Allman Brothers Band http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/481/all en Essential Listening: 10 Stellar Slide Guitar Songs http://www.guitarworld.com/essential-listening-10-great-slide-guitar-songs <!--paging_filter--><p>Not content with the status quo, industrious young guitar players have endeavored over the decades to make things more difficult for themselves. </p> <p>Some have tried playing the guitar behind their back, over their head, with their teeth, with their friends' teeth, etc. </p> <p>And then there was the inventive guitarist who, many decades ago, decided to slip a bottle over his finger and slide it along his guitar's strings to produce a magical sound (He probably emptied the bottle himself, if you know what I mean). </p> <p>While playing the guitar with your teeth is, was and always shall be a novelty, slide guitar — and slide guitarists — is and are here to stay. They actually started digging in their heels long before Robert Johnson made his haunting Delta blues recordings in Texas in the 1930s. </p> <p>Since Johnson's time, players — including guys like George Thorogood, Derek Trucks, Jerry Douglas and Roy Rogers — have built entire careers around slide guitar and its many stylistic varieties.</p> <p>Below, we present 10 tracks that represent essential listening in the world of slide guitar. Please note that we're sticking with regular ol' six-string guitar — no lap steel, sacred steel, pedal steel, etc. (Not that there's anything wrong with that.) These songs are presented in no particular order. I repeat: These songs are presented in no particular order.</p> <p>Also, if you want to track down any of these tracks, you'll find all 10 original album covers in the photo gallery below. Enjoy!<br /> <br /><br /> <strong>The Allman Brothers Band, "Statesboro Blues" (Duane Allman)</strong></p> <p>A generation of blues-influenced rockers toyed with slide guitar for several years, slowly bringing it into mainstream music (Check out Jeff Beck's performance on "Evil Hearted You" by the Yardbirds), but no one dragged it into the modern era quite like Duane Allman of the Allman Brothers Band. He used the slide to imitate the sound of a blues harp — not to mention mesmerize countless concert goers who were knocked out by his dexterity and intensity. Perhaps his quintessential slide performance is the Allmans' <em>At Fillmore East</em> version of Blind Willie McTell's "Statesboro Blues." As <em>Rolling Stone</em> put it, it features the sort of playing that gives people chills. Of course, be sure to seek out other live versions of the song, including the one on the band's recently released <em>SUNY at Stonybrook</em> album.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ezPZxfS1jys" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Sonny Landreth, "Überesso"</strong></p> <p>Respected Louisiana-based slide player Sonny Landreth started appearing on music fans' radar in earnest after the release of the 2007 Crossroads Blues Festival DVD. It features a few tracks by Landreth (jamming with Eric Clapton and such), including the uber-exciting instrumental, "Überesso." Landreth's unique slide technique lets him fret notes and play chords and chord fragments behind the slide. He plays with the slide on his little finger, so his other fingers have more room to fret. Check out his performance of "Überesso" from the 2007 Crossroads Guitar Festival below. Yes, he's awesome.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/sJ3IVTPPPLw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Steve Miller Band, "The Joker" (Steve Miller)</strong></p> <p>Although not primarily known as a slide player, Steve Miller put the slide to fun and creative use on his 1973 hit single, "The Joker," playing a hummable, tasteful slide solo for the masses (and imitating a whistle a few times in the process). Although it's no "Überesso" (See above), it shows that slide guitar has been invited to the chart-success party, especially in the early '70s, much like our next selection ...</p> <p><iframe width="640" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/DzSC2__LXk4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>George Harrison, "Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth)"</strong></p> <p>You'll read it in other roundups of great slide guitar songs — comments like, "Although he wasn't a virtuoso like these other players ... ." Yeah, whatever. OK, he wasn't Jeff Beck, Steve Howe or Ritchie Blackmore, but George Harrison, who, as a member of the Beatles, influenced millions of humans to play guitar, suddenly started playing slide guitar in 1969, inventing an entirely new "guitar persona" for himself. What he came up with was a distinctive, non-blues-based style that incorporated hints of Indian music, some pointers he picked up while learning sitar and other Beatles-esque odds and ends. While "My Sweet Lord" and Badfinger's "Day After Day" (featuring Harrison on slide) are better known, 1973's "Give Me Love" perfectly displays his new-found style. For some quality later work, check out "<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7HGkdDuIZ4">Cheer Down</a>" from 1989 and "Any Road" from 2002.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/s-KAvPbO8JY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Foghat, "Slow Ride" (Rod Price)</strong></p> <p>Staying in the '70s for a moment, let us consider Foghat's "Slow Ride," another slide-based song that topped the charts. Perhaps the polar slide opposite of George Harrison, the heavily blues-influenced Rod "The Bottle" Price (Yes, they called him "The Bottle") let it all hang out in his solo near the fadeout of Foghat's signature track. Be sure to also check out Foghat's "Drivin' Wheel" and "Stone Blue." Price, a product of the UK, died in 2005.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/GcCNcgoyG_0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Led Zeppelin, "In My Time of Dying" (Jimmy Page)</strong></p> <p>Although the "big three" guitarists who emerged from the '60s rock scene in England — Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page — flirted with slide guitar at different points in their careers, none took it as far, or used it with as much success, as Page. For proof, just listen to "In My Time of Dying" from <em>Physical Graffiti</em>. The recording (the most popular version of a song Josh White recorded in the mid-'40s), features Page sliding away in open A (E / A / E / A / C# / E). Although Page also played slide on "When the Levee Breaks," "Traveling Riverside Blues" and "What Is and What Should Never Be," his distinctive slide style simply defines the powerful and dark "In My Time of Dying."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/eoBKd0HXb9o" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Elmore James, "Dust My Broom"</strong></p> <p>We've mentioned a few "blues influenced" players, which is basically another way of saying "players who were influenced by Elmore James." James — who was actually dubbed the "King of the Slide Guitar" — is best known for his 1951 version of "Dust My Broom (I Believe My Time Ain't Long)." The song's opening riff is one of the best-known and most influential slide guitar parts ever. Yes, it sounds a lot like what Robert Johnson played on his "I Believe I'll Dust My Broom" several years earlier, but James played his riff on an electric guitar, pretty much claiming it for himself in the process and sending chills down the spine of a new generation. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/LIGxeQKQs-0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Johnny Winter, "Highway 61 Revisited"</strong></p> <p>The lanky Texan (and former Brit) simply burns it up in his legendary cover of Bob Dylan's "Highway 61 Revisited" from <em>Second Winter,</em> his second album. Be sure to <A href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AjcOSmmTTiE">investigate the acoustic "Dallas" from Winter's self-titled 1969 album</a>. If you can convincingly play these two songs, it's time to hang up your T-square and/or apron and look for session work! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/yclRjptWlW8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Derek Trucks Band, "Sahib Teri Bandi/Maki Madni" (Derek Trucks)</strong></p> <p>The list takes an exotic turn with this middle-eastern-flavored track by Derek Trucks. With his deep Allman Brothers Band lineage, we know Trucks (and Warren Haynes, of course) can tackle roots rock, extended blues jams and more, but this 10-minute instrumental track from his 2006 album, <em>Songlines</em>, steps way out of those boundaries and truly shows what Trucks is capable of. He makes the guitar sound like an exotic instrument from a distant land and time. Check out this live performance from 2008, below. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/N65cP52NC8s" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Rory Gallagher, "Want Ad Blues/Wanted Blues"</strong></p> <p>For our official acoustic entry, let's not forget the late, great Rory Gallagher, shown here playing a version of John Lee Hooker's "Wanted Blues." It's hard to believe this Irish master of the Stratocaster was also a ridiculously accomplished traditional blues slide player. By the way, <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7kGUXtEMbPU">in this brief video (Click here), Gallagher explains some slide basics. Be sure to check it out.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/88eLFmaVDdg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong><em>Learn Slide Guitar</em> is the ultimate DVD instructional guide to playing slide guitar like a pro. Designed for beginning-to-intermediate guitar players, this DVD contains more than two hours of lessons that will help you develop such skills and techniques as playing in open and standard tunings, slide scales for soloing in all keys, improvising, open-tuning chord forms, muting, vibrato, Delta and electric blues, plus much more! <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/dvds/products/learn-slide-guitar-dvd/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=SlideGuitarDamian">It's available now at the Guitar World Online Store!</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/duane-allman">Duane Allman</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/allman-brothers-band">Allman Brothers Band</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/george-harrison">George Harrison</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/derek-trucks">Derek Trucks</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/johnny-winter">Johnny Winter</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/elmore-james">Elmore James</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/essential-listening-10-great-slide-guitar-songs#comments Allman Brothers Band Derek Trucks Duane Allman Elmore James George Harrison Jimmy Page Rory Gallagher Videos News Features Thu, 21 Aug 2014 17:51:11 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17948 Allman Brothers Band: Compilation Producer Bill Levenson Talks Deluxe '1971 Fillmore East Recordings' http://www.guitarworld.com/allman-brothers-band-compilation-producer-bill-levenson-talks-deluxe-1971-fillmore-east-recordings <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The Allman Brothers Band At Fillmore East</em> has been considered rock’s best live album since its 1971 release. </p> <p>Recorded March 12 and 13, 1971, at the New York club, the album captured the original Allman Brothers Band at the peak of their powers, playing with verve, grace, intensity and seemingly telepathic communication. </p> <p>Guitarists Dickey Betts and Duane Allman finished one another’s phrases, spun beautiful leads off each other’s riffs and prodded themselves to guitar heights that have rarely, if ever, been equaled.</p> <p>Over the years, different versions have been issued, including the expanded <em>The Fillmore Concerts</em>, but the holy grail for Allmans fans has been hearing the many unreleased tracks from the shows, mostly stemming from Friday, March 12, as most of the album was culled from the final night.