Metal For Life http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/478/all en Metal for Life with Metal Mike: Forging Aggressive, Memorable Riffs with Unexpected Twists — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-forging-aggressive-memorable-riffs-unexpected-twists-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the April 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-april-15-abasi-satriani-govan?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=April2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience4079806418001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="4079806418001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-forging-aggressive-memorable-riffs-unexpected-twists-video#comments April 2015 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Fri, 27 Feb 2015 15:56:40 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23612 Metal for Life with Metal Mike: Exploring Musical Roads Less Traveled Within the Realm of Heavy Metal Riffing http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-exploring-musical-roads-less-traveled-within-realm-heavy-riffing <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the February 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-february-15-the-ultimate-dime-tribute-issue?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=Feb2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>This month, I’d like to explore some ideas that do not fall within the “normal” scope of metal soloing or riff writing. </p> <p>I borrowed the name for this month’s column from an incredible album recorded by the band Apocrypha back in the late Eighties, a very creative metal band that constantly pushed the limits of the metal genre to new and unexplored territories. </p> <p>If you are unfamiliar with them, be sure to check out this amazing album.</p> <p>An effective way to create a powerful and memorable metal riff is to imagine a chord progression and then “describe” it with a single-note line, instead of playing any chords, as demonstrated in <strong>FIGURE 1.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/fBM0_19B7N4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-exploring-musical-roads-less-traveled-within-realm-heavy-riffing#comments February 2015 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos News Lessons Magazine Wed, 07 Jan 2015 18:08:46 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23200 Metal for Life with Metal Mike: Continuing Our Look at Drop-D-Based Metal Riffage http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-continuing-our-look-drop-d-based-metal-riffage <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the January 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-january-15-ac-dc?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=January2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Last month, we investigated the great advantages of using drop-D tuning in the development of metal-style riffs and licks. This month, I’d like to continue with this topic and show you some additional advantages that this tuning offers.</p> <p>Drop-D tuning is achieved by tuning the guitar’s low E string down a whole step, to D, resulting in a tuning of, low to high, D A D G B E. As I stated, in this tuning, the bottom two strings are now a fifth apart—D to A—instead of the normal fourth apart—E to A. </p> <p>As the higher D string is tuned a fourth above the A string, sounding the bottom three strings open, or fretting across all three strings at any given fret, will yield a three-note root-fifth-root power chord. This makes it very easy to slide and shift this fat-sounding voicing, as a single finger can be barred across the strings to fret the power chord shape. </p> <p>Alice in Chains guitarist Jerry Cantrell makes very effective use of this technique in songs like “Dam That River,” “We Die Young” and “Them Bones.” Pantera’s Dimebag Darrell was also a big fan of using drop-D tuning to perform heavy riffs in songs like “Walk” and “A New Level,” and Metallica relied on drop-D for “The Thing That Should Not Be.” </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/QcubfA2iL5Y" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-continuing-our-look-drop-d-based-metal-riffage#comments January 2015 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos News Lessons Magazine Fri, 05 Dec 2014 13:24:01 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23009 Metal for Life with Metal Mike: Using Drop-D Tuning to Write Heavy Riffs http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-using-drop-d-tuning-write-heavy-riffs <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the Holiday 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-holiday-14-led-zeppelin?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=Holiday2014VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>For decades, a common practice in rock and metal has been to use drop-D tuning, wherein the guitar’s low E string is tuned down one whole step to D, one octave below the fourth string. </p> <p>Aside from the additional heaviness this tuning provides by extending the instrument’s range downward, having the bottom two strings tuned a fifth apart—D to A—enables one to play a root-fifth power chord simply by strumming the two strings open or barring a finger across them at any given fret. And with the fourth string included, a three-note, root-fifth-octave power chord can be sounded just as easily. </p> <p>My favorite way to use drop-D tuning is to combine one-finger power chords with single-note riffs that utilize the open low D note as a pedal tone. To do this, I will play on the sixth string as if it were tuned normally, to E, but move all notes on the other strings two frets lower than where I would ordinarily play them. </p> <p>This results in some unusual shapes when moving between the sixth and fifth strings. