Dream Theater http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/545/all en Seven Kick-Ass Seven-String Guitar Songs http://www.guitarworld.com/your-lucky-number-seven-kickass-7-string-guitar-songs <!--paging_filter--><p>Look around you. </p> <p>There seems to be a seven-string renaissance happening at the moment. </p> <p>Actually, eight-string guitars seem to be going pretty strong, too. But there's something particularly satisfying about plugging in a seven and riffing out in between the traditional ranges of the guitar and bass. </p> <p>Don't get me wrong; eight strings are great for getting right down into low-end territory and really shaking the walls. But if one thing really stood out to me at a recent Winter NAMM show, it was the sheer number of companies delving into sevens for the first time, or really embracing them in a big way. </p> <p>First-time models from Parker, Buddy Blaze and even some one-off Charvel Custom Shop sevens join new models by established seven-string purveyors, such as LTD's new Whitechapel, Suicide Silence and Unearth sigs, some pretty hot Schecters and DBZs and, of course, new models by the company that started the seven-string rock guitar trend, Ibanez.</p> <p>A lot of great music has been made on seven-string guitars over the past 22 years or so since Ibanez released the Universe at Steve Vai's behest. During the first era of the seven-string, Vai was pretty much the only guy exploring the instrument's potential. </p> <p>It fell out of favor until the mid- to late Nineties, when a bunch of guys picked up secondhand Universes and built their sound around the lowest string. Then detuning a regular six became all the rage and everyone forgot about the seven for a while. And now it's back. </p> <p>There's a lot of history behind the seven-string now, and here are a few of my personal favorites. Please feel free to share some of your own in the comments or on Facebook.</p> <p><strong>Steve Vai</strong>, <em>"I Would Love To"</em></p> <p>There are other Steve Vai songs that make use of the seven-string, sometimes quite obviously ("The Audience Is Listening," "The Riddle," "Ya Yo Gakk") and sometimes quite subtly ("For the Love of God"; listen really closely to see if you can spot where Vai lands on the low B). </p> <p>But "I Would Love To" was the most radio-friendly, MTV-visible track from his breakthrough solo album <em>Passion And Warfare</em>, and the song makes a great case for the seven-string's use as a wide range guitar, rather than just an excuse to play really, really low notes.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YVw_58MdduQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>Dream Theater,</strong> <em>"A Change of Seasons"</em></p> <p>Much like "I Would Love To," John Petrucci's work on "A Change of Seasons" is a great example of how to use the seven-string guitar to play things you couldn't play on either a regular six-string guitar in standard tuning or on a baritone. </p> <p>He zips all around the neck, making full use of the seven-string's range in clean and distorted settings, on supportive rhythms, blindingly intricate passages, wailing solos and crushing riffs. Yet at no point does the choice of instrument distract from the song itself.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7QlWpv958Uk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>Strapping Young Lad</strong>, <em>"Skeksis"</em></p> <p>Oh, so standard seven-string tuning's not low enough for you? How about Devin Townsend's GCGCGCE tuning? You can hear this used to great and guttural effect on "Skeksis" from Strapping Young Lad's <em>Alien</em> album.</p> <p>Progressive, exhilarating, intense and ridiculously heavy, the sheer technicality of this song foreshadowed the djent movement. I'm sure I can hear this song's influence when I listen to Periphery's Misha Mansoor.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/RjVT0MhSNeo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>Fear Factory</strong>, <em>"Descent"</em></p> <p>Fear Factory's Dino Cazares was an early pioneer of applying low tunings to thrash-influenced metal, but by the late '90s he was going the other way, using seven-string guitars to increase his range upwards rather than downwards.</p> <p>A perfect example is "Descent" from <em>Obsolete</em>, where Dino combines a low bassline with higher arpeggios. </p> <p>The riff itself isn't too tricky from a technical perspective, but it served as a timely reminder to guitarists of the era that there was much more to be done with a seven than just low riffage.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rJrKkZ1uHAc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>Joe Satriani,</strong> <em>"Hands in the Air"</em></p> <p>Satch isn't the first guy who comes to mind when you think of seven-string guitars, but he gets a pass on this list, thanks to the riff in "Hands In The Air," one of the most fun riffs you'll ever play for an hour straight. Or maybe that's just me. </p> <p>Joe has had other seven-string songs over the years, including one called—get this—"Seven String."