</p> <p>A new deluxe set, <em>The 1971 Fillmore East Recordings</em>, delivers almost all of the music played by the Allman Brothers at the Fillmore East during these shows in great, remastered sound. The set consists of six CDs or three Blu-ray discs, which are mixed for Surround Sound and bring the band’s performance to a shimmering new life. </p> <p>Duane Allman famously invited several guests, including soprano saxophonist Juicy Carter, harmonica player Thom Doucette and percussionist Bobby Caldwell (the drummer from the headlining Johnny Winter And), to sit in, much to the consternation of producer Tom Dowd. Dowd convinced the band to banish the horns for the second night and chose different versions of songs or edited out most of the guests’ contributions, which can now be heard — and mostly prove Dowd’s point.</p> <p>The final performance captured on the collection came a few months later, on June 27, 1971, the closing show of the Fillmore East. It includes promoter Bill Graham’s entire, ecstatic introduction, which concluded with “We’re going to round it out with the best of them all, the Allman Brothers Band.”</p> <p>We spoke with compilation producer Bill Levenson about the release.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: This set has been talked about for so long. Do you think it came out the same way it would have if you had done it any time in the last 20 years?</strong></p> <p>The main difference in the last year or two was the Blu-ray and Surround Sound. I don’t think we would have done that in the Nineties when we were first talking about it. I think that’s what doing it in 2014 brought us — a Blu-ray set.</p> <p>And I’m very excited about the Surround Sound. The goal was really to put the listener in the 10th row of the Fillmore, with everything in front of you and the reflections and the audience behind you. I grew up in New York and went into the Fillmore. It had a distinct sound, a fabulous sound, and you can feel the auditorium in any album recorded there. I was trying to recreate being in the Fillmore, and I do think we were able to capture the magic of what was in that hall.</p> <p><iframe src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:track:1UGlPSocDwycOOQeMNOVhx" width="620" height="365" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true"></iframe>”</p> <p><strong>Among other things, you finally brought us the sax stylings of Juicy Carter, which we’ve only been able to hear dabs of before. It’s really interesting but not hard to hear why Tom Dowd was upset about his sudden appearance during a recording.</strong></p> <p>Yes. What really made it work was just to find the place in the mix where it was forward but not too forward, dissonant but not too edgy. To be honest, there are moments where we buried him because he was went off in really dissonant tangents. It’s still there; you hear if you listen, but he’s been pulled back. During these times, he was playing two saxes at once — baritone and saxophone — and some of the playing gets really out there. </p> <p>It was really the magic of the fader.</p> <p><strong>This set scratched a lot of our itches, but a big one that remains is the first show, Thursday, March 11, which Tom Dowd said he recorded and which apparently featured a full horn section.</strong></p> <p>Thursday night is the blind spot for all of us. I’ve picked through the vaults hundreds of times, and there’s not even a hint of it existing, not even a reference somewhere. The only time it’s even mentioned is in a Tom Dowd interview, and he’s no longer with us to ask. But I am certain that there’s no tape, not even a tape that’s taped over … I just used everything we had.</p> <p><em>Alan Paul is the author of the best-selling book </em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1250040493/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=211189&amp;creative=373489&amp;creativeASIN=1250040493&amp;link_code=as3&amp;tag=alanpaulinchi-20">One Way Out: The Inside History of the Allman Brothers Band</a><em>. You can read an excerpt about the recording of </em>At Fillmore East<em> <a href="http://alanpaul.net/2014/08/one-way-out-excerpt-the-recording-of-at-fillmore-east/">here.</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/allman-brothers-band">Allman Brothers Band</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/duane-allman">Duane Allman</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dickey-betts">Dickey Betts</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/gregg-allman">Gregg Allman</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/allman-brothers-band-compilation-producer-bill-levenson-talks-deluxe-1971-fillmore-east-recordings#comments Allman Brothers Band Interviews News Features Wed, 13 Aug 2014 17:34:49 +0000 Alan Paul http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22115 The Allman Brothers Band Announce Their Final Shows http://www.guitarworld.com/allman-brothers-band-announce-their-final-shows <!--paging_filter--><p>The Allman Brothers Band have announced they're calling it quits.</p> <p>In a press release sent out this morning, the band listed several late-October Beacon Theatre makeup dates — October 21, 22, 24 and 25 — that take the place of shows originally scheduled for March.</p> <p>The press release goes on to say:</p> <p>"Immediately following the four make-up dates, the band have announced [their] final shows ... these final performances also will be at the Beacon Theatre October 27 and 28."</p> <p>The Allman Brothers Band have performed at New York City's Beacon Theatre 232 times since 1989, so it's the perfect place to host their final shows.</p> <p>The current lineup of the band — Gregg Allman (vocals and keyboards), Butch Trucks (drums and tympani) and Jaimoe (drums), plus Warren Haynes (vocals, lead and slide guitar), Derek Trucks (slide and lead guitar), Oteil Burbridge (bass) and Marc Quniones (congas and percussion) — is the longest-lasting version of the seminal band, which was formed in 1969. This current assemblage has been at it for 14 years.</p> <p>In January, Trucks and Haynes issued a joint statement saying they'd no longer tour with the Allman Brothers Band after 2014.</p> <p>Although Allman said the guitarists’ departure would likely mark the end of the band, which is celebrating its 45th anniversary in 2014, he hadn't issued an official statement addressing the band's future — until now.</p> <p>Trucks recently spoke to <em>Guitar World</em> about his decision to throw in the towel: </p> <p><strong>Why did you decide to leave the Allman Brothers at the end of this year?</strong></p> <p>It’s something I’ve been thinking about for a long time. I want to see the legacy end as it should — at the top. I don’t want to see Joe Montana in Kansas City or Muhammad Ali at the end of his career. It’s a rare thing to be able to go out on top and in great shape, and I think it would be great, but it’s ultimately not up to me, but to the original members, if they will continue.</p> <p><strong>Right. And people are waiting for a statement that hasn’t come, which would seem to indicate that Gregg, Butch and Jaimoe have not made up their minds about the future.</strong></p> <p>I‘m hoping that if it continues, it’s because it’s supposed to and not for personal reasons. I think from Duane until now, the band has given everyone so much and at some point you have to honor the legacy with real dignity.</p> <p>I was watching Leonard Cohen receive an award in Spain and I was struck by acceptance speech, with him talking about how everything has an end but you need to recognize and honor it and treat it with dignity. He said that if you have the ability to treat the end with real dignity and beauty, that’s what separates things. I thought that was apropos to our situation.</p> <p>For the rest of this interview, <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/derek-trucks-discusses-leaving-allman-brothers-band-some-point-you-have-step-away">head here.</a> Check out the band's final itinerary below.</p> <p>Sun 6/8 Hunter Mountain, NY Mountain Jam<br /> Thu-Sun 8/14-17Scranton, PA Peach Fest<br /> Sun 9/7 Arrington, VA Lockn' Music Fest<br /> Tues 10/21 New York, NY Beacon Theatre (tickets for March 25 honored)<br /> Weds 10/22 New York, NY Beacon Theatre (tickets for March 26 honored)<br /> Fri 10/24 New York, NY Beacon Theatre (tickets for March 28 honored)<br /> Sat 10/25 New York, NY Beacon Theatre (tickets for March 29 honored)<br /> Mon 10/27 New York, NY Beacon Theatre<br /> Tues 10/28 New York, NY Beacon Theatre</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/allman-brothers-band">Allman Brothers Band</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/allman-brothers-band-announce-their-final-shows#comments Allman Brothers Band News Mon, 02 Jun 2014 15:09:56 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21412 Top 10 Best (and Worst) Comeback Albums of All Time http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-best-and-worst-comeback-albums-all-time <!--paging_filter--><p><em>"Don't call it a comeback / I've been here for years."</em> </p> <p>So said LL Cool J in the title track from 1990's <em>Mama Said Knock You Out</em>, which came out when many fans and critics thought his career was just barely limping along. </p> <p>The album turned out to be a massive critical and commercial success. So, with our apologies to Mr. Cool J, we <em>are</em> calling it comeback. Because a comeback — as defined here at <em>Guitar World</em> — is any critically and/or commercially successful or significant album that follows a career-altering absence (breakup, retirement) or low point (death of band members, "dead" careers, being dropped by your label, critical uber-flops, telling a London audience that you're ashamed that George W. Bush is from Texas ...). </p> <p>So, with that in mind, here's our list of the 10 best (and worst) comeback albums of all time. </p> <p><strong>10. U2 — <em>All That You Can’t Leave Behind</em> (2000)</strong> </p> <p><strong>The Set-Up:</strong> Sitting-on-top-of-the-world stadium rockers U2 took some chances in the '90s, releasing three adventurous, occasionally bizarre albums. The last of the bunch, 1997's <em>Pop</em>, the techno-, dance- and electronica-influenced culmination of their self-inflicted reinvention, was harshly panned and widely misunderstood. It was as if fans and critics collectively said, "Enough already, guys." </p> <p><strong>The Comeback:</strong> <em>All That You Can't Leave Behind</em> was, in every respect, a homecoming. With producers Daniel Lanois and Brian Eno back at the helm, the band returned to its classic sound (although brilliantly updated) with an emphasis on grand melodies and a renewed reliance on guitar, bass and drums. <em>Rolling Stone</em> called it U2's third masterpiece, next to <em>The Joshua Tree</em> and <em>Achtung Baby</em>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/co6WMzDOh1o" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>09. Allman Brothers Band — <em>Brothers and Sisters</em> (1973)</strong> </p> <p><strong>The Set-Up:</strong> Allman Brothers Band co-founder and slide guitar master Duane Allman was killed in a motorcycle accident in late 1971 while the band was recording <em>Eat A Peach</em>. As if that wasn't terrible enough, bassist Berry Oakley was killed the same way — in the same Georgia town — one year later. Although the band — fortified by talented replacements — forged ahead, it was as if a dark cloud had found them and decided to stick around for a spell. </p> <p><strong>The Comeback:</strong> The album that would follow the band's tragedies, <em>Brothers And Sisters</em>, was, by far, their greatest success, settling in for five longs weeks at No. 1 on the U.S. albums chart. It also was a high point for guitarist Dickey Betts, whose composition, "Ramblin' Man," would become the band's only hit single, reaching No. 2 on the charts. The album featured two more eternal FM radio staples, "Southbound" and "Jessica," both written by Betts. Simply put, it was the band's — and Betts' — commercial high point.