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3873723493001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3873723493001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-using-drop-d-tuning-write-heavy-riffs#comments Holiday 2014 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos News Lessons Magazine Mon, 10 Nov 2014 13:56:22 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22777 Metal for Life with Metal Mike Chlasciak: Defending the Faith of Metal and Rock Guitar with Challenging Soloing Patterns http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-chlasciak-defending-faith-metal-and-rock-guitar-challenging-soloing-patterns <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the December 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-december-14-slipknot/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=DecemberVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Mastering metal and hard rock guitar poses a great variety of musical and technical challenges, encompassing everything from the development of solid and reliable pick- and fret-hand rhythm playing technique to a complete understanding of metal-style licks and patterns and the scales upon which they are based, coupled with fleet-fingered fret-hand technique. </p> <p>This month, I’d like to demonstrate a couple of fast, challenging lead-type phrases that are designed to lift your chops up to the next level.</p> <p>One of my favorite things to do when soloing is play long note sequences based on an unwavering rhythm, such as steady 16th notes or eighth-note triplets, as this approach serves to create rhythmic tension and aids in the construction of a powerful solo. This is something Randy Rhoads loved to do, and his “Over the Mountain” solo is a prime example of this approach</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Wl07SjMdP2Q?list=UUqHkFMEmOPFO3ahcrrBAj4w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-chlasciak-defending-faith-metal-and-rock-guitar-challenging-soloing-patterns#comments December 2014 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos News Lessons Magazine Mon, 13 Oct 2014 16:06:46 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22531 Metal for Life with Metal Mike: Incorporating Suspended Chords into Metal Rhythm Parts http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-incorporating-suspended-chords-metal-rhythm-parts <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the November 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-november-14-billy-gibbons-and-jeff-beck/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=NovemberVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>One of the coolest things about contemporary metal is that its harmonic palette is wide open. It’s not uncommon for a great metal riff to jump back and forth from one type of harmonic environment to another, such as from the natural minor scale to the Phrygian mode to the Mixolydian mode to the blues scale. </p> <p>Countless examples abound in the music of such great bands as Metallica, Megadeth, Pantera, At the Gates, In Flames and others. </p> <p>This month, I’d like to demonstrate a few different examples of rhythm-guitar ideas that jump around harmonically and also feature the incorporation of suspended chords, namely sus2 and sus4 chords.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Urw2_de1dUA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-incorporating-suspended-chords-metal-rhythm-parts#comments Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak November 2014 News Lessons Mon, 15 Sep 2014 20:27:26 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22317 Metal for Life with Metal Mike: Combining Metal-Style Rhythm-Playing Techniques to Create Memorable Riffs http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-combining-metal-style-rhythm-playing-techniques-create-memorable-riffs <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>NOTE: The incorrect tabs appear in the Metal for Life column in the October 2014 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>. We've included the correct tabs below, just below the lesson video.</strong></p> <p>As a working metal guitarist, I’m always faced with different challenges, whether I’m working with an artist like Rob Halford from Judas Priest or fronting my own band and performing my own music. </p> <p>In both situations, I’m required to come up with inspired, heavy metal–approved guitar parts that will fuel the music in an ideal way. Whether a specific guitar part is comprised of single-note lines against a pedal tone or fast-shifting chord voicings against different root notes, it’s essential that I have my rhythm/riff chops together for whatever situation I find myself in. </p> <p>In this month’s column, I’d like to detail a handful of riffs designed to sharpen up very specific and different aspects of proper heavy-metal guitar technique.