide-inspired-techniques-percussive-acoustic-guitar-playing <!--paging_filter--><p>Percussive acoustic playing has been around forever, and it’s easy to see why. </p> <p>The guitar is essentially a drum with strings stretched over it. (Its cousin, the banjo, uses a drumhead to cover the body.) </p> <p>As demonstrated in <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-fingerstylists-andy-mckee-jon-gomm-and-daryl-kellie-are-blazing-daring-style-percussive-alternate-tuned-shred">this issue’s feature on Andy McKee, Jon Gomm and Daryl Kellie</a>, there has been a resurgence of interest in the percussive-heavy, alternate-tuned style of progressive acoustic guitar playing pioneered in the Eighties by guitarists like Michael Hedges. </p> <p>Whatever style of music you play on the acoustic guitar, you can incorporate slaps, knocks, raps and other hands-on-wood effects into your playing that can enliven and add greater sonic interest to your performance. </p> <p>In this lesson, I’ll show you how to harness some of the percussive possibilities that the acoustic guitar offers through a pick-free playing approach that I’ve adopted over the years. I’ll demonstrate how to integrate tapping and thumping techniques into vamps and grooves that also incorporate fretted and open-string notes and chords played using conventional techniques. </p> <p>My own discovery of this technique was prompted by two things. First, my parents discouraged me from being a drummer because the instrument makes too much racket (you could say I’m a frustrated drummer at heart). </p> <p>Second, when I started out pursuing a career in music as a guitarist, I couldn’t afford to hire a band and was dissatisfied with the amount of music that came out of the acoustic guitar played in the conventional way. So I set out to create a kind of workaround—a “pocket band,” if you will—by incorporating various techniques of rapping on my guitar’s body with my bare hands, as if it were a drum, in order to emulate the feel of a rhythm section. </p> <p>If I’m writing a song and it seems to need a more rhythmically detailed pulse, I’ll start drumming on the instrument using my fingers and then try to get the strings to conform to my musical vision, typically by using an altered tuning. </p> <p>Of course, not every song is served by this approach, and it’s never been my intention to take any technique to the heroic level of a guitar god. My mission is simply to approximate the feel of a band and convey the sounds I’m hearing to facilitate the writing process. While the sound of drumming on an acoustic guitar is no replacement for a real drummer, the techniques that I’ll show you can communicate a rich rhythmic groove in a way that conventional guitar-playing techniques often can’t. </p> <p>We’ll begin with a look at the main pieces of a basic drum kit—bass drum, snare and hi-hat—as they relate to this technique. We’ll then move on to a discussion of tunings that can facilitate your use of the percussive-style playing, and conclude with some musical examples. </p> <p><strong>The Kick Drum </strong></p> <p>The kick sound that is most satisfying to me is found by striking the bottom three strings with my pick hand’s outstretched middle finger just in front of the bridge (see <strong>PHOTO A</strong>). If you’re using this technique in a live performance, make sure the sound technician understands what you’re going to do and provides a little more bottom end in the EQ to give your tone a satisfying <em>thump</em>. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/photo%20a.png" width="391" height="276" alt="photo a.png" /></p> <p>If you’re recording, it often helps to mix in the direct signal from your guitar’s pickup with that of a microphone, as the pickup will capture more of the low-frequency energy of the thumping. In my recording endeavors, I’ll sometimes use tight kick-drum samples to help bolster the groove. (I told you I wanted to be a drummer!) </p> <p>As an added benefit, if you have a bass line going on the bottom strings, you can perfectly synchronize them with your kick pattern by attacking the notes with this same pick-hand finger. This guarantees that your virtual bassist and drummer will always be perfectly locked in together.</p> <hr /> <strong>The Snare </strong> <p>There are several ways to achieve a snare drum–like effect on an acoustic guitar, and they all involve striking the instrument’s body anywhere that produces a pitch that is higher than that of the kick sound, which is pretty much anywhere. </p> <p>My rule is that the snare is wherever I can reach it, based on whatever other duties either hand is performing. My go-to snare drum is at the top corner area of the body, which I likewise strike with my pick-hand middle finger (see <strong>PHOTO B</strong>). </p> <p>Other fingers can be used, and you should use whichever one you prefer.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/photo%20b.png" width="620" height="443" alt="photo b.png" /></p> <p>This snare “cracks” pretty nicely, and its attack can be tempered by the way you strike the wood with your finger. For example, you can use the inner side of your first knuckle for that bone-on-wood sound, or the softer pad, or “paw,” between the knuckle and fingertip to smooth out the transient spikes that can be a bit shrill sounding and problematical for amplification or recording. </p> <p>When recording, I’ll sometimes use various makeshift damping devices. These include taping a cocktail napkin to that part of the body, much as a drummer will put a towel over his snare to dampen it or a lead guitarist will tie a sock around the neck in front of the nut to suppress sympathetic string vibration when recording a solo. (If you cringe at the idea of taping anything to a valuable or favorite guitar, you might want to consider using a less-precious instrument for this purpose.