Features http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/5/all en Synth City: 10 Classic Guitar Synth Songs http://www.guitarworld.com/synth-city-10-classic-guitar-synth-songs <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's an ode to a piece of gadgetry rarely heralded on GuitarWorld.com, something that has brought a whole new world of sounds to guitarists' fingertips: the guitar synthesizer, aka the guitar synth.</p> <p>A guitar synth is a synth module whose input device is a guitar instead of a keyboard. To quote Norm Leet from Roland's UK website, "The most important part of a guitar synth system is the divided — or hexaphonic — pickup, which allows each string to be treated individually and for the attached synth to be able to detect finger vibrato and string bending." </p> <p>At first these systems were farily sizable, taking up so much space that they had to be housed in specially designed guitars that were part of the entire synth system. Today's synth systems, however, are tiny things that can fit into pretty much any guitar.</p> <p>Modern systems send the pitch information as MIDI to allow you to control external modules or keyboards. This also means that pitch information can be recorded by a MIDI sequencer. </p> <p>Countless artists have dipped their toes into the world of guitar synths -- everyone from Eric Clapton to Steve Hackett to Eric Johnson and Jeff Loomis — and some players made it a massive part of their sound, including Pat Metheny, Robert Fripp and Adrian Belew. Carlos Alomar even recorded an entire album for synth guitar — 1990's <em>Dream Generator</em>. </p> <p>Here are 10 classic songs that feature guitar synths. They demonstrate at least some of the many dreamy, bizarre sounds (or "soundscapes," as some people like to say in this context), these devices can create.</p> <p>10. <strong>"Stranger In a Strange Land," Iron Maiden, <em>Somewhere in Time</em>, 1986</strong></p> <p>After completing a masterful trilogy of albums with 1984's <em>Powerslave</em>, Iron Maiden took a turn for the progressive, unleashing a barrage of synth guitars on their listeners with with sixth studio album, <em>Somewhere in Time</em>. </p> <p>Easing their fans into the idea, the album's first single, "Wasted Years," was the only track on the album to feature no synthesizers at all. Its follow-up, "Stranger in a Strange Land" — the tale of an Arctic explorer frozen and lost in time — featured Adrian Smith and Dave Murray's guitars processed through synth effects, giving their dual guitar attack a distinctive larger-than-life chorus sound.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ry42FHfz67A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>09. <strong>"Never Make You Cry," Eric Clapton, <em>Behind the Sun</em>, 1985</strong></p> <p>By the mid-'80s, the guitar synth was officially a bandwagon, and even ol' Slowhand himself, Eric Clapton, hopped on — if only briefly.</p> <p>Clapton used a Roland guitar synth to record "Never Make You Cry" from his successful 1985 album, <em>Behind the Sun</em>, which was co-produced by Phil Collins of Genesis (a major guitar synth band, especially during the <em>Duke</em> tour). </p> <p>It's only fitting that Clapton experimented with cutting-edge technology on <em>Behind the Sun</em>, the album that kicked off a period of slick commercial releases by the venerable guitarist, including 1986's <em>August</em> and 1989's <em>Journeyman</em>. </p> <p>Before its release, he had been coasting along on a series of rootsy, laidback, Band- and J.J. Cale-inspired albums, from 1974's <em>461 Ocean Boulevard</em> to 1983's <em>Money and Cigarettes</em>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/E8nC6e4OI4w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>08. <strong>"Are You Going With Me?," Pat Metheny, <em>Offramp</em>, 1982</strong></p> <p>Over the decades, guitarist Pat Matheny has become closely associated with Roland guitar synths — especially the GR-300. But it all started with his 1982 album, <em>Offramp</em>, which featured his first documented use of the Roland GR-300.</p> <p>The album features the samba-based "Are You Going With Me?," which has since become a trademark Metheny song. Its lengthy, trancelike guitar solo is played on the Roland. Check it out below.</p> <p>Metheny still uses his GR-300, which has since been discontinued by the company.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/qY8z1w1JzMs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>07. <strong>"Who's to Blame," Jimmy Page, <em>Death Wish II,</em> 1982</strong></p> <p>In 1981, former Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page was asked to compose and record the <em>Death Wish II</em> soundtrack by his neighbor, director Michael Winner. </p> <p>It was just what Page needed — an opportunity to start creating music again, now that John Bonham (and with him, Led Zeppelin) was gone.</p> <p>Page mirrored the film's moodiness and edginess with a slew of new devices, including the Roland GR-505 guitar synth and TR-808 Rhythm Composer. The guitar synth can be heard on the entire soundtrack album, which was re-released on JimmyPage.com late last year in a "heavyweight vinyl package." Only 1,000 copies were made.</p> <p>Page continued experimenting with guitar synths and even appeared in several Roland print advertisements in the early to mid-'80s.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/jF8X0t-Fllw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>06. <strong>"Venus Isle," Eric Johnson, <em>Venus Isle</em>, 1996</strong></p> <p>Texas guitar great Eric Johnson started dabbling with guitar synths in the late '80s, but he didn't seriously record with them until his 1996 album, <em>Venus Isle</em>, an album full of what he calls "extra textures." </p> <p>Johnson uses a Roland guitar synth to create those textures on several tracks, including "Mountain," "Battle We Have Won," "When the Sun Meets the Sky" and the title track, which you can check out below.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/RypgfOTUNRI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>05. <strong>"Discipline," King Crimson, <em>Discipline</em>, 1981</strong></p> <p>If you were putting together a dream team of guitar synthists, you'd probably want King Crimson's Robert Fripp and Adrian Belew batting third and fourth in your lineup.</p> <p>The guitarists were among the most proficient guitar synth users of their generation, and Fripp continues to push the boundaries of synthetic sound with his mesmerizing Soundscapes shows.</p> <p>On King Crimson's <em>Discipline</em> album, Fripp and Belew made great and bountiful use of the Roland GR-300. On later albums, they moved into GR-700 territory.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_-dZNzXylVE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>04. <strong>"Racing in A," Steve Hackett, <em>Please Don't Touch,</em> 1978</strong></p> <p>The upbeat and catchy "Racing in A" is from Steve Hackett's <em>Please Don't Touch</em> album from 1978. </p> <p>It was the first solo album he recorded after leaving Genesis and his first album to feature his pioneering work with the Roland GR-500 guitar synth. </p> <p>"Racing in A" is a five-minute-long progressive-rock masterpiece that glides along for more than a minute with its almost-Yes-like rhythm before the vocals kick in (But Hackett keeps the spotlight squarely on the GR-500). </p> <p>As is the case with several other selections on this list, be sure to check out the entire <em>Please Don't Touch</em> album for more examples of Hackett's guitar synth work.</p> <p>By the way, that's Hackett's photo at the top of this page (and all the pages in this story). </p> <p><strong>NOTE: We've included a cool live performance of "Racing in A," plus (for the purists), the studio version.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/NDIj1plyU04" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wkxk4IAmWvs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>03. <strong>"Turbo Lover," Judas Priest, <em>Turbo</em>, 1986</strong></p> <p>"Turbos were all the rage, the in-thing," said Judas Priest bassist Ian Hill of the mid-1980s. "I'd even bought a vacuum cleaner because it had the word 'turbo' on it!"</p> <p>Perhaps this obsession with the super-charged is what lead the boys in Priest to experiment with guitar synthesizers on their 1986 classic "Turbo Lover." </p> <p>Taken from the album <em>Turbo</em> — easily among the most divisive albums for diehard fans — the song featured a whole new sonic palette for the band, with guitarists K.K. Downing and Glenn Tipton employing guitar synths and anything else they could get their hands on to give the song its distinctive futuristic, sci-fi feel.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/DdwuxoSHsSo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>02. <strong>"Don't Stand So Close to Me," The Police, <em>Zenyattà Mondatta</em>, 1980</strong></p> <p>"Don't Stand So Close to Me," which appeared on The Police's 1980 <em>Zenyattà Mondatta</em> album, features Andy Summers jamming away on an early Roland synth (He had a few models during the band's heyday, including a GR-707).</p> <p>"After Sting had put the vocals on 'Don't Stand So Close To Me,' we looked for something to lift the middle of the song," Summers said in 1981. "I came up with a guitar synthesizer. It was the first time we'd used it. I felt it worked really well."</p> <p>"I was sort of known for [guitar synth] then, and I was in a pretty high-profile band," Summer said in a more recent interview for Roland. "I was trying to fill out two hours with a trio, trying to keep it interesting all the way. The Roland synths blended in quite well."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/KNIZofPB8ZM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>01. <strong>"Ashes to Ashes," David Bowie, <em>Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps)</em>, 1980</strong></p> <p>It's Hammer time. Guitarist Chuck Hammer is an accomplished player and Emmy-nominated digital film composer who has recorded with Lou Reed, David Bowie and Guitarchitecture, to name just a few. </p> <p>But Hammer might be best known for his textural guitar synth work on "Ashes to Ashes" from Bowie's <em>Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps)</em> album. Hammer used a Roland GR-500 with an Eventide Harmonizer to get the synthetic string sound that can be heard in the video below. He actually used four multi-tracked guitar synths, each one playing opposing chord inversions. Be sure to check out the rest of album, which features a healthy dose of Hammer.