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/lKve7uvgSxg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>Korn</strong>, <em>"Freak on a Leash"</em></p> <p>Korn kickstarted the second wave of seven-string use in the Nineties, and they inspired a lot of less-creative copycats who just ran with the low-end aspect of what the band were known for, but the interplay between guitarists Head and Munky on "Freak on a Leash" offers a great lesson in a more atmospheric use of the seven-string. </p> <p>Creepy high melodies and muddled low chords build tension, then the chorus riff shifts and snakes in a really unique way before the creep sets in again.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/jRGrNDV2mKc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>Jeff Loomis</strong>, <em>"Jato Unit"</em></p> <p>Loomis' seven-string skills are put to great use on this monster. </p> <p>Big octave melody lines, low palm-muted riffage, wide arpeggios, whammy bar dives, syncopated rhythms—this one is a great song to sharpen your skills, and, if you're a proficient six-string player making the transition to seven for the first time, it's a great one to cut your teeth on. </p> <p>Make it to the end and you can truly call yourself a seven-string guitarist.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/tvfg0iLnzsw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>John Petrucci photo: Marty Temme, johnpetrucci.com</em></p> <p><em>Peter Hodgson is a journalist, an award-winning shredder, an instructional columnist, a guitar teacher, a guitar repair guy, a dad and an extremely amateur barista. In his spare time he runs a blog, <a href="http://iheartguitarblog.com/">I Heart Guitar</a>, which allows him to publicly geek out over his obsessions. Peter is from Melbourne, Australia, where he writes for various magazines (including <em>Guitar World</em>) as well as for Gibson.com.</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/steve-vai">Steve Vai</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jeff-loomis">Jeff Loomis</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/korn">Korn</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/your-lucky-number-seven-kickass-7-string-guitar-songs#comments Dream Theater Fear Factory Jeff Loomis NAMM 2012 Peter Hodgson Steve Vai Blogs Features Thu, 18 Jun 2015 14:04:44 +0000 Peter Hodgson 14542 at http://www.guitarworld.com Wild Stringdom with John Petrucci: Using Triad Arpeggios to Imply More Complex Chord Qualities http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-using-triad-arpeggios-imply-more-complex-chord-qualities <!--paging_filter--><p>This month, I’m going to demonstrate how one can utilize simple triadic shapes and patterns in order to imply more complex and varied chord qualities. </p> <p>I find this to be a very cool and useful improvisational tool, because you can apply it to playing over either a chord progression that you want to outline melodically or over a static pedal tone or one-chord vamp over which you want to superimpose shifting harmonic colors.</p> <p> Let’s begin by outlining, and then combining, simple major and minor triads. <strong>FIGURES 1 and 2</strong> illustrate the notes of a G major triad—G B D—played in seventh position. The relative minor triad of G major is E minor, and <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> depicts an E minor triad played in the same position. Notice that both triads share two of the same notes, G and B.</p> <p> The “magic” happens when we combine these two triads, and we can utilize and analyze the resulting sound within either a G major or an E minor context. <strong>FIGURE 4</strong> shows the two triads combined, so in essence we’ve simply added the E note to the G major triad. </p> <p>Adding E, the sixth of G, implies the sound of a G6 chord. If we play the same pattern over an E minor tonality, the resultant chordal implication is Em7, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>, and the single-note triadic-based phrases evoke a different harmonic impression.