</p> <p>If your instrument isn’t a cutaway, the opposite corner area of the body will work well as a snare drum and can be easily reached with the fret hand from below the neck if your pick hand is busy picking or tapping a harmonic. </p> <p>This way of playing the guitar is similar to playing a conga drum and requires a bit of resourcefulness and creative problem solving, as any given groove can pose different physical challenges and restrictions and call for a certain pitch produced by striking the body at just the right place. Tapping on the side of the body (with either hand) produces a higher-pitched snare sound (akin to hitting a conga drum near the rim) that I like to use to achieve a cross-stick kind of effect. </p> <p>Another effective and convenient snare-like sound can be produced by tapping your fret-hand fingers on the back of the neck to create a grace-note flam effect or snare-drum “chatter,” akin to the way a drummer lets the stick bounce off the snare (<strong>PHOTO C</strong>). </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/photo%20c.png" width="364" height="299" alt="photo c.png" /></p> <p>It’s a subtle sound, but it can be very effective at enhancing a groove. You can also kill two musical birds with one stone by tapping a natural harmonic on one or more strings at the moment you’d expect to hear a snare hit, which is typically on beats two and four in 4/4 meter. In this way, you’re conveying harmonic and rhythmic information simultaneously. Efficiency is key when you’re trying to do the work of several instruments.</p> <p><strong>Hi-hat</strong></p> <p>By sweeping either hand along the wound strings, you can approximate the sound of closed or open hi-hats. Depending on your musical proclivities, you can conjure up a little old-school vinyl scratching by sweeping your hand over the strings in a way that visually resembles a DJ manipulating a record turntable (think Tom Morello).</p> <hr /> <strong>Tunings</strong> <p>Now that we understand the rhythmic part of the equation, let’s look at how to make your strings conform in a way that facilities the technique. </p> <p>Since you’re already doing as much as you can to wring sound out of the instrument, it makes sense to get as many of the strings involved at once. To do this, I’ll employ alternate tunings, my favorite being DADGAD. </p> <p>Occasionally, I’ll drop the sixth string to C (low to high, C A D G A D), or drop the G string to F#, which gives you a luscious open-D chord if you strum across the strings (open D tuning: low to high, D A D F# A D).</p> <p>Obviously, the strings provide the harmonic information, but they can also serve as drone notes to fill out your arrangement and provide an ambient environment for percussive playing. When playing this way, I’ll sometimes lay the guitar flat across on my lap, like a dobro. </p> <p>This obviously affects what you can do with your fret hand, as you now have to fret notes from above the top side of the neck, like a piano. </p> <p>When the guitar is on my lap, I’ll use droning open strings, typically the higher ones, and my fret-hand thumb to barre power-chord shapes across the bottom two or three strings (see <strong>PHOTO D</strong>). I also sometimes use my fret-hand middle finger to produce the previously mentioned snare-drum grace notes that provide some of the rhythmic finesse and chatter that a real drummer would. </p> <p>But that’s not where all of the harmonic information comes from. Many guitarists overlook that critical extra sound source—your voice. You can think of it as a seventh string, if you like, and it has the advantage of operating completely outside the confines of the instrument. </p> <p>Whereas open strings drone and remain static, sung melodies are able to move freely, and the voice can carry a lyric to the listener. With that, you’ve moved beyond percussive guitar and into songwriting, which, as I said in the beginning, is the whole reason I play. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/photo%20d.png" width="384" height="314" alt="photo d.png" /></p> <p>Many guitarists are less sure of their voices than they are of their playing. If you’re too inhibited or self-conscious to sing, consider whistling, an old-timey practice that has made a comeback thanks to artists like Andrew Bird. Also try humming or playing a harmonica with a hands-free brace, Bob Dylan–style. Anything that helps you achieve what you hear in your mind is fair game.</p> <p><strong>PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER</strong></p> <p>Now let’s see how these techniques can be put to use. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1a</strong> shows the basic two-bar vamp from my song “1,000 Miles” and is performed in the previously mentioned CADGAD tuning, which is one of my favorite tunings because of the wide pitch range between the low and high strings. </p> <p>The figure is a laid-back R&amp;B-style groove performed at a fairly slow tempo and serves as a good introduction to percussive fingerstyle acoustic playing. </p> <p>The slow tempo is ideal for our purpose here because it buys you valuable time to work on integrating percussive tapping/thumping with picking notes on the strings. The bass notes and kick drum are one and the same in this case and are picked with the thumb (a couple of quick hammer-ons are employed too). The Xs in the tablature indicate the virtual snare-drum hits, which fall on beats two and four as the bass notes are allowed to ring. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-29%20at%2012.08.31%20PM.png" width="620" height="445" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-29 at 12.08.31 PM.png" /></p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1b</strong> builds upon the basic bass-and-drums groove pattern and introduces melodic licks played in the upper register on the higher strings. Here, snare-drum duty is shared by both hands, specifically on beat three of bar 2, where I use my momentarily available fret hand to do a snare tap (again, indicated in the tablature by Xs) as my pick hand simultaneously plucks the open first string. </p> <p>Note the use of a hammer-on and double pull-off combination on the first string at the end of bar 1, which I use to create a noodle-y, exotic-sounding trill, Jimmy Page style (à la “Dancing Days”). </p> <p>By exploring this playing approach, you’ll discover little tricks like this and learn how to sneak in bits of melody while keeping the rhythmic groove going. A vamp such as this one can be used as an accompaniment to a singer or another instrument and form the basis for an entire section of a song, such as a verse.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 2</strong> is a passage from my song “Springtime.” It’s played in DADGAD tuning with a capo at the second fret and the guitar laid flat across the lap. In this example, I’m using the kick-drum string-tapping technique described earlier to sound the first two power chords on the bottom three strings. I then strum the remaining chords by brushing my pick-hand fingernails across the strings but continue to use the kick-drum technique to get a pitchless thump while the chords ring out. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-29%20at%2012.08.40%20PM.png" width="620" height="374" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-29 at 12.08.40 PM.png" /></p> <p>Other techniques employed here include snare hits (indicated by Xs on the higher tab lines) and slapped natural harmonics (N.H.) at the 12th fret (actually the 14th fret because of the capo usage), which I perform by quickly bouncing my outstretched pick-hand middle finger against the strings directly over and parallel to the fret wire. </p> <p>This kind of playing is obviously a challenge to convey on paper, so be sure to check out the accompanying video below. Once you get the hang of this pattern, you’ll see that it’s pretty intuitive and not difficult to play. The critical thing is to get it to groove and create a tight pocket, so that you have a rhythm section to sing or play harmonica over. (In this song, I happen to do both.) </p> <p>Once you’ve addressed the internal tools available for playing the guitar like a percussion instrument, it’s a short leap to the external. Tambourines and stomp boards for your feet or the use of a digital looper pedal can greatly expand upon this technique and help you fully realize the musical ideas you’re hearing. When these tools serve a song, I find they transcend gimmickry. </p> <p>My goal here has been to make my techniques as simple as possible so that others can incorporate them into their songwriting. </p> <p>To hear and see more demonstrations of how I employ and combine the techniques covered in this lesson, check out the companion instructional video at guitarworld.com as well as numerous videos of me performing songs I’ve written live, which can be viewed at my web site, <a href="http://www.errico.com/">errico.com</a>, and on YouTube.</p> <p><strong>PART ONE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3250151636001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3250151636001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>PART THREE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3250112965001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3250112965001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/beat-it-guide-inspired-techniques-percussive-acoustic-guitar-playing#comments Acoustic Nation April 2014 Mike Errico Lessons Videos News Features Lessons Magazine Fri, 04 Sep 2015 20:29:18 +0000 Mike Errico 20577 at http://www.guitarworld.com Eddie Van Halen Demos Peavey Wolfgang Guitar at 1996 NAMM Show — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/video-eddie-van-halen-demos-peavey-wolfgang-guitar-1996-namm-show <!--paging_filter--><p>How cool would it be to stumble upon the legendary Eddie Van Halen doing a guitar demo at a NAMM Show?</p> <p>It happened in 1996, as this just-uploaded video shows. The Van Halen guitarist was on hand to demo Peavey's Wolfgang Standard guitar.</p> <p>Best of all, Van Halen takes requests from NAMM Show attendees as he fires off riff after riff. After about four and a half minutes, he invites a spectator up to the "stage" area to try out the guitar for himself. Don't worry: The ax is back in Eddie's hands by 5:38.</p> <p>Enjoy!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/z274UXfVlew" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eddie-van-halen">Eddie Van Halen</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-eddie-van-halen-demos-peavey-wolfgang-guitar-1996-namm-show#comments Eddie Van Halen NAMM 1996 Peavey Videos News Fri, 04 Sep 2015 16:06:27 +0000 Damian Fanelli 20898 at http://www.guitarworld.com The DIY Musician: Five Reasons You Suck at Slide Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/diy-musician-five-reasons-you-suck-slide-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p>Have you ever bought a guitar slide and had intentions of ripping new leads with it, only to discover when you get home that it’s damn near impossible to use? </p> <p>I’ve been there, too.</p> <p>Playing slide guitar, well, takes a little dedication in practice, but also in the way you set up your gear, too. </p> <p>Here’s a quick rundown of five roadblocks that might be keeping you from sliding:</p> <p>01. <strong>Your guitar is in standard tuning</strong>. This is the biggest killer of new slide players. Don’t try to play slide in standard tuning. As a starter, re-tune your guitar to open D (D A D F# A D) and rake that slide up to the 12th fret like Elmore James! With an open tuning, the slide becomes a moveable chord up and down the neck.</p> <p>02. <strong>Your strings are too light, and the action is too low</strong>. Slide guitar is different than shred guitar. If you want to grind out some deep grooves with that new slide on your finger, get some heavier strings on your guitar that will maintain pressure as you slide. (My electric guitars are strung with .012 sets with wound G strings.) Also, raising your action keeps your slide from clacking on the frets. </p> <p>03. <strong>Your non-slide friends told you to study Sonny Landreth and Derek Trucks.</strong> That’s like learning to drive a car using a Lamborghini! Sonny and Derek are amazing players, but they’re the top-level masters. Start where they started, with the foundational slide heroes. Fill your playlist with Hound Dog Taylor, Elmore James, Muddy Waters and even some George Thorogood. </p> <p>04. <strong>You’re putting the slide on an uncomfortable finger.</strong> So which finger is correct for slide? The answer is, there is no correct finger! If the slide feels comfortable on your pinkie, then that’s where you should wear it. I use my ring finger. Bonnie Raitt puts her wine bottleneck slide on her middle finger. Australian slide wizard Dave Hole uses his index finger and plays with his hand over the top of the neck! </p> <p>05. <strong>Your slide doesn’t fit right.</strong> This one has a simple solution: Collect more slides! I now have more than 50 guitar slides, from generic slides sold in guitar stores to <a href="http://shanespeal.com/shop-guitar-slides">hand-cut wine bottlenecks,</a> spark-plug sockets (they make awesome slides!), medicine bottles found at flea markets and even strange contraptions like <a href="http://shanespeal.com/shop-guitar-slides">The Edge Slide,</a> which mimics Blind Willie Johnson’s pocketknife. </p> <p><strong>One extra suggestion:</strong> Get a dedicated slide guitar. Heavy-gauge strings and higher action might not be the best thing for your main axe. Instead, find the cheapest, gnarliest guitar and convert it to slide. Hound Dog Taylor played the shittiest, cheapo Japanese guitars through old Silvertone amps with blown speakers, and it was the greatest sound ever. For some reason, slide guitar sounds fantastic when played on junky guitars. Old electrics such as Silvertone, Teisco, Harmony and other off-name brands from the Sixties are prime axes. But your kid brother’s abandoned First Act electric guitar will work, too.