Features http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/5/all en 'Pink Floyd: The Black Strat' Tells History of David Gilmour's Iconic Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/pink-floyd-black-strat-tells-history-david-gilmours-iconic-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p>Catch a rare inside glimpse of one of the world's most revered guitarists, David Gilmour, and his iconic Black Stratocaster. </p> <p><em>Pink Floyd: The Black Strat</em> was written by Phil Taylor, Gilmour's personal guitar technician and the band's chief backline tech since 1974. He was the only man to know Pink Floyd's equipment better than the band. </p> <p>This expanded edition of the book contains new information and many unpublished photographs that further chart the Black Strat's illustrious history. Amending and elaborating on the previous edition, it also continues the story where the last one left off with all the latest live appearances, information and photographs, including Gilmour testing the Fender Black Strat replica models; performances with David Bowie, Jeff Beck and others; and much more. </p> <p><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/mix-books/products/pink-floyd-the-black-strat/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=PinkFloydBlackStrat">Check out this book at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/qu9MrAKJWWQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/pink-floyd">Pink Floyd</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/david-gilmour">David Gilmour</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/pink-floyd-black-strat-tells-history-david-gilmours-iconic-guitar#comments David Gilmour Pink Floyd News Features Mon, 01 Sep 2014 16:15:39 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16535 Your Signature, Please: Five Essential Pieces of Signature Gear http://www.guitarworld.com/your-signature-please-five-essential-pieces-signature-gear <!--paging_filter--><p>About 10 years ago, a home-furnishings company named a line of rugs after a gorgeous movie and TV actress. </p> <p>It turns out that, aside from walking, sidling and sashaying on them for a few decades, she really didn't know a lot about rugs — or furniture or pretty much anything her name still graces today. But the company put her moniker on the stuff and continues to reap the benefits that a big name (and a pretty face) can provide.</p> <p>Luckily, musicians in search of quality signature gear — from guitars to amps to effects to pickups — don't have to worry about that nonsense. Generally, gear manufacturers work closely with their signature artists, in some cases, right down to the tiniest of details (Some artists repeatedly send back their signature-model prototypes until they're absolutely perfect).</p> <p>So, while acknowledging the plethora of fine signature gear that's available today, here's the cream of the crop: five items that simply get it right. This list was compiled by a group of <em>Guitar World</em> staffers including Gear Editor Paul Riario. </p> <p><strong>Fender Eric Johnson Stratocaster</strong></p> <p>Maybe you've read it in forums or heard it from people in the know (maybe even from people whose job it is to try out Fender gear all day long), but Fender's Eric Johnson signature Strat has quietly earned a reputation as possibly one of the best instruments Fender produces on a regular basis.</p> <p>At first glance, the EJ model looks a lot like other U.S.-made Strats. But once you study the details, you start to notice its refinement. In fact, EJ-model connoisseurs tend to agree that it's not one single feature that makes this guitar special — it's the way all the smaller features work together. </p> <p>The guitar has a one-piece, vintage-tinted quartersawn plain maple neck (contours sanded very smooth) with a ’57-style V shape; a light, two-piece alder body with deep ’57-style body contours and cavities. It comes in 2-Color Sunburst, Black, Candy Apple Red and White Blonde. The frets are highly polished. The pickups are Eric Johnson single-coils (not over-wound at all) with countersunk screws and a five-way switch. Other features include a vintage tremolo with silver-painted block and ’57-style string recess. There's no paint between the base plate and the block.</p> <p>Basically, if you're a fan of the Stratocaster in its purest form, you'll truly appreciate this model, which also packs in several practical updates for modern players.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/EJ%20Strat.jpg" width="620" height="209" alt="EJ Strat.jpg" /></p> <p><em>MSRP: $2,599.99 | <a href="http://www.fender.com/products/search.php?partno=0117702806">Check out this guitar at fender.com.</a></em></p> <hr /> <strong>ESP LTD James Hetfield Snakebyte</strong> <p>When it comes to signature guitars made for the rigors of heavy metal, it's hard to beat the LTD James Hetfield Snakebyte from ESP.</p> <p>The Snakebyte is a light-weight guitar that packs the heavyweight punch necessary for one of metal's marquee players. The neck is thin and comfortable, perfect for quick chord changes, and you'll find all of the high-end features of its more expensive Japanese-made cousin without sacrificing quality.</p> <p>And, as an added bonus, the Snakebyte now comes stock with a set of EMG James Hetfield pickups, putting all of the Metallica guitarist's secret weapons — minus his fabled right hand — at your fingertips.</p> <p>For a full test drive and review from <em>Guitar World</em> Gear Editor Paul Riaro, head <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/review-esp-ltd-james-hetfield-snakebyte">here</a>.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/ltdsnakebyte.png" width="620" /></p> <p><em>MSRP: $1,570 | <a href="http://www.espguitars.com/guitars/signature/ltd-snakebyte.html">Check out this guitar at esp.com.</a></em></p> <hr /> <strong>Seymour Duncan Alnico II Pro Slash APH-2 pickups</strong> <p>For the die-hard Slash enthusiast, there's a whole boatload of signature gear to choose from, from the "Appetite" Les Paul to a the custom octave fuzz from Jim Dunlop.</p> <p>While you could buy your way to a pretty good replica of Slash's actual rig with enough money, the best place to start might just be the Alnico II Pro Slash APH-2 pickups from Seymour Duncan.</p> <p>These moderate-output humbuckers will give you just the right amount of bite for those gritty riffs while still allowing for the searing sustain necessary to unleash ripping solos. Pop them in any humbucker-friendly guitar and you'll be well on your way to channeling your favorite top-hat-wearing guitar hero.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/slashpickups.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p><em>MSRP: $269 | <a href="http://www.seymourduncan.com/products/electric/humbucker/vintage-output/alnico_ii_pro_s_1/">Check out these pickups at seymourduncan.com.</a></em></p> <hr /> <strong>Jim Dunlop DB01 Cry Baby From Hell</strong> <p>Take a quick poll of metal guitarists to find out their favorite wah pedal and Jim Dunlop's Cry Baby From Hell will undoubtedly come out on top.</p> <p>Made to the specifications of the late, great Dimebag Darrell, the Cry Baby From Hell features an extended sweep range knob, 6-way range selector and kick-in volume boost to take your solos over the top.</p> <p>Dime, like a number of other guitarists, would often use his wah as a high-end boost for solos, leaving it fully cocked while he tore up the fretboard. Either fully engaged or used as a high-pass filter, the Cry Baby From Hell should meet all your needs and then some. </p> <p>Now start getting those squeals and pinch harmonics down!</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/dimebagcrybaby.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p><em>MSRP: $286.44 | <a href="http://www.jimdunlop.com/product/db01-dimebag-signature-wah">Check out this pedal at jimdunlop.com</a></em></p> <hr /> <strong>EVH 5150 III 50-Watt Head</strong> <p>Perhaps no one's tone is as sought-after as that of Eddie Van Halen. And fortunately for all you finger-tapping maniacs out there, almost no other guitarist has more quality signature gear on the market.</p> <p>And while his Wolfgang Special guitar is top-of-the-line and the MXR Phase 90 will have you rocking the cradle with the best of them, it's his line of signature amps from EVH that have really made a mark on the world of hard rock and metal.</p> <p>Even if it is a scaled-down version of its 100-watt big brother, there's no denying the EVH III 5150 50-watt head packs a <em>lot</em> into a small package. This three-channel amp matches up nicely with any cabinet, but you definitely can't go wrong with any of the cabs in the EVH 5150 III line. Pair it up with either the 2x12 or 1x12 and you'll have 'em dancing in the streets in no time!</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/evh5150.png" /></p> <p><em>MSRP: $1,333.32 | <a href="http://www.evhgear.com/gear/subpage?partno=2253000400">Check out this amp at evhgear.com.</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slash">Slash</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/eric-johnson">Eric Johnson</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/eddie-van-halen">Eddie Van Halen</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/van-halen">Van Halen</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dimebag-darrell">Dimebag Darrell</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/pantera">Pantera</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/damageplan">Damageplan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/your-signature-please-five-essential-pieces-signature-gear#comments Dimebag Darrell Dunlop Eddie Van Halen Eric Johnson ESP EVH Fender James Hetfield Seymour Duncan Slash Guitar World Lists Amps Electric Guitars News Features Gear Fri, 29 Aug 2014 14:46:55 +0000 Damian Fanelli, Josh Hart http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16421 Labor Day Sale: Get 25 Percent Off Everything at Guitar World's Online Store! http://www.guitarworld.com/labor-day-sale-get-25-percent-everything-guitar-worlds-online-store <!