</p> <p> Let’s now apply this approach to a different tonal center. As shown in <strong>FIGURES 6 and 7</strong>, the combination of the notes of a C major triad—C E G—and an A minor triad—A C E—result in either a C6 sound, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 6</strong>, or an Am7 sound, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 7</strong>. The beauty of this exercise is that it demonstrates how the study of one theoretical concept and its associated single-note patterns can easily be applied to more than one tonal environment. </p> <p>On a grand scale, this means that the study of one idea can be applied to many different harmonic environments, yielding a broader understanding of music theory as well as heightening one’s fretboard awareness. </p> <p>Another great way to use this concept is to combine two different triads that are found within the same tonal center. For example, within the G major scale (G A B C D E F#), one can build a series of seven different triads by starting from each note in the scale and adding thirds above the starting note while remaining diatonic to (within the scale structure of) G major. If we start from B, the third degree of the G major scale, a B minor triad is formed by playing B D F#, notes that<br /> are all thirds apart, as they occur within the G major. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 8</strong> illustrates a phrase that combines G major and B minor triads. We can then apply this approach to the relative minor of G, Em7, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 9</strong>. When looked at as a whole, combining G major and B minor triads implies a Gmaj13 chord, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 10.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/X6LFTobJ7F4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-24%20at%202.49.42%20PM.png" width="620" height="677" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 2.49.42 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-24%20at%202.50.00%20PM.png" width="620" height="200" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 2.50.00 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-using-triad-arpeggios-imply-more-complex-chord-qualities#comments Dream Theater John Petrucci March 2014 Wild Stringdom Artist Lessons Blogs News Lessons Magazine Fri, 29 May 2015 15:31:00 +0000 John Petrucci 20319 at http://www.guitarworld.com John Petrucci Demos His Signature Sterling by Music Man JP100D Guitar — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-demos-his-signature-sterling-music-man-jp100d-guitar-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In this new video, Dream Theater guitarist John Petrucci walks you through the finer points of his signature JP100D guitar from Sterling by Music Man. </p> <p>For more information about this model, check out the specs below and visit the guitar's page on <a href="http://www.sterlingbymusicman.com/jp-guitars/jp100d-series">sterlingbymusicman.com.</a></p> <p><strong>JP100D SPECIFICATIONS:</strong></p> <p><strong>Scale:</strong> 25.5”<br /> <strong>Nut Width:</strong> 42mm<br /> <strong>Neck Width, 12th fret:</strong> 52mm<br /> <strong>Body Wood:</strong> Basswood (JP100D-MKOA has a Mahogany body)<br /> <strong>Body Top:</strong> Quilt Maple Veneer (JP100D-MKOA has a Koa top<br /> <strong>Neck Wood:</strong> Maple<br /> <strong>Fretboard Wood:</strong> Rosewood<br /> <strong>Tuning Machines:</strong> Locking<br /> <strong>Hardware:</strong> Chrome<br /> <strong>Neck Joint:</strong> 5 Bolt<br /> <strong>Frets:</strong> 24<br /> <strong>Fretboard Radius:</strong> 16”<br /> <strong>Pickup Selector:</strong> 3 Way<br /> <strong>Pickups:</strong> H/H, Dimarzio LiquiFireTM &amp; Crunch Lab pickups<br /> <strong>Bridge:</strong> Modern Tremolo</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0FKIanEVjCI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-demos-his-signature-sterling-music-man-jp100d-guitar-video#comments Dream Theater John Petrucci Sterling by Music Man Videos Electric Guitars News Gear Fri, 29 May 2015 15:25:05 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24578 at http://www.guitarworld.com Dream Theater's John Petrucci Demos His Ernie Ball Music Man JP6 Guitar — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/dream-theaters-john-petrucci-demos-his-ernie-ball-music-man-jp6-guitar-video <!--paging_filter--><p>John Petrucci has a lot of Ernie Ball Music Man signature guitars to his, well, name.</p> <p>Today, we present a brand-new video that shows the Dream Theater guitarist demoing his signature JP6 model.</p> <p>For more information about this guitar, including photos and specs, visit <a href="http://www.music-man.com/instruments/guitars/john-petrucci.html">music-man.com.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VNUdmkSnqdY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/dream-theaters-john-petrucci-demos-his-ernie-ball-music-man-jp6-guitar-video#comments Dream Theater Ernie Ball John Petrucci Music Man Videos Electric Guitars News Gear Tue, 19 May 2015 14:16:18 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24508 at http://www.guitarworld.com Setting Up John Petrucci's Ernie Ball Music Man JP15 Guitar — Time-Lapse Video http://www.guitarworld.com/setting-john-petruccis-ernie-ball-music-man-jp15-guitar-time-lapse-video <!