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> presents an eight-bar rhythm part built using a few different techniques. I begin in bar 1 with an A5 power chord, followed by open-A-string pedal tones that alternate against two-note chords on the D and G strings. There is an inherent melodic line played on the G string through this bar. In bar 2, I move to two-note voicings of G and Am, played against the A pedal, after which I wrap up the initial two-bar idea with a single-note line. </p> <p>Now that a theme has been established, in bar 3 I restate the riff from bar 1, and in bar 4, I wrap up this two-bar figure with a very unusual line that moves between the third and fifth frets on the D and G strings. </p> <p>To me, this line has a Randy Rhoads–like quality. Bars 5 and 6 are very similar to bars 1 and 2, except I end this phrase with an alternative melody. Bars 7 and 8 complete the idea, wrapping with a very specific idea. </p> <p>A three-note phrase, played in straight 16th notes, ends with a pull-off to the open D string. This three-note phrase moves up to each higher interval within the scale structure of the A Aeolian mode (A B C D E F G) until I finish on a two-note G major chord. Play through this eight-bar phrase slowly and carefully, striving for crystal-clear articulation as well as a rock-solid rhythmic feel.</p> <p> One of my favorite things to do is devise metal riffs played in odd meters, such as 7/8 and 9/8. <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> offers a riff in 9/8 that is performed almost entirely on the low E string. I begin with an index-finger pull-off from the third fret to the open low-E pedal note, and after riding on the low-E pedal in straight, palm-muted 16th notes for four more notes, I pull off from Bf at the sixth fret.</p> <p>The phrase in bar 1 ends with an ascending line that comes in at an unusual place, on the second 16th note of beat four. Notice that there are two extra 16th notes in the bar, which results in a phrase played in 9/8. As the riff progresses, these pull-offs are moved to different locations, and the riff ends with repeated pull-offs on the bottom two strings.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 3</strong> is a little more straight-ahead, in terms of Maiden/Priest-type metal. Based primarily on A minor pentatonic (A B C D E), repeated pull-offs on the D and A strings are followed with three-note chord accents. Each two-bar phrase ends with a different descending line. </p> <p>Now that you have the idea, try putting these techniques to use in your own metal riffs.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3725935016001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3725935016001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-08-19%20at%206.34.03%20PM.png" width="620" height="871" alt="Screen Shot 2014-08-19 at 6.34.03 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-combining-metal-style-rhythm-playing-techniques-create-memorable-riffs#comments Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak October 2014 Videos News Lessons Magazine Tue, 19 Aug 2014 22:38:26 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22108 Metal for Life with Metal Mike: Build Up Your Chops with These Challenging, Molten-Hot Metal Riffs http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-build-your-chops-these-challenging-molten-hot-metal-riffs <!--paging_filter--><p>The title of this month’s Metal for Life column is a reference to the title of one of my favorite tracks from Cacophony’s 1987 debut release, <em>Speed Metal Symphony</em>. </p> <p> Similar to the playing of guitar greats Jason Becker and Marty Friedman on that trailblazing album, the riffs I present this month are challenging in that they are meant to be played fast while also covering a lot of fretboard territory. Mastering these riffs will get your chops razor sharp and stronger than ever. </p> <p> In terms of harmony, <strong>FIGURE</strong> 1 is not based on any particular scale or intervallic structure. It’s built from a steady, insistent open low-E pedal tone played in straight 16th notes. I begin by picking F# at the second fret with a downstroke, then pulling off to the open low E string. After playing two low E notes, I use an upstroke to sound an F note at the first fret, which is followed by another pull-off to the open string. </p> <p> A similar figure is played in bar 2. Across bars 3 and 4, I use alternate picking to perform challenging 16th-note-based phrases with string skips. A wide fret-hand stretch is required here. At the beginning of bar 3, I fret A (sixth string, fifth fret) with my middle finger and then use my index finger and pinkie to fret consecutive notes on the fourth string.</p> <p> To perform these lines properly, keep your pick hand as loose as possible at all times. Also, through the use of light palm muting (P.M.), I block every string from sounding except the one that is struck as the riff progresses. In <Strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, I expand on the string-skipping technique to play a series of repeating one-bar riffs in 5/4 meter. </p> <p> Again, light palm muting is used throughout to provide a percussive sound as well as add an element of precision to the sound of each note. This example is also a great workout for developing independence between the fret-hand ring finger and pinkie, which is always a very important thing to focus on. A twist here is that I do not use steady alternate picking throughout: after the initial downstroke, I pick four consecutive upstrokes, followed primarily by alternate picking for the rest of the lick. No matter the pick direction, attention is paid to economy of movement and precise pick placement.