Led Zeppelin http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/489/all en Led Zeppelin Wrap Up Reissue Campaign with 'Presence,' 'In Through the Out Door' and 'Coda' http://www.guitarworld.com/led-zeppelin-wraps-reissue-campaign-presence-through-out-door-and-coda/25139 <!--paging_filter--><p>Friday, July 31, Jimmy Page will officially wrap up his massive Led Zeppelin reissue campaign with the release of remastered and expanded versions of 1976's <em>Presence</em>, 1979's <em>In Through the Out Door</em> and 1982's <em>Coda</em>.</p> <p>Like the reissues of the band's previous LP's, each album will include a remastered copy of the original album, plus a second disc of previously unreleased music culled from the band members' vaults. </p> <p>Each release also will be available as a single album, a single vinyl LP, a deluxe double-LP, digital download and a super-deluxe box set that features the CDs, LPs, a download card, a 70-page book with previously unseen photos and memorabilia and a high-quality print of the album cover.</p> <p>You can check out a trailer for the updated version of <em>Coda</em> below.</p> <p>Here are the track listings for the deluxe editions' companion audio discs (the songs remain the same on the original LPs):</p> <p><strong><em>Presence</em> (Companion Audio)</strong></p> <p>01. "Two Ones Are Won" (Achilles Last Stand - Reference Mix)<br /> 02. "For Your Life" (Reference Mix)<br /> 03. "10 Ribs &amp; All/Carrot Pod Pod (Pod)" (Reference Mix)<br /> 04. "Royal Orleans" (Reference Mix)<br /> 05. "Hots On For Nowhere" (Reference Mix)</p> <p><strong><em>In Through The Out Door</em> (Companion Audio)</strong><br /> 01. "In The Evening" (Rough Mix)<br /> 02. "Southbound Piano" (South Bound Saurez - Rough Mix)<br /> 03. "Fool In The Rain" (Rough Mix)<br /> 04. "Hot Dog" (Rough Mix)<br /> 05. "The Epic" (Carouselambra - Rough Mix)<br /> 06. "The Hook" (All My Love - Rough Mix)<br /> 07. "Blot" (I'm Gonna Crawl - Rough Mix)</p> <p><strong><em>Coda</em> (Companion Audio)</strong></p> <p><strong>Disc One</strong></p> <p>01."We're Gonna Groove" (Alternate Mix)<br /> 02."If It Keeps On Raining" (When The Levee Breaks - Rough Mix)<br /> 03."Bonzo's Montreux" (Mix Construction In Progress)<br /> 04."Baby Come On Home"<br /> 05."Sugar Mama" ( Mix)<br /> 06. "Poor Tom" (Instrumental Mix)<br /> 07. "Travelling Riverside Blues" (BBC Session)<br /> 08. "Hey, Hey, What Can I Do"</p> <p><strong>Disc Two</strong></p> <p>01."Four Hands" (Four Sticks - Bombay Orchestra)<br /> 02."Friends" (Bombay Orchestra)<br /> 03."St. Tristan's Sword" (Rough Mix)<br /> 04."Desire" (The Wanton Song - Rough Mix)<br /> 05."Bring It On Home" (Rough Mix)<br /> 06."Walter's Walk" (Rough Mix)<br /> 07."Everybody Makes It Through" (In The Light - Rough Mix)</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1xkQX6GIys0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/led-zeppelin-wraps-reissue-campaign-presence-through-out-door-and-coda/25139#comments Led Zeppelin Videos News Thu, 30 Jul 2015 19:51:22 +0000 Guitar World Staff 25139 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jimmy Page Elaborates on His Solo Plans, Says New Material Might Be Instrumental http://www.guitarworld.com/jimmy-page-elaborates-solo-plans-says-new-material-may-be-instrumental/25128 <!--paging_filter--><p>After Led Zeppelin broke up in 1980 following the death of drummer John Bonham, Jimmy Page wanted to stop playing. </p> <p>“I didn’t want to play the guitar,” Page tells <em>Rolling Stone</em>’s David Fricke in a <a href="http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/jimmy-page-wraps-led-zeppelin-reissues-with-a-bang-20150729/">new interview</a>. “It was going to bring up too much.”</p> <p>But when he wraps up Led Zeppelin’s reissue project at the end of this month, Page plans to invest his energies fully in his instrument—and possibly to the exclusion of having a singer.</p> <p>“I’ll put my music together,” he says, “then think about whether I need to embellish it with a singer.”</p> <p>The guitarist said last February that he was getting in shape to perform live again, sometime closer to the end of this year. Last week, Page <a href="http://www.guitarplayer.com/artists/1013/jimmy-page-reveals-his-next-move-and-favorite-led-zeppelin-album--video/53122/">announced</a> that he had new material written and would be looking for musicians to work with on it. This new interview was the first time he has suggested he would be working instrumentally. </p> <p>Page has spent much of the past eight years involved in Led Zeppelin–related activities, beginning with the band’s December 2007 reunion concert, with Bonham’s son, Jason, on drums. That show, a tribute to the late Ahmet Ertegun, who signed Zeppelin to Atlantic Records in 1968, was packaged for the 2012 album and DVD release <em>Celebration Day</em>.</p> <p>The reissuing of Zeppelin’s entire catalog, including session outtakes, was many years in the making and finally saw light of day in June 2014. With the release of the final three albums—<em>Presence</em>, <em>In Through the Out Door</em> and the odds-and-ends collection <em>Coda</em>—on July 31, Page is ready to move on to new projects.</p> <p>Though Page has said publicly that he would like to get Led Zeppelin back together, singer Robert Plant has rejected the idea, much to Page’s disappointment. “He’s just playing games, and I’m fed up with it, to be honest with you,” Page told NME in 2014. “I don’t sing, so I can’t do much about it.”</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/jimmy-page-elaborates-solo-plans-says-new-material-may-be-instrumental/25128#comments Jimmy Page Led Zeppelin News Thu, 30 Jul 2015 15:58:27 +0000 Christopher Scapelliti 25128 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jimmy Page Releases Lighter, Early Version of Led Zeppelin's “When the Levee Breaks” http://www.guitarworld.com/jimmy-page-releases-lighter-early-version-led-zeppelins-when-levee-breaks/25070 <!--paging_filter--><p>Jimmy Page has released audio of “If It Keeps on Raining,” an early version of Led Zeppelin’s “When the Levee Breaks.” You can check it out below. </p> <p>The previously unissued track will be released July 31 as part of the companion disc included with the remastered deluxe reissue of <em>Coda.</em></p> <p>This early version of the song is surprisingly lighter than the officially released version of “When the Levee Breaks,” which appears on 1971's <em>Led Zeppelin IV.</em> Page’s guitar isn’t quite as heavy and John Bonham’s drums are missing the earth-shaking heft and ambience they have on the standard version.</p> <p>“If It Keep on Raining” is the second track Page has issued from as a preview of the <em>Coda</em> reissue. <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/led-zeppelin-premiere-sugar-mama-unreleased-track-intended-1969-debut-album">He previously released “Sugar Mama,” an outtake from 1968.</a></p> <p>July 31 will also see the release of deluxe editions of 1976’s <em>Presence</em> and 1979’s <em>In Through the Out Door.</em> These are the last of Led Zeppelin’s nine original studio albums to be reissued. </p> <p><iframe src="http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid4363179321001?bckey=AQ~~,AAAAAyiIY-k~,nwbxG65xosXVDn2QxjpPXXim0zqRJpol&amp;bctid=4363283437001&amp;width=620&amp;height=365&amp;autoStart=false" scrolling="no" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="365" width="620"></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/jimmy-page-releases-lighter-early-version-led-zeppelins-when-levee-breaks/25070#comments Jimmy Page Led Zeppelin News Thu, 23 Jul 2015 22:00:32 +0000 Guitar World Staff 25070 at http://www.guitarworld.com The 25 Greatest Acoustic Songs In Hard Rock http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-25-greatest-acoustic-songs-hard-rock <!