</p> <p>Good luck! Don’t forget to share this all over Facebook. I'll see you at <a href="http://shanespeal.com/shows">McGarvey's Bar in Altoona, Pennsylvania,</a> this Saturday night (March 28). It'll be a slide guitar buffet.</p> <p>Until then, I’ll leave you with the late, great Hound Dog Taylor—all 12 fingers of 'im. Turn it up!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nK_GfjDfqAY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Photo: Kevin Stiffler</em></p> <p><em>Shane Speal is the "King of the Cigar Box Guitar" and the creator of the modern cigar box guitar movement. Hear the music, see the instruments and read about his Cigar Box Guitar Museum at <a href="http://www.shanespeal.com/">ShaneSpeal.com</a>. Speal's latest album, </em><a href="http://shanespeal.com/holler">Holler!</a><em> is on C. B. Gitty Records.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/diy-musician-five-reasons-you-suck-slide-guitar#comments Hound Dog Taylor Shane Speal The DIY Musician Videos Blogs News Fri, 04 Sep 2015 15:02:09 +0000 Shane Speal 23773 at http://www.guitarworld.com Watch Jimi Hendrix's Death Announcement from ABC News — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/watch-jimi-hendrixs-death-announcement-abc-news-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Guitar legend Jimi Hendrix died in London 45 years ago this month—on September 18, 1970. He was only 27.</p> <p>Although all these facts have become common knowledge for rock and guitar fans, there was a moment when it was actual news—the sort of announcement that makes you always remember where you were when you heard it.</p> <p>For instance, I remember I was in my crib with a fresh bottle of baby formula in my hands.</p> <p>Regardless, check out this actual ABC News announcement of the guitarist's death. </p> <p>Although it was totally normal and expected at the time, it's amusing how the reporter treats rock music as if it's something from another planet, a sign of the generation gap that still distanced reporters from a growing segment of the people they were reporting to. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wpgkRYeBoKw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/watch-jimi-hendrixs-death-announcement-abc-news-video#comments Jimi Hendrix Videos News Thu, 03 Sep 2015 18:06:45 +0000 Damian Fanelli 22435 at http://www.guitarworld.com Metallica Imitate Slayer and Other Bands at Donington 1995 — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/metallica-imitate-slayer-and-other-bands-donington-1995-video/25402 <!--paging_filter--><p>This one is straight out of the "in case you missed it 20 years ago" department.</p> <p>In this decent-quality clip, which was shot at the U.K.'s Donington Park in 1995, the members of Metallica imitate several of the bands that shared the Donington bill that year, including Slayer.</p> <p>They also have some fun with a few of the imitations. When James Hetfield asks the fans if they enjoyed Machine Head, guitarist Kirk Hammett, drummer Lars Ulrich and then-bassist Jason Newsted start playing "Smoke on the Water" from Deep Purple's <em>Machine Head</em> album.</p> <p>They also imitate White Zombie—or is that Whitesnake? You get the idea.</p> <p>Consider it a random trip down memory lane!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pRR7kPB13MU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/metallica-imitate-slayer-and-other-bands-donington-1995-video/25402#comments Metallica Videos News Thu, 03 Sep 2015 15:56:23 +0000 Damian Fanelli 25402 at http://www.guitarworld.com Freddie King Lesson: Going In Deep with a Blues Guitar Legend — with Video and Tab http://www.guitarworld.com/freddie-king-lesson-texas-blues-video-tab-andy-aledort-in-deep <!--paging_filter--><p>Freddie King is among the triumvirate of the greatest and most influential electric blues guitarists ever, revered with equal respect alongside the legendary blues gods B.B. King and Albert King. </p> <p>Together, they are often referred to as "The Three Kings"—all complete masters of their craft and essential subjects of study for any inspiring blues guitar enthusiast. </p> <p>In this edition of In Deep, we'll examine a few of the trademark Freddie King-isms that have earned him his rightful place as the forefront of electric blues guitar.</p> <p>Of the three Kings, Freddie had a hard-driving intensity that gave his guitar lines and solos a fiery spirit. And though he was blessed with what were arguably the most powerful vocal pipes of the three, he distinguished himself as a player and composer by penning the greatest blues guitar instrumentals in the genre’s history, such as the classic masterpieces “Hideaway,” “The Stumble,” “Sen-Sa- Shun,” “San-Ho-Zay,” “Side Tracked,” “In the Open,” and many others, all songs that have been covered brilliantly by such blues-rock heroes as Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Johnny Winter, ZZ Top and Stevie Ray Vaughan.</p> <p>Freddie King was born as Frederick Christian on September 3, 1934. Though his mother’s maiden name was King, in his early days as a performer he was thought to have changed his last name to King to align himself with B.B. King, then a rising star of blues guitar. </p> <p>His earliest records are credited to “Freddy,” but by 1968 he changed the spelling to “Freddie.” His recording career began in 1956, and by 1960 he had recorded the soon-to-be hit songs “Have You Ever Loved a Woman?,” “Love Her with a Feeling” and the instrumental smash "Hideaway," covered brilliantly by Eric Clapton with John Mayall on the <em>Blues Breakers</em> album, recorded in 1966. </p> <p>Early photos of King show him playing a mid-Fifties Gibson gold-top Les Paul with P-90 pickups, which he used along with a Gibson GA-40 amplifier. Shortly thereafter, he switched to his trademark Gibson ES-345 guitars, cranked to massive volume through Fender Quad Reverbs. </p> <p>He picked with his fingers, using a plastic thumb pick along with a metal index-finger pick, and his string gauges were very unusual: the top three string gauges were .010, .011 and .012—very light for the B and especially the G—while the wound strings were normal light-medium-gauge electric strings.