</p> <p><em>Rolling Stone</em> put Hammer in the category of "musical pioneers" along with guys like Robert Fripp and Allan Holdsworth.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/CMThz7eQ6K0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eric-clapton">Eric Clapton</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/iron-maiden">Iron Maiden</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/judas-priest">Judas Priest</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eric-johnson">Eric Johnson</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/synth-city-10-classic-guitar-synth-songs#comments Adrian Belew Andy Summers David Bowie Iron Maiden Judas Priest King Crimson Robert Fripp Roland The Police Guitar World Lists News Features Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:21:33 +0000 Damian Fanelli, Josh Hart http://www.guitarworld.com/article/15794 Top 10 Greatest Rock and Roll Song Endings of All Time http://www.guitarworld.com/top_10_rock_song_endings <!--paging_filter--><p>Well, bub, no matter how good the song is, it eventually has to end. The question, then, is: How’s it going to end? </p> <p>A studio fade giving the illusion of a sing-along chorus going on forever in some imaginary world populated by elves? A repeated turnaround? An abrupt, punk-rock-style halt? An unsuspected, off-key chord? </p> <p>It’s possible, of course, that the end could wind up being a transcendent moment in itself. Such is the case with the 10 gems below.</p> <p><strong>10. “Frankenstein,” Edgar Winter </strong></p> <p>It’s not so much the virtuosity of the synchronized synth and guitar arpeggios that got this one on the list but, rather, the fact it lends itself well to puns about monsters and rock ’n’ roll. (We won’t bother getting started.) It then dawns on us how language and wordplay makes us human. Mighty profound for an instrumental.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/P8f-Qb-bwlU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>09. “Roll With the Changes,” REO Speedwagon </strong></p> <p>The chorus is repeated so many times toward the end of the song that it becomes a mantra of sorts, meant to hammer home the Zen philosophy expressed in the title of this stadium anthem by an immensely popular band from the ’80s. Thankfully, Gary Richrath’s string bending and tremolo picking bring the listener back from the arena-rock astral plane into the real world.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/4PdU6migsqQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>08. “Let's Go Crazy,” Prince</strong> </p> <p>The Purp goes crazy as this ultimate party tune winds down, showing off his wah-wah-laced Hendrixisms. Judging by the ecstatic state of his solo, he doesn’t want the party to die. But the realization finally hits home that the party must end. Then what? The giant comedown known as <em>Under the Cherry Moon</em>.</p> <p><strong>07. “21st Century Schizoid Man,” King Crimson</strong> </p> <p>The end homes in on the most addictive part of the riff—Robert Fripp’s chromatic power-chord progression—and accelerates until it becomes a blur of tones, symbolic, perhaps, of human addiction patterns, obsessive behavior, and mental illness. I mean, can you down a bag of potato chips once it’s open? That’s what this riff is like. Do the research.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/8Ubc5_owhl0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>06. “Shy Boy,” David Lee Roth</strong> </p> <p>Vai, Sheehan. Sheehan, Vai. When David Lee Roth combined the talents of these two stringmen, he unleashed the shred equivalent of a nuclear fission reaction. The furious four-handed tapping makes one realize the importance of science to our daily lives.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/GYyuK2JcaSg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>05. “Paradise City,” Guns N’ Roses</strong> </p> <p>Rarely has an ending been so uncanny. Axl F. Rose’s repeated pleas for someone to take him home express a young man’s basic yearning for stability and warmth. Slash just wants to play faster and faster. This conflict foreshadows what would for the band grow into an appetite for self-destruction.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Rbm6GXllBiw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>04. “Metal Head,” Blotto </strong></p> <p>This obscure group, in a parody of ’80s heavy metal, takes the ever-loving piss out of the drawn-out rock ’n’ roll ending by practically turning it into its own movement. Obviously, they espouse the philosophy that life is a joke. Blue Oyster Cult’s Buck Dharma vouches for Blotto, though, by playing lead guitar on the track.</p> <p><strong>03. “Hot For Teacher,” Van Halen</strong> </p> <p>Eddie uses his space-age finger slides and tremolo picking to sound like a laser weapon battle from a late-’70s sci-fi flick, while brother Alex runs in place on his double bass pedals and David Lee Roth howls till his heart’s content. You don’t have to be Freud to figure out what pubescent fantasy an ending of this magnitude symbolizes. Orgasm. Oh, my gawd.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/vyJSetm6U0k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>02. “Highway to Hell,” AC/DC</strong> </p> <p>Whether or not this song is truly about Hell doesn’t matter. How the Young brothers wind it out—furiously strumming their chords, whittling away at the pentatonic scale, and battering up against Bon Scott’s wails—evokes a descent into an underworld of Wagnerian proportions.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/qKggnBh2Mdw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>01. “Won't Get Fooled Again,” The Who</strong> </p> <p>The tension of the synth interlude and the subsequent release—by way of Pete Townshend’s gargantuan power chords and Roger Daltrey’s vocal-chord-shredding scream—at the time encapsulated what we now refer to as “going postal.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zYMD_W_r3Fg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/top_10_rock_song_endings#comments Guitar World Lists Features Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:55:10 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/2012 A Clean and Sober Ace Frehley Discusses Kiss' Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Debacle and More http://www.guitarworld.com/clean-and-sober-ace-frehley-discusses-kiss-rock-and-roll-hall-fame-debacle-and-more <!--paging_filter--><p>This year started off innocently enough for Ace Frehley. </p> <p>Just one week prior to Christmas 2013, the former Kiss lead guitarist learned that he and his comrades in the original Kiss lineup—Gene Simmons, Paul Stanley and Peter Criss—were finally being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame after 15 years of eligibility (and 15 years of outcry from the Kiss Army). </p> <p>A cause for celebration, no doubt—and a golden opportunity for the four founding members of the legendary rock band to perform onstage together again for the first time since October 7, 2000, the final North American date of their Farewell Tour.</p> <p>And then, somehow, it all imploded. In the weeks preceding the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony on April 10 in Brooklyn, New York, Kiss became the primary focus of every public and private discussion surrounding the event after they announced that there would be no Kiss performance—let alone a Kiss reunion—that night. </p> <p>To make matters worse, the band members seized every opportunity to lambast one another in the press on a seemingly daily basis, effectively rendering what was supposed to be a triumphant reunion performance loaded with all the blood-spitting, fire-breathing, makeup-running pageantry that fans had been clamoring for all these years into a pitiful non-event. </p> <p>“I was like, Jesus Christ, after 40 years of support you can’t give the fans 10 minutes?” says a still worked-up Frehley over a cup of black tea at <em>Guitar World</em> headquarters in New York. “The fans wanted it, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame wanted it. But Gene and Paul didn’t. It’s sad. They definitely lost some fans because of this decision.</p> <p>“I think the reason they didn’t want to get together with the original members was because they’re afraid of history repeating itself. When we did <em>Unplugged</em> in 1995, you saw what happened: because the fans were so excited about me and Peter playing with those guys, they had to scrap their last record [with then-current members Bruce Kulick and Eric Singer] and do a reunion tour [with Frehley and Criss in 1996]. Although at this point I don’t think Peter could do a two-hour show and a full tour. But I still got the chops. I definitely blow [current Kiss guitarist] Tommy Thayer off the stage.”</p> <p>It’s obvious that Frehley is fired up, and with good reason. With the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame fiasco behind him, the clean-and-sober Spaceman is able to focus on the things in life that make him happy, like living in San Diego with his pretty, blond 47-year-old fiancé Rachael Gordon, writing books, working with Gibson on various signature guitars and recording new music. <em>Space Invader</em>, his first record since 2009’s top-notch <em>Anomaly</em>, is due out in a few weeks, and Ace couldn’t be more excited. </p> <p>“I haven’t had a drink in more than seven and a half years, and I feel great now,” says the 63-year-old guitarist. “I’m writing great songs and I’m singing great, and I’m super excited about this new album. It’s gonna be even better than <em>Anomaly</em>. I played some tracks for a couple of guys I was considering using for mixing, and the first thing out of their mouths was, ‘God, your voice sounds like it did on your 1978 solo record.’ Unlike some other people, whose voices aren’t maybe what they used to be. Not to name names, or anything.” </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/qGvz7FdUzOc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Your love affair with alcohol during Kiss’ heyday—and, well, all through the Eighties and Nineties—is well documented. Do you miss it? Are there days when you want a drink?</strong></p> <p>No. I haven’t had the urge to drink in a long time. And I don’t miss the hangovers, I don’t miss the smells, the late nights at the bars, or the people. I was hanging out with some pretty shady people in my heavy-drinking-and-coke years. I was in some situations that really could have gone sideways. I was just lucky. And you have to realize that my fans used to emulate my behavior when I was a crazy man—“Ace is a party animal, let’s go get loaded!” Then they’d go crash their car, and I’d feel terrible. </p> <p>Now it’s turned around. And when someone comes up to me and says that they haven’t had a drink in six months and that they’re doing well because I am, that makes my day. Maybe that’s one reason why God has kept me alive. By all rights I should have died a half dozen times already, so every day above ground I’m thrilled. </p> <p><strong>Did you think Kiss would ever be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame?</strong></p> <p>I knew that [the Hall] had to buckle to popular opinion. It was only a matter of time. We were first eligible 15 years ago, so I knew it would happen eventually. I mean, how can you exclude Kiss, one of the biggest American rock groups in history? Even though we didn’t perform, I’m still thrilled to be in it.</p> <p><strong>Where were you when you found out that you were being inducted?</strong></p> <p>I was at home in San Diego and got a call from my manager. Then, about a week later, I got the “congratulatory” call from Paul and Gene. And I could tell that there was some hesitancy on their part about the whole thing. I was asking them if we were gonna play, and Gene avoided the question by saying, “Well, we’re just looking forward to getting the four of us up there together and celebrating…whatever.” It was a noncommittal congratulatory call.</p> <p>Then, about a week later, I was told that the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame absolutely wants the four original members to reunite, and I said, “Great, I’ll do it.” And there was silence from Gene and Paul. And finally it was shot down. The next thing I heard is that Paul and Gene wanted to perform with the current Kiss lineup [with Tommy Thayer and Eric Singer]. And I said, Well, that’s kind of a slap in the face. I mean, they’re not even being inducted. I have to sit through a Kiss cover band when I’m receiving an award? I don’t think so. </p> <p>I also heard at one point that they wanted me to perform in makeup with Tommy at the same time. I really didn’t want to be onstage with Tommy, but I said I would do it, as long as I got to play the bulk of the songs and that I could wear the <em>Destroyer</em> costume. Then a few days later [it was], “No, we’re not gonna play at all.” It was almost like they were trying to bait me, so that if I said no to anything they would just blame me for there being no performance. I was almost going to boycott the whole thing.</p> <p><strong>The weeks leading up to the induction ceremony were filled with all sorts of public drama. A lot of negative comments were hurled back and forth in the press between the four original members of Kiss. Why do you think Gene and Paul are always so quick to disparage you publicly?</strong></p> <p>I don’t know. I think they’re just cranky. For years, when I was fucked up, Gene used to say that I was a drunk and a drug addict and that I was unemployable. Kick a guy when he’s down, right? But they can’t do that anymore, so it’s like they’re scratching their heads trying to come up with new ways to insult me. The most recent thing was that I’m anti-Semitic, that I’m a fucking Nazi. That’s just below the belt. Next I’ll be a member of the Ku Klux Klan. And my fiancé is Jewish! My whole life I’ve worked with Jewish people in all different capacities—my accountants, my attorneys, people on the road. Jesus Christ, I can’t believe the stuff that comes out of their mouths. But the truth is that I don’t want to be negative. I just want to keep everything light and be happy. </p> <p>Paul has been so goddamn cranky lately. I mean, what’s wrong, Paul, aren’t you happy? I know they must be frustrated because people are always writing about how Ace was the real guy or Ace was the real deal. It’s gotta rub them the wrong way. They would like nothing more than for me to start drinking again, start taking drugs again and end up as a bum on skid row. But that’s not gonna happen.</p> <p>Anybody who says anything bad about me is foolish, because a lot of people like me. You’re gonna make enemies when you put down Ace Frehley. And that’s because I’m a straight shooter—I tell it like it is. Gene is that way too. He’ll sit across from you in a room and say this or that and tell it like it is. Whether you like it or not, he lays it out, right to your face. Paul will tell you one thing, then walk out the door and stab you in the fucking back. That’s Paul Stanley. And now he’s trying to take credit for the fucking Kiss logo? Unbelievable. I designed the logo—all he did was draw straighter lines. </p> <p>And you know, I told Paul to wear the star on his eye. Do you know what his makeup was before he put the star on his eye? It was a round circle. He looked like the dog from the Little Rascals [Pete the Pup, a.k.a. Petey]. It told him it looked kinda silly and that he should put one star on his eye. But do I go around taking credit for that? No. I let him say he designed it. Who cares, you know? Let’s not be petty.</p> <p>You would think that if Gene and Paul had half a brain, they would realize what’s going on and start saying good things about Ace. I mean, keep bad-mouthing me. No one’s gonna show up at your fucking tour this summer.</p> <p><strong>Let’s talk about your upcoming solo album, <em>Space Invader</em>. It’s been five years since <em>Anomaly</em>. Why the delay?</strong></p> <p>I don’t know. [laughs] I’m not disciplined, and I can only create when I’m in the zone. I get preoccupied with other things—moving, family stuff, whatever—and then years go by. I had two record labels courting me, and I decided to go with E1 Music because of their reputation in the business and because they offered me more money. And when someone writes you a check, you gotta make the record! [laughs] The truth is, I work better when there’s a deadline. And I usually have to extend the deadline. But the end result is usually quality.</p> <p><strong>Do you enjoy the whole process of writing and recording?</strong></p> <p>Yes. I’m actually enjoying writing and recording more than ever, because I’ve become a lot more comfortable with Pro Tools, which means I can edit my own solos now. And that’s just fun. I prefer having an engineer there, but if there’s not one around, I can do my own editing and not have to depend on anyone else. Vocals too. I can do it all myself.</p> <p><strong>Which is quite different from recording with Kiss in the early Seventies.</strong></p> <p>With Kiss we used to do a slave reel. We’d mix down on two-inch tape, 24 tracks. [Producer] Eddie Kramer would mix down a stereo track of drums, and he’d give me a whole reel just to do solos. And Eddie was great at editing tape. But the flexibility you get nowadays with Pro Tools is just night and day compared to those days. Digital editing is a dream.</p> <p><strong>What was the songwriting process like for <em>Space Invader</em>?</strong></p> <p>You know, all my life I’ve never had a formula for writing songs. Sometimes it starts with a guitar riff, sometimes it’s a lyrical idea or just a melody. Sometimes I wake up with an idea. There’s no rhyme or reason. Sometimes I write on an acoustic, sometimes on a bass. There’s a song on the new album called “Into the Vortex.” It’s a riff song, but I wrote it on a bass guitar. Why? Because I write differently with a bass guitar in my hand than an acoustic guitar or an electric guitar. When I feel creative, I just sit down and start playing. </p> <p><strong>Did you write differently in the early days of Kiss?</strong></p> <p>Yes. I wasn’t as structured as I am now. Even though I’m not really structured—I’m at least cognizant of what’s going on. [laughs] Back then it was more hit or miss—and when I hit, I hit big. You know, I go back and listen to my 1978 solo record, and it still holds up. My whole body of work that I’ve created over the years has withstood the test of time. I know that I still have the goods. And when this record gets released, everybody’s gonna say, “Well, Ace did it again.” </p> <p><strong>Were there things about <em>Anomaly</em> that you wanted to change with <em>Space Invader</em>?</strong></p> <p>I know that everyone is hoping that this album is heavier than the last one, and it is. I’m also doing an instrumental this time, called “Starship,” that isn’t slow. It’s a departure from the “Fractured Mirror” style. It’s more fast paced and has a lot of transitions in it. </p> <p><strong>You cover the Steve Miller song “The Joker” on the new album. How did that come about?</strong></p> <p>It was the record company’s idea, to be honest. And I was a little resistant when it first came up. But then I thought back to my 1978 solo record, when Eddie Kramer’s assistant said to me, “Why don’t you try this song?” And it was “New York Groove.” At first I said, “I don't want to do that,” and it turned out to be my biggest hit. So maybe history can repeat itself. </p> <p><strong>Where was <em>Space Invader</em> recorded?</strong></p> <p>I did most of the recording at my friend’s studio in Turlock, California, called the Creation Lab. Turlock is in the middle of nowhere—it’s like a farming community—and that’s why I loved it. I have Attention Deficit Disorder, and there are absolutely no distractions when working at this place. You record for eight or 10 or 12 hours, then you go back to the hotel and go to sleep. You wake up and go back to the studio. </p> <p>There’s nothing else to do there, which means it’s the perfect place for me to record. Plus, I like working with the least amount of people, and this studio is great because it’s quiet and there aren’t all kinds of people walking through. I did most of this record with just me and a drummer, Matt Starr. For a couple of songs I brought in Chris Wyse from the Cult to play bass. </p> <p><strong>What guitars and amps are you using on the album?