--paging_filter--><p>Slash might've said it best: "There's no lying with the acoustic guitar. There's something very pure, and very humbling, about it." </p> <p>A profound statement coming from one of rock 'n' roll's most celebrated electric guitarists. </p> <p>But strip away all the muck of multi-layered overdubs, rack effects and endless symphonies of tracks, and you separate the dodgers hiding behind studio wizardry and the artists who know a great song only needs six strings and a melody. </p> <p>Here are 25 of hard rock's best acoustic rockers. Some are pure acoustic jams, others only start out out that way before ascending into grand opuses. But what makes these songs iconic is their elemental simplicity. </p> <p>In other words, all you need to bring them to life is an acoustic guitar and a little feeling. And from the looks of these rockers, some gaudy jewelry helps. Note that these songs are not presented in any particular order. </p> <p><strong>"STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN," LED ZEPPELIN<br /> <em>Led Zeppelin IV</em> (1971)</strong> </p> <p><em>Led Zeppelin III</em> was largely an unplugged affair, but "Stairway to Heaven," from the band's follow-up, wins the prize for acoustic guitar excellence. </p> <p>Jimmy Page's delicately fingerpicked arpeggios made the song Zeppelin's-and rock's-definitive acoustic moment. </p> <p>Over the years, "Stairway to Heaven" has dominated countless "greatest rock song ever" lists, thanks to its spellbinding mix of lyrical mysticism, compositional and production genius and instrumental virtuosity. </p> <p>But its most celebrated moment remains Page's unaccompanied intro: whether heard on a radio or played by some pimply kid in a guitar store, all it takes is those first few acoustic guitar notes and you can instantly name that tune.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9Q7Vr3yQYWQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"MORE THAN A FEELING," BOSTON<br /> <em>Boston</em> (1976)</strong> </p> <p>Tom Scholz's soaring leads (recorded with an early version of his Rockman amp unit) and crunchy, multi-tracked electric guitar rhythms have more than a little to do with "More Than a Feeling" becoming one of classic rock's most enduring anthems.</p> <p> But it is the song's lilting, arpeggiated acoustic intro that puts fans in the mood. Working as something of a one-man band in his basement, Scholz, one of music's first DIY dudes, played all the guitar parts on "Feeling." </p> <p>For the arpeggiated intro and verses, he used a Yamaha 12-string; the more fully strummed choruses called for a Guild D-40. A bit of trivia: Noting the similarities between "More Than a Feeling" and "Smells Like Teen Spirit," Kurt Cobain teased fans at Nirvana's 1992's Reading Festival performance with a few bars of the Boston classic.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4N7qdcBJzJs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"DUST IN THE WIND," KANSAS<br /> <em>Point of Know Return</em> (1977)</strong> </p> <p>When Vicci Livgren overheard her husband, Kansas guitarist Kerry, practicing finger exercises on his acoustic one day, she told him she heard a song there and suggested he add some lyrics. He listened, and the result was "Dust in the Wind." </p> <p>A departure from Kansas' characteristic prog-rock bombast, "Dust in the Wind" was a stark, plaintive meditation on the meaning of life. </p> <p>While many assume that the track features a 12-string acoustic, the rich unplugged sound is actually the result of multiple six-strings (a few in Nashville tuning), played by Livgren and co-guitarist Rich Williams. </p> <p>The song became Kansas' only Top-10 single, charting at Number Six in 1978. In the years since, it has become something of a cultural touchstone, popping up everywhere from TV shows like <em>The Simpsons</em> and <em>Family Guy</em> to movies like <em>Bill &amp; Ted's Excellent Adventure</em> and <em>Old School</em>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tH2w6Oxx0kQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"STREET FIGHTING MAN," THE ROLLING STONES<br /> <em>Beggars Banquet (1968)</em></strong><em> </em></p> <p>One might assume this rebel yell, released during the tumultuous summer of 1968, would rage with the sound of electric guitars. </p> <p>Not so: with the exception of an electric bass, played by Keith Richards, the track is 100 percent acoustic. </p> <p>Preparing a demo for the song, Richards miked two acoustics and recorded them into a cheap Phillips mono cassette recorder. The guitarist was so enamored of the resulting distortion (the machine had no limiters, causing the signal to overload) he decided to go au naturale and ditch the electrics. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NHugEELD8o8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em><strong>"PINBALL WIZARD," THE WHO<br /> <em>Tommy</em> (1969)</strong> </em></p> <p>By 1969, Pete Townshend was known as much for smashing guitars as for playing them. But on the Who's ground breaking <em>Tommy</em>, he demonstrated some astonishing six-string skills.</p> <p> And with an acoustic in his hands (check out "It's a Boy" for some deft blues-meets-flamenco work), he was unstoppable. </p> <p>Although electrics bolster the verses and choruses of the album's centerpiece, "Pinball Wizard," a 1968 Gibson J-200 acoustic is the dominant instrument throughout. Townshend's furiously strummed barre chords (which he deemed "mock baroque"), heard in the intro and breakdown section, provide the kind of power and majesty befitting a genuine rock opera. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/d4TF9YBi5ck" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>"FEEL LIKE MAKIN' LOVE," BAD COMPANY<br /> <em>Straight Shooter</em> (1975)</strong> </p> <p>As the first band signed to Led Zeppelin's Swan Song label, Bad Company, led by former Free Singer Paul Rodgers and former Mott the Hoople guitarist Mick Ralphs, followed their bosses' lead and specialized in sweaty, swaggering blues rock. </p> <p>Taking another lesson from the Zepmen, Ralphs juxtaposed chiming acoustics with explosive power chords on this Top 10 smash, to wondrous effect. </p> <p>The bright, jangly acoustics lend a relaxed, down-home country vibe to the verses, while the electric guitars in the chorus scream with big, brash British rock. Presumably, quite a few people felt like doing the nasty after hearing this cut. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/mQfTe6ta36I" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"YOU CAN'T PUT YOUR ARMS AROUND A MEMORY," JOHNNY THUNDERS<br /> <em>So Alone</em> (1978)</strong> </p> <p>As a member of the proto-punk glam-rockers the New York Dolls, and later with his own band, the Heartbreakers, Johnny Thunders knew how to dish out rough-and ragged three-chord rock. </p> <p>And with a Les Paul Junior slung well below his waist, he had "cool" written all over him. So it came as a surprise when Thunders, on his debut solo album, issued this poetic acoustic ballad. </p> <p>Tempering his patented pounding style, the singer-songwriter lays out his junkie lifestyle with unflinching candor, practically caressing his guitar strings in the process. Melancholic and remorseful, the song has come to serve as an elegy of sorts for the troubled Thunders, who died of an apparent drug overdose in 1991. (The song's title, it should be noted, was lifted from a line spoken in an episode of the Fifties TV sitcom <em>The Honeymooners</em>. Punk rock, indeed .) </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/TknY89kECq0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"CLOSER TO THE HEART," RUSH<br /> <em>A Farewell to Kings</em> (1977)</strong> </p> <p>By 1977, Rush had firmly established themselves as fine purveyors of glorious 20-minute sci-fi opuses that could fill entire album sides.</p> <p> But on this, their fifth studio release, the Canadian prog trio demonstrated their ability to be hooky, concise and, with "Closer to the Heart," radio-friendly. Perhaps the most surprising aspect of the song's gentle, ringing 12-string acoustic guitar intro is that it was written by bassist Geddy Lee, rather than guitarist Alex Lifeson. </p> <p>The same figure is later repeated after a particularly ripping electric guitar solo-only this time the 12-string acoustic is smartly doubled by a six-string electric. When it comes to Rush, of course, the contributions of drummer extraordinaire Neil Peart can never be overlooked. Here, he adds plenty of bells and whistles throughout. Okay ... they're actually chimes. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BEgXe-gQxX4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"ROUNDABOUT," YES<br /> <em>Fragile</em> (1971)</strong> </p> <p>Pick up a Martin 00-8 acoustic, pluck octave harmonics at the 12th fret (essentially comprising an Em chord) and voila!-you'll have a whole room of guitar dudes sitting up and taking notice. </p> <p>And with good reason-this simple move is Steve Howe's signature opening line to "Roundabout," Yes' breakthrough 1971 hit. </p> <p>Make it past Howe's harmonic-heavy unaccompanied intro, and you just might have a chance at mastering this intricate prog-rock masterpiece, in which acoustics and electrics, played in classical, jazzy and rocking splendor, weave in, out and "roundabout." As for the lyrics, this is prog—you're on your own there. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qjvGzxnUDuM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"DEE," RANDY RHOADS<br /> <em>Blizzard of Ozz</em> (1980)</strong> </p> <p>With his inventive, neoclassical spin on Eddie Van Halen's already established bag of tricks, Randy Rhoads became the new heavy metal guitar king after fans heard his work on Ozzy Osbourne's 1980 solo debut, <em>Blizzard of Ozz</em>. </p> <p>But while electrified Ozz rockers like "Crazy Train" and "I Don't Know" wowed the metal masses, it was the solo classical piece "Dee" that was Rhoads' true masterpiece. </p> <p>Rhoads grew up in a musical family—his mother, Delores, runs a music school in North Hollywood, California—so it was only fitting that "Dee," all 49 seconds of it, paid tribute to the woman who inspired and nurtured his dreams. Fingerpicked on a nylon-strong acoustic, the piece is by turns playful, melancholy, heartbreaking and hopeful. </p> <p>Tragically, Rhoads was killed in a 1982 plane crash, at the age of 25. Five years later, Ozzy Osbourne included an extended, studio outtake version of "Dee" on his album Tribute, reminding us all of Rhoads' immense and largely untapped talent. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EWSUD3ZmqT8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>"COULD THIS BE MAGIC?," VAN HALEN<br /> <em>Women and Children First</em> (1980)</strong> </p> <p>Eddie Van Halen gave acoustic-shred fetishists much to chew on in 1979 with "Spanish Fly," a hummingbird-fast flamenco instrumental from <em>Van Halen II</em>. But guitarists of all stripes found a lot to like in the bluesy-and boozy, slightly off-kilter "Could This Be Magic?" </p> <p>The track, which marks the guitarist's first recorded bottleneck moment, finds Eddie's whimsical acoustic slide playing expertly shadowing David Lee Roth's vocal on the verses. </p> <p>The idea to use a slide came from producer Ted Templeman, and while Eddie was initially leery of trying it, he practiced for a few days and, in typical VH style, pulled off the part with aplomb. Another first: "Could This Be Magic?" represents the debut of an outside singer on a Van Halen album. </p> <p>Templeman suggested a different sound for one of the choruses and brought in country Singer Nicolette Larson, who was working in a neighboring studio, to lend vocal support. Listen closely following Eddie's slide so lo to hear Larson and Diamond Dave make sweet harmonized magic. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CBsBiqBPvoQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE," BON JOVI<br /> <em>Slippery When Wet</em> (1986)</strong> </p> <p>The story is legend: Jon Bon Jovi and Richie Sambora ride into the 1989 MTV Video Music Awards, do the acoustic-duo thing on "Wanted Dead or Alive," and before you can say "dreadnought," the Unplugged series is born. The song is no slouch either. </p> <p>On it, Sambora lays down some fancy acoustic finger work, picking out descending arpeggios and bluesy bends as JBJ rolls his fascination with the Old West into a story about the weariness of life on the road. The result was a smash hit, insuring that Bon Jovi would see a million faces and rock them all for many years to come. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Mqyrt7RCgsg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"FADE TO BLACK," METALLICA<br /> <em>Ride the Lightning</em> (1984)</strong></p> <p>Recorded way back in the early days of thrash, "Fade to Black" is rightly acknowledged as the genre's first "power ballad."</p> <p> A seven-minute rumination on despair and suicide, the song is built around singer and guitarist James Hetfield's mournful, arpeggiated acoustic picking, over which Kirk Hammett adds some beautiful and soaring electric leads. </p> <p> Of course, this being Metallica, things remain sweet and mellow for only so long. Midway through, the song builds in intensity, shifting rhythms and adding plenty of heavily distorted six-strings, culminating in an extended and explosive Hammett solo. </p> <p>While hardcore metalheads at the time accused Metallica of selling out by recording a ballad, "Fade to Black" remains one of the group's most well-known and beloved songs, and it is a concert staple to this day. Besides, as Hetfield has said, "Limiting yourself to please your audience is bullshit." </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/38p55TkZibc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"EVERY ROSE HAS ITS THORN," POISON<br /> <em>Open Up and Say ...Ahh!</em> (1988)</strong> </p> <p>When you think of Eighties power ballads, one song stands head, hair and shoulders above the rest: "Every Rose Has Its Thorn."</p> <p> Penned by singer Bret Michaels after he discovered that his stripper girlfriend had been cheating on him, the 1988 smash hit proved that glam-metal dudes have feelings, too. </p> <p>While the recorded version features a typically histrionic electric guitar solo from Poison's C.C. DeVille, Michaels' lyrical directness, solid song construction and strong acoustic playing rule the day. </p> <p>Michaels has said that "People related to the song because I related to the song," and indeed, "Every Rose Has Its Thorn," which hit Number One in 1988, has since become a defining tune of the era. As for that stripper girlfriend, she's now a hedge fund investor. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gYeZJ9_Hmwg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"PATIENCE," GUNS N' ROSES<br /> <em>GN'R Lies</em> (1988)</strong> </p> <p>Although <em>GN'R Lies</em> features a number of acoustic tracks, including the country-ish, darkly comedic "Used to Love Her" ("but I had to kill her" ... ), it was the lovelorn "Patience," a glacial-paced ballad, that marked the most radical left turn for the normally hard-rocking group, and also gave them one of their biggest hits. </p> <p>The song was recorded in a single take, with guitarists Slash and Izzy Stradlin and bassist Duff McKagan all on acoustics. Axl Rose, for his part, contributes some fine whistling at the intro. </p> <p>The final two minutes stand as Gn'R's "Kumbaya" moment, with the whole band cooing the song's title in sweet harmony. Then everybody got in a fight, but that's another story. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ErvgV4P6Fzc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>"JANE SAYS," JANE'S ADDICTION<br /> <em>Nothing's Shocking</em> (1988)</strong></p> <p> It's five minutes long, features just two chords (G and A) and, with its steel drum ornamentation, sounds like something Jimmy Buffett might have conjured up after a three-day orgy of sponge cake and margaritas. </p> <p>Nonetheless, "Jane Says" remains one of the L.A. punk-metal band's most enduring songs. Perhaps its durability can be attributed to the fact that it doesn't fit neatly in the group's canon. </p> <p>In place of frenzied, psychedelic metal dispatched with tectonic force, we get a wistful, straightforward acoustic ditty, tailor-made for campfires and backyard cookouts. Coming from Perry Farrell, Dave Navarro and Co., that's pretty shocking. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gPsorSm1PpQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"MORE THAN WORDS," EXTREME<br /> <em>Extreme II: Pornograffitti</em> (1990)</strong></p> <p>In the late Eighties, Extreme carved out a niche as the funkiest hard rockers on the block, with a sound that, thanks to guitar hero Nuno Bettencourt, straddled the line between Van Halen shred and Aerosmith strut. </p> <p>And so it was something of a kick in the head when Bettencourt and singer Gary Cherone unleashed the Everly Brothers homage "More Than Words." </p> <p>Aside from a couple of finger snaps, the only accompaniment to Cherone and Bettencourt's harmonizing voices was Bettencourt's fingerpicking on a Washburn acoustic and the percussive knocking of his hand against the guitar's top. The result was a smash hit: "More Than Words" hit Number One on the <em>Billboard</em> charts in 1991, and led a generation of would-be shred heroes to put down the electric, grab an acoustic, and knock the hell out of it. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UrIiLvg58SY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"SHE TALKS TO ANGELS," THE BLACK CROWES<br /> <em>Shake Your Money Maker</em> (1990)</strong> </p> <p>"Jealous Again," "Twice as Hard" and "Hard to Handle" put Atlanta's Black Crowes on the map as a raucous, genuine-article blues-rock ensemble.