--paging_filter--><p>"Check out this time lapse [video] of Maddi doing a string change on my JP15," wrote John Petrucci on his Facebook page about 19 hours ago (not that we're stalking him or anything).</p> <p>Below, check out a just-posted clip of Maddi, Petrucci's guitar tech, setting up and re-stringing the Dream Theater guitarist's signature Ernie Ball Music Man JP15.</p> <p>Enjoy!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5TYk56xIhuk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/setting-john-petruccis-ernie-ball-music-man-jp15-guitar-time-lapse-video#comments Dream Theater Ernie Ball John Petrucci Music Man Videos News Thu, 14 May 2015 16:16:27 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24471 at http://www.guitarworld.com John Petrucci Demos Signature Ernie Ball Music Man JP13 Guitar — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-demos-signature-ernie-ball-music-man-jp13-guitar-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In this brand-new video below, Dream Theater guitarist John Petrucci walks you through the features of his Signature Ernie Ball Music Man JP13 guitar.</p> <p>Intrigued? Watch the video and visit <a href="http://www.music-man.com/instruments/guitars/jp13.html">music-man.com.</a></p> <p>Still intrigued? Watch <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/node/24377">Petrucci's demo of the Ernie Ball Music Man JPBFR6 John Petrucci Ball Family Reserve guitar.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/omGrS_uNbmw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-demos-signature-ernie-ball-music-man-jp13-guitar-video#comments Dream Theater Ernie Ball John Petrucci Music Man Videos Electric Guitars News Gear Mon, 11 May 2015 19:48:04 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24442 at http://www.guitarworld.com John Petrucci Visits Guitar Center — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-visits-guitar-center-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Dream Theater guitarist John Petrucci recently visited the Platinum Room at the Carle Place, New York, Guitar Center.</p> <p>During his visit, he discussed his musical beginnings, the genesis of his sound and his signature guitars with Ernie Ball Music Man. </p> <p>For more information on Petrucci's signature Music Man Majesty model, visit its page on <a href="http://www.music-man.com/instruments/guitars/the-majesty.html">music-man.com.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ao9JIdNXJ5Q" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-visits-guitar-center-video#comments Dream Theater Ernie Ball Guitar Center John Petrucci Music Man Videos News Mon, 11 May 2015 16:13:22 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24437 at http://www.guitarworld.com John Petrucci Demos Signature Ernie Ball Music Man Majesty Guitar — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-demos-signature-ernie-ball-music-man-majesty-guitar-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In this new video posted by <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9Wd_EiD8gAly1qwF4OZSSA">Ernie Ball,</a> Dream Theater guitarist John Petrucci demos and discusses the John Petrucci Majesty electric guitar from Ernie Ball Music Man. </p> <p>"The Majesty guitar symbolizes the very reason why I am so proud to be a Music Man artist," Petrucci says. "I had the idea for this guitar a couple of years ago, but it is because of their innovative spirit and dedication to the art of guitar building that it is now a reality. </p> <p>"I am so grateful that I am able to collaborate with the best guitar company on the planet and so incredibly proud that together we have created what is to me, the perfect musical instrument for guitar players. I really hope you get a chance to play one and am confident that you will feel the same!"</p> <p>For more about the Majesty, visit <a href="http://www.music-man.com/instruments/guitars/the-majesty.html">music-man.com.</a></p> <p><strong>Ernie Ball Music Man Majesty Specs:</strong></p> <p>• <strong>Size:</strong> 6 string: 12" wide, 1-3/4" thick, 37" long (30.4 cm wide, 4.5 cm thick, 94.0 cm long) 7 String: 12" wide, 1-3/4" thick, 38" long (30.4 cm wide, 4.5 cm thick, 96.5 cm long)<br /> • <strong>Weight:</strong> 6 string: 6 lbs, 12 oz (3.06 kg) - varies slightly 7 String: 7 lbs, 8 oz (3.29 kg) - varies slightly<br /> • <strong>Body Wood:</strong> Basswood with maple top and mahogany through neck<br /> • <strong>Body Finish:</strong> Matte<br /> • <strong>Body Colors:</strong> Polar Noir, Glacial Frost, Iced Crimson, Siberian Sapphire, Arctic Dream, Copper Fire, Goldmine, Silver Lining<br /> • <strong>Bridge:</strong> Custom John Petrucci Music Man® Piezo floating tremolo, made of black pearl plated (chrome for Precious Metal Series), hardened steel with stainless steel saddles.