</strong></p> <p>I’m using a big variety of guitars. I have 35 or 40 different guitars hanging on the wall, and I just grab different ones. There’s a seven-string on one song, a Dobro, some 12-string acoustics… Sometimes I get the urge to use the double-neck. I like flexibility. The more variety, to me, the better. As for amps, it’s basically the same stuff I used on Anomaly: Marshalls and Voxes and Fenders. </p> <p><strong>The “Budokan” Les Paul replica guitar you did with Gibson in 2012 was a huge success. Are you planning another signature model?</strong></p> <p>I remember when I first did that deal and I went to the Gibson office to sign a bunch of the guitars, I said to [Gibson senior VP] Rick Gembar, “How are they selling?” And he said, “What do you mean, ‘How are they selling?’ They’re already sold. They were already sold before we put them out. Ace, anything you do turns to gold.” </p> <p>That was a good feeling. I’m trying to figure out what to do next. I keep asking people what they think, and some say to do the three-pickup black Les Paul; some say to do the first one I had, the sunburst Standard. But I don’t have to make that decision today, so I’m not worrying about it. But Gibson does an amazing job with these guitars. I don’t know how they make guitars that look 30 or 40 years old, right down to the screws and scratches and little details.</p> <p>I’m working on a design for a new amp right now that I think is just going to be too cool. I can’t talk about it yet because I haven’t finished the prototype. I also have a prototype guitar in the works that’s gonna be revolutionary. But that deal’s not done, so I can’t talk about that either. Amp and guitar—both completely different from anything else on the market. I’m always coming up with new ideas. I invented an electric guitar, like, 20 years ago. [laughs] My father was an inventor. It’s in my blood. I also have an idea for a really cool clock. But I can’t even talk about it because it’s so brilliant.</p> <p><em>Photo: Jimmy Hubbard</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ace-frehley">Ace Frehley</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/kiss">Kiss</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/clean-and-sober-ace-frehley-discusses-kiss-rock-and-roll-hall-fame-debacle-and-more#comments Ace Frehley July 2014 Kiss Interviews News Features Magazine Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:14:02 +0000 Jeff Kitts http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21338 2015 Guitar World Buyer's Guide: Nonstop Gear Plus Playboy Playmates Nikki Leigh, Gemma Lee Farrell and Dani Mathers http://www.guitarworld.com/2015-guitar-world-buyers-guide-nonstop-gear-plus-playboy-playmates-nikki-leigh-gemma-lee-farrell-and-dani-mathers <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>Guitar World Buyer's Guide 2015 is <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/guitar-world-buyers-guide-2015/?&amp;utm_source=facebook&amp;utm_medium=daily_ad&amp;utm_campaign=BuyersGuide15">available NOW at the Guitar World Online Store!</a></strong></p> <p><em>Guitar World's</em> 2015 Buyer's Guide issue features more than 1,000 products and photos. </p> <p>The 2015 Buyer's Guide features more brands and models than any other guide and includes electrics, acoustics, basses, amps, effects and accessories modeled by <em>Playboy</em> Playmates Nikki Leigh, Gemma Lee Farrell and Dani Mathers.</p> <p>The best guitar Buyer's Guide ever — we've got reviews on all the gear:</p> <p> • Electrics<br /> • Acoustics<br /> • Basses<br /> • Amps<br /> • Effects<br /> • Accessories<br /> • and many more!</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/guitar-world-buyers-guide-2015/?&amp;utm_source=facebook&amp;utm_medium=daily_ad&amp;utm_campaign=BuyersGuide15">For more information, head to the Guitar World Online Store now!</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/MRVRzaQ0I0s" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-07-02%20at%2012.25.57%20PM.png" width="620" height="812" alt="Screen Shot 2014-07-02 at 12.25.57 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/2015-guitar-world-buyers-guide-nonstop-gear-plus-playboy-playmates-nikki-leigh-gemma-lee-farrell-and-dani-mathers#comments Buyer's Guide News Features Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:07:46 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21833 Michael Amott of Arch Enemy Discusses 'Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols' — The Record That Changed My Life http://www.guitarworld.com/michael-amott-arch-enemy-discusses-never-mind-bollocks-heres-sex-pistols-record-changed-my-life <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Michael Amott of Arch Enemy chooses (and discusses) the record that changed his life.</em></p> <p><strong>Sex Pistols</strong><br /> <em>Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols</em> (1977)</p> <p>“I grew up with my parents’ record collection, and they listened largely to classical, along with some jazz, blues, Motown, Stevie Wonder and David Bowie. </p> <p>"I had a good foundation. When I first found my own music, it was Kiss. They were massive in Scandinavia. I wasn’t playing guitar yet, but I loved their music and image—especially <em>Destroyer</em> and ‘Detroit Rock City,’ with the harmonized guitar. </p> <p>"Later, when I was about 11 and had started playing music, my friend came over one day after school and said, ‘Mike, we’re gonna be punks now.’ And I was like, ‘Okay! What’s that?’ He showed me a magazine with a picture of the Sex Pistols and played me their first album, <em>Never Mind the Bollocks</em>, on cassette tape. I loved it! And we started a band that day.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ooIz_Di2w3g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/arch-enemy">Arch Enemy</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/sex-pistols">Sex Pistols</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/michael-amott-arch-enemy-discusses-never-mind-bollocks-heres-sex-pistols-record-changed-my-life#comments Arch Enemy July 2014 Michael Amott Never Mind the Bollocks Here's the Sex Pistols Sex Pistols The Record that Changed My Life Interviews News Features Thu, 24 Jul 2014 14:30:18 +0000 Michael Amott http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21901 Orianthi Discusses Santana's 'Sacred Fire: Live in South America' — The Record That Changed My Life http://www.guitarworld.com/orianthi-discusses-santanas-sacred-fire-live-south-america-record-changed-my-life <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Orianthi chooses (and discusses) the record that changed her life.</em></p> <p><strong>Santana</strong><br /> <em>Sacred Fire: Live In South America</em> (1993)</p> <p>“There’s just so much wonderful soloing throughout that entire concert—really inspired soloing—and that inspired me to want to play electric guitar. I had been playing since I was six, but I was studying classical guitar and just strumming at that point. </p> <p>"When I was around 11, my dad took me to see Santana live, and then I got <em>Sacred Fire</em>, and everything changed for me. My dad is actually an amazing guitarist, and he always had an incredible record collection, which is how I discovered things like Jimi Hendrix and Santana. I’ll always be grateful for that.</p> <p>“Everything about that album and the concert, which I had on video tape, changed my life. The band was amazing; the energy of the crowd was incredible. It’s just a really special performance. I actually wore out the video from pausing it so many times because I was trying to learn all of his solos.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/lPekBJ47BnM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/orianthi">Orianthi</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/carlos-santana">Carlos Santana</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/orianthi-discusses-santanas-sacred-fire-live-south-america-record-changed-my-life#comments July 2014 Orianthi Santana The Record that Changed My Life Interviews News Features Magazine Wed, 23 Jul 2014 18:35:47 +0000 Orianthi http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21890 Crown the Empire Guitarist Bennett Vogelman's 2014 Summer Tour Survival Guide — Warped Tour http://www.guitarworld.com/crown-empire-guitarist-bennett-vogelmans-2014-summer-tour-survival-guide-warped-tour <!--paging_filter--><p><em>In this new feature from the August 2014 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>, the guitarists of Avenged Sevenfold, Morbid Angel, Trivium and other metal acts tell how they'll beat the heat and tame the crowds on the season's biggest tours.</em></p> <p><strong><em>TODAY: Crown the Empire Guitarist Bennett Vogelman — WARPED TOUR</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Your sweatiest concert ever?</strong></p> <p>The sweatiest concert we ever played was at the Speak Easy Lounge in Lake Worth, Florida, on our first headlining tour. It was so hot, you could literally see everyone’s perspiration in the air. We walked into the venue before our set and within maybe 30 seconds, we were completely drenched in sweat. By the end of the set, all of us could barely breathe.</p> <p><strong>Tips for playing in extreme heat?</strong></p> <p>The obvious one is to make sure that you have water onstage for each person. Wear short sleeves, and depending on how hot it is, you might want to tone down how intense you play onstage—which is something we never do.</p> <p><strong>One item you’ll carry with you at all times this summer?</strong></p> <p>My phone and a water bottle. That’s about it.</p> <p><strong>Considerations when playing an outdoor show versus an indoor show?