</p> <p>King scored many early instrumental hits, the biggest being the aforementioned “Hideaway,” an easy-grooving 12-bar shuffle in E with a distinct, memorable melody. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates a similar melody played within the 12-bar form. </p> <p>As melodic lines are played on the top two strings with abundant use of open notes—akin to the country blues of Lightnin’ Hopkins—a rhythm part is equally attended to, built from palm-muted two-note forms on the bottom two strings and balanced against the melodic development.</p> <p>In bar 2 of the example, a simple open- to-second-fret hammer-on is replaced with a “rolling” hammer-on, wherein the middle finger is hammered onto the first fret, instead of the second, followed by a slide up to the second fret. (This more intricate technique was later adopted and employed frequently by Stevie Ray Vaughan.) </p> <p>Throughout this example, notice the subtle inclusion of single-note phrases that serve to connect the elements of the part while keeping it moving forward.</p> <p>Freddie revisited this melody for another of his classic instrumentals, “The Stumble.” <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> illustrates a similar form, which begins with a melodic line close to that of “Hideaway” but is played over a different chord progression, starting on the IV(four) chord, A, in the key of E. </p> <p>In this 16-bar form, a descending sliding double-stop lick, based on a sixth interval, is played on the G and high E strings, executed by picking the G string with the thumb and the high E string with either the index or middle finger. Pick each pair sharply and in a staccato manner (short and detached), and strive for absolute accuracy as you move quickly down the fretboard.</p> <p>Freddie showcased a similar lick in “Hideaway,” with a band “breakdown” (the band lays out from playing the groove, supplying accented chordal stabs only). <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> offers a lick along these lines, initiated with a very cool and unusual E7add2 chord voicing. The band comes back in at bar 5, over A, and, in this example, further melodic development is performed on the top two strings.</p> <p>A great example of King’s relentlessly hard-driving style is a song called “Boogie Funk,” essentially a one-chord vamp played in A. The roots of this song can be found in the John Lee Hooker classic, “Boogie Chillen.”</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 4</strong> presents a repeating riff, built around an A5 chord, that features muted- string accents along with subtle half-step bends on the low E and A strings. This is played with a “triplet feel,” so what is written as eighth notes is intended to be played as a quarter-note/eighth-note combo within a triplet bracket. I use a pick to play this part, alternating evenly between downstrokes and upstrokes, but Freddie would fingerpick such a part, so try using the thumb for the downstrokes and the index or middle finger (or both) for the upstrokes. In <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>, I add a melodic figure to the form.</p> <p>After building intensity by riding on the I (one) chord, Freddie would switch briefly to the IV (four) chord and play a similar rhythmic lick. <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> offers a part along these lines, to be performed with the pick hand in the same manner as <strong>FIGURES 4</strong> and <strong>5</strong>.</p> <p>These examples just scratch the surface of Freddie King’s genius, so dig deep into his catalog to discover even more for yourself.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1699133089001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1699133089001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <br /></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1699133013001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1699133013001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2011.35.41%20AM.png" width="620" height="442" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 11.35.41 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2011.36.04%20AM.png" width="620" height="584" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 11.36.04 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2011.37.10%20AM.png" width="620" height="589" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 11.37.10 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2011.38.06%20AM.png" width="620" height="461" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 11.38.06 AM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/freddie-king">Freddie King</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/freddie-king-lesson-texas-blues-video-tab-andy-aledort-in-deep#comments August 2012 blues Freddie King In Deep 2012 Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Thu, 03 Sep 2015 11:26:25 +0000 Andy Aledort 16113 at http://www.guitarworld.com Joe Bonamassa Plays 1919 Gibson Style U Harp Guitar — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-bonamassa-plays-1919-gibson-style-u-harp-guitar-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Followers of <a href="https://www.facebook.com/JoeBonamassa">Joe Bonamassa's Facebook page</a> know the gear-loving guitarist likes to shoot quick, spur-of-the-moment videos backstage at his shows.</p> <p>These videos usually show him playing rare, oddball or just plain insane stringed instruments. As evidenced below!</p> <p>In one of his latest (although not <em>the</em> latest) backstage videos, Bonamassa is playing a 1919 Gibson Style U harp guitar.</p> <p>"Some backstage fun with a 1919 Gibson Style U harp guitar," Bonamassa wrote on his harp-guitar Facebook post from March 3. "Please keep in mind it was recorded on an iPad and not in Abbey Road Studios. Enjoy!"</p> <p>Harp guitars like this one (we're not sure if it belongs to Bonamassa, who has a lot of rare guitars—and a lot of rare-guitar-owning buddies, it seems) are early relatives modern doubleneck guitars, offering two stringed instruments in one, even though it's played as a single instrument. The top neck sports 10 sub-bass strings (earlier versions had 12 sub-bass strings).