</p> <p> <Strong>FIGURE 3</strong> is another great drill for building up independence between the fret hand’s ring finger and pinkie. The phrases in bars 1–5 are constructed from two-note patterns wherein the first note is picked, followed by a pull-off. In bars 6 and 8, I alternately hammer-on from the index to the middle, the ring, or the pinkie in ascending and descending patterns.</p> <p><strong>PART ONE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2101484692001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2101484692001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2101434856001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2101434856001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-08-05%20at%2010.55.10%20AM.png" width="620" height="487" alt="Screen Shot 2014-08-05 at 10.55.10 AM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-08-05%20at%2010.55.23%20AM.png" width="620" height="441" alt="Screen Shot 2014-08-05 at 10.55.23 AM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-build-your-chops-these-challenging-molten-hot-metal-riffs#comments March 2013 Metal For Life Metal Mike Metal Mike Chlasciak News Lessons Magazine Tue, 05 Aug 2014 14:58:33 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17689 Metal for Life with Metal Mike: Utilizing Powerful-Sounding Chord Voicings That Include Open Strings http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-utilizing-powerful-sounding-chord-voicings-include-open-strings <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the September 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-september-2014-the-black-keys/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=SeptemberVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Within the genre of heavy metal, the art of rhythm guitar can sometimes seem a bit predictable—either root-fifth (or root-fifth-root) chords shifted up and down the fretboard on the same strings, or open low-string pedal tones played against two-note power chords, and little else. </p> <p>In this column, I’d like to demonstrate a few different ways that metal guitarists can open up their approach to rhythm guitar by utilizing some less-common chord voicings and those that include open strings.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3676497298001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3676497298001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-utilizing-powerful-sounding-chord-voicings-include-open-strings#comments Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak September 2014 Tue, 15 Jul 2014 22:00:38 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21801 Metal For Life with Metal Mike Chlasciak: Injecting Unusual, Jarring Chord Voicings into Metal Rhythm Parts — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-chlasciak-injecting-unusual-jarring-chord-voicings-metal-rhythm-parts-video <!--paging_filter--><p>One of the essential qualities of a great metal riff is the presence of a signature element—unusual chord voicings, a twisted melodic line—that immediately grabs your attention. </p> <p>In this column, I’d like to demonstrate a few ways to achieve this and dress up your riff ideas with murky, monstrous-sounding, aggressively attacked chord figures and patterns.</p> <p><strong>Figure 1</strong> is played in a rhythm of steady, hard-driving eighth notes, for which the open low E string is used as a palm-muted pedal tone throughout. In bar 1, two-note E5 power chords are accented on the downbeats of beats two and three, but at the end of the bar, I switch to upbeat accents of Bb(b5) on the upbeats of beat four and beat one of bar 2. Bar 2 then ends with an unusual voicing of G. This is all repeated across bars 3 and 4, except for one twist: at the end of bar 4, I add a single accent on a prog-style “spread” voicing of Gsus2. Bars 5 and 6 are a recap of bars 1 and 2, and then the figure ends in the last two bars with the bottom two open strings played in conjunction with hammer-ons with the fret-hand index and ring fingers. These final chords have an atonal quality and, when struck aggressively, impart an “angry” and “edgy” sound.</p> <p>With <strong>Figure 2</strong>, my goal was to inject a lot of melody into a guitar part via a succession of moving two-note chord voicings. Once again, the voicings are played against a palm-muted, open low E-string pedal tone. And as in <strong>Figure 1</strong>, I begin by accenting the downbeats but then switch immediately to upbeat accents, such as on the chords E5, C/E, F5 and B/D# played later in the progression. Most of the melodic content in this rhythm part is supplied by the notes that fall on the D string, which is the highest string used in the figure. In bar 4, the melodic element shifts to the A string, as the E root note moves down a half step to D#, the major third of B, resulting in a two-note B/D# voicing. Additional rhythmic drive is provided by the “gallop” rhythm—an eighth note followed by two 16ths—played on the low-E pedal tone on beat two of each bar. It can at first be a bit tricky getting used to dropping this gallop rhythm into the part at precisely the right moment, so start out slowly and gradually build up speed once you fix the pattern into your muscle and auditory memory.