</strong></p> <p>Basically, the deal with outdoor shows is there are no lights in the afternoon, so you have to make up for it with how you interact with the crowd. You also have to account for any weather that you might encounter, like rain, lightning, thunder, wind and dust storms. Plus, with some outdoor shows, you’re really far away from the crowd because of the barricade, which makes it a little hard to get up close and personal with the fans.</p> <p><strong>Primary gear you’ll be playing this summer?</strong></p> <p>Right now we’re actually looking into switching over to running things all digital. We'll have a computer that runs a standalone guitar plug-in—probably Line 6’s POD Farm—that emulates a guitar tone very similar to the one used on the actual song.</p> <p><strong>Tips for winning over a tough crowd?</strong></p> <p>That’s tricky. We’ve had our fair share of tough crowds over the last few years, and it’s really a different animal every time. What we normally do is make sure we’re confident. We’re at that show playing it for a reason, and understanding that helps keep our morale high, even when the crowd sounds like crickets chirping. We talk to the crowd and tell them we need to see more action and then make sure we give it our all so the crowd sees we’re not just fucking around up there. </p> <p><strong>Highlight of your band’s set list?</strong></p> <p>For me, it’s either playing “Makeshift Chemistry,” which has a lot of energy to it, or doing our “wall of death" during “Children of Love.”</p> <p><strong>Advice for a band just starting to play live?</strong></p> <p>The most important thing for me is making sure you’re playing your parts as solidly as you can. We do a lot of choreography live, and we’ve had to learn how to play and move around aggressively at the same time. Play the songs correctly first, go crazy second.</p> <p>Check out the video for "Makeshift Chemistry" here: </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/PoMJ0VkGG1c" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/crown-empire-guitarist-bennett-vogelmans-2014-summer-tour-survival-guide-warped-tour#comments 2014 Summer Tour Survival Guide August 2014 Bennett Vogelman Crown the Empire Interviews News Features Magazine Wed, 23 Jul 2014 18:25:55 +0000 Jeff Kitts http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21712 Miss May I Guitarist Justin Aufdemkampe's 2014 Summer Tour Survival Guide — Mayhem Fest http://www.guitarworld.com/miss-may-i-guitarist-justin-aufdemkampes-2014-summer-tour-survival-guide-mayhem-fest <!--paging_filter--><p><em>In this new feature from the August 2014 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>, the guitarists of Avenged Sevenfold, Morbid Angel, Trivium and other metal acts tell how they'll beat the heat and tame the crowds on the season's biggest tours.</em></p> <p><strong><em>TODAY: Miss May I Guitarist Justin Audemkampfe — MAYHEM FEST</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Your sweatiest concert ever?</strong></p> <p>It was in Louisville, Kentucky, at this place called Uncle Pleasant’s, back in 2010. The show was amazing and there were a lot of people inside this small place, so the combination of the heat outside, the heat coming off people inside, the lights, and the fact that the ceilings were eight feet high just trapped the heat. I specifically remember, about mid set, I was so hot that I thought I might pass out. I ran out of water about halfway through playing, so I just had to tough it out. After we played the last note, I darted for the back door. I was beyond dizzy at that point and getting outside was such a godsend.</p> <p><strong>Tips for playing in extreme heat?</strong></p> <p>Sometimes when it’s really humid outside and there’s a lot of condensation, wrapping your in-ear monitor pack and guitar wireless pack in plastic can help protect them from moisture. If those things go out, I can’t hear what I’m playing or my guitar signal will go out.</p> <p><strong>One item you’ll carry with you at all times this summer?</strong></p> <p>Sunglasses. I get headaches if I squint for too long. The combination of a headache and being dehydrated is the worst feeling, so sunglasses and a water bottle are a must in the summer heat. </p> <p><strong>Considerations when playing an outdoor show versus an indoor show?</strong></p> <p>One of the biggest problems I ran into playing on Warped in 2011 and 2012 was the dust getting into my gear. I really like my guitar rig and guitars to be clean. Almost every day there was some sort of dirt on both of them, and it’s something you cannot help. The wind carries it, and it can be a real pain in the ass for you or your tech. </p> <p><strong>Primary gear you’ll be playing this summer?</strong></p> <p>I recently started playing EVH 5150 III heads, which I’m falling in love with more and more with every tour that passes. I’ll be running a pretty standard pedal setup at the front of the stage as well: a Boss TU-3 tuner into a Maxon OD808 Overdrive pedal to an ISP Decimator noise-reduction pedal and after that to a Boss DD-7 Digital Delay. All of these are in my guitar chain and run straight into my head. We’ll be using Orange cabs too. We’ve been using them for a couple of years, and they’re really the only things in my rig that have stayed the same. As far as guitars, I’ll be using the Charvel San Dimas Style guitars for all of the festivals this summer. </p> <p><strong>Tips for winning over a tough crowd?</strong></p> <p>Sometimes it’s as simple as one song or one thing your singer says between songs that gets a crowd going. When I went to shows as a kid, it always made me more comfortable when I saw the guitarist moving around onstage. It let me know that I could just let loose and have a good time. So now, at every show, I give my all for the fans that have paid to see our band play, but even when playing in front of the worst crowds, I try to move around as much as possible. Playing in front of a bad crowd actually fuels me. </p> <p><strong>Highlight of your band’s set list?</strong></p> <p>My favorite songs to play are “Hey Mister,” “Refuse to Believe,” “Our Kings,” “Relentless Chaos” and “Echoes.”</p> <p><strong>Advice for a band just starting to play live?</strong></p> <p>Just go up there and have as much fun as possible. I was so nervous at Miss May I’s first show seven years ago, which was also my first show. I kept thinking, Do I remember my parts? What am I going to look like in front of people? Am I going to mess up? I ended up having one of the best experiences of my life. When I walked offstage, I said to myself, I could do this for the rest of my life. </p> <p>Check out the video for "Hey Mister" here: </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ZUaQtfnMzdw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Photo: Julien Esteban Pretel</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/miss-may-i-guitarist-justin-aufdemkampes-2014-summer-tour-survival-guide-mayhem-fest#comments 2014 Summer Tour Survival Guide August 2014 Justin Audemkampfe Miss May I Interviews News Features Magazine Wed, 23 Jul 2014 18:18:16 +0000 Jeff Kitts http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21717 John Petrucci of Dream Theater Discusses Rush's '2112' — The Record That Changed My Life http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-dream-theater-discusses-rushs-2112-record-changed-my-life <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Dream Theater guitarist John Petrucci chooses (and discusses) the record that changed his life.</em></p> <p><strong>Rush</strong><br /> <em>2112</em> (1976)</p> <p>“If I had to pick a favorite band of all time, it would be Rush. </p> <p>"As a teenager, I was already familiar with the group and its albums like <em>Moving Pictures</em> and <em>Signals</em>. But once I discovered <em>2112</em>, it opened me up to this whole concept that rock music could be bigger than just a tune—that it could be used as a vehicle to tell a story or to transport you to some other world. </p> <p>"The idea of a big piece like that being broken down into numbered sections like they were chapters in a book was just unbelievable to me, and it’s a technique that I continue to use to this day.</p> <p>“I have so much respect for [Rush drummer] Neil Peart, especially as a lyricist. And <em>2112</em> was the first time I heard something where, lyrically, it didn’t have to just be about the typical rock and roll topics, that it could be about something more heady or esoteric, something that makes you think. That really influenced me as a lyricist.</p> <p>“I was also blown away by how a three-piece band could sound so majestic and huge and play in a style that’s inherently rock and roll yet still pushes the boundaries of what they’re doing musically—this idea of being experimental, using different time signatures and not really being concerned about song length and traditional constraints. I can’t tell you how huge of an impact that had on me. <em>2112</em> basically set the course for my musical career and how I approached Dream Theater.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/QnATFkU-we8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/rush">Rush</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-dream-theater-discusses-rushs-2112-record-changed-my-life#comments Dream Theater John Petrucci July 2014 Rush The Record that Changed My Life Interviews News Features Magazine Wed, 23 Jul 2014 18:04:35 +0000 John Petrucci http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21897 Guitar World's Top 50 Guitar Albums of the Eighties http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-worlds-top-50-guitar-albums-eighties <!--paging_filter--><p>In early 1990, the editors of <em>Guitar World</em> magazine sat back, grabbed some coffee and painstakingly selected what they considered the top 50 guitar albums of the just-ended Eighties.</p> <p>In the photo gallery below, you can see what they came up with! </p> <p>The albums are listed in order, from "killer" to "jaw-droppingly awesome." Or from 50 to 1, depending on your perspective. </p> <p>Please note that there are actually 51 albums in the gallery (There was a tie somewhere along the way).</p> <p>Don't agree with the vintage editors' vintage choices? As always, let your voice be heard! Share your opinion in the comments below or on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/GuitarWorld">Facebook!