</p> <p>But it was this soulful acoustic-driven number about the ravages of heroin addiction that put the band over the top-and gave it a Number One song. </p> <p>For the recording, guitarist Rich Robinson (who wrote the music to the song when he was just 15) played a Martin D-28 in open D tuning. Although he capoed the 2nd fret, effectively giving him an open E tuning, there's a certain feel and texture to his sound that fits the wrenching nature of the track. Add in brother Chris Robinson's soulful, yearning vocal, and you have something truly heavenly. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/y-HamRO4nC8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"SILENT LUCIDITY," QUEENSRYCHE<br /> <em>Empire</em> (1990)</strong> </p> <p>Let's say you're a proggy metal band (from Seattle, of all places), best known for releasing a kitchen-sink concept album (1988's <em>Operation: Mindcrime</em>) about government overthrow ... or something like that. What do you do for an encore? </p> <p>If you're Queensryche, you whip up a kitchen-sink acoustic song about dream consciousness ... or something like that. "Silent Lucidity" features songwriter and QueensrYche guitarist Chris DeGarmo on Spanish six-string guitar in the intro and verses, playing a sweetly arpeggiated pattern that beautifully mixes fretted notes and open strings. </p> <p>The song drifts steadily along, adding electrics, voice-overs and swelling orchestration until practically busting at the seams with sound. And yet it ends as it began, with DeGarmo's lone acoustic. And then, silence. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CL5HwghYXGE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> </p> <p><strong>"NO EXCUSES," ALICE IN CHAINS<br /> <em>Jar of Flies</em> (1994)</strong> </p> <p>With their 1992 mostly acoustic EP, <em>Sap</em>, Alice in Chains served notice that they had more to offer than merely distorted grunge. </p> <p>Melodic and full of somber beauty, Sap set the stage for Jar oj Flies, which firmly established AIC.as a band of uncommon, if very bleak, depth. </p> <p>"No Excuses" marked something of a departure for the band. With its gentle, easygoing pace and hopeful (for Alice in Chains, at least) lyrics about enduring life's hills and valleys, "No Excuses" is practically toe-tappin' and good-timey. But the real revelation is guitarist Jerry Cantrell's wide-a s-the-Grand-Canyon acoustic sound-full, ringing and droning for days. No excuses needed for that at all. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wWQwx89gy-I" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> </p> <hr /> <strong>"GOOD RIDDANCE (TIME OF YOUR LIFE)," GREEN DAY<br /> <em>Nimrod</em> (1997)</strong> <p> When recording what would be the album version of this acoustic ballad, Green Day leader Billie Joe Armstrong flubbed the opening G/D chord - twice - and after the second time deadpanned, "Fuck." </p> <p>Fortunately, he soldiered on, and, despite the uttered expletive, "Good Riddance (Time of Your Life)" enjoyed huge crossover success and stands as the band's biggest hit to date. Which was hardly anticipated. </p> <p>At the time, Green Day were considered little more than snot-nosed, albeit multi-Platinum, Bay Area ruffians, and an acoustic guitar-and-strings ballad wasn't what most people expected to hear from them. For that reason bassist Mike Dirnt called the song the "most punk" thing they could have done. Which just goes to show that even punks can wear their hearts on their sleeves. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4hBZ7F7G8Bc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> </p> <p><strong>"LAKE OF FIRE," NIRVANA<br /> <em>MTV Unplugged in New York</em> (1994)</strong> </p> <p>For their appearance on MTV's Unplugged, Nirvana abstained from playing some of their biggest hits (no "Smells Like Teen Spirit," for one) in favor of lesser-known material and covers of songs from artists they knew and admired. </p> <p>One such artist was Arizona's Meat Puppets, a particular favorite of Kurt Cobain's. And so, on the night of November 18, 1993, on a stage decorated with flowers and black candles, Cobain invited the Puppets' Curt and Cris Kirkwood out for, among other tunes, a mellow run-through of their swampy "Lake of Fire." </p> <p> With Krist Novoselic, Dave Grohl and the Kirkwoods holding down the accompaniment, Cobain put aside his guitar to hone in on the vocals, howling his way through the impressionistic lyrics. The performance became one of the highlights of the show, and to this day the song is as associated with Nirvana as it is with its originators. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zgvUaOuEdwA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> </p> <p><strong>"EVERLONG," (ACOUSTIC) FOO FIGHTERS<br /> <em>Skin and Bones</em> (2006)</strong> </p> <p>The full-band version of "Everlong," that appeared on the Foo Fighters' 1997 album, <em>The Colour and the Shape</em>, was a raging slab of rock that seemed hard to beat.</p> <p> But when Dave Grohl appeared on Howard Stern's radio show later that year and performed an impromptu acoustic version, listeners went wild, and bootlegs soon abounded. (David Letterman would later call "Everlong" his "favorite song.") </p> <p>Musically, the composition is positively Townshend-esque, built around a simple, movable progression in a drop-D (D-A-DG-B-E) tun ing. The studio version features Dave Grohl pumping wildly on the drums (Taylor Hawkins had not yet joined the band), but it is his ten se, driving solo acoustic reading that truly sets pulses quickening. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AFqXoSxh5jQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"OUTSIDE," STAIND<br /> <em>Break the Cycle</em> (2001)</strong> </p> <p>Sludgy, down-tuned electric guitars bulldoze the choruses of the official recording, but originally this song was an all-acoustic ballad: Staind lead singer Aaron Lewis used to perform a half-finished version of "Outside" during solo shows. </p> <p>One night in Biloxi, Mississippi, as Staind were preparing to open for Limp Bizkit on the 1999 <em>Family Values Tour</em>, the singer was asked to do a number with Fred Durst providing backing vocals. </p> <p> Onstage, Lewis came up with the lyrics to complete the tune he'd been laboring over for months. Radio stations picked up on the live acoustic version and helped build a buzz for "Outside" months before the official version was released on <em>Break the Cycle</em>. The song-and the album's success launched a thousand nu-metal power ballads in its wake. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Tfz7Sl9ZIbU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> </p> <p><strong>"PHOTOGRAPH," NICKELBACK<br /> <em>All the Right Reasons</em> (2005)</strong></p> <p> It sold more than 1.4 million digital downloads in the U.S., reached Number Two on the Billboard Hot 100 and was voted the fifth "most annoying song of all time" in a <em>Rolling Stone</em> poll. </p> <p>Such is the case with Nickelback's "Photograph": love it or hate it, the tune gets a reaction. Like many a country-tinged power ballad, electric guitars fire up the song's choruses, but the backbone of "Photograph" rests in the heartfelt strumming of an unplugged ax. </p> <p>And if it's a formula that Chad Kroeger and Co. have repeated to great success, so have scores of modern rock bands that have followed in the band's wake. Chances are when a power ballad with big guitars and an even bigger chorus works its way up the charts today, there's a little bit of that "Photograph" magic in there somewhere.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5m237V82hbs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/boston">Boston</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-25-greatest-acoustic-songs-hard-rock#comments Acoustic Nation Boston GW Archive Kansas Led Zeppelin Rolling Stones Blogs News Features Wed, 22 Jul 2015 17:54:01 +0000 Joe Bosso 12775 at http://www.guitarworld.com The Top 30 12-String Guitar Songs of All Time http://www.guitarworld.com/top-30-12-string-guitar-songs-all-time <!