--paging_filter--><p>Now through September 2, 2014, you can get 25 percent off EVERYTHING at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=LaborDay2014">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</p> <p>Just be sure to use this special code at checkout:</p> <p><strong>LABORDAY25</strong></p> <p>Choose from products from <em>Guitar World, Guitar Aficionado, Bass Player, Guitar Player, Electronic Musician, Keyboard, Guitar Legends</em> and <em>Revolver</em>.</p> <p>Once again, that code is:</p> <p><strong>LABORDAY25</strong></p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=LaborDay2014">Head to the Guitar World Online Store now!</a></strong></p> <p>Happy Labor Day from Guitar World!</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/labor-day-sale-get-25-percent-everything-guitar-worlds-online-store#comments News Features Fri, 29 Aug 2014 14:13:26 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22235 Essential Listening: 10 Stellar Headphone Albums http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-albums-headphone-listening <!--paging_filter--><p>What, exactly, is a headphone album? Well, the definition changes depending on who you are. </p> <p>For audiophiles, a headphone album is a work that is so exquisitely recorded that it demands you listen to each beautifully recorded note under a sonic microscope. Miles Davis’ <em>Kind of Blue</em> fits that bill. </p> <p>For others, a great headphone album is one that makes an intimate album more intimate (such as Bob Dylan’s original mono recordings), or a loud album louder (Rage Against the Machine’s debut album).</p> <p>We’re an unsubtle and hyperactive bunch at <em>Guitar World</em>, so our favorite headphone albums are those that have a lot of activity in the stereo field. As dumb as it sounds, we love it every time a guitar solo takes a shortcut through our skulls as it zooms from one ear to the other. </p> <p>If you don’t know what we’re talking about or you’ve never experienced any of these great albums under the influence of some high-end ear buds, we suggest you go home, put on your best set of ‘phones, turn out the lights, turn up the volume and prepare to have your mind blown sky high.</p> <p><strong>The Jimi Hendrix Experience, <em>Electric Ladyland</em> (1968)</strong></p> <p>If you haven't taken LSD, the good news is you don’t have to. Save your brain cells and listen to this masterpiece under a good set of headphones to get the complete psychedelic picture. On <em>Electric Ladyland</em>, Jimi Hendrix and his brilliant engineer, Eddie Kramer, create a wonderful, three-dimensional sonic world and invite you to step in. This album is not necessarily stoned, but it certainly is beautiful. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/TLV4_xaYynY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Pink Floyd, <em>The Dark Side of the Moon</em> (1973)</strong></p> <p>TICK TOCK, TICK TOCK. DING DONG! BRRRRRRRANG!!!! WIIRRRRRRRRLLLLLLYYYYYY WHIRL…HA HA HA HA! I mean, what else can you say about the <em>Citizen Kane</em> of headphone albums? </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/nDbeqj-1XOo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>The Edgar Winter Group, <em>They Only Come Out At Night</em> (1972)</strong></p> <p>This is a little on the obscure side, but it ranks right up there with <em>Dark Side</em> as an essential Seventies listening experience. The star of the show is the extended version of the hit instrumental “Frankenstein,” but almost every song on the album is a sonic thrill ride.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/kbr4qNnffi8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Santana, <em>Caravanserai</em> (1972)</strong></p> <p>This album was originally mixed and released in both stereo and quadrophonic. Designed to be an all-encompassing, complex and exotic listening experience, the percussion surrounds you while the soaring guitars lift you to the heavens. This is the best-recorded album of Carlos Santana’s career, and probably his best album overall. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/XdmevPWZTRg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Dukes of the Stratosphear, <em>Psonic Psunspot</em> (1987)</strong></p> <p>The Dukes of the Stratosphear was a pseudonym used by the British rock band XTC in the mid-to-late Eighties, and their <em>Psonic Psunspot</em> album was a brilliant homage to the Sixties psychedelic pop of the Beatles, Pink Floyd and the Zombies. While the project was a bit of a joke, the songs are brilliant and, due to advancements in recording technology, the sound of the album eclipses anything actually recorded in London in 1967.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/0bbqezgfqD8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>The Cure, <em>Disintegration</em> (1989)</strong></p> <p>They say that guitarist Robert Smith was using hallucinogenic drugs throughout the coarse of this beautifully textured album. Like Hendrix’s <em>Electric Ladyland</em>, the sound of the album reflects his trippy state of mind. Listening to <em>Disintegration</em> under headphones is like stepping into someone else’s dream—and a rather dark one, at that. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/X8UR2TFUp8w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Radiohead, <em>Kid A</em> (2000)</strong></p> <p>In the late Nineties, Radiohead wanted to shake up their music. Their solution was to work as a collective—one that would make interesting “sounds”—rather than with each person in band playing a prescribed role. The result was an album that sounded unlike anything else before or since. This philosophy extended to the album’s sumptuous mix, which can only truly be truly appreciated with a pair of speakers right next to your ears.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/X3pPvCo-Rt0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Tool, <em>Lateralus</em> (2001)</strong></p> <p>In 2005, four years after its original release, Tool’s <em>Lateralus</em> was released as a limited-edition two-picture-disc vinyl LP in a holographic gatefold package. It took them a while to do it, but they were finally able to create a package that adequately reflected the multi-dimensional music offered inside.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/EDlC7oG_2W4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Dream Theater, <em>A Dramatic Turn of Events</em> (2011)</strong></p> <p>While everything sounds “good” these days, it’s hard to find albums that sound “great.” Everything is engineered so loud and compressed that most modern recorded music lacks the kind of space and depth that allows for a true headphone experience. Dream Theater probably doesn’t really give a damn about what is happening in popular music, which is why this album sounds as good as it does. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zJYcVwOP-Gg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>The Beatles, <em>Abbey Road</em> (1969)</strong></p> <p>Every collection has to have some Beatles, and this is by far their best and most modern-sounding album. Enjoy.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/IrW7dlDHH28" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Brad Tolinski is the editor-in-chief at </em>Guitar World.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/tool">Tool</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beatles">The Beatles</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/carlos-santana">Carlos Santana</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/pink-floyd">Pink Floyd</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/radiohead">Radiohead</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-albums-headphone-listening#comments Brad Tolinski Dream Theater Essential Listening Pink Floyd The Beatles Tool Guitar World Lists News Features Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:43:52 +0000 Brad Tolinski http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22195 Richard Lloyd: 'Alchemical Guitarist' Guitar Lesson DVD http://www.guitarworld.com/richard-lloyd-alchemical-guitarist-guitar-lesson-dvd <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The Alchemical Guitarist: Fretboard Secrets Unlocked</em> presents the 12 best videos and accompanying columns from <em>Guitar World</em> columnist Richard Lloyd. </p> <p>In this insightful instructional DVD, Lloyd gives viewers a new and comprehensive way to understand the fretboard, one that unlocks the mysteries that so often confuse and frustrate guitarists, whether they are beginners or advanced players. One of <em>Guitar World</em>'s most popular instructors, Lloyd presents lessons on topics that include hexatonic blues scales, emphasizing minor thirds in pentatonic patterns, the cycle of fourths and fifths, and much more. </p> <p>With more than two hours of lessons, <em>The Alchemical Guitarist</em> will give you the power to transform your guitar playing into pure gold.