</a></p> <p>Head back to the ... past!</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-worlds-top-50-guitar-albums-eighties#comments GW Archive Guitar World Lists Galleries News Features Magazine Wed, 23 Jul 2014 17:05:18 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/13083 DVD Combo Pack — 'Talkin' Blues' Parts 1 and 2 — on Sale at Guitar World Online Store http://www.guitarworld.com/dvd-combo-pack-talkin-blues-parts-1-and-2-sale-guitar-world-online-store <!--paging_filter--><p>The <em>Talkin' Blues</em> DVD Combo Pack is <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/talkin-blues-dvd-combo-pack/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=TalkinBluesCombo">available now at the Guitar World Online Store</a> for a special sale price — $24.95 (down from $29.98)!</p> <p>Get both <em>Talkin' Blues</em> DVDs from Keith Wyatt in this special combo offer! That's four hours of in-depth video lessons on essential blues elements and guitar-playing techniques.</p> <p>Don't miss out on this amazing blues tutorial at a great price!</p> <p><strong><em>Talkin' Blues</em> DVD Part 1:</strong></p> <p> Precision string bending<br /> Low-register phrasing for musical effect<br /> How to use fills effectively<br /> Chicken-pickin' phrases for a funky feel<br /> How to bring your licks to life with accented notes<br /> Jazz-blues techniques:extensions, alterations and substitutions<br /> How to make licks groove with swinging eighth notes</p> <p><strong><em>Talkin' Blues</em> DVD Part 2:</strong></p> <p> "Street Jazz" chord extensions and alterations<br /> Soloing over chord substitutions<br /> How to play like Blink Blake and Charlie Christian<br /> How to match the solo to the song<br /> "Dead thumb (or pick)" technique<br /> Conversational phrasing<br /> Sixth and ninth chords<br /> The New Orleans sound</p> <p>Your instructor: For more than 35 years, Wyatt has been active as a guitarist and educator specializing in American music. He is a prolific author of books, instructional videos and columns on subjects ranging from theory and ear training to beginning guitar methods and blues and "roots" styles. Since 1978, Keith has been an instructor at the world-famous Musicians Institute in Los Angeles, where he also serves as Director of Curriculum. Since 1996, he has been touring internationally and recording with LA's legendary Blasters. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/talkin-blues-dvd-combo-pack/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=TalkinBluesCombo">This combo pack is available now at the Guitar World Online Store!</a></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/dvd-combo-pack-talkin-blues-parts-1-and-2-sale-guitar-world-online-store#comments News Features Wed, 23 Jul 2014 14:40:56 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21855 ‘Rockabilly Riot’: Brian Setzer Talks New Album, Gretsch Guitars and Future of Rockabilly http://www.guitarworld.com/rockabilly-riot-brian-setzer-talks-new-album-gretsch-guitars-and-future-rockabilly <!--paging_filter--><p>Following last year’s successful Christmas tour with his 18-piece orchestra, iconic guitarist, songwriter and three-time Grammy winner Brian Setzer entered the studio to get back to his rockabilly roots — with incredible results. </p> <p>Setzer’s new album, <em>Rockabilly Riot: All Original</em>, which will be released August 12 via Surfdog Records, is pure, straight-ahead rockabilly that features 12 new, original songs. Along with his trademark twang and fretboard fire, Setzer is backed by three musicians who are among the best at their craft — Mark Winchester (bass), Kevin McKendree (piano) and Noah Levy (drums).</p> <p>The album, which was recorded in Nashville, was produced by Peter Collins, who handled those same duties for Setzer’s <em>Vavoom!</em> and <em>The Dirty Boogie</em>. The result is a cross-mix of early Stray Cats and Setzer’s solo records, with an emphasis on a fresh, modern rockabilly sound.</p> <p>Setzer first captured the hearts of guitarists everywhere as founder and frontman of Stray Cats, whose signature songs “Rock This Town," “(She's) Sexy &amp; 17” and “Stray Cat Strut” introduced the sound and attitude of rockabilly to a new generation of rock fans in the early Eighties. </p> <p>I recently spoke to Setzer about <em>Rockabilly Riot: All Original</em> <a href="http://hifi247.com/brian-setzer-rockabilly-riot-all-original-cd-preorder.html">(which is available now for pre-order)</a>, his early days, guitars and what the future holds for rockabilly music.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: How would you describe the sound of <em>Rockabilly Riot</em>?</strong></p> <p>To me, it sounds a little bit like a mixture of an album I had called <em>Ignition</em> and the first Stray Cats album. The production of it is straight forward, but it really is songs first. Then I make them into rockabilly just by me playing them.</p> <p><strong>What makes rockabilly so special?</strong></p> <p>It’s based in the blues, which is kind of the basis of it all. Rock and roll, rockabilly, country, swing, jazz — it all started from the blues. Anything that seems to come from something honest works for me. I like to say that rockabilly is like the bad brother who goes out late and doesn’t come back [laughs]. It was probably too risqué for its time and never really gained the traction it should have.</p> <p><strong>Do you consider this album a sequel of sorts to <em>Ignition</em>, considering both have songs about roosters and chickens</strong>?</p> <p>Well, Mark Winchester [bass] says that any song about barn yard animals is fine by him. I guess it was inspired by Mark’s “Rooster Rock." [laughs]</p> <p><strong>Speaking of Mark, you’re joined by some amazing players on this album. Can you speak to what it’s like working with Mark, Kevin McKendree and Noah Levy?</strong></p> <p>It reminds me of watching the All-Star Game in baseball. You know that anything you throw at them, they’re going to catch or going to hit. It’s fun making a record with guys like that, just like it was with Jim and Lee from the Stray Cats or the big band. They’re all top players, so you know you’re going to get a great performance. Once you sit down and play, work on the songs and gel, it all comes together and you’ve got a first-place team.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/155136713&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> <p><strong>What was the writing process like for this album?</strong></p> <p>It’s interesting. When you start writing, you really have to get a spark or something to light the fuse. The first song I wrote for this album was “Vinyl Records,” and the spark was my daughter listening to songs on her iPod. She had the little peas in her ear and I pulled them out and listened and said, “Ah, I really don’t like that. It doesn’t sound good.”</p> <p>That’s when she said, “Well, that’s just because you don’t like the band.” I said, “No, it’s not about the music.” Then I showed her a stereo I had sitting at home. I pulled out an old record and put it on so she could hear what it sounded like. She flipped, and it was a victory for Dad! Now, she and her friends go out and hunt down vinyl records. That was the spark that really got that song going for me lyrically. Musically, I had this riff lying around that I thought was cool. It was just a blues riff in C but it counts down all of the notes in the blues scale. It was something I hadn’t really heard anybody do yet. Once I had those two things, it just kind of snowballed from there.</p> <p><strong>The song “Rockabilly Blues” has an autobiographical theme to it. Was that your intention?</strong></p> <p>Yeah, that’s right. I was just sitting there finger picking a blues/rockabilly thing on a guitar that I’ve had for 40 years. I started thinking about the idea of making it personal and decided to write the song about the guitar and me.</p> <p><strong>What was the recording process like?</strong></p> <p>It was a no-stress record. To go in with Peter [Collins] was like going in with a buddy. We recorded it in Nashville, and what I did differently this time was arrange all of the songs together beforehand. We recorded all of the tracks and arranged them and then I gave the guys a CD and had them listen to it and live with it for a month and half. Then right after our Christmas tour, we all went straight into the studio. It was easier and more fun to have everything ready and then just go in and rock it out. There are no overdubs on this album except for the vocal. </p> <p><strong>What inspired you to first pick up the guitar?</strong></p> <p>The first real inspiration I had was George Harrison. I remember when I first heard the Beatles on a jukebox. At the time, I was so young I didn’t even really know what was making the sound that I liked. Then there was a record store on the corner with a picture hanging up that said “The Beatles." Once I saw George holding his guitar, I said, “Wow! So cool!” That was the first spark.</p> <p>Then later on, after it had cemented itself in place, I was really blown away by Eddie Cochran. I remember in the late Seventies no one really knew who he was. But once I saw his record (the black and white <em>Legendary Masters Series</em>), I knew I wanted to look like him. And after I had heard the songs, that just completed it for me. I said, “That’s it! [laughs]. </p> <p><strong>Did the Stray Cats find it difficult finding its niche in those early years?</strong></p> <p>I remember people used to think, “What the heck are these guys doing?” [laughs]. It’s kind of like Fifties rock and roll, but it’s not. This was the guitar-based, bad-ass cousin of that. But we built it up just like any other band. Whether you were in a blues band or a punk band at the time, everyone had to pay their dues and bang around in the back of a van. There was no instant overnight thing. It was a good learning experience climbing the ropes. </p> <p><strong>What’s your setup like these days?</strong></p> <p>I don’t use pedals. I just use the Roland Space Echo and mess around with the settings. If I want more of a “rock” sound, I’ll just turn the volume up. Then when I want the “billy” sound, I’ll turn the volume down to get it a little more twangy and then add a bit more delay on it. That’s really the only thing that I use. </p> <p><strong>Tell me a little about your guitars.