--paging_filter--><p>When considering the choices for this list, we realized it wasn't as easy a task as we first thought. </p> <p>What makes for a great 12-string guitar song as opposed to a great song that just happens to have a 12-string guitar somewhere on it? Let's face it, if Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven" had a ukulele on it, it would immediately be in the running for Greatest Ukulele Song of All Time. </p> <p>That being said, we looked at not only the legacy of the song but how prevalent 12-string guitar is in the song and how influential the song would be in inspiring others to pick up their 12-strings. </p> <p>Without the 1964 Beatles film <em>A Hard Day's Night</em>, the Byrds might not have existed as you now know them (assuming you know them—and you should know them), and without "Stairway to Heaven," the doubleneck guitar might be sitting in a museum as a one-time oddity produced by Gibson. </p> <p>So what song will we crown as the Greatest 12-String Guitar Song of All Time? </p> <p>Read on ... (And yes, we threw in an extra song; our math isn't too good. Enjoy our top 31!).<br /> <br /><br /> <strong>31. Pantera, "Suicide Note, Part 1"<br /> <em>The Great Southern Trendkill</em> (1996)</strong> </p> <p>This song marked one of the most experimental moments in Pantera's catalog, with Dimebag Darrell's dark 12-string guitar part perfectly echoing the song's somber subject matter. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LliBvurRIB4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>30. John Butler Trio, "Ocean"<br /> <em>John Butler</em> (1998)</strong> </p> <p>The newest song to make the cut, John Butler's instrumental masterpiece "Ocean" stands as a fine example of the timeless sound of the 12-string. Keep an ear out for Butler's use of two-hand tapping ala Satriani in "Midnight."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ja9UeCypJNw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>29. America, "A Horse with No Name"<br /> <em>America</em> (1971)</strong> </p> <p>Although the 12-string acoustic guitar plays only a supporting role in this ubiquitous folk-rock tune about a nameless equine, it actually plays a major part in its overall sound. When "A Horse With No Name" was released, a lot of people thought it was a Neil Young song, which is ironic because it replaced Young's “Heart of Gold” at the Number 1 spot on the U.S. pop chart. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Tm4BrZjY_Sg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>28. Bob Dylan, "Hurricane"<br /> <em>Desire</em> (1976)</strong> </p> <p>Most assume it was Dylan himself who played the 12-string here, but it was actually session guitarist Vinnie Bell manning the Danelectro Bellzouki 12-string guitar on this classic cut. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FvI6ZX0yNjM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>27. Gordon Lightfoot, "Early Morning Rain"<br /> <em>Gord's Gold</em> (1975)</strong> </p> <p>Gordon Lightfoot re-recorded this old Gordon Lightfoot tune for his 1975 compilation album, <em>Gord's Gold,</em> and it's this lush, radio-friendly version that became the hit. While 12-string electric guitars were all the rage in the Sixties, 12-string acoustics had taken their place in the Seventies; this song is a prime example of that shift. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/KP_MDIYhPH0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>26. Alice In Chains, "I Stay Away"<br /> <em>Jar of Flies</em> (1994)</strong></p> <p> If ever there was a rock band who had an equally strong handle on menacing drop-D riffs and menacing, introspective acoustic music, it was most certainly Alice In Chains. "I Stay Away" from <em>Jar of Flies</em> is not only the band's best 12-string moment, but it marks the first track Jerry Cantrell wrote with then-new Alice in Chains bassist Mike Inez. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ODTv9Lt5WYs?list=RDODTv9Lt5WYs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>25. The Hollies, "Look Through Any Window"<br /> <em>Hollies</em> (1965)</strong> </p> <p>As you'll see, 1965 was a huge year for the electric 12-string guitar. It was big like synthesizers and skinny black ties were big in 1982. You had your Byrds, of course, your Beatles—and your Hollies, who rode the 12-string bandwagon to great heights with this song written by Graham Gouldman and Charles Silverman. That's Tony Hicks on the 12-string, by the way. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/F1E-9ZwoKnA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>24. Queen, "39"<br /> <em>A Night at the Opera</em> (1975)</strong> </p> <p>Brian May's massive-sounding 12-string acoustic is an integral part of this sci-fi masterpiece, the B-side of "You're My Best Friend." It's about a group of astronauts who set out on what they think is a one-year journey, but when they get back, they realize they've been gone for 100 years. They simply don't write Einstein allusions like this anymore. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pAnpGXPYAIQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>23. Mahavishnu Orchestra, "You Know You Know"<br /> <em>The Inner Mounting Flame</em> (1971)</strong> </p> <p>It's undeniable that Mahavishnu Orchestra had many fine 12-string moments in their career, but "You Know You Know" off their first album, <em>The Inner Mounting Flame</em>, stands out as guitarist John McLaughlin's shining moment with the instrument. Fun fact: This song was later sampled by both Mos Def and Massive Attack. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LcQKjffxIOY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>22. Red Hot Chili Peppers, "Breaking the Girl"<br /> <em>Blood Sugar Sex Magik</em> (1991)</strong></p> <p> One of only two Chili Peppers songs in 3/4 time, John Frusciante's main 12-string riff in this song was inspired by none other than Jimmy Page. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/iyu04pqC8lE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;"><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/top-30-12-string-guitar-songs-all-time?page=0,1">CLICK HERE TO SEE SONGS 21 THROUGH 12.</a></span><br /> <br /></p> <hr /> <p><strong>21. Jimi Hendrix, "Hear My Train a-Comin'"<br /> <em>Blues</em> (1969)</strong> </p> <p>Jimi Hendrix sitting alone playing blues on a 12-string acoustic guitar is a reminder that, despite all of his distortion and psychedelia, he always felt a strong connection to his roots, including Delta blues. Although he performed and recorded electric, full-band versions of this song (as heard on the <em>Valleys of Neptune</em> album), this version is more stark and disarming. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CzL7G0jItzU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>20. Supertramp, "Give a Little Bit"<br /> <em>Even in the Quietest Moments....</em> (1977)</strong> </p> <p>This international hit for Supertramp is a pop masterpiece in the key of D, which, as the Byrds proved a decade-plus earlier, is the 12-stringiest of all the keys. It was written by Roger Hodgson, and a solo Hodgson performance is featured in the video below. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CdTrqV6dt3o" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>19. David Bowie, "Space Oddity"<br /> <em>David Bowie/Space Oddity</em> (1969)</strong> </p> <p>Long before working with the likes of Adrian Belew, Carlos Alomar, Robert Fripp and Stevie Ray Vaughan, Bowie himself manned the 12-string for his 1969 ballad of Maj. Tom. The song was so well-received, the album it appeared on, <em>David Bowie</em>, was renamed after the song before its 1972 reissue. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/D67kmFzSh_o" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>18. The Who, "Substitute" (1966)</strong> </p> <p>When Pete Townshend wanted a riff to one-up the Rolling Stones' "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction," he reached for his 12-string. "Substitute" was a top ten hit twice in the U.K., once in 1966 when it was originally released an again 10 years later when it was re-issued. The track found unlikely supporters in the punk rock movement, being covered by both the Sex Pistols and the Ramones. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eswQl-hcvU0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>17. The Beatles, "A Hard Day's Night"<br /> <em>A Hard Day's Night</em> (1964)</strong> </p> <p>Although the Byrds were the band that was most associated with the 12-string Rickenbacker in the Sixties, their inspiration came from the Beatles. "We went as a group to see <em>A Hard Day’s Night</em> multiple times and were totally taken with the Beatles," said Roger (formerly Jim) McGuinn. "I liked George Harrison’s Rickenbacker 12, but I couldn’t find one that looked like his with the pointy cutaways, so I bought the blonde 360 model." For a clear, crisp example of the beauty of the guitar's sound, check out the 12-string riff as the song fades. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rqbXyJ0Jctk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>16. Rod Stewart, "Maggie May"<br /> <em>Every Picture Tells a Story"</em> (1971)</strong> </p> <p>"Maggie May," Rod's Stewart's first hit as a solo performer, starred a striking combination of 12-string acoustic guitar and mandolin. In 2004, <em>Rolling Stone</em> ranked the song at No. 130 on its list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. We like it too. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fD_6KqP7K0g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>15. Bon Jovi, "Wanted Dead or Alive"<br /> <em>Slippery When Wet</em> (1986)</strong> </p> <p>Half-inspired by Old West Outlaws and half by Bob Seger's "Turn the Page," Jon Bon Jovi and Richie Sambora managed to craft arguably the most recognizable acoustic guitar riff of a ballad-heavy era in rock music. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Mqyrt7RCgsg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>14. The Rolling Stones, "As Tears Go By"<br /> <em>December's Children (And Everybody's)</em> (1965)</strong> </p> <p>This was one of the first Jagger/Richards compositions—although producer Andrew Loog Oldham is also credited as a writer. Legend has it that ol' Loog Locked Mick and Keith in a room and told them to come out with an original song, period. This is what they came up with, and they gave it to Marianne Faithfull in 1964 before taking a stab at it a year later. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/h6sfPhYwyAU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>13. The Byrds, "Mr. Tambourine Man"<br /> <em>Mr. Tambourine Man</em> (1965)</strong> </p> <p>Even though George Harrison had been recording with his 12-string Rickenbacker for a while, with this song, Jim (later Roger) McGuinn showed the world exactly how cool a 12-string guitar could be. Its jangly sound was the perfect partner to Bob Dylan's ethereal lyrics. The 12-string Rick would be an integral part of the Byrds' sound until they disbanded in 1973. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pJO4KAv-GiY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>12. Led Zeppelin, "Stairway to Heaven"<br /> <em>Led Zeppelin IV</em> (1971)</strong></p> <p>With this song, Jimmy Page did for the doubleneck guitar what Roger McGuinn of the Byrds did for the 12-string electric. Or perhaps more fitting, Page did for the doubleneck what Henry Ford did for the horseless carriage. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9Q7Vr3yQYWQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;"><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/top-30-12-string-guitar-songs-all-time?page=0,2">CLICK HERE TO SEE SONGS 11 THROUGH 1.</a></span><br /> <br /></p> <hr /> <p><strong>11. Rush, "Closer to the Heart"<br /> <em>A Farewell to Kings</em> (1977)</strong> </p> <p>Taken from Rush's 1977 album <em>A Farewell to Kings</em>, "Closer to the Heart" begins with a majestic-sounding arpeggio picking pattern played by guitarist Alex Lifeson on a 12-string guitar. This song was also Rush's first hit in the U.K. and has been a staple of their live show ever since. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kyhW2v0NDM0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>10. Ozzy Osbourne, "Mama I’m Coming Home"<br /> <em>No More Tears</em> (1991)</strong> </p> <p>Zakk Wylde's obvious Southern-rock homage in the opening bar gives way to beautiful, descending riff, which anchored Ozzy Osbourne's only solo Top 40 hit. Rest assured there are plenty of Zakk's patented pinch harmonics to go around, but the sound of the 12-string intro is what makes this song instantly recognizable. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/K0siYUjV9UM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>09. Boston, "More Than a Feeling"<br /> <em>Boston</em> (1976)</strong> </p> <p>A classic rock radio mainstay and one of the most recognizable 12-string guitar intros in all of rock, "More Than a Feeling" reportedly took Tom Sholz five years to write. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fT6yVgcewk4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>08. Tom Petty, "Free Falling"<br /> <em>Full Moon Fever</em> (1989)</strong> </p> <p>Back when the Traveling Wilburys ruled the airwaves, Tom Petty, a Wilbury himself, adopted the band's thick, acoustic sound for <em>Full Moon Fever,</em> his first solo outing. He also took fellow Wilbury Jeff Lynne along for the ride as co-producer. This one features 12-string acoustic on the rhythm and a touch of 12-string Rickenbacker on the mini-solo. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1lWJXDG2i0A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>07. The Byrds, "Turn! Turn! Turn!"<br /> <em>Turn! Turn! Turn!</em> (1965)</strong> </p> <p>Yes, it's the Byrds again. This song is higher up on the list than "Mr. Tambourine Man" because of its beautiful 12-string Rickenbacker solo and the fact that the Byrds are actually playing on it (which is not entirely true for "Mr. Tambourine Man"). </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/W4ga_M5Zdn4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>06. The Beatles, "Ticket to Ride"<br /> <em>Help!</em> (1965)</strong> </p> <p>Yet another one from '65. This tune, with its crisp 12-string Rickenbacker intro, is one of the many highlights from the Beatles' second feature film, <em>Help!</em> Just play an A on the G string, an open E string, a C sharp on the B string, that A again and then an open B string, and you're on your way. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/I62ozmyl2JM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>05. Stevie Ray Vaughan, "Rude Mood"<br /> <em>Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble (Box Set)</em> (1990)</strong> </p> <p>It was a little surprising when SRV turned up on MTV's <em>Unplugged</em> in 1990 with a Guild 12-string, tearing through a slew of <em>Texas Flood</em> tunes, including "Pride and Joy," "Testify" and "Rude Mood." Then again, that's also the year he recorded "Life by the Drop" on a 12-string. Perhaps he'd stumbled upon something new that he could've put to greater use in the future. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/IYSoJmSMctU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>04. Pink Floyd, "Wish You Were Here"<br /> <em>Wish You Were Here</em> (1975)</strong> </p> <p>Recorded to sound like it was being played through an old transistor radio, the 12-string intro of Pink Floyd's "Wish You Were Here" never fails to evoke a sense of nostalgia. When David Gilmour plays the overdubbed six-string solo, sounding like a lonely old man playing along with the radio, you get one of the most timeless songs in the back catalog of one of the most timeless bands of all time. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DPL_SV3n7IU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>03. Led Zeppelin, "Over the Hills and Far Away"<br /> <em>Houses of the Holy</em> (1973)</strong> </p> <p>"Stairway" may be the most revered song on this list, but there's no denying "Over The Hills and Far Away" as the quintessential 12-string guitar song in Led Zeppelin's catalog. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6bD9t44JUD4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>02. The Byrds, "Eight Miles High"<br /> <em>Fifth Dimension</em> (1966)</strong> </p> <p>Hey, we love big, sloppy guitar solos played on Rickenbacker 360s. This is Jim (later Roger) McGuinn at his, well, 12-stringiest.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/e8QypoBpQqI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>01. The Eagles, "Hotel California"<br /> <em>Hotel California</em> (1976)</strong> </p> <p>Yes, it's "Hotel California." What a nice surprise! Admit it: Don Felder's 12-string acoustic guitar intro (and every other note and chord he plays on this song) is, at this point, a part of our collective consciousness. This song, the ubiquitous soundtrack to 37 trillion barbecues, elevator rides and long trips through the desert at 3 a.m., has never gone away—and probably never will.