</p> <p><strong>The Alchemical Guitarist DVD contains these lessons:</strong></p> <p>• Magic Circles: The cycle of fourths and fifths<br /> • Skeleton Key: Unlocking the modes with the mystical major-scale diagram<br /> • Call Me: Two telephone numbers and an introduction to vertical knowledge<br /> • Five Chords &amp; the Truth: The five-chord cycle<br /> • The Dark Stuff: The modes in order of descending brightness<br /> • The 48-Step Program: The modal step-down practice method<br /> • Box Cutters: Breaking free with pentatonic trees<br /> • Diagonal Diatonics: Another way out of the boxes<br /> • Back in the Box: Positional play and the pentatonic boxes<br /> • Minor Issues: Emphasizing minor thirds in and out of the boxes<br /> • Opening Your Third Eye: Three maps for moving in and out of the boxes<br /> • The Hexatonic Blues Scale: Inviting the devil back to the party</p> <p><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/dvds/products/the-alchemical-guitarist-dvd/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=AlchemicalDVD">The Alchemical Guitarist: Fretboard Secrets Unlocked DVD is a Guitar World Online Store EXCLUSIVE. You won't find this product anywhere else! It's available now at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="465" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/mNmEq-cP9Oo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/richard-lloyd">Richard Lloyd</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/richard-lloyd-alchemical-guitarist-guitar-lesson-dvd#comments Richard Lloyd News Features Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:39:21 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16693 ALS Ice Bucket Challenge Videos: Guitarists and Rockers Get Moist for Charity http://www.guitarworld.com/als-ice-bucket-challenge-videos-guitarists-and-rockers-get-moist-charity-video <!--paging_filter--><p>What if there were one place where you could tune in to see ALS Ice Bucket Challenge videos by your favorite rockers, guitarists and manufacturers of your favorite gear?</p> <p>Dream no more!</p> <p>Because there are new Ice Bucket Challenge videos being posted every day, we've decided to make one file out of them, updating it daily — or at least whenever something applicable or interesting comes along.</p> <p>Right off the bat, below, you'll find videos by Homer Simpson (who was, of course, a member of the Be Sharps), Robert Plant, Steel Panther, Orianthi, Jason Becker, Joe Satriani, Nita Strauss and the Alice Cooper Band, Tommy Emmanuel, John Mayer, Foo Fighters, Ronnie Wood, Corey Taylor, Eddie Vedder, Brian May, Dave Davies (full Kinks reunion in 2015, please!), Geddy Lee of Rush, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, dudes from Carvin Guitars, Paul Reed Smith, Seymour Duncan and, well, the list goes on. Hopefully!</p> <p><strong>For more about the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge (and to donate whatever you can afford), visit <a href="http://www.alsa.org/fight-als/ice-bucket-challenge.html">alsa.org</a>.</strong></p> <p>Let the videos begin! If you know of Ice Bucket Challenge videos by other artists, let us know about them in the comments below or on Facebook! That's what this is story is for.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/kYNPtDbykp0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/gwViiRUoYGo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ImWeqm13vO8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/C748Gsr6bDc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/KbRTTTl9Qq0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/2BCq-CsgN0I" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/tJfIeqbwNcA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Wo-bsaCnSgY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ZkS83gY784U" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wysc5sAkC2Y" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/HOe12kVXauQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/VYlhE_ErO8M" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/BrjLSjoe_HQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/m4RT-J_20aI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/YY6hitfV2dY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/kGKB4AcvBbI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/oYNJzNxW62M" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/XLZOjLv0_6k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/9asV5DiRsK4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Os6Lubg_bps" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/PhRZVISDppU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/B917Ra1RG0E" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/VLZRSZm5G4U" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/b1B7Y6tYvyM" frameborder="0" 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class="field-item even"> <a href="/aerosmith">Aerosmith</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/kiss">Kiss</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/def-leppard">Def Leppard</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/alice-cooper">Alice Cooper</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jason-becker">Jason Becker</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/robert-plant">Robert Plant</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/orianthi">Orianthi</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/duff-mckagan">Duff McKagan</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/motley-crue">Motley Crue</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/als-ice-bucket-challenge-videos-guitarists-and-rockers-get-moist-charity-video#comments ALS Ice Bucket Challenge Dave Davies Eddie Vedder Nita Strauss Richie Sambora Videos News Features Thu, 28 Aug 2014 10:44:23 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22205 Inquirer with Alex Lifeson of Rush: "When I Sit Down and Play Guitar, I Melt Into the Instrument" http://www.guitarworld.com/rush_inquirer_with_alex_lifeson <!--paging_filter--><p><em>FROM THE ARCHIVE: </em>Guitar World<em> asks Rush's Alex Lifeson some tough questions.</em></p> <p><strong>What inspired you to play guitar?</strong></p> <p>My brother-in-law played flamenco guitar. He lent his guitar to me and I grew to like it. When you’re a kid, you don’t want to play an accordion because it would be too boring. But your parents might want you to play one, especially if you’re from a Yugoslavian family like me. [<em>laughs</em>]</p> <p><strong>What was your first guitar?</strong></p> <p>My parents got me a $25 Kent steel-string acoustic guitar when I was around 12. The following Christmas my parents bought me a Conora electric guitar. It looked almost like a Gretsch. It cost $59, and my mom still has it.</p> <p><strong>Were you inspired by any particular guitarist?</strong></p> <p>The Beach Boys had a really cool guitar sound. I also liked the guitarists in the Searchers and the Dave Clark Five. Then Jimi Hendrix and Pete Townshend hit, and it turned the guitar world on its ear. The more I got into playing guitar, the more I enjoyed music and the broader my listening became. The instrument itself became important to me, and I started messing around with classical guitar and took classical lessons.</p> <p><strong>What was the first song you learned who to play?</strong></p> <p>The Rolling Stones’ “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction.” The songs starts off with the three most important chords—E, A and D—and I learned them. I learned the lead line, as well.</p> <p><strong>Do you remember your first gig?</strong></p> <p>Yeah. In September 1968, Rush played for around 20 people at a small hall in a church basement. We played songs like “Spoonful,” “Fire” and “Born Under a Bad Sign,” and got paid $10. Then we went to a nearby deli and ordered Cokes and French fries, and started planning our future.</p> <p><strong>What was your most memorable gig?</strong></p> <p>Probably the 2002 show we played in São Paulo, Brazil, during the <em>Rush in Rio</em> tour. It was before an audience of 60,000, the largest number of people we ever played for. It was pouring rain, and the huge crowd was singing along to our songs. It was really amazing, because people don’t even speak English there.</p> <p><strong>What advice do you have for guitarists?</strong></p> <p>Do it because you love it, and never give up. It’s great to be able to do it for your entire life. I’ve been playing for 40 years, and I love it more than ever. When I sit down and play guitar, I <em>melt</em> into the instrument. I can play for hours by myself. Playing guitar has given me such a wonderful life, and I’m grateful for it.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/rush">Rush</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/rush_inquirer_with_alex_lifeson#comments Alex Lifeson Articles GW Archive Inquirer Rush Interviews News Features Magazine Wed, 27 Aug 2014 19:03:26 +0000 Joe Lalaina http://www.guitarworld.com/article/966 Songcraft: Singer-Songwriter David Poe Discusses His New Album, 'God & The Girl' http://www.guitarworld.com/songcraft-singer-songwriter-david-poe-discusses-his-new-album-god-girl <!--paging_filter--><p>Credited by <em>Rolling Stone</em> as having given "the singer-songwriter genre a much-needed jolt,” composer/singer-songwriter David Poe has issued numerous literate, melodic, major-label collections as a solo artist. </p> <p>At the same time, his songs have done well in the hands of others; they've been recorded by pop-rockers Grace Potter and Daryl Hall, Broadway composer Duncan Sheik and jazz singer Curtis Stigers. </p> <p>Poe’s eclectic compositions have also appeared in TV shows, including <em>Dexter</em> and <em>Nashville</em>, and in theatre productions such as <em>Shadowland</em>, the landmark dance piece by American troupe Pilobolus.