</p> <p>For more information on these guitars, visit <a href="http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_605754">americanhistory.si.edu</a> and <a href="http://www.harpguitars.net/iconography/icon-gibson.htm">harpguitars.net</a> (<a href="http://www.harpguitars.net/history/gibson/gibson_appendix.htm">You might as well try here too.</a>)</p> <div id="fb-root"></div> <script>(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));</script><div class="fb-post" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=10153091348954659" data-width="620"> <div class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"><a href="https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=10153091348954659">Post</a> by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/JoeBonamassa">Joe Bonamassa</a>.</div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-bonamassa">Joe Bonamassa</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-bonamassa-plays-1919-gibson-style-u-harp-guitar-video#comments Acoustic Nation Gibson Joe Bonamassa News Acoustic Guitars Videos Blogs Videos Gear Wed, 02 Sep 2015 20:30:54 +0000 Damian Fanelli 23675 at http://www.guitarworld.com AC/DC's "Thunderstruck" — Acoustic Guitar Arrangement by Luca Stricagnoli — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-acdcs-thunderstruck-arrangement-luca-stricagnoli-video <!--paging_filter--><p>The guys (and girls?) at <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMJecdKUslHToOEpeuRGwXg">Candyrat Records</a> have come up with another good one.</p> <p>Check out this new acoustic-guitar arrangement and performance of AC/DC's "Thunderstruck" by Italian guitarist <a href="http://www.candyrat.com/artists/LucaStricagnoli/">Luca Stricagnoli.</a></p> <p>Stricagnoli, 23, began studying classical guitar at 10 but quickly decided to dedicate himself to judo (Obviously, he switched back to guitar at some point). He plays <a href="http://www.serracini.it/wordpress/">Serracini Guitars</a> and is working on his debut album with Candyrat.</p> <p>Enjoy!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LMPWfHqVj40" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/acdc">AC/DC</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-acdcs-thunderstruck-arrangement-luca-stricagnoli-video#comments AC/DC ACDC Luca Stricagnoli News Videos Blogs Videos Wed, 02 Sep 2015 20:29:24 +0000 Damian Fanelli 23688 at http://www.guitarworld.com Five Finger Death Punch Guitarist Jason Hook Says "Betcha Can't Play This" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/five-finger-death-punch-guitarist-jason-hook-says-betcha-cant-play-video/25397 <!--paging_filter--><p>This just-posted "Betcha Can't Play This" video features Five Finger Death Punch guitarist Jason Hook.</p> <p>Check it out below and have a crack at his lick!</p> <p>The band's new album, <em>Got Your Six,</em> will be released this Friday, September 4.</p> <p>For more about Hook and Five Finger Death Punch, visit <a href="http://www.fivefingerdeathpunch.com/">fivefingerdeathpunch.com.</a></p> <p><strong>Be sure to subscribe to <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqHkFMEmOPFO3ahcrrBAj4w">Guitar World's YouTube channel,</a> where you'll find new videos every day.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/88q9R4LILns" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/five-finger-death-punch-guitarist-jason-hook-says-betcha-cant-play-video/25397#comments 5FDP Betcha Can't Play This FFDP Five Finger Death Punch Jason Hook Videos News Lessons Wed, 02 Sep 2015 17:58:57 +0000 Guitar World Staff 25397 at http://www.guitarworld.com Motorhead’s Lemmy Kilmister Walks Off Stage After Three Songs: “I Can’t Do It” http://www.guitarworld.com/motorhead-s-lemmy-kilmister-walks-texas-stage-mid-show-i-can-t-do-it/25395 <!--paging_filter--><p>Last night (September 1), Motorhead frontman Lemmy Kilmister walked off the stage after playing three songs, telling fans, "I can't do it."</p> <p>The bassist, who will turn 70 in December, eventually returned to the stage to apologize to the crowd for the show’s quick end.</p> <p><strong>The band played “Damage Case” (bottom video), “Stay Clean” and “Metropolis” before Lemmy excused himself (top video).</strong></p> <p>Motorhead began their North American tour August 19 in support of their new album, <em>Bad Magic,</em> but the shows have been plagued by a host of issues. They cut short their Salt Lake City gig last week and canceled their Denver show, telling fans that Kilmister was having trouble breathing because of the high Colorado altitude.</p> <p>Motorhead have since issued a statement about the Austin show, while also announcing that the band will not perform tonight in San Antonio. Here's the complete statement: </p> <p>"As you might have heard, Motörhead again had to abbreviate a performance due to Lemmy not feeling well. This is a DIRECT follow-on from the altitude issues in Colorado, and clearly, Lemmy tried to get back at it too quickly. </p> <p>"For this reason, Motörhead will not play in San Antonio tonight, but the show will still go on with Saxon headlining. Lemmy will resume duties the moment he is PROPERLY rested and firing on all cylinders again. The legendary Motörheadbanger patience is much appreciated, and the band send their deepest thanks. More details will be released soon."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cX7P6c0VwBQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ORsOgkdg6vA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/motorhead">Motorhead</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/motorhead-s-lemmy-kilmister-walks-texas-stage-mid-show-i-can-t-do-it/25395#comments Lemmy Motorhead Videos News Wed, 02 Sep 2015 16:33:07 +0000 Damian Fanelli 25395 at http://www.guitarworld.com Nita Strauss Meets Jason Becker and Performs “Perpetual Burn” — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/nita-strauss-meets-jason-becker-and-performs-perpetual-burn-video/25394 <!--paging_filter--><p>Nita Strauss uploaded this video a few days ago, in which she’s tricked by her manager/boyfriend, Josh, into performing for her guitar hero, Jason Becker.