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/6VxoXn-0Ezs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>08. Foo Fighters — <em>Foo Fighters</em> (1995)</strong> </p> <p><strong>The Set-Up:</strong> There's no doubt that Nirvana changed everything, and that by 1994 they were one of, if not <em>the</em> biggest band in the world. For a few years, all of the United States felt like Seattle, and the sale of thrift-store sweaters was at an all-time high. That is, until the suicide of lead singer/guitarist Kurt Cobain in April of that year. </p> <p><strong>The Comeback:</strong> It would take one hell of an effort for anything Dave Grohl released from that point on to not be considered a mere footnote in the history of Nirvana. The fact that we now know Grohl as one of the biggest personalities in rock — who also has shared the stage with the likes of Jimmy Page and plays in a band with John Paul Jones — is a testament to his tenacity and talent for crafting memorable hooks. </p> <p>It could be argued that the second Foo Fighters album (and their first as a real band), <em>The Colour and the Shape,</em> is better suited for this position because it spawned the first mega-hits for the band, but the first Foos album was Dave Grohl playing everything himself, a lone man trying to forge ahead and create something meaningful after the demise of the biggest band on the planet. If that's not the meaning of a comeback, we don't know what is. </p> <object width="620" height="365"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/X_rTTsZZ9KE?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" /><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/X_rTTsZZ9KE?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object> <hr /> <p><strong>07. Metallica — <em>Death Magnetic</em> (2008)</strong> </p> <p><strong>The Set-Up:</strong> Napster, Tom Cruise film soundtracks, <em>St. Anger.</em> Let's face it, the turn of this century was not kind to Metallica when it came to public opinion. </p> <p>Their latest, guitar-solo-free album had left fans more confused than betrayed, and the follow-up film, <em>Some Kind of Monster</em>, showed the band in a new, vulnerable light that left fans of <em>Ride the Lightning</em> scratching their heads. It would take one hell of an album to get the image of the band in group therapy talking about feelings out of the heads of fans. </p> <p><strong>The Comeback:</strong> Enter <em>Death Magnetic</em>. While the album itself was met with some criticism — mainly for its over-compressed sound — there's no doubt that it re-ignited interest in the band's thrashier roots and made people forget about "I Disappear," perhaps for good. One might even venture to say that, had the band made another <em>St. Anger</em> or <em>Load</em>, the Big Four shows might not have ever happened. Can anyone imagine Kerry King, Dave Mustaine, Charlie Benante and others joining James and crew onstage for a rendition of "Tuesday's Gone"? Didn't think so. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/sqA0V8UoOVo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> </p> <hr /> <p><strong>06. Johnny Cash — <em>American Recordings</em> (1994)</strong> </p> <p><strong>The Set-Up:</strong> Although Johnny Cash never really went away (much like LL Cool J), during the 1980s, record sales and support from his longtime label, Columbia, were at all-time lows. After putting out a string of fine yet occasionally overproduced albums (Check out his cheesy cover of CCR's "Have You Ever Seen The Rain" from 1985's <em>Rainbow</em> album), Cash found himself without a label in the early '90s. </p> <p><strong>The Comeback:</strong> Enter Rick Rubin. The producer, known for his work with A-list hip-hop artists and heavy metal bands, offered Cash a contract with his label, American Recordings, and got right to work, stripping the Man in Black's sound down to the basics: voice and acoustic guitar. The album, considered his finest release since the late '60s, transformed Cash from museum piece to the ultimate in cool.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/T8tGCVavS5s" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>05. Aerosmith — <em>Pump</em> (1989)</strong> </p> <p><strong>The Set-Up:</strong> The early '80s were not kind to Aerosmith. The had band lost both their guitarists by the time of the recording of <em>Rock in a Hard Place</em> (you know, the album with Jimmy Crespo and Rick Dufay) and were in serious danger of being a footnote of '70s American rock. </p> <p>Aerosmith in the mid-'80s can be summed up as this: When the movie <em>This Is Spinal Tap</em> came out, Steven Tyler actually thought the movie was about Aerosmith. In a 1997 interview, Brad Whitford was quoted as saying, "The first time Steven saw it, he didn't see any humor in it." </p> <p><strong>The Comeback:</strong> Sure, Run DMC gave them another taste of the spotlight, and <em>Permanent Vacation</em> gave us "Dude Looks Like a Lady" and "Rag Doll," but if anything is going to be called a comeback album for Aerosmith, it would have to be 1989's <em>Pump</em>. </p> <p>Commercially, <em>Pump</em> does have a slight edge over <em>Permanent Vacation</em>, with the latter going a measely five-times platinum as opposed to <em>Pump</em>'s seven-times, good enough to make it the second-best-selling Aerosmith album of all time behind <em>Toys in the Attic</em>. But beyond numbers, <em>Pump</em> just <em>felt</em> like an Aerosmith album (yes, even the horn section). That's not to knock the strong numbers on <em>Permanent Vacation</em>, but Steven Tyler singing about needing to get away to St. Tropez when the whole world was still wondering "Where were you?" may have been a bit premature. </p> <object width="620" height="365"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/h3Yrhv33Zb8?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" /><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/h3Yrhv33Zb8?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object> <hr /> <p><strong>04. John Lennon and Yoko Ono — <em>Double Fantasy</em> (1980)</strong> </p> <p><strong>The Set-Up:</strong> The mid-'70s weren't the best of times for John Lennon. He had endured a separation from Yoko Ono and a complicated lawsuit filed by Morris Levy (regarding breach of contract and the messy <em>Roots</em> / <em>Rock 'n' Roll</em> scandal), not to mention the disappointing — by former-Beatle standards — sales of his 1975 greatest-hits album, <em>Shaved Fish</em>. </p> <p>So, after taking part in a recording session for Ringo Starr's 1976 <em>Ringo's Rotogravure</em> album, Lennon made the shift from rock star to house husband, living a private, tame existence at the Dakota in New York City with Ono and their 1-year-old son, Sean. </p> <p><strong>The Comeback:</strong> In 1980, after taking several years off, Lennon felt it was time to get back to work. Inspired and/or awakened by new music by Madness, The Pretenders and the B-52s, he decided it was "time to get out the old axe and wake the wife up," as he told <em>Rolling Stone</em>. The album he and Ono made, <em>Double Fantasy,</em> was the perfect comeback, representing a fresh start for a well-rested couple who were ready to greet the world again. The irony is that when Lennon was killed on December 8, 1980, <em>Double Fantasy</em> went from comeback to sad farewell.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/iAJ2AoEwDvY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>03. Deep Purple — <em>Perfect Strangers</em> (1984)</strong> </p> <p><strong>The Set-Up:</strong> After releasing a string of heavy, successful albums between 1969 and 1973, including <em>Deep Purple In Rock, Made In Japan</em> and <em>Machine Head,</em> the classic "Mk II" lineup of Deep Purple — Ian Gillan (vocals), Ritchie Blackmore (guitar), Roger Glover (bass), Jon Lord (keyboards) and Ian Paice (drums) — basically just fizzled out. By the mid-'70s, when only Lord and Paice remained (David Coverdale, Tommy Bolin and Glenn Hughes had come onboard), the band was just a shell of its former self. Their lackluster late-1975 album, <em>Come Taste the Band,</em> was sonic proof of that. Deep Purple disbanded in 1976.</p> <p><strong>The Comeback:</strong> In 1984, Deep Purple regrouped — with the Mk II lineup, thankfully — and released <em>Perfect Strangers</em>, a major worldwide hit that went platinum in the U.S. The band reached back and dusted off its classic sound, spotlighting Gillan's ageless vocals and Blackmore's lightning-fast snake-charmer scales. The album spawned several radio hits and a tour that just kept on going — because people just couldn't taste enough of the band.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/gZ_kez7WVUU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>02. Ozzy Osbourne — <em>Blizzard of Ozz</em> (1980)</strong> </p> <p><strong>The Set-Up:</strong> After two less-than-stellar releases from Black Sabbath — 1975's <em>Technical Ecstasy</em> and 1976's <em>Sabotage</em> — Ozzy Osbourne took a brief break from the band to work on a project he called "Blizzard of Ozz." At the request of the band, Ozzy dropped the project to return to the band for the recording of 1978's <em>Never Say Die!</em>, which brought tensions in the band to a new high. </p> <p>A myriad of drug problems and mounting tensions between Osbourne and Sabbath guitarist Tony Iommi led to the group unanimously deciding to fire Ozzy. Within two years, the band had recorded <em>Heaven and Hell</em> with new vocalist Ronnie James Dio, which proved that the band could remain relevant without Osbourne. The question then became, could Ozzy pull himself out of the gutter and remain relevant as well? </p> <p><strong>The Comeback:</strong> It turns out all Ozzy needed was new management. Of course, not just any manager would do. It took then-girlfriend Sharon Arden (daughter of Sabbath manager Don Arden) to pull Ozzy out of his haze and set him to work on his "Blizzard of Ozz" project. With the help of bassist/lyricist Bos Daisley and a young guitar prodigy named Randy Rhoads, Ozzy finally finished the album, <em>Blizzard of Ozz</em>, which would re-ignite his career and eventually lead to his being one of the biggest personalities in rock and metal.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ZcoweoZ6jpM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>01. AC/DC — <em>Back in Black</em> (1980)</strong> </p> <p><strong>The Set-Up:</strong> In late 1979, AC/DC unleashed <em>Highway to Hell</em> on the world. While not a departure in sound from their previous albums, the production efforts and arrangement contributions of producer Mutt Lange, alongside the wry lyricism of lead singer Bon Scott and always-fiery guitar efforts of Angus Young, made <em>Highway to Hell</em> the band's most commercial success to date. Less than six months later, Scott was found dead in the back of a car, having choked to death on his own vomit. </p> <p><strong>The Comeback:</strong> Whether or not to continue the band without their charismatic frontman wasn't an easy choice for the remaining members of AC/DC, but after much soul-searching, the band recruited former Geordie singer Brian Johnson to try and fill the void left by Scott's death. </p> <p>Johnson had his own troubles after joining the band, struggling to pen lyrics he felt were up to the lofty standards set by his predecessor. As fate would have it, a storm rolling in one night over the Bahamas, where the band had retreated to in order to write, inspired the opening lyrics to "Hells Bells," the opening track from the ultimate comeback album — not to mention the second-highest-selling album of all time — <em>Back In Black</em>. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/pAgnJDJN4VA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Next: Honorable Mentions</strong></p> <hr /> <p><strong>Honorable Mentions</strong> </p> <p>Iron Maiden – <em>Brave New World</em> </p> <p>Eric Clapton – <em>461 Ocean Boulevard</em> </p> <p>Avenged Sevenfold - <em>Nightmare</em> </p> <p>Alice in Chains – <em>Black Gives Way To Blue</em> </p> <p>Van Halen – <em>5150</em> </p> <p>Red Hot Chili Peppers – <em>Californication</em> </p> <p>Celtic Frost - <em>Monotheist</em> </p> <p>Heaven &amp; Hell - <em>The Devil You Know</em> </p> <p>Judas Priest - <em>Painkiller</em> </p> <object width="620" height="365"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/YlUKcNNmywk?