</p> <p>In addition to his duties as a world-touring troubadour and in-demand songwriter, Poe also has collaborated with uber-producers T-Bone Burnett and Larry Klein and is a Composer Fellow of the Sundance Institute.</p> <p>Songcraft recently cornered this talented New Yorker, now living in Los Angeles, as his latest album, <em>God &amp; The Girl</em>, neared release to talk songwriting, deities and the women who love them. </p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: First off, congrats on the new album. I love it. It’s very smart, with this beautiful quality of hushed intensity to it. And <em>God &amp; The Girl</em> is such an amazing album title, the allusions are unending. Do titles serve as sparks of inspiration for your songwriting or are they more just a necessary result of the process?</strong></p> <p>"Hymn &amp; Her" sounded glib. The album title refers to the subject matter of the songs. Half concern faith, half concern love, or the lack of either. Some of them, like "The Devil" and "When I Fly," are an attempt to address both, to compare spiritual and romantic love.</p> <p>A song’s title is its thesis statement, the bumper sticker, the controlling idea. Traditional pop songs are a lot like old jokes: something happens three times — three verses — and the chorus is the punch line. </p> <p><strong>On your self-titled debut album, you had the chance to work with producer extraordinaire, T Bone Burnett. From a compositional standpoint, what does a producer of that caliber bring to the table in terms of the formation of a song?</strong></p> <p>Every producer imparts special information; Emile Kelman encouraged minimalism. Brad Jones taught me about layering. Larry Klein has deep intuition. Rick Parker conjures a vibe. Pete Min is a master of process. John Alagia understands how tonality impacts songs. Steve Rosenthal knows history. Ed Ackerson rewrites it. Buddy Miller captures lightning in a bottle. They all do. </p> <p>T Bone can love a record into being. In the studio, enthusiasm works wonders, and having the enthusiasm of someone who is an American hero is powerful. He is known as a unique producer who has come to the rescue of the culture multiple times, but T Bone is also one of our great songwriters, and his solo projects, especially <em>Tooth Of Crime</em> and all that came after it, are, to me, as influential as records like <em>Bone Machine</em> or <em>Time Out Of Mind.</em></p> <p>So yeah, having an experienced songwriter produce the debut of an aspiring songwriter made sense. Working with him was inspirational. Still is. Always is. </p> <p><strong>You’ve done a solid amount of co-writing. Do you approach that process any differently than you would when writing solo? Is the creative head-space the same or different?</strong></p> <p>As a co-writer, my job is to help gather wood and build the fire. Sometimes you’re in the wilderness rubbing flint and steel until there’s a spark. Sometimes a burning bush appears. I keep a match in my back pocket.</p> <p>The goal is to help create something an artist can sing for the rest of their career, starting with a fundamentally sound lyric and melody. There are a lot of factors in the making of a hit song, and some of them — marketing, bribery, the politics of the music business — have nothing to do with art. A songwriter’s responsibility is to render a beautiful thing that is simple but profound and enhances rather than betrays the culture. The Pilobolus choreographer and founder Robby Barnett says, “The idea is the best idea until there’s a better one,” which is a good approach to any collaboration. </p> <p>Another way to say it is “don’t negate, create.” Rather than say “I don’t like that,” say “how about this?” It’s important to be generous with your creativity and to have faith that the song will arrive. When it doesn’t, take a walk. </p> <p><strong>To date you’ve written pop music, music for theatre and music for the screen. Are all aforementioned exercises just slight variations of the larger process, or do you approach writing for each genre differently?</strong></p> <p>A good song works in any genre, but not necessarily in every medium. Music married to a narrative is its own thing, magical when it works, and everyone feels it.</p> <p><strong>What’s the most important piece of compositional/songwriting advice you’ve absorbed in your experience at the Sundance Institute?</strong></p> <p>Be brave enough to edit and revise. Or reject. No music is ever wasted. Every chord progression you learn, every bit of discarded lyric or melody will suit a future piece.</p> <p>The Sundance Institute encourages innovation and serves as an antidote for that sect of the entertainment industry that has a deep contempt for the general public – the ones who say “people are stupid,” even though we’re smarter as a culture than we ever have been. When aspiring artists collude with that sect in order to have a hit, the culture gets flooded with pap and confused. But the best artists have always been at the vanguard of social change, and the pursuit of a distinct vision is its own reward. For me, the reward is in the writing process, especially when others sing a song I’ve worked on. They always sing it better than I ever could, and the thrill I get from hearing it is like when people sing "Happy Birthday" to you, then give you cake. </p> <p><em><a href="http://www.markbacino.com/">Mark Bacino</a> is a singer/songwriter based in New York City. When not crafting his own melodic brand of retro-pop, Mark can be found producing fellow artists or composing for television/advertising via his <a href="http://www.thequeensenglish.com/">Queens English Recording Co</a>. Mark also is the founder/curator of <a href="http://www.introversechorus.com/">intro.verse.chorus</a>, a website dedicated to exploring the art of songwriting. Visit Mark on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/mark.bacino">Facebook</a> or follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/MarkBacino">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/songcraft-singer-songwriter-david-poe-discusses-his-new-album-god-girl#comments David Poe Mark Bacino Songcraft Blogs Interviews News Features Wed, 27 Aug 2014 19:00:56 +0000 Mark Bacino http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22206 Stevie Ray Vaughan's Top Five Studio Guest Appearances http://www.guitarworld.com/top-five-studio-guest-appearances-stevie-ray-vaughan <!--paging_filter--><p>For someone who spent a mere seven years in the spotlight, Stevie Ray Vaughan left behind an impressive amount of recorded material.</p> <p>He released four studio albums, a double live album and a Vaughan Brothers album (recorded with his big brother, Jimmie Vaughan), not to mention enough leftover live and studio material to fill several posthumous albums and a box set or two. </p> <p>He even found time to perform on albums by several other artists — from Teena Marie to Stevie Wonder to Don Johnson to Lonnie Mack — pretty much always with fiery results. </p> <p>With that in mind, here are Vaughan's top five guest appearances as a guest or session guitarist during his "famous" years, 1983 to 1990. We'll discuss his pre-fame session work in another story (maybe).</p> <p>Just so the Vaughanophiles are clear, this list does not take into account Vaughan's 1983 Canadian TV studio appearance with Albert King — or anything recorded in a TV studio, a radio studio or a studio apartment. </p> <p>It also doesn't include his <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/stevie-ray-vaughan-and-dick-dale-play-pipeline-video-thats-got-it-all">1987 recording of "Pipeline" with Dick Dale</a> because that track is credited to the duo, so neither guitarist is the other's "guest."</p> <p><strong><em>[[ Pick up the new October 2014 issue of Guitar World magazine, which features SRV on the cover and celebrates the 60th anniversary of his birth with a "Top 30 Performances" list, a feature about his Number One Strat, the current SRV Grammy Museum exhibit and more. <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-october-14-stevie-ray-vaughan/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=OctoberVideosPage">The issue is available now. ]]</a></em></strong></p> <p><strong>05. A.C. Reed, "Miami Strut," from <em>I'm In the Wrong Business!</em> (1987)</strong></p> <p>A.C. Reed was a respected Chicago-based sideman who started his lengthy career in the Forties and worked with a host of big names, including Magic Sam, Son Seals, Albert Collins and Buddy Guy.</p> <p>"Miami Strut" is a funky instrumental that features Vaughan playing a Strat through a Leslie cabinet, its revolving speaker providing an exceptionally "wet" sound. Note how he plays around Reed's catchy tenor sax riffs, making his guitar an integral part of the track. Vaughan's guitar solo starts around 1:22.</p> <p>Because the album, which also features Bonnie Raitt, was released in 1987, it represents a lost period in Vaughan's discography, since <em>Soul to Soul</em> came out in 1985 and <em>In Step</em> came out in 1989. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/GZq5akABb9A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>WHILE YOU'RE AT IT</strong>: Check out "These Blues Is Killing Me" from the same album. Vaughan's guitar solo starts around 2:06. That's Reed on vocals.