</p> <p>Strauss, who plays guitar <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/nita-strauss-lesson-how-play-alice-cooper-im-eighteen-videoin Alice Cooper’s band</a> and performs with <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/iron-maidens-nita-strauss-and-courtney-cox-trooper-playthrough-video">the Iron Maidens,</a> sets up the situation in the video description on <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3HWEDvjRwI9kB8AtScQjBw">her YouTube channel:</a></a></p> <p>“A few months ago, my boyfriend and savvy business manager Josh told me that I had an audition to be the face of a new guitar app that was going to be the next big thing in the music world. Little did I know it was an elaborate trick that would end in me playing a composition by one of my biggest guitar influences—in front of him in his own living room.”</p> <p>For the “audition,” Josh had Strauss learn <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-jeff-loomis-plays-jason-beckers-perpetual-burn">“Perpetual Burn,”</a> the title track from Becker’s 1988 album, and one of the finest displays of his virtuoso guitar work. The guitarist, who is one of Strauss’s influences, developed the muscle-degenerative disease ALS in 1989 and is today unable to move or speak. He lives at home in the care of his family. </p> <p>The video opens with Strauss rehearsing “Perpetual Burn” at home, followed by shots of her being driven to an unknown destination. When they pull up to a house, Strauss suddenly comprehends that she’s going to “audition” for the guitar app, at which point she quite understandably exclaims, “I’m not ready.”</p> <p>Strauss isn’t aware of what’s actually happening until she enters the home and sees Becker, at which point she realizes she’s been set up for a nice surprise. </p> <p>Prior to playing, Strauss talks with Becker and his mother, Amy, who translates his eye movements into words. (Becker communicates using a coded system of eye movements devised by his father.) </p> <p>“Can I talk you into playing?” Becker asks Strauss.</p> <p>Amy offers Strauss the pick of Becker’s guitars, which are displayed on the walls, for her to play. “Loiter and play anything you want,” Becker says.</p> <p>Strauss’s performance of “Perpetual Burn” begins at the 5:00 mark, if you want to skip right to the action. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3Ti5rWHOkZ0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jason-becker">Jason Becker</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/nita-strauss-meets-jason-becker-and-performs-perpetual-burn-video/25394#comments Jason Becker Nita Strauss Perpetual Burn Videos News Wed, 02 Sep 2015 16:10:16 +0000 Christopher Scapelliti 25394 at http://www.guitarworld.com Steve Vai Reveals His Favorite New Guitar Player — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/steve-vai-reveals-his-favorite-new-guitar-player-video/25386 <!--paging_filter--><p>Steve Vai has his legions of followers. But who does the guitar legend follow?</p> <p>Turns out it’s a guitarist by the name of Daniele Gottardo.</p> <p>Vai revealed the information in the following message:</p> <p>“Hey Folks,</p> <p>“I’m often asked who is my favorite new young guitar player. Well, here he is: Daniele Gottardo. </p> <p>“He’s Italian, and I have been following him for quite some time now. He has an elegant touch, stunning intonation, innovational style, and he honors the melody. Enjoy, and check out his new record here for a real treat.”</p> <p>So who is Daniele Gottardo? As it turns out, quite a diverse player. In addition to his stunning virtuoso solo work—an expressive and technically superb rock-symphonic fusion—he performs with the jazz project the Nuts and the self-described pop/punk/glam-metalcore experiment Plastik Boobies. (Even if we didn’t tell you the styles of those bands, the names alone would suggest Gottardo defies easy categorization.)</p> <p>Here are a few videos to acquaint you with Gottardo and his music. You can find more at his YouTube channel and follow him on Facebook.</p> <p>“Rimsky’s Beard,” the first track on Gottardo’s second album, <em>Non Temperato.</em></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/c0-ote7Kx0c" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> “Caligula,” also from <em>Non Temperato:</em></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SJoJGfMWIWc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> Gottardo’s cover of Radiohead’s “Paranoid Android”:</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pnnlEEpSmMQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/steve-vai">Steve Vai</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/steve-vai-reveals-his-favorite-new-guitar-player-video/25386#comments Daniele Gottardo Steve Vai Videos News Tue, 01 Sep 2015 17:49:52 +0000 Christopher Scapelliti 25386 at http://www.guitarworld.com How to Construct Classic Eighties-Style Metal Guitar Parts http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-how-construct-classic-eighties-style-metal-guitar-parts-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Back in the Eighties, during the heyday of metal, bands like Van Halen, Judas Priest and the Scorpions were releasing incredible, killer albums packed with amazing guitar playing. </p> <p>Today, I feel that the majority of metal is more focused on rhythmic parts with less harmonic movement than what I think of as the approach representative of Eighties-style metal. It is from that perspective that I put together the three “classic” metal-style riffs.</p> <p>During the NWOBHM (New Wave of British Heavy Metal) days of the late Seventies and early Eighties, bands like Iron Maiden and Judas Priest were forging blazing, melodic metal earmarked by powerful and memorable song riffs. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> is indicative of Iron Maiden’s style: above the progression of three different pedal tones, shifting two- and three-note chord shapes create the melodic content that keeps this part interesting and moving forward. </p> <p>I begin with an open D5 power chord, using the D string as a repeating pedal tone, and by simply changing the note on the G string, I can move from D5 to Bb/D to G5/D. Be sure to palm-mute all of the open D pedal tones while allowing the higher strings to ring clearly. In bar 3 into bar 4, I shift to an F5 power chord followed by C/F, sounded by lowering the high F on the B string one fret to E, played in unison with the open high E string. </p> <p>After the second ending (bar 5), I transition to the key of A minor, with sliding two-note power chord shapes fretted on the D and G strings, supported by an open A-string pedal tone that is picked in consecutive 16th notes. In bar 8, I move down two whole steps to F5 and use the fretted F note as the pedal tone, followed at the end of bar 9 with a shift from F5 to C5, performed by simply moving from F to G on the D string while keeping the C note on top.