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" /><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/YlUKcNNmywk?version=3&amp;hl=en_US&amp;rel=0" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object><p> </p> <p><strong>Next: The Top 10 Worst Comeback Albums of All Time</strong></p> <hr /> <p><strong>Top 10 Worst Comeback Albums</strong></p> <p>01. Guns N' Roses - <em>Chinese Democracy</em> </p> <p>02. Iron Maiden - <em>The X Factor</em> </p> <p>03. Kiss - <em>Psycho Circus</em> </p> <p>04. Queen + Paul Rodgers - <em>The Cosmos Rocks</em> </p> <p>05. Aerosmith - <em>Done With Mirrors</em> </p> <p>06. Tony Iommi - <em>Seventh Star</em> </p> <p>07. Motley Crue - <em>Motley Crue</em> </p> <p>08. Poison - <em>Hollyweird</em> </p> <p>09. Ozzy Osbourne - <em>Down to Earth</em> </p> <p>10. Judas Priest - <em>Angel of Retribution</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-best-and-worst-comeback-albums-all-time#comments ACDC Aerosmith Allman Brothers Band Black Sabbath Dave Grohl Deep Purple Foo Fighters John Lennon Johnny Cash Metallica Ozzy Osbourne U2 Guitar World Lists News Features Wed, 21 May 2014 14:57:33 +0000 Damian Fanelli, Josh Hart http://www.guitarworld.com/article/11377 Derek Trucks Discusses Leaving the Allman Brothers Band: "At Some Point, You Have to Step Away" http://www.guitarworld.com/derek-trucks-discusses-leaving-allman-brothers-band-some-point-you-have-step-away <!--paging_filter--><p>In January, Derek Trucks and Warren Haynes issued a joint statement that they would no longer tour with the Allman Brothers Band after this year. </p> <p>Though Gregg Allman said in an interview that the guitarists’ departure would likely mark the end of the band, which is currently celebrating its 45th anniversary, the band has not released any official statement and their future plans remain unknown. </p> <p>I spoke with Derek as the band was beginning their March run at New York City’s Beacon Theatre. They played 10 of 14 shows before postponing the final four because Allman was unable to perform after an illness he said was bronchitis. They have not yet announced when the shows will be played.</p> <p>This weekend, the Allman Brothers Band will appear at <a href="http://www.waneefestival.com">Florida’s Wanee Festival</a>, along with the Tedeschi Trucks Band, Gov’t Mule and many others. I'll be speaking there Saturday, discussing my new book <em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1250040493/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=211189&amp;creative=373489&amp;creativeASIN=1250040493&amp;link_code=as3&amp;tag=alanpaulinchi-20">One Way Out: The Inside History of the Allman Brothers Band.</a></em></p> <p><a href="http://alanpaul.net/2014/04/warren-haynes-on-why-he-decided-to-leave-the-allman-brothers-band/">Click here to read an exclusive interview with Warren Haynes on his thoughts on leaving the Allman Brothers Band.</a></p> <p><strong>Why did you decide to leave the Allman Brothers at the end of this year?</strong></p> <p>It’s something I’ve been thinking about for a long time. I want to see the legacy end as it should — at the top. I don’t want to see Joe Montana in Kansas City or Muhammad Ali at the end of his career. It’s a rare thing to be able to go out on top and in great shape, and I think it would be great, but it’s ultimately not up to me, but to the original members, if they will continue.</p> <p><strong>Right. And people are waiting for a statement that hasn’t come, which would seem to indicate that Gregg, Butch and Jaimoe have not made up their minds about the future.</strong></p> <p>I‘m hoping that if it continues, it’s because it’s supposed to and not for personal reasons. I think from Duane until now, the band has given everyone so much and at some point you have to honor the legacy with real dignity.</p> <p>I was watching Leonard Cohen receive an award in Spain and I was struck by acceptance speech, with him talking about how everything has an end but you need to recognize and honor it and treat it with dignity. He said that if you have the ability to treat the end with real dignity and beauty, that’s what separates things. I thought that was apropos to our situation.</p> <p><strong>I understand what you’re saying, but also understand why it’s hard to stop something that is still working very, very well.</strong></p> <p>Yes, but at some point, you have to step away. With all the ups and downs of the band, it’s been an amazing, unique story — as you know as well as anyone! And if you can go out the right way, it keeps the story amazing to the end. It might be a hard thing to do, but to me, it’s the right thing to do.</p> <p><strong>Why did you and Warren elect to make your announcement together?</strong></p> <p>I think it’s more powerful that way. The information was leaked out in January on the Jam Cruise, and it was going to come out one way or the other that I had decided not to tour with the Allman Brothers after this year, and I just wanted to get out in front of it</p> <p>I was really happy that Warren decided to be with me, but that was, of course, up to him. It all happened really quickly; information travels quickly these days. I was leaving for a tour and I started getting these emails asking questions and basically saying, “We’re going to run with the story. Do you want to comment?” </p> <p>Obviously I’ve been thinking about it for a while and I just decided to jump on it.</p> <p><strong>The statements by you and Warren were very eloquent. Did you really write them in response or did you have them ready?</strong></p> <p>Thanks. We wrote them in response. I spoke to [Tedeschi Trucks Band singer] Mike Mattison who has a great way with words and helped me craft my statement. Then I sent it to Warren. I didn’t want to implicate him at all if he wasn’t ready. Half an hour later, he called me and said, “Do you mind if we change the first paragraph from I to 'we' and I add my own statement?”</p> <p><strong>Can you just explain a little why you have decided to do this now?</strong></p> <p>Really, it’s more time at home and more time focusing on one project. Since I’ve been an adult, I’ve never had the opportunity to go full steam on one project. I love all the amazing opportunities, but it’s going to be great to wrap my head around one and see what we can do.</p> <p>I’ve been in the Allman Brothers for 15 years, and the whole time I’ve also had my solo career and it’s been wonderful but very busy, and frankly I’ve missed a lot of my kids growing up. I’ve never been home for one of my son’s birthdays. It’s March 6 and I’ve been at the Beacon every year. I want to jump on the last remaining years I have with my kids before they are fully grown up. We’ve managed it really well and been very fortunate to have family close by to help out, but it’s time to simplify and refocus on my own band and my family.</p> <p><strong>Anyone with a family can understand that desire. On the other hand, the Allman Brothers have toured less and less and it doesn’t seem like a huge time commitment.</strong></p> <p>Right, everyone thinks that, but there’s also travel, rehearsals, the difficulty of scheduling. And even if it’s “only” three or four months a year dedicated to the Allman Brothers, that means you start the year with eight or nine instead of 12 and it gets chopped up pretty quickly. I don’t think I’ve had a month at home since I joined the Allman Brothers, and I’m ready for that. </p> <p><strong>The band has done a remarkable job for 45 years at finding great new players to replace seemingly irreplaceable members.</strong></p> <p>Yes, and who knows what will happen next. I would never bet against an Allman Brothers' resurrection. There have been a few times I thought it was over, and we came roaring back.</p> <p>There’s something about the storyline that sets it apart. You have to give back to the institution and even though it may seem counter–intuitive, it may be that the best way to do so is walking away. I respect the band and the music as much as anyone does, and it’s been amazing being a part of it, but I also feel like sometimes you have to step back from it and think what’s best for the legacy of the group. </p> <p>Warren and I and a few of the other guys in the band have had long heart-to-hearts about this and really believe we have the chance to go out and throw down. Going out with guns blazing, giving it everything you’ve got, is a lot better than limping across the finish line. No one wants to see that happen. If I were writing the story, that’s how it would go. But a lot of people are in a lot of different places personally and musically. </p> <p><strong>You seem very calm and at peace with your decision.</strong></p> <p>Honestly, I feel like a weight has been lifted because it’s something I’ve been contemplating for a long time. You can only mean it at 100 percent as long as you mean it at 100 percent. I’m not an actor, and when I play it’s got to be full on. If I feel like it’s the right thing to do, it’s easy to do.</p> <p>My feeling always is, if you can continue to put your heart in for the right reason and keep roiling then you should do so. Now I feel much as I did when I put my solo band aside in favor of [Tedeschi Trucks Band]. Some people didn’t understand why I would do that, but I just thought it was time. </p> <p>And from the first day of rehearsal, it feels really fresh and new and honest, maybe in a way it hasn’t since the 40th anniversary. I’m excited about getting on stage every night and playing every show like it’s the last show. You try to have that feeling every time you go on stage, but it’s 100 percent different when it really might be true that It could be the last time you play this particular song with this particular band — so make it count.</p> <p><em>Photo: Dino Perrucci</em></p> <p><em>Alan Paul is the author of the best-selling book </em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1250040493/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=211189&amp;creative=373489&amp;creativeASIN=1250040493&amp;link_code=as3&amp;tag=alanpaulinchi-20">One Way Out: The Inside History of the Allman Brothers Band.</a></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/derek-trucks">Derek Trucks</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/allman-brothers-band">Allman Brothers Band</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/derek-trucks-discusses-leaving-allman-brothers-band-some-point-you-have-step-away#comments Allman Brothers Band Derek Trucks Dino Perrucci Interviews News Features Thu, 10 Apr 2014 14:48:57 +0000 Alan Paul http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20984 Gear Rundown: Warren Haynes and Derek Trucks of the Allman Brothers Band http://www.guitarworld.com/gear-rundown-warren-haynes-and-derek-trucks-allman-brothers-band <!--paging_filter--><p>The Allman Brothers Band played 10 nights at New York City's Beacon Theatre before having to postpone their final four shows of the run due to Gregg Allman’s ongoing struggle with bronchitis. </p> <p>They played the final two nights, Friday and Saturday, March 21 and 22, without Allman.</p> <p>Throughout the run, guitarists Derek Trucks and Warren Haynes, who have announced that they will no longer tour with the band after this year, were front and center. </p> <p>Both guitarists use different rigs with the Brothers than they do on their own, in the Tedeschi Trucks Band and Gov’t Mule, respectively. </p> <p>Duane Allman’s 1959 tobacco sunburst Gibson Les Paul was on the way from Cleveland’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, courtesy of Duane’s daughter, Galadrielle, who owns the instrument. Trucks and Haynes were planning on playing it March 28 and 29, two of the cancelled shows. The plan was for each guitarist to play it one set per night, both nights.