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/_YTQLQiNXIE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>04. Bennie Wallace, "All Night Dance," from <em>Twilight Time</em> (1985)</strong></p> <p>Here's Vaughan guesting with another sax player — this time Bennie Wallace (with Dr. John) — on another blues-based instrumental, a lengthy shuffle called "All Night Dance" from Wallace's now-out-of-print 1985 <em>Twilight Time</em> album. The song also was featured on the <em>Bull Durham</em> soundtrack album in 1988 — and even that's out of print (Good luck finding it for less than $60 on Amazon Marketplace or eBay!).</p> <p>Stevie's guitar solo starts around 3:24, and he really pours it on, dialing up his <em>Soul to Soul</em> sound and including several signature SRV motifs and bends. </p> <p>Like a great songwriter who sometimes relegates jaw-dropping tunes to the cutting-room floor or non-album B-sides, Vaughan recorded this brilliant guitar solo one random day in his career — and then just moved on to the next gig, never really looking back.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/vfyhbaJ7CpU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>03. Johnny Copeland, "Don't Stop by the Creek, Son," from <em>Texas Twister</em> (1984)</strong></p> <p>Texas blues guitarist and singer Johnny Copeland (father of blues singer Shemekia Copeland) invited Vaughan to play on two tracks on his <em>Texas Twister</em> album. On "Don't Stop by the Creek, Son," Copeland, a fine player in his own right, stepped aside to let Vaughan handle all the lead work. </p> <p>Although Vaughan's Strat was mixed a little too low in the original vinyl mix (It had to compete with Copeland's acoustic guitar), "Creek" is a fun, engaging, upbeat track with a catchy melody and some nifty guitar work from start to finish.</p> <p>It's worth noting that the original 1984 Black and Blues version of <em>Texas Twister</em> featured two tracks with Vaughan on guitar — "Don't Stop by the Creek, Son" and "When the Rain Stops Fallin'." However, when the album was reissued by Rounder Records in 1986, "When the Rain Stops Fallin'" was gone — and it's still gone. iTunes sells only the <a href="http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/texas-twister/id446039365">1986 version of the album</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/nM9-QRPGc_U" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>02. Lonnie Mack, "If You Have to Know," from <em>Strike Like Lightning</em> (1985)</strong></p> <p>Serious Vaughan fans got a nice bonus in 1985: Alligator Records released Lonnie Mack's masterful <em>Strike Like Lightning</em> album, which was co-produced by Vaughan and Mack, one of SRV's many guitar idols (Check out Mack's classic 1964 album, <em><a href="http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/the-wham-of-that-memphis-man!/id285852886">The Wham of That Memphis Man!</a></em>).</p> <p>Vaughan plays on several songs on the album, but he actually plays and sings on "If You Have to Know," making it the closest thing to a straight-ahead bonus SRV track. Check it out below.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/jMj-q5A7MfM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>WHILE YOU'RE AT IT</strong>: From the same album, be sure to get a taste of "Oreo Cookie Blues," which features Vaughan on acoustic guitar, predating "Life By the Drop" and his <em>Unplugged</em> appearance by five years ...</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ZsDcBg4X7fQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>... and don't forget "Double Whammy" (a new recording of Mack's early Sixties instrumental hit "Wham!" featuring Vaughan and Mack duking it out in E), "Hound Dog Man" and "Satisfy Suzie," which you can hear below. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Snxi6CW42fE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>01. David Bowie, "Cat People (Putting Out the Fire)," from <em>Let's Dance</em> (1983)</strong></p> <p>Come on, you knew something from David Bowie's <em>Let's Dance</em> album had to be No. 1 on this list. </p> <p><em>Let's Dance</em> served as the world's introduction to Vaughan, who, with Bowie, invented something new by adding Texas-style blues guitar to contemporary, dance-based pop music — raising eyebrows, expectations and bank accounts for all involved.</p> <p>Vaughan plays lead guitar on several tracks, including two of the album's many mega-hits ("Let's Dance" and "China Girl"), but guitar-wise, the song that truly kicks collective ass is the less-famous "Cat People (Putting Out the Fire)." It's also got the album's healthiest serving of SRV; he solos in the middle, adds Albert King-style bends throughout and then solos near the end of the song.</p> <p>Note that Bowie recorded two studio versions of this song in the early Eighties; be sure to seek out the <em>Let's Dance</em> version (not that there's anything wrong with the other one).</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/n4xpdaIZyzs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>WHILE YOU'RE AT IT</strong>: It just feels wrong to leave out the album's title track — which millions of people can credit as the first time they heard Stevie Ray Vaughan.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/N4d7Wp9kKjA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/top-five-studio-guest-appearances-stevie-ray-vaughan?page=0,5">Click here to read about THREE MORE SONGS featuring SRV!</a></strong></p> <hr /> <p>Welcome to the bonus page! I don't think too many people get this far. Poor them ...</p> <p>Here are three extra tunes that feature Vaughan as the guest guitarist, each interesting in its own way. </p> <p>Please note that we seriously wanted to include "Bumble Bee Blues" from Brian Slawson's 1988 album, <em>Distant Drums</em>, but it's not available on YouTube. You can always track down the CD on eBay for about $5.</p> <p>Anyway, here we go:</p> <p><strong>Stevie Wonder, "Come Let Me Make Your Love Come Down," from <em>Characters</em> (1987)</strong></p> <p>While the Vaughan-heavy video below is promising, it's also misleading. </p> <p>Sadly, the finished studio recording of this 1987 Stevie Wonder track features much less of Vaughan's playing, although he can be heard closer to the end of the song, going head to head with B.B. King. So make the most of this video! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/6loFxCKwQjE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>Don Johnson, "Love Roulette," from <em>Heartbeat</em> (1986)</strong></p> <p>What's interesting about this one? First of all, <em>Miami Vice</em> star Don Johnson released an album in 1986. Second of all, he got Vaughan to play on it. Third of all, the album reached No. 17 on <em>Billboard's</em> Hot 100. </p> <p>The album, <em>Heartbeat</em>, was a star-studded affair that also featured Dickey Betts of the Allman Brothers Band, Ron Wood of the Rolling Stones, Dweezil Zappa and Willie Nelson. Johnson eventually recorded one more album, 1989's <em>Let It Roll</em>.</p> <p>Vaughan's solo on "Love Roulette," which you can check out below, starts around 2:51.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/4bFxjRdzWO4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>And then there's this thing, which is from a weird late-Eighties commercial filmed in New Zealand. We don't know what to make of it (and we don't really like it), but we figured we'd share:</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/R8S7yIZFa78" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Photo from </em>Martin Scorsese Presents The Blues: Stevie Ray Vaughan<em> album cover</em></p> <p><em>Damian Fanelli is the online managing editor at </em>Guitar World<em>. Follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/DamianFanelli">Twitter</a>. Or not. Whatever.</em></p> <p><strong>Be sure to pick up the October 2014 issue of Guitar World magazine, which features SRV on the cover and celebrates the 60th anniversary of his birth with a "Top 30 Performances" list, a feature about his Number One Strat, the current SRV Grammy Museum exhibit and more. <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-october-14-stevie-ray-vaughan/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=OctoberVideosPage">The new issue is available now at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/stevie-ray-vaughan">Stevie Ray Vaughan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/top-five-studio-guest-appearances-stevie-ray-vaughan#comments Damian Fanelli David Bowie Johnny Copeland list lists Lonnie Mack Stevie Ray Vaughan Stevie Wonder Teena Marie Guitar World Lists Blogs News Features Wed, 27 Aug 2014 15:46:25 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16097 DVD Is a 'Goldmine' of 200 Quality Country Guitar Licks http://www.guitarworld.com/dvd-goldmine-200-quality-country-guitar-licks <!--paging_filter--><p>Feel like adding some serious twang to your six-string arsenal? </p> <p>Check out an item that's now <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/mix-books/products/200-country-licks-guitar-licks-goldmine-dvd/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=200CountryLicks">available at the Guitar World Online Store</a> -- the <em>200 Country Licks: Guitar Licks Goldmine</em> DVD.</p> <p>The DVD, which is more than four hours long, features a host of country lead lines (200, to be exact!), phrases and riffs, all thoughtfully presented by guitarists John Heussenstamm, Josh Tovar and Chad Johnson. </p> <p>Every country lick includes a walk-through explanation and note-for-note, on-screen tab. Normal and slow-speed performance demos are included to really help viewers master the licks.