</p> <p>For our final example, <strong>Figure 3</strong>, I was looking to create a “grinding” sound via the use of repeated hammer-ons into A5 and Bb5 power chords. With my ring finger fretting notes on the A string, I repeatedly hammer from the open low E string to either the fifth or sixth fret with my index finger. In bar 4, I interject a chromatically descending line on the low E string, and at the very end of the phrase, I switch to hammer-ons into an F5 power chord. Be sure to attack the strings aggressively with the pick throughout, striving to accentuate the high-frequency harmonics in the notes on the bottom two strings. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3626916846001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3626916846001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-chlasciak-injecting-unusual-jarring-chord-voicings-metal-rhythm-parts-video#comments August 2014 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos News Lessons Magazine Mon, 23 Jun 2014 15:26:50 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21598 Metal For Life with Metal Mike: How to Fortify Power-Chord Ideas with Single-Note Lines and Diads http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-how-fortify-power-chord-ideas-single-note-lines-and-diads <!--paging_filter--><p>I call this month’s column “The Riff Welder” because in it I demonstrate a variety of ways you can bring more melodic content to your power-chord-driven ideas through the use of single-note lines and small two-note chord voicings, often referred to as “diads.” </p> <p>I will take a few fairly “stock” chord progressions and, by moving a few notes and voicings around, show you how to devise much more interesting and effective rhythm parts.</p> <p>Let’s start with a basic chord progression built from mostly open power chords, as illustrated in <strong>Figure 1A</strong>. The first three chords used in the progression—E5, D5 and A5—are all played in first or second position and include as many open strings as possible. For C5, I simply barre my index finger across the D and G strings at the fifth fret, and end the progression with a second-position B5 power chord. </p> <p>Now let’s embellish this rhythm part with a few subtle tweaks to the chord voicings, as shown in <strong>Figure 1B</strong>. I begin with the same E5 power chord, but I replace the standard D5 power chord used in <strong>Figure 1A</strong> with a two-note diad played on the bottom two strings, consisting of the notes F# (sixth string, second fret) and D (fifth string, fifth fret), which produce the chord D/F# (described as “D over F#,” or “D with an F# in the bass”). In this voicing, the major third of the chord is the bottom note, and the root note is played three frets higher on the next higher string.</p> <p>I then take this same“third-in-the-bass” shape and move it over to the A and D strings and up two frets to sound the next chord, A/ Cs, which takes the place of the A5 power chord used in the original example. I then use the same C5 and B5 power chords as in <strong>Figure 1A</strong> but move from B5 into B/D# by placing the major third of B, D#, on the A string’s sixth fret under an index-finger barre across the D and G strings at the fourth fret.</p> <p>Now let’s take this “third-in-the-bass” idea and expand on it with a faster, slightly more intricate example. As shown in <strong>Figure 2</strong>, the rhythm part is driven by the insistent use of palm-muted 16th notes on the open low E string, punctuated by two-note chord stabs. </p> <p>In bars 1 and 2 of this figure, I quickly alternate between D5 and A/C# by simply moving the note on the A string down and up one fret while keeping the same A note fretted on the D string with my pinkie. In bars 3 and 4, I switch the idea around by changing the note on the D string, raising it and lowering it one fret, while keeping a constant note on the A string. This is a simple but effective way to make a standard chord progression more interesting by creating an “internal melody.”</p> <p>Our last example, <strong>Figure 3</strong>, is played at a slower tempo and works a series of two-note voicings against the open A string. I begin with an index-finger barre across the D and G strings at the fifth fret, sounding C5/A, then drop the note on the D string down one fret to produce D7/A. </p> <p>In bar 3, this note is dropped an additional fret, yielding Dm7/A (this can also be thought of as F5/A). I wrap things up by dropping this note one more fret to sound Am, with the fifth of A, E, played on the D string and the minor third, C, fretted on the G string.</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1876166338001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1876166338001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1876118196001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1876118196001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-06-16%20at%201.40.25%20PM.png" width="620" height="708" alt="Screen Shot 2014-06-16 at 1.40.25 PM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-06-16%20at%201.40.35%20PM.png" width="620" height="155" alt="Screen Shot 2014-06-16 at 1.40.35 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-how-fortify-power-chord-ideas-single-note-lines-and-diads#comments December 2012 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos News Lessons Magazine Mon, 16 Jun 2014 18:17:38 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16951 Metal For Life with Metal Mike Chlasciak: How to Develop Appealing Metal Riffs and Solo Ideas Using One String — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-chlasciak-how-develop-appealing-metal-riffs-and-solo-ideas-using-one-string-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the