</strong></p> <p>I have three that play really well. I’ve got the Stray Cat Gretsch, another ’59 that is pretty much my main guitar, and then my friends at TV Jones just found me a wicked one. I think it’s a ‘60 model that really just has the stuff. I’ve also got my new line of Gretsch guitars that I always take with me on the road.</p> <p><strong>What first attracted you to the Gretsch?</strong></p> <p>I had always wanted one because of George and Eddie. I just loved their sound and my ear was drawn to that sound rather than to a Les Paul. Back in the Seventies, you couldn’t really find a 6120 because they had stopped making them. But when I did find one and plugged it in, I was smitten. It was exactly what I was looking for. </p> <p><strong>Can you tell me the origin of the Stray Cats song “Rock This Town”?</strong></p> <p>We were all tired of the whole disco era and one night, me and Slim Jim [Phantom] snuck into a bar. I remember we looked at the jukebox and saw that it was all still disco and we were both really pissed off about it. I think that was the spark that got it off the ground and helped me to write something that was rock and roll instead of something that was dominating the airwaves. </p> <p><strong>What do you think the future holds for rockabilly music?</strong></p> <p>If you follow history, it always seems to stick its head above water, sees what the world is like and then goes back under. It had its spike in the Fifties, then the Stray Cats brought it back, and now you’ve got people like Imelda May who are having success with it. I think rockabilly will always be there because it’s so good and just keeps regenerating itself. Whether it’s in the public eye or not, people will always know it’s there.</p> <p><strong><em><a href="http://hifi247.com/brian-setzer-rockabilly-riot-all-original-cd-preorder.html">'Rockabilly Riot' is available now for pre-order.</a></em></strong></p> <p><em>James Wood is a writer, musician and self-proclaimed metalhead who maintains his own website, <a href="http://gojimmygo.net/">GoJimmyGo.net</a>. His articles and interviews are written on a variety of topics with passion and humor. You can follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/JimEWood">Twitter @JimEWood.</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/rockabilly-riot-brian-setzer-talks-new-album-gretsch-guitars-and-future-rockabilly#comments Brian Setzer Gretsch James Wood Interviews News Features Tue, 22 Jul 2014 21:08:46 +0000 James Wood http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21882 ‘1000hp’: Guitarist Tony Rombola Talks New Godsmack Album and Side Project http://www.guitarworld.com/1000hp-guitarist-tony-rombola-talks-new-godsmack-album-and-side-project <!--paging_filter--><p>Multi-platinum hard rock heroes Godsmack are revving their engines for their highly anticipated sixth studio album, <em>1000hp</em> The album, which is set for an August 5 release, is the follow-up to 2010’s <em>The Oracle</em>, which debuted at Number 1 on <em>Billboard's</em> Top 200.</p> <p>Co-produced by Sully Erna along with Dave Fortman (Slipknot, Evanescence), <em>1000hp</em> returns the band to their Boston-based roots. Even the album’s title track pays homage to the band’s journey from playing tiny clubs to packed arenas worldwide. </p> <p>With a new-found thrashed-up “punk” energy, <em>1000hp</em> is really about going back to basics. It's old-school Godsmack, but with a new kind of twist.</p> <p>Coinciding with the release of <em>1000hp</em> — <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/1000hp/id898318144">which is available for pre-order at iTunes</a> — Godsmack also will headline this year’s Rockstar Energy Drink UPROAR Festival, which kicks off August 14. Godsmack is Sully Erna (vocals), Tony Rombola (guitar), Robbie Merrill (bass) and Shannon Larkin (drums).</p> <p>I recently spoke with Rombola about <em>1000hp</em>, touring and his blues-based side project, the Blue Cross Band.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: How would you describe the sound of <em>1000hp</em>?</strong></p> <p>We wanted it to be straight forward and simple. I think that was the theme. There are elements of punk in some of the grooves that Sully brought in, and even in the selection of some of the riffs that I had as well. A lot of it is simpler, with some different feels.</p> <p><strong>What's the songwriting process for a Godsmack album?</strong></p> <p>For me, it all starts with riffs Shannon and I put together and arrange into a demo. We'll bring in a bunch of the material and Sully will go through it to get vibe for the record. He has great vision. He also brought in riffs for the songs "Something Different" and "Life Is Good". Sully's the one who picks the direction for the album and works on the lyrics. I'm more focused on the music. For me, it's all about the guitar.</p> <p><strong>What was it like working with producer Dave Fortman?</strong></p> <p>It was great. We had actually met Dave when we were working on our last album, <em>The Oracle</em>. He has a lot of ideas and was a lot of fun to work with. He's also a guitar player and plays drums, so he was able to give us input and bounce ideas off of us.</p> <p><strong>Do you feel any added pressure being the headlining band for a huge festival like UPROAR?</strong></p> <p>I actually feel less pressure. Whenever you do your own shows, there's always something to worry about because it's just you. With festival shows like this, each one has a similar feel and there are a lot more bands. It's outdoors and feels more like an event with a great crowd. I really enjoy doing them.</p> <p><strong>What's your live setup going to be like?</strong></p> <p>I'm with Diamond now, so I'll be bringing out a Diamond amp I really like, as well as a Diezel Herbert. I usually use two different amps at once for couple of different reasons. First, it gives me added tone and if one happens to crap out, I'll still have a solid amp going for me. I also have a couple McNaught guitars that I'll be bringing out, as well as a Les Paul or two. Not too many effects, though. I pretty much play dry all night.</p> <p><strong>Let's talk a little about your early years playing. What inspired you to first pick up the guitar?</strong></p> <p> Growing up, I had a friend whose mother had this really great record collection. Bands like Black Sabbath, Eric Clapton, Rush, Lynyrd Skynyrd. My buddy started playing guitar and taking lessons and within weeks I wanted to do the same. I didn’t take lessons, but I remember he would always show me whatever he had learned. </p> <p>Eventually, he quit but I continued to play. And to this day I pretty much play all day, every day [laughs]. The more you play, the more you discover.</p> <p><strong>Who were some of your early influences?</strong></p> <p>In the beginning, it was guys like Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix and Tony Iommi. Then a little later on I got into all of the Eighties guitarists like Randy Rhoads and Gary Moore when he was doing the blues thing. Yngwie Malmsteen was another guy I looked up to and someone I tried to pick up from as much as could. His technique was much more advanced than mine so I could only learn certain things, but he was still inspiring.</p> <p><strong>How did your side project, the Blues Cross Band, come together?</strong></p> <p>Shannon and I have this jam room we like to go to whenever we're not on tour. Sometimes we'll go in there five days a week and just hang out and play music. He heard me playing the blues one day and thought it sounded cool. So we decided to write a few songs together. Then we wound up getting a bass player and a singer, and the next thing you know we were a band. We just recently did our first shows together. It was a really good experience being able to play with totally different gear and a whole different style of music. I'm having a lot of fun with it.</p> <p><strong>How would you describe the sound of this project?</strong></p> <p>It's more blues/rock. I'm trying to do more traditional stuff: using single coil and keeping the tones traditional and not do too much shredding. It's an even balance. We haven't recorded much so there's still an opportunity to find my voice and how I want to be heard.</p> <p><strong>Is there a particular moment in your career that stands out to you as a highlight?</strong></p> <p>I think it was when the local radio station, WAAF, made a connection with Sully and started playing our music on their own. That's what really got the ball rolling for us. Then there was the time when we got our first gold record. We were doing OzzFest and it was our first big tour playing for huge audiences. To get handed a gold record in the afternoon by record label was a big moment, and proof that we had made it!</p> <p><em>James Wood is a writer, musician and self-proclaimed metalhead who maintains his own website, <a href="http://gojimmygo.net/">GoJimmyGo.net</a>. His articles and interviews are written on a variety of topics with passion and humor. You can follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/JimEWood">Twitter @JimEWood.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/1000hp-guitarist-tony-rombola-talks-new-godsmack-album-and-side-project#comments Godsmack James Wood Tony Rombola Interviews News Features Tue, 22 Jul 2014 16:48:07 +0000 James Wood http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21838 Eric Clapton Discusses His Star-Studded J.J. Cale Tribute Album, 'The Breeze' — Exclusive Interview http://www.guitarworld.com/eric-clapton-discusses-his-star-studded-jj-cale-tribute-album-breeze-exclusive-interview <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This is an excerpt from the September 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the rest of this story, plus features on the Black Keys, Judas Priest, 17 Amazing practice amps, columns, tabs and reviews of new gear from Epiphone, ESP Guitars, Visual Sound, Blackstar, G&amp;L Guitars, Ibanez and more, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-september-2014-the-black-keys/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=BlackKeysExceprt">check out the September 2014 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <p><strong>Cool Breeze: <em>In this GW exclusive, Eric Clapton pays tribute to his friend and inspiration J.J. Cale and talks about </em>The Breeze<em>, his new star-studded tribute to the late Oklahoma guitarist and songwriter.