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 2</strong> is played at a slower tempo, and, as with <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, the melodic content in this riff is provided by the simple movement of two-note chord shapes sounded above a pedal tone. In bars 1–3, the open A string provides the pedal tone, over which I play a sequence of double-stops that imply Bm, Am, G and F chords. In this example, the melodic element comes from the highest note in each double-stop. </p> <p>Let’s wrap up with a lick reminiscent of George Lynch with Dokken or Queensrÿche, specifically from the latter band’s <em>Operation: Mindcrime</em> period, in terms of the overall approach to the riffs and the feel of the rhythms. </p> <p>In <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I begin with an A5 power chord followed by a repeating open A-string pedal tone, and at the end of bar 1 I use sliding two-note power chords to transition to F5, followed by D7/A, which I sound by moving from F up one fret to F# on the D string. In bar 4, I use the opposite movement, shifting down one fret from D to C# on the A string to change from D5 to A/C#. At the end of the riff, I use pull-offs on the A string to set up the two-note C5 and D5 power chords. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/a3BpNvJ9rgI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/May2015.jpg" width="620" height="763" alt="May2015.jpg" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-how-construct-classic-eighties-style-metal-guitar-parts-video#comments May 2015 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos Blogs Features Lessons Magazine Tue, 01 Sep 2015 15:38:39 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak 23801 at http://www.guitarworld.com Wild Stringdom with John Petrucci: Combining Triad Arpeggios to Form Polytonal Chordal Allusions http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-combining-triad-arpeggios-form-polytonal-chordal-allusions <!--paging_filter--><p>I often use triadic arpeggio forms within my riffs and solos as a tool to create rich-sounding, poly-chordal sounds. </p> <p> I’d like to continue in that vein by presenting different ways in which to move from one arpeggio form to another, using a series of specific triads that complement one another well.</p> <p> Let’s start with the triads F# diminished and D major, as shown in <strong>FIGURES 1</strong> and <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, respectively. The F# diminished triad is built from the notes C, F# and A, and the D major triad is built from almost the same set of notes, D, F# and A. Both <strong>FIGURES 1 and 2</strong> show these triads as played in fifth position for comparison. </p> <p> If I wanted to get a bluesy vibe, I’d use the D major triad and combine it with the F# diminished triad, as demonstrated in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>. Here, the C note is heard as the b7 (flat seventh) of D, implying a D dominant-seven tonality.</p> <p> Now let’s try combining the F# diminished arpeggio with an A minor arpeggio—A C E—as shown in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>. The combination of these two sets of notes gives an F#m7b5 arpeggio (F# A C E: see <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>). These licks work well over an Am chord, as the inclusion of the F# note, the major sixth of A, implies an Am6, A Dorian–mode type of sound.</p> <p> As you probably have noticed, all of these arpeggios are played on the top three strings, and I often like to incorporate sweep picking when using arpeggios like this. <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> illustrates a combination of an Em7 arpeggio—E G B D—and a Gmaj7 arpeggio—G B D F#. As denoted in the example, in order to sweep pick these arpeggio shapes properly, begin with an upstroke on the first note and then use a single down-stroke to rake across the top three strings to play the next three notes. </p> <p> The form ends with another upstroke. I then slide up to 10th position and reverse the process, beginning with a down-stroke and then using a single upstroke to rake across the top three strings, moving from high to low. <strong>FIGURE 7</strong> offers an example of applying this approach to the chord progression Em7 Am9 F#m7b5 Gmaj7.</p> <p> This is the last installment of Wild Stringdom for now. I hope these columns have been useful to you and have served to broaden your knowledge of the guitar while building up your chops. Thanks for reading, and I’ll see you out on the road!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hvBm_lza1N8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-30%20at%2010.38.33%20AM.png" width="620" height="693" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-30 at 10.38.33 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-30%20at%2010.39.19%20AM.png" width="620" height="339" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-30 at 10.39.19 AM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-combining-triad-arpeggios-form-polytonal-chordal-allusions#comments April 2014 Dream Theater John Petrucci Wild Stringdom Videos Blogs Lessons Magazine Tue, 01 Sep 2015 15:00:44 +0000 John Petrucci 20542 at http://www.guitarworld.com Sock Puppet Parody of Pantera's "Walk" Features Vinnie Paul — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/sock-puppet-parody-panteras-walk-features-vinnie-paul-video/25384 <!--paging_filter--><p>The wonderfully deranged gang over at Sock Puppet Parody has posted a brand-new video—a sock-puppet parody of Pantera's "Walk" as performed by a fictional band called Hamptera.</p> <p>The Hamptera version of "Walk" is about a disgruntled sock that has lost its grip.</p> <p>Lyrics include, "With each step I slip off of your heel" and "Is there no elastic anymore?"</p> <p>The video, which you can check out below, even features a mini Dimebag Darrell sock puppet (complete with razor blade) and a cameo by Pantera's drummer, Vinnie Paul (as an actual human, not a sock). Enjoy!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kxit-s0fvkQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/pantera">Pantera</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/sock-puppet-parody-panteras-walk-features-vinnie-paul-video/25384#comments Pantera Sock Puppet Parody Videos News Tue, 01 Sep 2015 14:45:47 +0000 Guitar World Staff 25384 at http://www.guitarworld.com