July 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-july-14-led-zeppelin/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=MayVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>When writing songs, you can develop solo ideas as well as signature riffs by creating melodic patterns on a single string. This is a useful and often overlooked technique that can greatly aid your creativity. </p> <p>Yngwie Malmsteen and—his biggest influence—Richie Blackmore have frequently exploited this technique, traversing the fretboard while playing fast licks on one string. You will also hear it used frequently in classical guitar and violin music. </p> <p>Playing up and down on a single string produces a pleasingly consistent tonal quality that cannot be achieved in any other way. It’s also a great way to work on your scale knowledge on the fretboard, and it can help you build up speed and endurance in both hands. In this month’s column, I’d like to detail a few different patterns that I’ve devised to demonstrate the value of this technique. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3578185067001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3578185067001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-chlasciak-how-develop-appealing-metal-riffs-and-solo-ideas-using-one-string-video#comments July 2014 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos News Lessons Magazine Thu, 22 May 2014 15:02:03 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21316 Guitar World DVD: Master Heavy Metal Guitar with Metal Mike http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-world-dvd-master-heavy-metal-guitar-metal-mike <!--paging_filter--><p>The <em>Metal For Life: Mastering Heavy Metal</em> DVD is available now at the Guitar World Online Store for only $14.95.</p> <p>Strap on your ax for an extreme-metal boot camp, as Metal Mike Chlasciak helps you hone your chops to perfection! You'll learn how to traverse the fretboard with ever-essential minor pentatonic scale, incorporate minor scales into riffs and rhythm parts, build power-chord variations for maximum sonic effect and much more. </p> <p>Plus, you'll get a first-hand tutorial in playing black and death metal and creating licks in the styles of:</p> <p> • Metallica<br /> • Testament<br /> • Pantera<br /> ... and more!</p> <p>Also, learn 10 essential metal licks every guitarist should know!</p> <p>With over two hours of lessons, this DVD is perfect for any skill-level in the heavy metal genre. </p> <p><strong>Your instructor</strong></p> <p>A longtime contributor to <em>Guitar World</em> magazine with his "Metal for Life" instructional column, Metal Mike Chlasciak plays guitar for Halford and with his own band. His latest releases are <em>The Metalworker</em> and <em>This is War</em>, available from <a href="http://metalmike.net/">metalmike.net</a>.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/dvds/products/metal-for-life/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=MetalMikeDVD">For more information or to order, head to the Guitar World Online Store.</a></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-world-dvd-master-heavy-metal-guitar-metal-mike#comments Metal For Life Metal Mike Metal Mike Chlasciak News Features Mon, 12 May 2014 12:55:13 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18288 Metal for Life with Metal Mike: Incorporating Minor Scales Into Riffs and Rhythm Parts http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-incorporating-minor-scales-riffs-and-rhythm-parts <!--paging_filter--><p> The minor scale is the most commonly used scale in metal. This month, I’d like to detail the most prevalent minor scales in metal: natural minor (also known as the Aeolian mode), the Dorian mode, the Phrygian mode and the harmonic minor scale.</p> <p> To begin, let’s play each of these scales in the key of E, starting with E natural minor. <strong>FIGURE 1a</strong> shows this scale played in one octave, starting from the open low E string and staying on the bottom two strings. </p> <p> You can see the symmetry in the fingering pattern, as the second, third and fifth frets are played on both the low E and A strings. The same type of symmetry occurs in the second octave, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 1b</strong>, as well as in the third octave (see <strong>FIGURE 1c). FIGURE 2</strong> shows E natural minor played across three octaves. Another essential minor scale is the Dorian mode. <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> illustrates this scale in three octaves.</p> <p> Be aware that, as compared to natural minor, there is only one note that is different in Dorian: the sixth scale degree. In natural minor, the sixth is minor, or “flatted,” whereas in Dorian, the sixth is major, or “natural.” The Phrygian mode, shown in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>, sounds slightly darker than natural minor and Dorian minor. </p> <p> The intervallic structure of Phrygian is almost identical to natural minor, with the exception of the second scale degree, which in Phrygian is minor, or “flatted”—F in the key of E, as opposed to the major second, F#, present in natural minor. The Phrygian mode can be used to play long runs of symmetrical licks across all six strings.