</p> <p>I visited with guitar techs Brian Farmer (Haynes and bassist Oteil Burbridge) and Bobby Tis (Trucks) before the March 21 show for a look at the gear on an otherwise abandoned Beacon stage. Both musicians utilize rigs that are beautiful in their simplicity.</p> <p><strong>WARREN HAYNES</strong></p> <p>Haynes played through two amps: a PRS Super Dallas with reverb and a Sewell Texi Plex without reverb. The latter was designed and built by Doug Sewell, who now works for PRS. Virtually the same amp is now available through PRS. Both amps feed into a Marshall 4x12 cabinet with Vintage 30 speakers. </p> <p>Haynes also has a 100-watt Ampeg BA 115 cross stage bass amp that feeds Oteil Burbridge’s bass lines behind him. “He likes to really hear and feel the bass,” Farmer says. </p> <p>Haynes primarily played a few different Gibson Les Pauls and 335s at the Beacon. His most-played Les Paul was “Chester,” a Gibson Custom Shop Warren Haynes model with a '59 neck, a '58 body and Gibson Burstbucker pickups. For a few songs in drop-D tuning, he played “Dee,” a '58 reissue with Burstbuckers. He also played “Big House,” a 1959 Les Paul owned by the Big House Museum in Macon, Georgia. </p> <p>Haynes also played two 335s: “Huddie,” a new Gibson Memphis Warren Haynes model, which is a copy of his ‘61 335, which he no longer takes on the road, and “Blondie,” a ’59 reissue. He also sometimes plays a Zagler ES, which is custom made by Austrian builder Paul Zagler. </p> <p>The guitars are strung with GHS burnished nickel strings, .10-.46. “The only exception is Dee, where we use GHS Nickel Rockers, and I change the .46 to a .54,” Farmer says.</p> <p>Haynes’ Allman Brothers pedal board is extremely minimalist. With Gov’t Mule, he utilizes at least 10 pedals, but the with the ABB, he has only an Ernie Ball volume pedal into a GLab Warren Haynes model Wowee Wah into a Palmer Tri Line A/B switch to alternate amps. </p> <p>“His Allman Brothers band setup is simple and effective,” Farmer says. “He gets most of his tonal variation by alternating guitars and amps, as well as pickups.”</p> <p>The band’s guest amp, which was used this run by Jimmy Vivino, Gregg Allman Band guitarist Scott Sharrard, bluesman Junior Mack, Devon Allman and others, is a PRS Dallas labeled Charlie, for Trucks’ son, and run through a PRS 4x12 cab with Vintage 30s.</p> <p><strong>DEREK TRUCKS</strong></p> <p>Derek Trucks’ main guitars are two Gibson Custom Shop Dickey Betts “From One Brother to Another” model SGs, which are based on the 1961-62 SG Betts gave to Duane Allman and both played in the original ABB..</p> <p>Trucks also played a sunburst Les Paul, which is a ’53 converted to a ’59 electronically and borrowed from a New York collector. </p> <p>Trucks’ rig is a model of simplicity. Like Haynes, he runs through two amp heads: a PRS model HXDA, which Tis describes as a combination of a Marshall Super Lead and Super Bass; and an Alessandro, which Tis says is similar to a beefed-up 1959 Fender Twin. “It has a really clean and clear David Gilmour-type sound,” Tis says.</p> <p>The Allesandro has reverb, but the PRS does not, so before hitting the amp, Trucks’ guitar runs through a 1963 Fender Reverb unit. The amps run into a Randall 4x12 cabinet with Custom Eminence speakers.</p> <p>The only other thing in Trucks’ signal chain is a Radial Tone Bone switching pedal and a TC Electronic PolyTune tuner.</p> <p>“He doesn’t like thinking there is anything between him and his amp,” Tis says. “It’s guitar-tuner-reverb-amp-done. Even his cable and tuner have been carefully selected to have no noise. “</p> <p><strong>OTEIL BURBRIDGE</strong></p> <p>Bassist Burbridge plays only two instruments: a Road Worn Fender P Bass with a Jazz Bass pickup added — and a six-string Fodera. He plays through two Epifani bass rigs. “They’re American made and based in Long Island, and Oteil loves them,” Farmer says. </p> <p><em>Photo gallery: All photos by Alan Paul except where indicated.</em></p> <p><em>Alan Paul is the author of the best-selling book </em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1250040493/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=211189&amp;creative=373489&amp;creativeASIN=1250040493&amp;link_code=as3&amp;tag=alanpaulinchi-20">One Way Out: The Inside History of the Allman Brothers Band.</a></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/allman-brothers-band">Allman Brothers Band</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/warren-haynes">Warren Haynes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/derek-trucks">Derek Trucks</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/gear-rundown-warren-haynes-and-derek-trucks-allman-brothers-band#comments Allman Brothers Band Derek Trucks Oteil Burbridge Warren Haynes Amps Electric Guitars Galleries News Gear Thu, 27 Mar 2014 17:22:30 +0000 Alan Paul http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20856 Book Review: 'One Way Out: The Inside History of The Allman Brothers Band' http://www.guitarworld.com/book-review-one-way-out-inside-history-allman-brothers-band <!--paging_filter--><p>Democracies very rarely work in rock bands. </p> <p>Most successful groups usually have one dominant member (maybe two) who provides the artistic vision the rest can respect and rally around. </p> <p>Without strong leadership, you can usually kiss any band goodbye. This appears to be the underlying lesson in <em>Guitar World</em> writer Alan Paul’s excellent new book, <em>One Way Out: The Inside History of The Allman Brothers Band</em> (St. Martin’s Press).</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-exclusive-look-allman-brothers-band-performing-midnight-rider-1992-live-great-woods-dvd">[[ Video: Get an Exclusive Look at the Allman Brothers Band Performing "Midnight Rider" in 1992 from the 'Live At Great Woods' DVD ]]</a></strong></p> <p>Written with the Allman Brothers Band’s participation, <em>One Way Out</em> is perhaps the most in-depth look at one of America’s most beloved, but thoroughly dysfunctional ensembles. </p> <p>With slide guitar genius Duane Allman at the helm, the Brothers started out strong and sure. They went from strength-to-strength in the late Sixties and early Seventies, becoming one of the world’s truly inspired improvising bands as evidenced by their landmark 1971 double album <em>At Fillmore East.</em></p> <p>The Allman Brothers Band was largely Duane’s conception, and it was his unflagging energy and incredible guitar playing that drove them to mesmerizing heights as they blended rock, jazz, blues and country in new and exciting ways. Unfortunately, the guitarist was killed in a motorcycle accident in October of ’71 just as the band was achieving large-scale commercial recognition. </p> <p>In the aftermath, co-guitarist Dickey Betts picked up the baton, and for a while it looked like he would lead them to new-found glory. Their next two albums, <em>Eat a Peach</em> (1972) and <em>Brothers and Sisters</em> (1973) were artistic and commercial triumphs. However, Betts’ temperamental behavior made him a less than ideal captain, and over the next several decades the band split into warring factions that became the stuff of legend. Astonishingly, they continued to play solid, often inspired, music and somehow survived—but just barely. </p> <p>The band’s incredible rise and their trials and tribulations naturally make for a great story and engrossing reading. Alan Paul has written about the Allmans in <em>Guitar World</em> for the last 25 years, and his depth of knowledge shows. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/blues-sub-offer">[[ Guitar World’s Blues Greats Subscription Offer: Get one year of Guitar World plus a new digital EP, 'Legacy Recordings Presents: Blues Greats! Past &amp; Present,' featuring “Get On With Your Life" (Live) by the Allman Brothers Band! ]]</a></strong></p> <p>He manages to get every surviving member of the band—past and present—to be shockingly honest in their assessment of their music and relationships with each other. Even the group’s famously easygoing guitarist Warren Haynes gets into the act as he expresses his exasperation at the sometimes strange and unpredictable behavior of his gifted, but flawed, band mates. </p> <p>The book is written in an oral history format, so the stories are salty, unfiltered and straight from the horse’s mouth. It’s a good thing, too, because the Allmans’ story is often so bizarre and harrowing it’s hard to believe it’s true. The word “definitive” gets tossed around so often it has lost some of its meaning, but this 400-page journey into the heart of rock and roll darkness deserves the accolade.</p> <p>The book also makes you wonder just what would’ve happened if Duane had been around to kick some butt …</p> <p><strong><em>One Way Out: The Inside Story of the Allman Brothers</em> (St. Martin’s, February 18) is <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1250040493/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=211189&amp;creative=373489&amp;creativeASIN=1250040493&amp;link_code=as3&amp;tag=alanpaulinchi-20">available for pre-order at Amazon.com.</a> For more about Alan Paul, visit <a href="http://alanpaul.net/">alanpaul.net</a>.</strong></p> <p><em>Brad Tolinksi is the editor-in-chief of </em>Guitar World<em> magazine</em>.</p> <p><strong>The March 2014 issue of <em>Guitar World</em> magazine is available now: Eric Clapton's 50 Greatest Guitar Songs, How the <em>Layla</em> Sessions Almost Destroyed the Allman Brothers Band, Mike Bloomfield, Johnny Winter and More! <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-march-14-eric-clapton/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=AlanPaulBookReview">It's available at newsstands and at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/allman-brothers-band">Allman Brothers Band</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/duane-allman">Duane Allman</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/gregg-allman">Gregg Allman</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/book-review-one-way-out-inside-history-allman-brothers-band#comments Alan Paul Allman Brothers Band Brad Tolinski Duane Allman Blogs News Features Tue, 18 Feb 2014 20:18:38 +0000 Brad Tolinski http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20386 Video: Exclusive Look at the Allman Brothers Band Performing "Midnight Rider" in 1992 from 'Live At Great Woods' DVD http://www.guitarworld.com/video-exclusive-look-allman-brothers-band-performing-midnight-rider-1992-live-great-woods-dvd <!--paging_filter--><p>Today, GuitarWorld.com presents the premiere of an exclusive video of the Allman Brothers Band's live performance of "Midnight Rider" from their storied 1992 tour.</p> <p>The clip is from an upcoming archival DVD release from the band, <em>Live at Great Woods</em>, which will be available February 18.</p> <p>That same date, fans of the band also will be treated to a new two-CD set, <em>Play All Night: Live at the Beacon Theatre 1992</em>, and a new Allmans biography by Alan Paul — <em>The Inside History of the Allman Brothers Band</em>. <strong>You can check out <em>Guitar World</em> Editor-in-Chief Brad Tolinski's review of <em>One Way Out</em> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/book-review-one-way-out-inside-history-allman-brothers-band">right here.</a></strong></p> <p>Recorded before a crowd of nearly 20,000 fans at the Great Woods Center for the Performing Arts in Mansfield, Massachusetts, and featuring a set of favorites, <em>Live at Great Woods</em> features, for the first time on DVD, the original long-form video version of this show with no interviews edited into the main feature. </p> <p>Meanwhile, <em>Play All Night: Live at the Beacon Theatre 1992</em> showcases the band’s first time playing an extended run at New York City's Beacon Theatre.</p> <p>Both releases feature founding members Gregg Allman (vocals/keyboards), Dickey Betts (guitar), Butch Trucks and Jaimoe (drums) plus a trio of talented up-and-comers: Allen Woody on bass, Marc Quinones on percussion and Warren Haynes on guitar. The hiring of Haynes, a little-known guitarist who’d toured with Betts, was genius; his approach evoked the spirit of the late Duane Allman, drawing a clear line from the band’s past to its future.