</p> <p>The DVD is $24.99 <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/mix-books/products/200-country-licks-guitar-licks-goldmine-dvd/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=200CountryLicks">at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/dvd-goldmine-200-quality-country-guitar-licks#comments News Features Wed, 27 Aug 2014 10:07:18 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16433 ‘One For The Road’: Cinderella Guitarist Jeff LaBar Delivers First Solo Album http://www.guitarworld.com/one-road-cinderella-guitarist-jeff-labar-delivers-first-solo-album <!--paging_filter--><p>For several years, Cinderella guitarist Jeff LaBar had always promised to make good on his quest to record a solo album. </p> <p>After years of waiting, the time has finally arrived. LaBar’s new album, <em>One for the Road</em>, was recorded in Nashville with long-time friend and engineer Ronnie Honeycutt and features mixing by Cinderella bandmate Fred Coury, with mixing and mastering by Chris Collier (KXM, Lynch Mob, Lita Ford).</p> <p>What’s unique about LaBar's first solo endeavor is that not only does it showcase LaBar’s guitar playing, but it also highlights his singing and songwriting prowess. Aside from drums by Tesla’s Troy Luccketta, all of the instruments and vocals on <em>One for the Road</em> are performed by LaBar, a true "solo” album.</p> <p>The new album also captures the magic and spirit of a genre of music LaBar helped define. “No Strings” has a classic Cinderella feel, while songs like “Asking for a Beating” and ”Nightmare on My Street” take on a far heavier edge. Then there’s the acoustic-flavored “Hello or Goodbye,” which speaks to LaBar’s folk influences.</p> <p>I recently caught up with LaBar and asked him about <em>One for the Road</em>, which was released today, August 26, plus guitars and more!</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: What was the inspiration behind <em>One for the Road</em>?</strong></p> <p>I had been threatening to do a solo album for quite a while. I've been a singer all of my life and actually started singing around the same time I started playing guitar, so I've always had it in me and always wanted to do it. </p> <p>When Tom [Keifer] announced he was going to be putting out a solo album, which also meant Cinderella was going to be put on hold, my manager Larry [Morand], my wife Debi [Salazar] and everyone around me finally called me on it and said now is the time. So with the help of Troy Luccketta from Tesla and my engineer, Ronnie Honeycutt, I laid down a few tracks.</p> <p><strong>How would you describe <em>One for the Road</em>?</strong></p> <p>It's a little taste of all of my musical influences. When I started out, I was playing acoustic guitar and singing to folk music like the Eagles, Crosby Stills &amp; Nash and Cat Stevens. Then I discovered bands like Yes, Genesis and Pink Floyd. From there, I got more into Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Alice Cooper, Iron Maiden and Judas Priest. The five songs I'm singing on this record represent each of those heavier influences.</p> <p><strong>What were some of the differences you encountered working on this album as opposed to a Cinderella record?</strong></p> <p>I think one of the biggest challenges was that I didn't have those three other guys in there with me. Over the years, we've all leaned on each other in the studio to help each other out. With Cinderella, it was always four minds and a producer. For this project, it was just me and Ronnie. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zl3fswzTxP0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Let’s discuss a few tracks off of the new album. “Hello Or Goodbye” isn't the kind of song we've come to expect from you.</strong></p> <p>Yeah, that song is a little bit more in the vein of Fleetwood Mac. It could even be a country-style song. </p> <p><strong>What about "Nightmare on My Street"?</strong></p> <p>That one started out in my basement studio. I was in a heavy metal kind of mood and set up a beat on a drum machine and did some jamming. That’s actually how I come up with most of my riffs.</p> <p><strong>Is there any place else where you find inspiration?</strong></p> <p>Some of the music for the album I originally wrote at a Cinderella sound check, after Fred [Coury] got his drums together and started playing a beat. That was actually where I came up with the riff for "Asking for a Beating."</p> <p><strong>What was your setup like for recording the album?</strong></p> <p>I still have my white, now nicely yellowed, 1980 Custom Shop Les Paul. That's my main guitar and the one I used for all of the heavy stuff you hear on the album. I also have an old Strat I used for the clean stuff and a Telecaster for “Hello or Goodbye." For the acoustic songs, I used an Alvarez 12-string and an Epiphone six-string.</p> <p><strong>There seems to be a lot of chemistry in the “band” that was put together for the video for “No Strings." Do you have plans to tour?</strong></p> <p>I’d like to, and we’re working on it. The chemistry you mention comes from the fact that it's actually my son Sebastian on guitar. He plays for a band called Mach 22. The video also features my good friends Jasmine Cain on bass and Matt Arnn on drums. My wife Debi also makes an appearance.</p> <p><strong>What satisfies you the most about completing your first solo album?</strong></p> <p>Because I had been threatening to do it for so many years, the fact that I did it was a big accomplishment. It finally took my friends and loved ones to really encourage me to do it. I hope it makes and impact and that people enjoy it. </p> <p><strong>What would you say has been the highlight of your career overall?</strong></p> <p>The most memorable things are all of the “firsts." Like the first time I walked into an arena when we were opening for David Lee Roth's first solo tour and saying, "Oh my God! I'm playing here!" Or the first time I got a gold record, which was on that same tour. Then there’s the first time we toured Japan or the first time we headlined on the Long Cold Winter Tour with our own lighting and backline. Things like that are my favorite memories.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Jeff%20Labar%20CD%20Cover.jpg" width="620" height="620" alt="Jeff Labar CD Cover.jpg" /></p> <p><em>James Wood is a writer, musician and self-proclaimed metalhead who maintains his own website, <a href="http://gojimmygo.net/">GoJimmyGo.net</a>. His articles and interviews are written on a variety of topics with passion and humor. You can follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/JimEWood">Twitter @JimEWood.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/one-road-cinderella-guitarist-jeff-labar-delivers-first-solo-album#comments Cinderella James Wood Jeff LaBar Interviews News Features Tue, 26 Aug 2014 20:39:33 +0000 James Wood http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22204 Steve Howe Talks Vintage and Line 6 Guitars and New Yes Album, 'Heaven & Earth' http://www.guitarworld.com/steve-howe-talks-vintage-and-line-6-guitars-and-new-yes-album-heaven-earth <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This is an excerpt from the October 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the rest of this story, plus our Stevie Ray Vaughan 60th-birthday blast features, the 60th anniversary of the Fender Strat, lessons, tabs and reviews of new gear from TC Electronic, Seymour Duncan, Prestige Guitars and more, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-october-14-stevie-ray-vaughan/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=John5Excerpt">check out the October 2014 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <p><strong>As Yes take their classic <em>Fragile</em> and <em>Close to the Edge</em> albums on the road, guitar virtuoso Steve Howe sits down for a talk about the making of those groundbreaking prog productions.</strong></p> <p>“Somebody called me the granddaddy of prog-rock,” Steve Howe says with a laugh. </p> <p>“I’m not ashamed to be called that. But the thing that matters most to me is musicality. I don’t think prog is all about technical playing. Much more important are your musical ideas. What choices and decisions are you making in the music? If that’s still an intelligent force within the music, then I like being considered a part of prog.”</p> <p>More than just a part of progressive rock, Howe is one of the music’s great originators. From the moment he joined Yes in 1970, he staked out a bold and vast territorial range for the guitar in a musical form often dominated by keyboard virtuosos like Keith Emerson and his former Yes bandmate Rick Wakeman. What those guys needed banks of pianos, organs and synthesizers to achieve Howe could often attain with just six strings and a boundless imagination. </p> <p>His contribution, moreover, transcends prog-rock or any single musical genre. Steve Howe is one of the most distinctive and original guitarists in all of rock, a brilliant musical colorist whose evocative volume pedal swells and echoey textures possess all the subtle and complex expressiveness of the human voice itself. Howe’s palette has always been incredibly broad, drafting everything from classical and flamenco fire to psychedelic expansiveness to jazzy archtop electric abstraction into the rock guitar vocabulary. </p> <p>At age 67, he’s still in top form, as can be clearly heard on the brand new Yes album, <em>Heaven &amp; Earth</em>. On the disc, Howe is joined by longtime Yes members bassist Chris Squire, drummer Alan White and keyboardist Geoff Downs, who has been an on-and-off Yes-man since 1980. </p> <p>On vocals is the group’s newest member, Jon Davison, who joined in 2012 and does a superb job of channeling the dulcet melodicism of original Yes vocalist Jon Anderson. Davison even shares Anderson’s spiritual perspective on lyric writing and fondness of Indian guru Paramahansa Yogananda. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/IxKoM9imbm8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>While some tracks on <em>Heaven &amp; Earth</em> evoke the prog symphonic majesty of Yes’ Seventies heyday, others skew in a lighter pop direction more in keeping with radio-friendly Eighties Yes recordings, such as their <em>90125</em> album. But in working with legendary producer Roy Thomas Baker (Queen, the Cars, Smashing Pumpkins), on <em>Heaven &amp; Earth</em>, Howe had one supreme mandate.</p> <p>“I told Roy, ‘It’s gotta be Yes.’ ” </p> <p>The prominent presence of Howe’s guitar work on the album is a sterling guarantee that the disc does indeed sound like Yes. Howe’s inventive melody lines and otherworldly textures are woven deep into the polychromatic musical fabric. Never an overtly flash player, Howe will nonetheless sometimes conclude a tuneful guitar passage with a brief burst of sheer incandescent brilliance. The effortlessness with which he executes these dazzling little interludes offers understated testimony to his mastery of his instrument.</p> <p>“I don’t think guitarists should concentrate on being guitarists,” he says. “They should concentrate on being musicians. Being a guitarist can be a dangerous thing if you just want to race off and steal the show all the time on bended knees with your tiddly tiddly tiddly. I think that’s pretty dead in the water. I daresay most people agree.” </p> <p>Once famed for bringing a vast arsenal of guitars with him onstage and in the studio, Howe has taken a more streamlined approach in recent years. His rig is based largely around his Line 6 Variax guitar and Line 6 HD500/Bogner DT50 digital modeling amp and pedal board, which allow him to cover a wide range of traditional guitar and amp tones. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Ne317y_eOYs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>“I think the Variax is one of the most overlooked instruments in the guitar universe,” he says. “The first time I saw it, I knew it was made for me. I like affordable guitars that can make lots of sounds and textures. I’ve got to tell you, the Strat, ’58 Les Paul and [Gibson] ES-175 models, in particular, are sensational on the Variax. Okay, it doesn’t feel like a Les Paul. But when you plug it in and it sounds like one, what’s the problem?”</p> <p>Howe does augment this digital setup with several “real” guitars in his live rig, however, all of which made it into the studio for the Heaven &amp; Earth sessions. These include his mid-Eighties red Fender Stratocaster; a 1955 Fender Telecaster which he has modified with a humbucker in the neck position, six-saddle bridge and Gibson-style toggle switch; a Martin MC-38 Steve Howe signature model acoustic; a Fender dual-neck steel guitar; and a Gibson Steve Howe signature model ES-175 electric archtop. </p> <p>“That one is actually Number One—the first-ever Steve Howe production model 175,” he says. “And I added a third pickup to it, because at the time I was using it cover the sound of the [Gibson] ES-5 Switchmaster that I used on Yes’ <em>Fragile</em> album.”</p> <p>This signature model 175 is based on Howe’s 1964 ES-175D, his first serious electric guitar, purchased new when he was just 17 and an instrument with which he has been closely associated ever since. These days he uses the guitar only in the U.K. where he lives, “because the airlines have been such an effing pain in the butt over the years,” he says. “But I have actually got a ’63 175 as well, which a friend of mine in Fort Wayne [Indiana] found for me. That was there with me in the studio as well.” </p> <p>Another key instrument for Howe onstage and in the studio is his guitarra portuguesa, or Portuguese guitar. Heard on the track “To Ascend” from <em>Heaven &amp; Earth</em>, it is also featured prominently on classic Yes tracks like “Your Move/All Good People” and “The Preacher The Teacher” and “Wonderous Stories.” Strung in six double-string courses, the instrument is tuned unconventionally by Howe: [low to high] E B E B E Ab. </p> <p><em>This is an excerpt from the October 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the rest of this story, plus the rest of our Stevie Ray Vaughan Top 30 feature, the 60th anniversary of the Fender Strat, columns, tabs and reviews of new gear from TC Electronic, Seymour Duncan, Prestige Guitars and more, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-october-14-stevie-ray-vaughan/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=John5Excerpt">check out the October 2014 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/steve-howe">Steve Howe</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/yes">Yes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/steve-howe-talks-vintage-and-line-6-guitars-and-new-yes-album-heaven-earth#comments October 2014 Steve Howe Yes Interviews News Features Magazine Tue, 26 Aug 2014 14:45:09 +0000 Alan di Perna http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22095 October 2014 Guitar World: Stevie Ray Vaughan's 30 Greatest Guitar Moments, Steve Howe and Yes, 60 Years of the Fender Strat and More http://www.guitarworld.com/october-2014-guitar-world-stevie-ray-vaughans-30-greatest-guitar-moments-steve-howe-and-yes-60-years-fender-strat-and-more <!--paging_filter--><p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/guitar-world-october-14-stevie-ray-vaughan/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=GWOCT14">The all-new October 2014 issue of Guitar World is available now!</a></strong></p> <p>In the new issue, we celebrate blues giants <strong>Stevie Ray Vaughan</strong> with an in-depth examination of his 30 greatest recordings — from “Texas Flood” to “Riviera Paradise,” from “Couldn’t Stand the Weather” to “The Sky is Crying." Read about how Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble (bassist <strong>Tommy Shannon</strong> and drummer <strong>Chris Layton</strong>) didn’t walk into Jackson Browne’s Down Town Studio in Los Angeles in late 1982 with highfalutin plans about recording their monster debut album. In fact, their sites were set much lower. </p> <p>Also, <strong>Metallica’s Kirk Hammett</strong> teaches you how to play like the great bluesman SRV. Then blues legend <strong>Buddy Guy</strong> pays tribute to his late friend. We go up close and personal with Stevie’s favorite Strat, which is now on display at the Grammy Museum in L.A.</p> <p>Then, <em>Guitar World</em> features <strong>John 5</strong>, the prophet of the Telecaster who shows us some rare mint-condition Teles from his collection and talks about his latest album, <em>Careful with That Axe</em>.</p> <p>Next, as the prog legends take their classic <em>Fragile</em> and <em>Close to the Edge</em> albums on the road, guitar virtuoso <strong>Steve Howe</strong> sits down for a talk about the making of those groundbreaking productions.</p> <p>Finally, as the curvaceous <strong>Fender Stratocaster</strong> marks six decades of innovation and influence, <em>Guitar World</em> celebrates its legacy via 60 players, songs, solos and historical moments.</p> <p>PLUS: An ode to the late <strong>Johnny Winter</strong>, a PureSalem guitar review, Satchel's Man of Steel column returns and much more!</p> <p><strong>Five Songs with Tabs for Guitar and Bass</strong></p> <p> • Stevie Ray Vaughan - "Look at Little Sister"<br /> • Stevie Ray Vaughan - "Testify"<br /> • Scorpions - "Rock You Like a Hurricane"<br /> • Within The Ruins - "Gods Amongst Men"<br /> • Magic - "Rude"</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/products/guitar-world-october-14-stevie-ray-vaughan/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=GWOCT14">Head to the Guitar World Online Store now!</a></strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-08-12%20at%203.40.45%20PM.png" width="620" height="806" alt="Screen Shot 2014-08-12 at 3.40.45 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/october-2014-guitar-world-stevie-ray-vaughans-30-greatest-guitar-moments-steve-howe-and-yes-60-years-fender-strat-and-more#comments October 2014 News Features Tue, 26 Aug 2014 14:21:02 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22141 Barre None: Jethro Tull's 10 Greatest Guitar Moments http://www.guitarworld.com/barre-none-jethro-tulls-10-greatest-guitar-moments <!--paging_filter--><p>Today, <em>Guitar World</em> checks in with Jethro Tull and pinpoints what we feel are the legendary British band's 10 greatest guitar moments. </p> <p>As always, our list digs deep into the band's six-string artistry (a staggering amount of which was provided by the great Martin Barre and, of course, Ian Anderson), while taking historical importance and other factors into account.</p> <p>Barre, the axman behind "Cross-Eyed Mary," "Locomotive Breath" and so many more, holds a special place in <em>Guitar World</em> history; his solo on "Aqualung" comes it at Number 25 on our list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time." </p> <p>"That guitar solo was totally improvised, and I did it in one take," <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/dear-guitar-hero-jethro-tull-guitarist-martin-barre">he told Guitar World.</a> "Luckily for me, that solo turned out well, because if it didn’t there would’ve been a flute solo in its place."