</p> <p> As shown in <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>, I can play fast triplet figures articulated with pull-offs on every string and create a seamless sound while moving down through three octaves. Also essential to metal guitar is the harmonic minor scale, shown in the key of E in <strong>FIGURES 6a and 6b</strong>. Harmonic minor is also very similar to natural minor, with the exception of the seventh scale degree. In harmonic minor, there is a major, or “natural,” seventh, which in the key of E would be D#. </p> <p>Harmonic minor is a great scale for heavy single-note licks, as demonstrated in <strong>FIGURE 7</strong>. A great twist is to play double-stops, or two-note figures, against the open low E pedal, as I do in <strong>FIGURE 8</strong>, something heard often in the music of In Flames and At the Gates.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1149646217001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1149646217001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-05-06%20at%205.10.01%20PM.png" width="620" height="669" alt="Screen Shot 2014-05-06 at 5.10.01 PM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-05-06%20at%205.10.15%20PM.png" width="620" height="362" alt="Screen Shot 2014-05-06 at 5.10.15 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-incorporating-minor-scales-riffs-and-rhythm-parts#comments 2011 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak November 2011 November Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Tue, 06 May 2014 21:41:31 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/12747 Metal for Life with Metal Mike: How to Build Classic Three-Part Metal Guitar Harmonies http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-how-build-classic-three-part-metal-guitar-harmonies <!--paging_filter--><p>One of the essential elements of great metal is the execution of razor-sharp harmony lead guitar lines. </p> <p>Just listen to any of the most celebrated songs by Judas Priest, Iron Maiden, Metallica, Megadeth and many other metal bands of all stripes, and you will hear the types of guitar harmonies I am referring to. </p> <p>Many students have asked me how to go about constructing multilayered guitar harmonies and which notes will sound the best. To answer these questions for everyone, in this month’s column I’ll show you a simple and effective way to build a classic metal-style three-part harmonized guitar line.</p> <p>The very first thing to decide when building guitar harmonies is what scale to use. The vast majority of metal music is based on minor scales, and the one that is exploited most often is natural minor, also known as the Aeolian mode. The intervallic structure of natural minor is 1 2 f3 4 5 f6 f7. In the key of E, the notes would be E F# G A B C D. This is the scale we are going to use in this column to build a three-part harmonized lead guitar line.</p> <p><strong>Figure 1</strong> illustrates a melody, or primary line, that I constructed specifically for this lesson. Using the open low E string as a repeating pedal tone, the melodic line is played in a steady eighth-note rhythm (with the occasional quarter note added), with an opening melodic pattern (bar 1) that repeats in bars 3 and 5, functioning as a recurring theme. Play this melody repeatedly until you have it memorized and comfortably under your fingers.</p> <p>Now let’s add our first harmony line, or secondary part. The most common way to create harmonies is to use the notes that are a third above the melody while staying diatonic to (within the scale structure of) the appropriate scale. <strong>Figure 2</strong> illustrates the first harmony. After doubling the open low-E pedal tone, the first fretted note played is a G (on beat two of bar 1), which is a third higher than E, the first note of the melodic line. The simplest way to know what note is a third above any note in a specific scale is to count two scale degrees higher than the original melody note. If the melody note is E, the next two scale degrees of E natural minor are F# and G, so G is the note two scale degrees, or a third, above E. Likewise, the four-note line that falls across beats three and four of bar 1 in <strong>Figure 1</strong> begins on G, so the harmony line begins on B, two scale degrees higher, as shown in <strong>Figure 2</strong>. This “third above” formula is then applied to the entire pattern.</p> <p>Now let’s add a second harmony part, or tertiary line—the third line in the three-part harmony. This is formulated in the same manner as the first harmony line. Starting from the first note of that line, G, I begin a third above, starting on B. <strong>Figure 3</strong> presents this third line, or second harmony, and all of the subsequent notes are situated a third above the notes of the secondary line (<strong>Figure 2</strong>), as they fall diatonically within E natural minor. Note that this third line sits a fifth above the initial melody (<strong>Figure 1</strong>). When one hears all three lines played simultaneously, a perfect three-part harmony is sounded.</p> <p>Now that you have the formula for creating guitar harmonies, I encourage you to experiment with melodies based on different scales. There are endless possibilities to discover!</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3496394163001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3496394163001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-how-build-classic-three-part-metal-guitar-harmonies#comments June 2014 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos News Lessons Magazine Tue, 29 Apr 2014 12:41:30 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21060