</p> <p><em>Play All Night</em> features new liner notes by John Lynskey, editor of <em>Hittin’ The Note,</em> the official ABB magazine, plus onstage photos by Kirk West (See the photo gallery below). You can see the track lists from both releases below.</p> <p>For more about the Allman Brothers Band, visit <a href="http://www.allmanbrothersband.com/">allmanbrothersband.com</a>.</p> <p>The pre-order the new releases, check out the links below:</p> <p><strong><em>Play All Night: Live at the Beacon Theatre 1992</em></strong><br /> • <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/play-all-night-live-at-beacon/id789974922">iTunes</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HNTUR1S/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00HNTUR1S&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=legacy_recordings-20">Amazon</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.hittinthenote.com/cart/p-1631-allman-brothers-bandbrplay-all-night-live-atbr-the-beacon-theatre-1992.aspx">Hittin' The Note</a></p> <p><strong><em>Live at Great Woods</em> DVD</strong><br /> • <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005MXQD0G/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B005MXQD0G&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=legacy_recordings-20">Amazon</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.hittinthenote.com">Hittin' The Note</a></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/blues-sub-offer">[[ Guitar World’s Blues Greats Subscription Offer: Get one year of Guitar World plus a new digital EP, 'Legacy Recordings Presents: Blues Greats! Past &amp; Present,' featuring “Get On With Your Life" (Live) by the Allman Brothers Band! ]]</a></strong></p> <!-- Start of VEVO Player --><!-- Start of VEVO Player --><object width="620" height="365"> <param name="movie" value="http://videoplayer.vevo.com/embed/embedded?videoId=USSM21302544&playlist=false&autoplay=0&playerId=62FF0A5C-0D9E-4AC1-AF04-1D9E97EE3961&playerType=embedded&env=0&siteSection=&sbId=346C2586-D3F8-4B75-BA0D-398FDB6E4C08&enableDomScan=true&endScreen=play" /> <param name="wmode" value="transparent" /> <param name="bgcolor" value="#000000" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /> <embed src="http://videoplayer.vevo.com/embed/embedded?videoId=USSM21302544&playlist=false&autoplay=0&playerId=62FF0A5C-0D9E-4AC1-AF04-1D9E97EE3961&playerType=embedded&env=0&siteSection=&sbId=346C2586-D3F8-4B75-BA0D-398FDB6E4C08&enableDomScan=true&endScreen=play" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" width="620" height="365" bgcolor="#000000" wmode="transparent"></embed> <div id="fw_300x60" style="background:black;width:575px;height:relative;position:relative;top:-6px;text-align:center;"> <span id="comp_300x60" class="_fwph"> <form id="_fw_form_comp_300x60" style="display:none" > <input type="hidden" name="_fw_input_comp_300x60" id="_fw_input_comp_300x60" value="ptgt=p&envp=g_iframe_js&slid=comp_300x60&w=300&h=60&slau=300x60_Companion1|300x60" /></form> <span id="_fw_container_comp_300x60" class="_fwac"> </span></span></div></object><!-- End of VEVO Player --><!-- End of VEVO Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong><em>Play All Night: Live at the Beacon Theatre 1992</em> 2CD</strong></p> <p>DISC 1<br /> 01. Statesboro Blues<br /> 02. You Don’t Love Me<br /> 03. End Of The Line<br /> 04. Blue Sky<br /> 05. Nobody Knows<br /> 06. Low Down Dirty Mean<br /> 07. Seven Turns<br /> 08. Midnight Rider<br /> 09. Come On In My Kitchen</p> <p>DISC 2<br /> 01. Guitar Intro / Hoochie Coochie Man<br /> 02. Jessica<br /> 03. Get On With Your Life<br /> 04. In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed<br /> 05. Revival<br /> 06. Dreams<br /> 07. Whipping Post</p> <p><strong><em>Live at Great Woods</em> DVD</strong></p> <p>01. Statesboro Blues<br /> 02. End Of The Line<br /> 03. Blue Sky<br /> 04. Midnight Rider (Presented here exclusively)<br /> 05. Going Down The Road<br /> 06. Hoochie Coochie Man<br /> 07. Get On With Your Life<br /> 08. In Memory Of Elizabeth Reed<br /> 09. Revival<br /> 10. Jessica<br /> 11. Whipping Post</p> <p><em>All photos: Kirk West</em></p> <p><strong>The March 2014 issue of <em>Guitar World</em> magazine is available now: Eric Clapton's 50 Greatest Guitar Songs, How the <em>Layla</em> Sessions Almost Destroyed the Allman Brothers Band, Mike Bloomfield, Johnny Winter and More! <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-march-14-eric-clapton/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=AlanPaulBookReview">It's available at newsstands and at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/allman-brothers-band">Allman Brothers Band</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/warren-haynes">Warren Haynes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dickey-betts">Dickey Betts</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-exclusive-look-allman-brothers-band-performing-midnight-rider-1992-live-great-woods-dvd#comments Allman Brothers Band Dickey Betts Gregg Allman Warren Haynes Videos News Features Mon, 03 Feb 2014 16:59:51 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20385 Warren Haynes and Derek Trucks to Leave Allman Brothers Band at End of 2014 http://www.guitarworld.com/warren-haynes-and-derek-trucks-leave-allman-brothers-band-end-2014 <!--paging_filter--><p>Last night, longtime Allman Brothers Band guitarists Warren Haynes and Derek Trucks announced they'll be departing the band at the end of 2014.</p> <p>"For 25 years and 15 years respectively, we've had the honor and pleasure of playing, living, learning and traveling with the Allman Brothers Band, one of the truly legendary rock and roll bands," wrote Haynes and Trucks in a joint statement released last night. </p> <p>"We will be forever grateful for the opportunity and the experience, and for the love, enthusiasm and support of the incredible fans. We are both preparing to dig even deeper into our various creative and musical endeavors and, as a result, 2014 will be our final year as part of the band."</p> <p>The news is something of a surprise — at least to everyone besides Haynes and Trucks. Just last week, the band announced their 45th-anniversary plans for 2014, which include a string of shows in March (See dates below) and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/allman-brothers-band-release-new-archival-live-album-boston-common-81771-announce-2014-shows">several archival releases (Read more here).</a> </p> <p>"Spontaneous things still happen. Going through the motions would be a real bore," Gregg Allman told <em>Rolling Stone</em> last month. "I know a band that plays the same songs in the same order, they even say the same shit at the same time every night. But, no, we're all still real into it."</p> <p>Haynes joined the Allmans in 1989 at age 28. </p> <p>"Based on the success of the tour and the uncanny chemistry between the original members and the new members, we decided to continue and see where it all led," Haynes wrote. "Now, here we are, 25 years later, and it has been an amazing experience. I've always said that if I were to join a band that I grew up listening to the ABB would be at the top of that list. </p> <p>"The original version of the band was a huge influence on me and I'm sure that the countless hours I spent listening to and studying that music helped shape me as a musician. As proud as I am of being a member of such a legendary band, I'm even more proud of the music that we've made together and of being a part of carrying their original vision into the future."</p> <p>Trucks, who joined the band at age 19, added:</p> <p>"When I started with ABB, I didn't know how long it would last, only that I would let the music lead me and teach me. Amazingly that led me past the band's 40th anniversary, to the band's 45th, and now my 15th year as a member of this incredible band. Five years ago the 45th seemed like a lofty goal, but I thought if we could make it to that milestone it would be a logical time to move on.</p> <p>"While I've shared many magical moments on stage with the Allman Brothers Band in the last decade plus, I feel that my solo project and the Tedeschi Trucks Band is where my future and creative energy lies. The Tedeschi Trucks Band tour schedule keeps growing, and I feel the time has finally come to focus on a single project, which will allow me to spend that rare time off the road with my family and children. It’s a difficult decision to make, and I don’t make it lightly."</p> <p>We could have more information as early as Friday, when Allman will be honored with a tribute concert at Atlanta's Fox Theater; the show will feature Haynes and Trucks (Check out the details below). The Allman Brothers Band are also set to kick off their annual run at New York City's Beacon Theater on March 7.</p> <p><strong>Allman Brothers Band Live Dates</strong></p> <p><Strong>January 10</strong>: Atlanta, Georgia, Fox Theater, <a href="http://celebrategreggallman.com/">All My Friends: Celebrating the Songs and Voice of Gregg Allman</a></p> <p><strong>March (various dates):</strong> Beacon Theater, New York City, March 7, 8, 11, 12, 14, 15, 18, 19, 21, 22</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Jwf9k-vGpRU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/derek-trucks">Derek Trucks</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/warren-haynes">Warren Haynes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/allman-brothers-band">Allman Brothers Band</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/warren-haynes-and-derek-trucks-leave-allman-brothers-band-end-2014#comments Allman Brothers Band Derek Trucks Warren Haynes News Thu, 09 Jan 2014 15:22:53 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20162 Allman Brothers Band to Release New Archival Live Album, 'Boston Common 8/17/71,' Announce 2014 Shows http://www.guitarworld.com/allman-brothers-band-release-new-archival-live-album-boston-common-81771-announce-2014-shows <!--paging_filter--><p>The Allman Brothers Band have announced plans for their 45th anniversary in 2014, including the annual string of concerts at New York City’s Beacon Theatre, with 10 shows kicking off March 7. </p> <p>The band has performed at the 2,800-seat Beacon more than 220 times since they began the tradition in 1989.</p> <p>In 2014, fans of the band — which now includes Gregg Allman, Butch Trucks, Jaimoe, Warren Haynes, Derek Trucks, Oteil Burbridge and Marc Quinones — will hear an array of live releases from throughout their career. </p> <p>In February, the group’s Allman Brothers Band Recording Company will issue <em>Boston Common 8/17/71</em>, which was recorded 10 weeks before the death of co-founding guitarist Duane Allman. It's one of the few Duane Allman-era shows that no fan has heard or owns. </p> <p>On February 18 Epic/Legacy Recordings will release the two-CD set <em>Play All Night: Live At The Beacon Theatre 1992</em> and a live DVD from 1991, <em>Live At Great Woods.</em></p> <p>In April, the group will return to Live Oak, Florida, for the 10th annual Wanee Festival, which they have curated and headlined since 2005; the full lineup will be announced in early 2014. Acts who have joined the ABB at Wanee in past years include Gov’t Mule, the Tedeschi Trucks Band, Jaimoe’s Jasssz Band, the Black Keys, Furthur, Widespread Panic, Robert Plant, Dr. John, Steven Stills, Steve Miller Band, O.A.R., Robert Randolph, Bob Weir &amp; Ratdog, Levon Helm, Buddy Guy, Little Feat, Drive-By Truckers, Grace Potter &amp; The Nocturnals, Sharon Jones &amp; The Dap Kings and more.</p> <p>Tickets for the Beacon Theatre shows go on sale to the public Friday, January 10, at 10 a.m. ET and can be purchased at <a href="http://www.ticketmaster.com/">ticketmaster.com</a> and <a href="http://www.beacontheatre.com/">beacontheatre.com</a> and via charge by phone at 800-745-3000.