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/puHoadtIivc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/top-30-12-string-guitar-songs-all-time#comments 10 Best Songs Alice in Chains Beatles Bon Jovi Led Zeppelin Rolling Stones The Beatles The Byrds The Eagles The Who Tom Petty top 30 Guitar World Lists News Features Thu, 16 Jul 2015 20:30:07 +0000 Josh Hart, Damian Fanelli 11735 at http://www.guitarworld.com Led Zeppelin Premiere Previously Unheard "In the Evening (Rough Mix)" http://www.guitarworld.com/evening-led-zeppelin-premiere-previously-unheard-rough-mix/24926 <!--paging_filter--><p>Led Zeppelin will wrap up their long-running reissue campaign July 31 with their final three albums: 1976’s <em>Presence,</em> 1979’s <em>In Through the Out Door</em> and 1982’s <em>Coda.</em> </p> <p>As we've come to expect from the band's previously issued remasters, each album will come with a companion disc full of alternate takes/mixes of several classic tracks. </p> <p>Below, you can check out one of those alternate mixes. It's the decidedly raw "rough mix" of “In the Evening," a standout track from <em>In Through the Out Door.</em></p> <p>This previously unheard version of the song lacks many of the production flourishes found on the final version. We admit it offers a refreshing alternative. As <a href="http://consequenceofsound.net/2015/07/led-zeppelin-shares-never-before-heard-raw-version-of-in-the-evening-listen/">Consequence of Sound</a> points out, "there’s a distinct lack of scuzz on John Bonham's drumming and Jimmy Page’s guitar work, and even Robert Plant’s vocals are devoid of the album version’s effects ticks."</p> <p>Take a listen below via <a href="https://screen.yahoo.com/evening-rough-mix-120000744.html">Yahoo Music!.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" src="https://screen.yahoo.com/evening-rough-mix-120000744.html?format=embed" allowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" webkitallowfullscreen="true" allowtransparency="true"></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/evening-led-zeppelin-premiere-previously-unheard-rough-mix/24926#comments in the evening Led Zeppelin rough mix News Mon, 13 Jul 2015 14:34:51 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24926 at http://www.guitarworld.com Watch the Trailer for a New Led Zeppelin Book, 'Earl's Court May 1975' — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/teaser-led-zeppelins-five-glorious-nights-book-video <!--paging_filter--><p><a href="http://www.rufuspublications.com/">Rufus Stone Limited Editions</a> has unveiled a teaser video for its new book, <em>Five Glorious Nights: Led Zeppelin at Earl's Court May 1975</em>. </p> <p>The book, which combines pics from a who's who of mid-Seventies rock photographers, is a high-end visual document of the band's five-night stand at London's Earl's Court in May 1975. </p> <p>Check out a computer-generated teaser below and visit <a href="http://www.rufuspublications.com/">rufuspublications.com</a> for more information. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Lq2KgmVc3TQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/teaser-led-zeppelins-five-glorious-nights-book-video#comments Led Zeppelin Videos News Tue, 23 Jun 2015 22:26:10 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24722 at http://www.guitarworld.com Led Zeppelin Premiere "Hots On for Nowhere" Reference Mix http://www.guitarworld.com/led-zeppelin-premiere-hots-nowhere-reference-mix-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Led Zeppelin have premiered the reference mix of "Hots On For Nowhere," a selection from the upcoming deluxe reissues of the band's final three album's, 1976's <em>Presence</em>, 1979's <em>In Through the Out Door</em> and 1982's <em>Coda</em>. </p> <p>Although this mix is close to the version heard on <em>Presence</em>, you'll hear a lot more of John Paul Jones' supple bass, while Jimmy Page's wild guitar playing has a bit more snap. </p> <p>These final Led Zeppelin reissues are set for a July 31 release. You can pre-order them <a href="http://www.ledzeppelin.com/">right here.</a></p> <p><center><iframe src="http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid4301156482001?bckey=AQ~~,AAAAAyiIY-k~,nwbxG65xosWL-43KmaaAFUK99VOtmU5z&amp;bctid=4301776759001&amp;width=620&amp;height=365&amp;autoStart=false" width="620" height="365" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe></center></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/led-zeppelin-premiere-hots-nowhere-reference-mix-video#comments Led Zeppelin News Tue, 23 Jun 2015 15:42:13 +0000 Jackson Maxwell 24793 at http://www.guitarworld.com Madonna Plays Led Zeppelin's "Whole Lotta Love" Riff on Guitar — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/madonna-plays-led-zeppelins-whole-lotta-love-riff-guitar-video <!--paging_filter--><p>This past Friday (June 19), Madonna uploaded a video of herself playing the iconic Jimmy Page guitar riff from Led Zeppelin‘s “Whole Lotta Love."</p> <p>In the video, which originally appeared (and still does) <a href="https://instagram.com/madonna/">on the singer's Instagram,</a> she’s dressed in black and stands in a room with at least five other guitars in the background (not to mention the Orange cab she's playing through). </p> <p>When she posted it, she included the caption, “Channeling Led Zeppelin. Whole Lotta Love. #rebelheart.” <em>Rebel Heart</em> is her latest album. </p> <p>The video has more than 66,200 likes and thousands of comments. Care to add to that?</p> <p>“Whole Lotta Love,” the opening track from 1969's <em>Led Zeppelin II</em>, was the band’s only Top 10 single, reaching No. 4 on the charts. It seems that when people want to mess with a Led Zeppelin song, they choose this one. For instance:</p> <p>• <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/whole-lotta-love-dulcimer-check-out-crazy-led-zeppelin-cover-video">"Whole Lotta Love" on a Dulcimer: Check Out This Crazy Led Zeppelin Cover</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/whole-lotta-sound-effects-michael-winslow-covers-led-zeppelin-video">Whole Lotta Sound Effects: Michael Winslow Covers Led Zeppelin</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/whole-lotta-editing-five-awesome-led-zeppelin-mashups">Whole Lotta Editing: Five Awesome Led Zeppelin Mashups</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/jess-greenberg-covers-led-zeppelins-rock-and-roll-and-whole-lotta-love-video">Jess Greenberg Covers Led Zeppelin's "Rock and Roll" and "Whole Lotta Love"</a><br /> • <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-larzgallows-covers-led-zeppelins-song-remains-same-whole-lotta-love-and-more">"One Man Zepp" Covers Led Zeppelin's "The Song Remains the Same," "Whole Lotta Love" and More.</a></p> <p>By the way, this reminds us of the time Madonna covered Pantera's "A New Level" in 2008. You can watch her play a few seconds of "Whole Lotta Love" in the top video and most of "A New Level" in the bottom video. Enjoy!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Fuwdlm-gi-Q" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/E5coRmYYAlY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/madonna-plays-led-zeppelins-whole-lotta-love-riff-guitar-video#comments Jimmy Page Led Zeppelin Madonna Whole Lotta Love Videos News Mon, 22 Jun 2015 12:05:59 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24782 at http://www.guitarworld.com Led Zeppelin Premiere "Sugar Mama," an Unreleased Track Intended for 1969 Debut Album http://www.guitarworld.com/led-zeppelin-premiere-sugar-mama-unreleased-track-intended-1969-debut-album <!--paging_filter--><p>Led Zeppelin are still in the process of opening their vaults and issuing previously unheard material. </p> <p>For their third and final wave of reissues, the band will release deluxe versions of 1976's <em>Presence</em>, 1979's <em>In Through the Out Door</em> and 1982's <em>Coda</em> (which, itself, was a collection of vintage, previously unreleased Led Zep material).</p> <p>Today you can check out "Sugar Mama," a bonus track on the new version of <em>Coda.</em> </p> <p>The group recorded the song in October 1968 at London's Olympic Studios with the intention of including it on their 1969 debut, <em>Led Zeppelin.</em> </p> <p>Although it has been available on bootlegs for years, it's finally getting its day in the sun July 31, when the deluxe edition of <em>Coda</em> is released.</p> <p>Check it out below and let us know what you think in the comments or on Facebook!