</p> <p>For more about Barre, including his recent projects, visit <a href="http://www.martinbarre.com/">martinbarre.com.</a> Also be sure to read our recent <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/dear-guitar-hero-jethro-tull-guitarist-martin-barre">"Dear Guitar Hero" interview with Barre.</a> For more about Jethro Tull and Anderson's recent solo work, visit <a href="http://jethrotull.com/">jethrotull.com.</a></p> <p>Check out our guide to Jethro Tull's 10 greatest guitar moments below! (Just as you have already started doing) Be sure to leave a comment below to recommend other songs. We are NOT OPPOSED to turning this into a Top 20! </p> <p><strong>"With You There To Help Me"</strong></p> <p>This opening track from Jethro Tull’s third album, <em>Benefit</em> (1970), announced that the rock world had a distinctive new guitar hero, and his name was Martin Barre. </p> <p>With Les Paul in hand, Barre sliced through Ian Anderson’s echoing flute like a battle axe through butter, adding bursts of dangerous excitement to this rather fabulous piece of melancholy. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/isQSPQNx4BE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"To Cry You a Song"</strong></p> <p>Another great guitar-driven track from <em>Benefit</em>. The opening harmonized riff is as strong as anything off Black Sabbath’s <em>Paranoid</em>, which was recorded that same year, and the dueling guitar solos scattered throughout the song’s dynamic construction are all knockouts. This is the song Opeth wishes they wrote. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/TNCEIGgyIS4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Aqualung"</strong></p> <p>Who would’ve thought one of the greatest guitar solos in the classic rock era would be the centerpiece in song about a horny British hobo? </p> <p>Guitarist Barre remembers that while he was recording this great guitar track, Jimmy Page stopped by and waved to him through the studio glass. He almost stopped playing his Les Paul Jr. mid-solo to wave back. Damn good thing he didn’t.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/W7-EEGiABBU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Life Is a Long Song"</strong></p> <p>It would definitely be wrong not to acknowledge a guitar contribution or two from front man/flautist Anderson. A masterful acoustic guitarist, his l playing can be heard throughout Jethro Tull’s entire catalog. </p> <p>“Life Is a Long Song” from <em>Living In the Past</em> is just one fine example of his gift, along with favorites like “Mother Goose” from <em>Aqualung</em> or the iconic opening to their classic <em>Thick As a Brick</em> album. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/gCS23lORsSM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Thick As a Brick"</strong></p> <p>Speaking of <em>Thick As a Brick</em>, in 1972 Tull had the unmitigated audacity to release an album comprised of a single 43:46-minute-long song. That was even ballsy by progressive rock standards, so thank god the song was good! </p> <p>The guitar fireworks are subtler than on previous albums, but there are still plenty of pleasures to be had. No, we won’t make you listen to the whole album…the first five minutes will do just fine. The real guitar excitement, however, kicks in at the three-minute mark. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/M9JEPeeohYs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Pibroch (Cap in Hand)"</strong></p> <p>This tune from <em>Songs From the Wood</em> begins with one of the gnarliest, fuzziest, fattest guitar riffs ever committed to tape. Granted, the song takes a number of weird left turns down some disturbingly frilly medieval roads, but they all come back this gargantuan bastard of a guitar line.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/QxiHgm5UEsA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Steel Monkey"</strong></p> <p>Somewhere around 1980, Jethro Tull began to get a little too synthesizer-happy for their own good, and with every album it seemed harder for Barre to bust loose and burn down the house like he did in the early part of the band’s career. But every so often, bandleader Anderson would let the poor boy off his leash and let his guitar roar. </p> <p>This rocker from their 16th album, 1987’s <em>Crest of a Knave</em>, was one of those welcomed occasions. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/HOzDsYPNWQU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Cross-Eyed Mary"</strong></p> <p>This is as funky as Tull gets—a surprisingly lascivious song about a cross-eyed prostitute, featuring an equally dirty guitar riff. Guitarist Barre was often called upon to go toe-to-toe with a flute, and he definitely shows who's boss as he takes control of this edgy classic from the band’s biggest album, <em>Aqualung</em>. This is the song Electric Wizard wishes they wrote.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/M7jLiXeFm_E" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Passion Play (“Magus Perde”)"</strong></p> <p>After having incredible success with the complex 1972 concept album <em>Thick As a Brick</em>, Jethro Tull did what any self-respecting prog band would do: follow it with an even more complicated concept album. </p> <p>Like <em>Brick</em>, the primary focus of 1973’s <em>Passion Play</em> was on the overall arrangement, but if you really listen to the guitar playing throughout, you’ll be amply rewarded. No fancy soloing on this section that comes, oh, about 40 minutes into the title song, but the rhythm work is wonderful and the riff is unlike any other. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ISqVHVjPyu4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Conundrum"</strong></p> <p>This instrumental from the live 1978 <em>Bursting Out</em> demonstrates the deadly precision of Barre's picking and his wicked way with odd time signatures. One wishes he would’ve extended his solo at the two-minute mark, but if you’ve ever wanted to know what the fuss about Barre was all about—without a bunch of flutes buzzing around—this isn’t a bad place to start. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/DTM06dGmrgU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Photo from <a href="http://jethrotull.com/press/">jethrotull.com/press</a></em></p> <p><em>Brad Tolinski is the editor-in-chief at </em>Guitar World.<em> Christopher Thumann contributed to this story.</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jethro-tull">Jethro Tull</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/martin-barre">Martin Barre</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/barre-none-jethro-tulls-10-greatest-guitar-moments#comments Brad Tolinski Christopher Thumann Ian Anderson Jethro Tull Martin Barre Guitar World Lists News Features Mon, 25 Aug 2014 09:53:11 +0000 Brad Tolinski http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22154 Take the Ultimate Jazz Guitar Master Class with the 'Vic Juris: All That Jazz' DVD http://www.guitarworld.com/take-ultimate-jazz-guitar-master-class-vic-juris-all-jazz-dvd <!--paging_filter--><p>Take the ultimate jazz master class with <em>Guitar World</em> columnist Vic Juris and the <em>Vic Juris: All That Jazz</em> DVD. These video lessons teach you everything from Coltrane changes to unusual uses for the minor pentatonic scale, and they including standard notation and tab.</p> <p>With more than 90 minutes of lessons, <em>All That Jazz</em> is guaranteed to improve your jazz-playing skills. <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/dvds/products/vic-juris-all-that-jazz-dvd/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=VicJurisJazzDVD">Buy this DVD now at the Guitar World Online Store for $14.95!</a></p> <p><strong>The DVD includes:</strong></p> <p> • Chapter 1: Best of Both Worlds: Improvising with the Lydian-dominant scale<br /> • Chapter 2: Alternative Routes: Implying a tritone substitution over a ii-V-I progression<br /> • Chapter 3: Any Color You Like: Creating modal chord scales from interval stacks<br /> • Chapter 4: Inner Stirrings: Creating movement within a chord voicing<br /> • Chapter 5: Smooth Moves: Step-wise voice leading in a cyclical chord progression<br /> • Chapter 6: Made for Guitar: Cool and unusual applications of the pentatonic scale<br /> • Chapter 7: Blues Detours, Part 1: "Extreme" chord substitutions for the first four bars of the blues progression<br /> • Chapter 8: Blues Detours, Part 2: "Extreme" chord substitutions for bars 9-12 of the blues progression<br /> • Chapter 9: Blues Detours, Park 3: Applying "extreme" chord substitutions to the first and last four bars of the blues progression<br /> • Chapter 10: Blues Matrix: Applying "constant-structure" chord qualities across the 12-bar blues form<br /> • Chapter 11: Out of Dorian: Shifting fourths in and out of the Dorian mode<br /> • Chapter 12: Take Your Pick: Comparing and combining alternate picking, sweeping and slurring<br /> • Chapter 13: Onward &amp; Upward: Transposing melodic sequences through the cycle of fourths<br /> • Chapter 14: New Pathways: Sequencing arpeggios with double-stops and Coltrane changes.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/dvds/products/vic-juris-all-that-jazz-dvd/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=VicJurisJazzDVD">The DVD is available now at the Guitar World Online Store</a>.</strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/take-ultimate-jazz-guitar-master-class-vic-juris-all-jazz-dvd#comments Vic Juris News Features Sun, 24 Aug 2014 14:24:45 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16847