</p> <p>John Lynskey — ABB authority and publisher of the group’s <em>Hittin’ The Note</em> magazine — wrote the liner notes for <em>Boston Common 8/17/71</em> and sums up the new Boston release:</p> <p>“1971 was a watershed year for the Allman Brothers Band — they recorded their seminal live album, At Fillmore East, in March, and continued to tour relentlessly. By this point, their performances had reached a level of musicianship and intensity that other groups could only dream of. </p> <p>"<em>At Fillmore East</em> was released in July to massive critical acclaim, and a month later, they rolled back into Boston to once again jam in the Common, playing two shows on August 17. <em>Boston Common 8/17/71</em> manages to capture the loose and engaging early set, with the band clearly enjoying themselves — Berry [Oakley]’s stage banter is particularly engaging as he comments on the group’s relationship with Boston and their friendship with the J. Geils Band. </p> <p>"As for the music, Duane’s slide guitar is blistering on ‘Statesboro Blues’ and ‘Don’t Keep Me Wonderin’’; his interplay with Dickey [Betts] on ‘You Don’t Love Me’ is a complex masterpiece, and their dual melody line on ‘In Memory of Elizabeth Reed’ is flawless. Gregg’s vocal work is stellar throughout, and his growl on ‘Trouble No More’ clearly justifies his reputation as one of the best blues singers of all time. Berry, Butch and Jaimoe lay down a rhythm foundation that is a mile wide — the thumping bass line and syncopated drum patterns turn the ‘Whipping Post’ finale into a musical maelstrom.”</p> <p><strong>ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND 2014</strong></p> <p>Fri 3/7<br /> New York, NY Beacon Theatre</p> <p>Sat 3/8<br /> New York, NY Beacon Theatre</p> <p>Tue 3/11<br /> New York, NY Beacon Theatre</p> <p>Wed 3/12<br /> New York, NY Beacon Theatre</p> <p>Fri 3/14<br /> New York, NY Beacon Theatre</p> <p>Sat 3/15<br /> New York, NY Beacon Theatre</p> <p>Tue 3/18<br /> New York, NY Beacon Theatre</p> <p>Wed 3/19<br /> New York, NY Beacon Theatre</p> <p>Fri 3/21<br /> New York, NY Beacon Theatre</p> <p>Sat 3/22<br /> New York, NY Beacon Theatre</p> <p>Fri 4/11<br /> Live Oak, FL Wanee Music Festival</p> <p>Sat 4/12<br /> Live Oak, FL Wanee Music Festival</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/allman-brothers-band">Allman Brothers Band</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/allman-brothers-band-release-new-archival-live-album-boston-common-81771-announce-2014-shows#comments Allman Brothers Band News Thu, 02 Jan 2014 16:35:15 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20098 Video: Eric Clapton, Allman Brothers Band Perform "Why Does Love Got to Be So Sad" from 2013 Crossroads Guitar Festival DVD http://www.guitarworld.com/video-eric-clapton-allman-brothers-band-perform-why-does-love-got-be-so-sad-2013-crossroads-guitar-festival-dvd <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Crossroads Guitar Festival 2013</em> — the CD and DVD/Blu-ray souvenir of Eric Clapton's latest star-studded charity concert, which took place in April at New York City's Madison Square Garden — was released Tuesday, November 19.</p> <p>GuitarWorld.com has posted several performances from the DVD (See RELATED CONTENT to the left), and we've got a good one for you today. </p> <p>Check out Clapton's live version of "Why Does Love Got to Be So Sad," a song that appears on Derek and the Dominos' classic 1970 album, <em>Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs.</em> As a bonus, Clapton performs the track with the Allman Brothers Band and trades licks with Derek Trucks.</p> <p><em>Crossroads Guitar Festival 2013</em> contains five hours of performances and includes 45 songs by Clapton, Jeff Beck, Jimmie Vaughan, the Allman Brothers Band, John Mayer, Blake Mills, Keith Richards, Robert Cray and many more. </p> <p>The second video below is an official teaser clip from the DVD.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="400" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/i-NrOFLLMuM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="400" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/8_XqKLl5nJk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eric-clapton">Eric Clapton</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/allman-brothers-band">Allman Brothers Band</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-eric-clapton-allman-brothers-band-perform-why-does-love-got-be-so-sad-2013-crossroads-guitar-festival-dvd#comments Allman Brothers Band Eric Clapton News Wed, 20 Nov 2013 15:45:15 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19811 In Deep: Tribute to the Musical Genius and Signature Lead Guitar Style of Duane Allman http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-tribute-musical-genius-and-signature-lead-guitar-style-duane-allman <!--paging_filter--><p>A true original, the late, great virtuoso guitarist Duane Allman led the Allman Brothers Band into rock history with his ferocious, deeply expressive and trailblazing guitar work. </p> <p>Rounder Records offers ample testimony to the beauty as well as the breadth of Duane’s recorded work in the new, beautifully compiled box set <em>Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective</em>. In this edition of In Deep, we will examine some of the key elements of Duane’s signature style as a lead guitarist. </p> <p>One of the best examples of the genius of Duane Allman can be found on the timeless, classic live album, At Fillmore East (1971), which captures the Allman Brothers Band live in concert at the peak of their powers. </p> <p>Duane’s razor-sharp articulation and masterful touch abound, starting with the slide guitar tour de force “Statesboro Blues,” through the smoldering slow blues “Stormy Monday” and continuing through the fiery, aggressive solos performed on “Whipping Post,” “You Don’t Love Me” and other great tracks.</p> <p>Duane’s rich, warm tone was achieved via his main ax, a 1958 tobacco sunburst Gibson Les Paul Standard, played through Marshall<br /> “Plexi” 50- and 100-watt heads, usually running two 4x12 Marshall bottoms. For additional distortion, he very occasionally used a Dallas-Arbiter Fuzz Face, usually in the studio. </p> <p>A key to Duane’s virtuosity was the fact that, like Jimi Hendrix, he had extensive experience as a session guitarist, working closely alongside R&amp;B greats like Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin and King Curtis. Through his studio work, Duane had developed a great sense of rhythm as well as a keen understanding of economy, in terms of phrasing.</p> <p>This understanding resulted in improvised solos that remained cohesive and conversational no matter how long they stretched out or how far they roamed from the original starting point. For this column, let’s use two of Duane’s signature songs, “Stormy Monday” and “Whipping Post,” as our points of focus.</p> <p>“Stormy Monday,” written and originally recorded by blues great T-Bone Walker, is played in the key of G. For soloing, Duane relied primarily on a few standard “bluesapproved” scales. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates a scale most guitar players are well familiar with, G minor pentatonic (G Bf C D F), as played in third position. <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> illustrates the G blues scale, which is the same as G minor pentatonic but additionally includes the flatted fifth (f5), Df.</p> <p>Most blues players move alternately between minor and major pentatonic scales based on the same root note. Eric Clapton and B.B. King are two great examples of guitarists whose solos are almost always based on a combination of these two scales. <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> illustrates the G major pentatonic scale (G A B D E) in an extended pattern that diagonally traverses the fretboard from third to 12th positions.</p> <p>Duane often used a soloing device that can be traced to B.B. King, one of his biggest influences. King’s signature soloing approach combines the notes of minor and major pentatonic scales in a very specific fretboard pattern, or “shape.” The pattern, known as “B.B.’s box,” is illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>. </p> <p>This small handful of notes can be ordered and phrased in nearly an infinite number of ways, resulting in many great blues licks. <strong>FIGURES 5–8</strong> offer four different ways in which Duane would use this shape as a jumping off point to improvised solo ideas.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/1%20to%207.png" width="620" height="615" alt="1 to 7.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/8%20to%20something.png" width="620" height="389" alt="8 to something.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/8%20part%202.png" width="839" height="504" alt="8 part 2.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART ONE OF THREE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243315216001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243315216001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><hr /> <p>Now let’s focus on soloing over a 12-bar slow blues form along the lines of “Stormy Monday” and in the style of Duane Allman, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 9</strong>. </p> <p>I begin in bars 1 and 2 with a melodic idea based on G major pentatonic, but in bar 3, I morph into G minor pentatonic by overbending the second, A, up and step and a half to the fourth, C. At the end of bar 4 into bar 5, I apply the overbending technique to E, the sixth, bending that note all the way up to the G root note, repeating the melodic motif into bar 6. </p> <p>When performing these bends, line up additional fingers behind the fretting finger—for example, reinforcing the ring finger with the middle finger or both the middle and index—to help it push the string. Doing so will give you better pitch control and stability when bending. The same is true for bend vibratos.</p> <p>Throughout the remainder of the example, I limit my movement to the eighth and 10th positions to demonstrate that a great amount of melodic invention can be found without moving up and down the fretboard. The intent here is to create lines that are expressive and vocal-like while also evoking a bit of the Duane-like focused intensity.</p> <p>For his “Whipping Post” solo, Duane drew primarily from the A Dorian mode (A B C D E Fs G), two fretboard patterns of which are shown in <strong>FIGURES 10 and 11</strong>. Both patterns are very useful for soloing, so you’ll want to memorize them thoroughly.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 12</strong> offers an eight-bar solo along the lines of Duane’s “Whipping Post” solo. The song is played in 12/8 meter, which affords a lot of room for rhythmic creativity, and Duane made the most of the opportunity every time he played it. I begin this solo with a wholestep bend from the A root up to the second, B, followed by subtle movement down through the notes of the A Dorian mode. </p> <p>In bar 2, I play a quick repeated hammer/pull phrase that emphasizes two notes of a G major triad (G and B) before moving into a line based on A minor pentatonic (A C D E G).</p> <p>Bar 5 offers a unique rhythmic superimposition that Duane used often. Another classic Duane-ism is illustrated in bar 7, as quick pulloffs on the top three strings alternate back and forth in an ascending-and-descending manner.</p> <p>Try using your index and ring fingers to execute this phrase as well as your index and middle fingers and index and pinkie, or a combination of any of these. The aim should be, as always, clarity in execution.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/end.png" width="620" height="651" alt="end.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243315196001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243315196001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>PART THREE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243325650001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243325650001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><img src="/files/imce-images/8%20part%202_0.png" width="620" height="372" alt="8 part 2_0.