</em></strong></p> <p>Robert Johnson and J.J. Cale represent the yin and yang of Eric Clapton’s musical influences. On one side is Johnson, the famously troubled Thirties-era Mississippi bluesman who moaned about hellhounds on his trail, spooks around his bed and those lowdown, shakin’ chills. On the other side is Cale, the famously laidback singer-songwriter from Tulsa who penned laconic odes to singin’ whippoorwills, “chugalugging” and shakin’ tambourines. </p> <p>Clapton has covered the music of both men on several occasions throughout his career, taking Johnson’s “Crossroads” to the heights of blues-rock jam-outs with Cream in 1968 and earning massive commercial success as a solo artist with his versions of Cale’s insanely catchy “After Midnight” in 1970 and breezy “Cocaine” in 1977.</p> <p>Yet, when looking back at Clapton’s work as a whole, one can’t help but notice that the Cale-influenced side of the equation takes up a much larger chunk of the pie, which was probably the result of the fact that Clapton actually got to meet and hang with Cale. Their bond lasted from the Seventies until Cale’s death in 2013 at age 74. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/eric-clapton-premieres-new-song-train-nowhere-jj-cale-tribute-album-breeze-exclusive">[[ Eric Clapton Premieres New Song, "Train to Nowhere," from JJ Cale Tribute Album 'The Breeze' — Exclusive ]]</a></strong></p> <p>Clapton even had Cale’s phone number, something he’s still tickled about.</p> <p>“Nobody had his phone number. You had to be in the inner circle to have that,” Clapton says with a laugh. “I’d call him, and sometimes I’d get his voice mail. Other times, I’d get him on the line and we’d talk for hours. I felt I had some kind of inside track, and that was a wonderful thing.”</p> <p>On July 29, however, Clapton will release a bona-fide tribute to his friend and former collaborator: <em>Eric Clapton &amp; Friends: The Breeze, An Appreciation of J.J. Cale</em>. The album features 16 Cale songs—from “Call Me the Breeze,” “Starbound” and “Lies” to “Magnolia” “Songbird” and “Crying Eyes”—performed by Clapton and a host of guests, including Mark Knopfler, John Mayer, Willie Nelson, Tom Petty and Don White. Other friends include Albert Lee, Derek Trucks, David Lindley, Doyle Bramhall II and Don Preston, all of whom split up the six-string duties.</p> <p>In the interview below, Clapton discusses Cale and the new album—which happens to be his only tribute album besides <em>Me and Mr. Johnson</em>, his 2004 homage to Robert Johnson. </p> <p><strong>It’s 1969. You’ve left behind Cream’s heavy blues-rock, extended guitar solos, freeform improvisation, high intensity and volume. Then you discover J.J. Cale’s music, courtesy of Delaney Bramlett of Delaney &amp; Bonnie. Before you know it, you immerse yourself in Cale’s “relaxed” Tulsa style, and the Clapton of Cream becomes a thing of the past. Did you see Cale’s music as the embodiment of something you had been seeking? Or were you not even looking for something new?</strong></p> <p>I think I was looking for someone to identify with. A lot of my musical growth and education came from players who weren’t around anymore. <em>The Best of Muddy Waters</em> [1958] was one of my primary sources of education, as well as a lot of the country blues guys who had been gone a long time. But even the Muddy album, which was an electric album—that band, by the time I got to hear that album, was long gone.</p> <p>What I’m trying to say is, if I was looking for something current, there it was. He had the root and the understanding—the knowledge about all the music I loved—in the same way Delaney and Leon Russell did. These guys understood the history of this thing I was attracted to, so it was logical to me that I should keep an eye on them and follow what they were doing. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zsqF3p8ORDE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Sometimes you immerse yourself in your influences to the point that you ignore your own ego and delve into the artist’s style, even including the way he sings and plays. When that’s the case, do you consider it a learning experience or some type of comfort zone?</strong></p> <p>A bit of both, I think. With J.J., for instance, and trying to learn to play some of the Robert Johnson songs…when you put those two things side by side, my intention is always to try and leave my ego at the door and go in and learn everything I can about how they did it. That’s the starting point. That will be the aspiration. And what happens inevitably is that my ego gets back in and I adapt what I’m learning to suit what I want to do. So my will is always present. </p> <p>Robert Johnson was the hardest thing to tackle because, in order to play any of the songs he put on tape exactly as he did it, that’s a life’s work in itself. Any one of his songs, they’re so strategically different in terms of technique and how to sing and play those things at the same time. It’s like master-class stuff. My approach is to get as far as I can and allow my will to come in and take over and make it so that I can play it now and not in five years’ time, because I’m too impatient to have to follow that through to its logical conclusion. And with J.J., it’s the same thing. So what I end up with, even if I’m trying to imitate and emulate, is a version, because my will has twisted me to make it easier for me.</p> <p><strong>How, when and where did <em>The Breeze, An Appreciation of J.J. Cale</em> come together?</strong></p> <p>Right after his funeral service, I flew from California back to Columbus, Ohio, where I have a house, and my wife’s family is there. At some point over the last couple of years, I started putting in a primitive little studio, and we started tracking there. I’d put rhythm tracks together and then I’d overlay guitars, and Walt Richmond came to play keyboards. Then, when we’d built enough with the artificial sounds, we went to L.A. I asked [drummer] Jim Keltner and [bassist] Nathan East to start putting down a proper rhythm section. Then we got some other players, including [drummers] Jamie Oldaker, David Teegarden, Jim Karstein and James Cruce. Then came [guitarists] Don White, Don Preston, David Lindley, Doyle Bramhall II, all to kind of build the sound.</p> <p><em>This is an excerpt from the September 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the rest of this story, plus features on the Black Keys, Judas Priest, 17 Amazing practice amps, columns, tabs and reviews of new gear from Epiphone, ESP Guitars, Visual Sound, Blackstar, G&amp;L Guitars, Ibanez and more, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-september-2014-the-black-keys/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=BlackKeysExceprt">check out the September 2014 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eric-clapton">Eric Clapton</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/eric-clapton-discusses-his-star-studded-jj-cale-tribute-album-breeze-exclusive-interview#comments Damian Fanelli Eric Clapton exclusive Interview J.J. Cale September 2014 Interviews News Features Magazine Tue, 22 Jul 2014 16:30:27 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21879 September 2014 Guitar World: The Black Keys 'Turn Blue,' Return of Judas Priest, Eric Clapton Speaks, Amazing Practice Amps http://www.guitarworld.com/september-2014-guitar-world-black-keys-turn-blue-return-judas-priest-eric-clapton-speaks-amazing-practice-amps <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>The all-new September 2014 issue of Guitar World is <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/guitar-world-september-2014-the-black-keys/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=GWSEP14">available now!</a></strong></p> <p>In the September 2014 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>, we talk with <strong>Dan Auerbach</strong> of <strong>the Black Keys</strong>. Auerbach tells how the group made its latest hit album, <em>Turn Blue</em>, in the midst of personal hardship, using a handful of guitars, amps and effects and whole lotta spontaneous inspiration. Then, the guitarist reveals his gear. Learn which guitars, amps and effects are behind the band's strange musical brew.</p> <p>Then, <em>Guitar World</em> focuses on <strong>Judas Priest</strong>. A few years ago, it looked as though Judas Priest were finished. But with the ferocious new album <em>Redeemer of Souls</em>, the Metal Gods have regained their mojo. </p> <p>Next, the GW editors come up with a list of 10 vintage guitars that at one point were considered mutant oddities from an alternate universe. But in the hands of <strong>Muddy Waters, Jack White, Dan Auerbach</strong> and other visionary players, these pawnshop rejects became six-string superheroes.</p> <p>Finally, legend <strong>Eric Clapton</strong> salutes and pays tribute to his friend and inspiration <strong>J.J. Cale</strong> and talks about <em>The Breeze</em>, his new star-studded tribute to the late Oklahoma guitarist and songwriter.</p> <p>PLUS: <strong>Neal Schon</strong>, 17 Best Practice Amps, <strong>Dave Mustaine, Linkin Park</strong> and much more!</p> <p><strong>Five Songs with Tabs for Guitar and Bass</strong></p> <p>• Judas Priest - "Electric Eye"<br /> • Cream - "Sunshine of Your Love"<br /> • Animals As Leaders - "CAFO"<br /> • Ed Sheeran - "Sing"<br /> • Black Keys - "Lonely Boy"</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/guitar-world-september-2014-the-black-keys/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=GWSEP14">Head to the Guitar World Online Store now!</a></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/september-2014-guitar-world-black-keys-turn-blue-return-judas-priest-eric-clapton-speaks-amazing-practice-amps#comments September 2014 News Features Tue, 22 Jul 2014 16:29:24 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21881