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RnL_usrjBoE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/led-zeppelin-premiere-sugar-mama-unreleased-track-intended-1969-debut-album#comments Led Zeppelin News Tue, 09 Jun 2015 19:29:20 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24681 at http://www.guitarworld.com The 'Peanuts' Kids Sing Led Zeppelin's "In the Light" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/peanuts-kids-sing-led-zeppelins-light-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Get your weekend off to a weird, random start with this video of the <em>Peanuts</em> gang performing Led Zeppelin's "In the Light," a standout tune from 1975's <em>Physical Graffiti.</em></p> <p>If the early, Schroeder-centric part of the clip bores you, just jump ahead to around the two-minute, which is when the vocals kick in.</p> <p>Happy Friday, everyone!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Q7KlfbsTK4k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/peanuts-kids-sing-led-zeppelins-light-video#comments In the Light Led Zeppelin Peanuts Videos News Fri, 05 Jun 2015 16:00:39 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24649 at http://www.guitarworld.com Led Zeppelin Announce 'Presence,' 'In Through the Out Door' and 'Coda' Reissue Details http://www.guitarworld.com/led-zeppelin-announce-presence-through-out-door-and-coda-reissue-details <!--paging_filter--><p>Led Zeppelin have announced deluxe reissues of 1976's <em>Presence</em>, 1979's <em>In Through the Out Door</em> and 1982's <em>Coda</em>.</p> <p>The three reissues are due for a July 31 release, and, like the reissues of the band's other LP's, each album will include a remastered copy of the original album, plus a second disc of previously unreleased music culled from the band members' vaults. </p> <p>Each release also will be available as a single album, a single vinyl LP, a deluxe double-LP, digital download and a super-deluxe box set that features the CDs, LPs, a download card, a 70-page book with previously unseen photos and memorabilia and a high-quality print of the album cover.</p> <p>Here are the track listings for the deluxe editions' companion audio discs (the songs remain the same on the original LPs):</p> <p><strong><em>Presence</em> (Companion Audio)</strong></p> <p>01. "Two Ones Are Won" (Achilles Last Stand - Reference Mix)<br /> 02. "For Your Life" (Reference Mix)<br /> 03. "10 Ribs &amp; All/Carrot Pod Pod (Pod)" (Reference Mix)<br /> 04. "Royal Orleans" (Reference Mix)<br /> 05. "Hots On For Nowhere" (Reference Mix)</p> <p><strong><em>In Through The Out Door</em> (Companion Audio)</strong><br /> 01. "In The Evening" (Rough Mix)<br /> 02. "Southbound Piano" (South Bound Saurez - Rough Mix)<br /> 03. "Fool In The Rain" (Rough Mix)<br /> 04. "Hot Dog" (Rough Mix)<br /> 05. "The Epic" (Carouselambra - Rough Mix)<br /> 06. "The Hook" (All My Love - Rough Mix)<br /> 07. "Blot" (I'm Gonna Crawl - Rough Mix)</p> <p><strong><em>Coda</em> (Companion Audio)</strong></p> <p><strong>Disc One</strong></p> <p>01."We're Gonna Groove" (Alternate Mix)<br /> 02."If It Keeps On Raining" (When The Levee Breaks - Rough Mix)<br /> 03."Bonzo's Montreux" (Mix Construction In Progress)<br /> 04."Baby Come On Home"<br /> 05."Sugar Mama" ( Mix)<br /> 06. "Poor Tom" (Instrumental Mix)<br /> 07. "Travelling Riverside Blues" (BBC Session)<br /> 08. "Hey, Hey, What Can I Do"</p> <p><strong>Disc Two</strong></p> <p>01."Four Hands" (Four Sticks - Bombay Orchestra)<br /> 02."Friends" (Bombay Orchestra)<br /> 03."St. Tristan's Sword" (Rough Mix)<br /> 04."Desire" (The Wanton Song - Rough Mix)<br /> 05."Bring It On Home" (Rough Mix)<br /> 06."Walter's Walk" (Rough Mix)<br /> 07."Everybody Makes It Through" (In The Light - Rough Mix)</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/led-zeppelin-announce-presence-through-out-door-and-coda-reissue-details#comments Led Zeppelin News Wed, 03 Jun 2015 16:23:17 +0000 Jackson Maxwell 24617 at http://www.guitarworld.com Session Guitar: The Top 10 Session Guitarists of All Time http://www.guitarworld.com/photo-gallery-top-10-session-guitarists <!--paging_filter--><p>One of the most important things I can discuss with people who want to become session players is how they need to take a good long look at those who have gone before. </p> <p>In the photo gallery below is a list of some of my faves—and a brief description of each player.</p> <p>Some may be familiar, others may be obscure. Some are still active, some have gone on to that soundstage in the sky. No matter, we are looking at some of the top players of recent recorded history. Listen to them, study them, learn from them.</p> <p>And now, in the photo gallery below, I offer up my top 10 session guitarists. </p> <p>Let me know if you think I've missed anyone! Let’s hear some of your favorites.</p> <p><strong>Ron Zabrocki on Ron Zabrocki:</strong> <em>I’m a session guitarist from New York, now living in Connecticut. I started playing at age 6, sight reading right off the bat. That’s how I was taught, so I just believed everyone started that way! I could pretty much sight read anything within a few years, and that aided me in becoming a session guy later in life. I took lessons from anyone I could and was fortunate enough to have some wonderful instructors, including John Scofield, Joe Pass and Alan DeMausse. I’ve played many jingle sessions, and even now I not only play them but have written a few. I’ve “ghosted” for a few people that shall remain nameless, but they get the credit and I got the money! I’ve played sessions in every style, from pop to jazz.</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/photo-gallery-top-10-session-guitarists#comments Brent Mason Jimmy Page Led Zeppelin Ron Zabrocki Session Guitar Blogs News Features Tue, 02 Jun 2015 17:27:33 +0000 Ron Zabrocki 11951 at http://www.guitarworld.com Watch “Stairway to Heaven” Played on Upright Bass — Solo and All! — Video Finds http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-watch-stairway-to-heaven-played-on-upright-bass-solo-and-all-video-finds <!--paging_filter--><p>We can always count on Candyrat Records to deliver the goods on a variety of acoustic-based music, and this new video (uploaded May 8) is a winner. </p> <p>Here we have Olivier Babaz performing Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” using an upright bass and kalimba (otherwise known as a thumb piano).</p> <p>The most impressive part of the clip comes around the 2:30 mark, where Babaz pulls his best Page impression, nailing the solo on his upright bass. Never seen that before. </p> <p>Check out the clip below — let us know your thoughts in the comment section below or on Facebook — and find out more at <a href="http://www.olivierbabaz.com">www.olivierbabaz.com</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vP93bxurM2o" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-watch-stairway-to-heaven-played-on-upright-bass-solo-and-all-video-finds#comments Acoustic Nation Led Zeppelin Blogs Videos Mon, 11 May 2015 15:07:49 +0000 Acoustic Nation 24434 at http://www.guitarworld.com Whole Lotta Sound Effects: Michael Winslow Covers Led Zeppelin — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/whole-lotta-sound-effects-michael-winslow-covers-led-zeppelin-video <!--paging_filter--><p>We know this isn't exactly a new video, but it seems the 4-year-old clip was randomly "discovered" and shared—several thousand times—on Facebook earlier this week.</p> <p>It's a bizarre, brief but nifty cover of Led Zeppelin's "Whole Lotta Love" featuring actor/comedian Michael Winslow—that guy from <em>Police Academy, Spaceballs</em> and <em>Gremilns</em>.</p> <p>Winslow is known as the "Man of 10,000 Sound Effects," and it's easy to see why in this clip.</p> <p>The (real) guitar player is a fellow named Odd Nordstoga, and the clip is from a Norwegian talk show called <em><a href="http://www.tv2.no/underholdning/senkveld/">Senkveld med Thomas og Harald</a></em>. Enjoy!</p> <p>P.S.: If you want to see and hear more of this sort of thing, check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-michael-winslow-covers-jimi-hendrix-his-mouth">Michael Winslow Covers Jimi Hendrix ... with His Mouth — Video</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/QxcCC2g1Ke0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/whole-lotta-sound-effects-michael-winslow-covers-led-zeppelin-video#comments Led Zeppelin Michael Winslow WTF Videos News Fri, 24 Apr 2015 17:11:43 +0000 Damian Fanelli 22433 at http://www.guitarworld.com