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/duane-allman">Duane Allman</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-tribute-musical-genius-and-signature-lead-guitar-style-duane-allman#comments Allman Brothers Band Andy Aledort Duane Allman In Deep May 2013 In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Wed, 20 Nov 2013 11:35:36 +0000 Andy Aledort http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18091 Guitar Lust: The Story of Duane Allman's Long-Lost 1957 Gibson Les Paul Goldtop http://www.guitarworld.com/duane-allman-revival <!--paging_filter--><p><em>From the GW archive: This story was originally published in the January 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World.</p> <p>Duane Allman played a gorgeous 1957 Les Paul goldtop for the first 18 months of his two and a half years in the Allman Brothers Band. </p> <p>He played the goldtop on the band’s first two albums, which featured the original versions of “Whipping Post,” “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed,” “Midnight Rider,” “Revival” and other classics, and he played it on his numerous sessions with other artists, including Derek and the Dominos’ 1970 masterpiece, <em>Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs</em>. </p> <p>Then Allman swapped the guitar for a sunburst Paul, and this piece of rock and roll history disappeared into the ether.</p> <p>Now the goldtop is back where it belongs: in the spotlight. Today, Duane’s former guitar is on display at the <a href="http://www.thebighousemuseum.com/">Allman Brothers Band Museum</a> at the Big House in Macon, Georgia.</p> <p>What’s more, it can be heard on a new recording, <em>Guitar Magic</em>, by the Skydog Woody Project, which also features the 1976 Gibson Thunderbird bass once owned by late ABB/Gov’t Mule bassist Allen Woody.</p> <p>The story of how Duane and the goldtop became separated is a classic tale of guitar lust. </p> <p>On September 16, 1970, the Allmans played a show in Duane and Gregg Allman’s hometown of Daytona, Florida. Duane, fresh off recording <em>Layla</em> with Eric Clapton and company, was, as usual, playing his ’57 goldtop.</p> <p>The opening band was a local group called the Stone Balloon, whose guitarist, Rick Stine, was playing a 1959 cherry sunburst Les Paul, which caught Duane’s eye. While making <em>Layla</em> he had fallen in love with Clapton’s cherry sunburst. Wanting one of his own, Duane offered to swap Les Pauls with Stine. When Stine balked, Allman upped the ante, throwing in $200 and one of his regular Marshall 50 heads.</p> <p>Stine agreed, but Duane had one caveat: he wanted the goldtop’s pickups for his new ’burst. The electronics were swapped, and the deal was done. Exactly one week later, on September 23, Allman played his new guitar when the Allman Brothers Band performed at the Fillmore East in New York City, a fact born out by video footage from the show. He played his new cherry ’burst throughout the rest of his career, which ended far too soon when he was killed in a motorcycle crash on October 29, 1971.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Allman’s original goldtop drifted around Daytona, passing through the hands of three different owners, the last of which eventually sold it to a local guitar store. In 1977, the shop sold it to Gainesville guitarist Scot LaMar. He’d heard from his friend Billy Bowers that Duane’s Les Paul was for sale in Daytona, and he rushed to the store to purchase it. He paid $475, a fair price for a vintage Les Paul in 1977.</p> <p>The goldtop had some damage, including a bite mark on the headstock from a previous owner’s dog. LaMar had two respected luthiers refinish the guitar, but he was dissatisfied with the results and eventually had the instrument refinished by Tom Murphy, the man behind the Gibson Historic series and probably the most renowned “goldtop guy” in the world. The guitar was restored to its original glory and placed on display at the Allman Brothers Band Museum at the Big House.</p> <p>Opened last year in the communal house where various members of the band lived, played and jammed together from 1970 to 1973, the Big House Museum includes thousands of artifacts from the ABB’s career. The goldtop is displayed along with artifacts directly related to it, including a shirt given to Duane by Clapton during the <em>Layla</em> sessions and two amps Duane used with the guitar: a Fender Showman and a 50-watt Marshall head, which were sometimes used together.</p> <p>Other items on display at the museum include Berry Oakley’s Fender Jazz “Tractor” bass and Showman amp, a T-shirt from the first-ever run of ABB merchandise, a Fender Bassman that Dickey Betts used during the band’s earliest days and one of Duane’s Marshall cabs. It also includes a recreation of the famous Fillmore East stage, where the band recorded its landmark <em>At Fillmore East</em> live album in 1970. The display includes a set of vintage Ludwig drums used by Butch Trucks from 1968 to 1970, and a pair of road cases with stenciled lettering pictured on the cover of <em>At Fillmore East</em>.</p> <p>The guitar will be on display at the Big House at least through this year, and probably longer. “The guitar is where it belongs right now,” LaMar says. “People need to appreciate it and see it.”</p> <p>Remarkably, LaMar’s generosity with the instrument includes a firm belief that it should be played as well as viewed. “It’s a real living legend and it shouldn’t exist only behind glass,” he says. “It’s a shame to me how many of our greatest guitars have become dead artifacts.”</p> <p>Putting his money where his mouth is, LaMar recently lent the goldtop to guitarist Joe Davis, who used it to record <em>Guitar Magic</em>, which also features bassist Garry Harper playing Allen Woody’s Gibson Thunderbird bass, on loan from Woody’s father. Davis and Harper released the album under the name the Skydog Woody Project, an amalgam of Woody’s name and Duane’s nickname, Skydog. “There was magic in these instruments,” Davis says, “and it impacted everything we did.”</p> <p>The project got rolling after Davis heard about the goldtop and got in touch with LaMar, who invited him to come visit. The two men spent a few days hanging out, but while LaMar showed Davis many to-die-for vintage axes, the goldtop was not among them. “I think he was testing me out,” Davis says. “He took me swimming in alligator-infested water and watched how I acted and how I treated the guitars. During those days, I got discouraged that I might never even see the goldtop because it wasn’t discussed. But we made a great friendship, which started with our mutual love of Jimi Hendrix and Duane Allman.”</p> <p>At long last, LaMar produced Duane’s 1957 goldtop and shocked Davis by asking if he wanted to play it. “I knew right away that this is the perfect guitar,” Davis says. “I went home satisfied that I got to see the <em>Layla</em> guitar and thrilled that I got to play it.”</p> <p>Davis could barely dream that within months he would be in the studio recording an album with that piece of rock and roll history. “It’s the first time I‘ve recorded an album and not thought about how it will sell at all,” says Davis, who has released four other CDs. “I’m just thinking about how it happened and feeling very pleased that I had this opportunity.”</p> <p>LaMar says he was just happy to see and hear the guitar being put to good use. Derek Trucks has also performed with the instrument, and LaMar hopes Warren Haynes will lay his hands on it soon as well. “I want people to see it and hear it,” LaMar says. “It’s not my guitar; it’s Duane Allman’s. I’m just babysitting.”</p> <p><em>Photo: E.J. Devokaitis</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/duane-allman">Duane Allman</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/allman-brothers-band">Allman Brothers Band</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/duane-allman-revival#comments Allman Brothers Band Articles Duane Allman GW Archive January 2011 News Features Tue, 19 Nov 2013 22:18:17 +0000 Alan Paul http://www.guitarworld.com/article/10750 Video: Allman Brothers Band Perform "Whipping Post" at 2013 Crossroads Guitar Festival http://www.guitarworld.com/video-allman-brothers-band-perform-whipping-post-2013-crossroads-guitar-festival <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Crossroads Guitar Festival 2013</em> — the CD and DVD/Blu-ray souvenir of Eric Clapton's latest star-studded charity concert, which took place in April at Madison Square Garden in New York City — will be released November 19.</p> <p>GuitarWorld.com has posted several officially released performances from the DVD (See RELATED CONTENT to the left), and we've got a good one for you today. Check out this impressive, 13-minute-long version of the Allman Brothers Band's "Whipping Post."</p> <p>Sometimes we forget, or simply take for granted, the fact that the Allman Brothers Band has not one, but two world-class guitarists — Derek Trucks and Warren Haynes. But a performance like this is a stunning reminder of how just high the band scores on the talent index.</p> <p>In terms of guitar solos, Trucks starts things off (switching to slide halfway through his showcase). Then it's all Haynes — until the song's emotional climax. The band is rounded out by Gregg Allman, Butch Trucks, Jai Johanny "Jaimoe" Johanson, Marc Quiñones and Oteil Burbridge.</p> <p><em>Crossroads Guitar Festival 2013</em> contains five hours of performances and includes 45 songs by Clapton, Jeff Beck, the Allman Brothers Band, John Mayer, Blake Mills, Keith Richards and many more. The second video below is an official teaser clip from the DVD.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="385" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Jwf9k-vGpRU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="385" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/8_XqKLl5nJk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/allman-brothers-band">Allman Brothers Band</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-allman-brothers-band-perform-whipping-post-2013-crossroads-guitar-festival#comments Allman Brothers Band News Sun, 10 Nov 2013 17:43:18 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19718 Video: 'Eric Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival 2013' Coming to Nearly 500 Movie Theaters Tonight http://www.guitarworld.com/video-eric-clapton-s-crossroads-guitar-festival-2013-coming-nearly-500-movie-theaters-august-13 <!--paging_filter--><p>Eric Clapton's 2013 Crossroads Guitar Festival, which took place at New York City's Madison Square Garden this past April, is coming to a movie theater near you tonight — Tuesday, August 13.</p> <p>The film version of the event — titled <em>Eric Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival 2013</em> — is being presented in nearly 500 theaters around the country through NCM’s Digital Broadcast Network. Tickets are available at theater box offices and at <a href="http://www.fathomevents.com/#!clapton-crossroads">fathomevents.com.</a></p> <p>The film features performances by Clapton, Jeff Beck, Keith Richards, Jimmie Vaughan, Vince Gill, Buddy Guy, John Mayer, Keith Urban, the Allman Brothers Band, Blake Mills, Booker T., Buddy Guy, Derek Trucks, Doyle Bramhall II, Gary Clark Jr., Gregg Allman, Los Lobos, Robert Cray, Sonny Landreth, Warren Haynes and more.</p> <p>For a complete list of theater locations and prices, visit the <a href="http://www.fathomevents.com/#!clapton-crossroads">NCM Fathom Events website</a> (NOTE: Theaters and participants are subject to change). Get your tickets at <a href="http://www.fathomevents.com/#!clapton-crossroads">fathomevents.com.</a></p> <p><em>Photo: Danny Clinch</em></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/i-NrOFLLMuM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/4ZDUIhyoIoU?list=UUSAexy0-lgubAz-JpyGKGSA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eric-clapton">Eric Clapton</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-eric-clapton-s-crossroads-guitar-festival-2013-coming-nearly-500-movie-theaters-august-13#comments Allman Brothers Band Eric Clapton News Tue, 13 Aug 2013 14:34:40 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18793