<br /> • <strong>Scale Length:</strong> 25-1/2" (64.8 cm)<br /> • <strong>Neck Radius:</strong> 17" (43.2 cm)<br /> • <strong>Headstock Size:</strong> Angled &amp; Only 5-7/8" (14.9 cm) long<br /> • <strong>Frets:</strong> 24 - Medium Jumbo profile, Stainless Steel<br /> • <strong>Neck Width:</strong> 6 string: 1-11/16" (43.0 mm) at nut, 2-1/4" (57.2 mm) at last fret 7 String: 1-7/8" (47.6 mm) at nut, 2-7/16" (61.9 mm) at last fret<br /> • <strong>Neck Wood:</strong> Honduran Mahogany<br /> • <strong>Fingerboard:</strong> Ebony<br /> • <strong>Fret Markers:</strong> Custom JP Majesty Inlays<br /> • <strong>Neck Finish:</strong> Matte<br /> • <strong>Neck Colors:</strong> Color matches body<br /> • <strong>Tuning Machines:</strong> Schaller M6-IND locking with black pearl buttons (Chrome on Precious Metal Series)<br /> • <strong>Truss Rod:</strong> Adjustable - no component or string removal<br /> • <strong>Neck Attachment:</strong> Through neck design<br /> • <strong>Electronic Shielding:</strong> Graphite acrylic resin coated body cavity and aluminum control cover<br /> • <strong>Controls:</strong> Custom Music Man active preamp; push/push volume for gain boost, 500kohm push/push passive tone for custom 2 pickup configurations - .022µF tone capacitor<br /> • <strong>Switching:</strong> three-way toggle pickup selector, with custom center position configuration; three-way toggle piezo/magnetic selector, momentary mono/stereo output knob (Piezo Volume)<br /> • <strong>Pickups:</strong> HH - DiMarzio Illuminators; Piezo bridge pickup<br /> • <strong>Left Handed:</strong> No<br /> • <strong>Strings:</strong> 6 String: 10p-13p-17p-26-36-46 (RPS 10 Slinkys #2240) 7 String: 10p-13p-17p-26-36-46-56 (RPS 10 Slinkys #2240 with added P01156)</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cnRrxk3vUks" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-demos-signature-ernie-ball-music-man-majesty-guitar-video#comments Dream Theater Ernie Ball John Petrucci Music Man Videos Electric Guitars News Mon, 27 Apr 2015 16:44:13 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24393 at http://www.guitarworld.com John Petrucci Demos Ernie Ball Music Man JPBFR6 John Petrucci Ball Family Reserve Guitar — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-demos-ernie-ball-music-man-jpbfr6-john-petrucci-ball-family-reserve-guitar-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In this brand-new video below, Dream Theater guitarist John Petrucci walks you through the features of the JPBFR6 John Petrucci Ball Family Reserve (BFR) guitar from Ernie Ball Music Man. </p> <p>Intrigued? Watch the video and visit <a href="http://www.music-man.com/instruments/guitars/john-petrucci-bfr.html">music-man.com.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/D0ib2j3LF48" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-demos-ernie-ball-music-man-jpbfr6-john-petrucci-ball-family-reserve-guitar-video#comments Dream Theater Ernie Ball John Petrucci Music Man Videos News Gear Fri, 24 Apr 2015 16:09:38 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24377 at http://www.guitarworld.com Deep Purple's Ritchie Blackmore Talks "Highway Star" Guitar Solo — Covers by John Petrucci, Joe Satriani and More http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-purple-ritchie-blackmore-highway-star-solo-covers-john-petrucci-joe-satriani <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The bulk of this story is from the </em>Guitar World<em> archives, from our "100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time" series. Enjoy!</em></p> <p>“Highway Star” is but one highlight of <em>Machine Head</em>, Deep Purple’s greatest triumph. Ironically, it almost never came to be. </p> <p>In early 1972, shortly after retreating to Montreaux, Switzerland, to record, the British band was beset by a wealth of problems. </p> <p>"First, the place they were staying, which overlooked Lake Geneva, burned down—inspiring them to write “Smoke on the Water.” Then, in response to a complaint about excessive noise, the police kicked the band out of the ballroom where they were recording.</p> <p>“We were stuck in Switzerland with nowhere to go, and a friend of ours who was the mayor of the town said that there was an empty hotel we could use,” recalls guitarist Ritchie Blackmore. “We gladly accepted and retreated to this lonely hotel in the mountains. We set up all the equipment in the corridor, with the drums and some amps tucked into alcoves.</p> <p>“We had the Rolling Stones’ mobile recording unit sitting outside in the snow, but to get there we had to run cable through two doors in the corridor into a room, through a bathroom and into another room, from which it went across a bed and out the veranda window, then ran along the balcony for about 100 feet and came back in through another bedroom window. </p> <p>"It then went through that room’s bathroom and into another corridor, then all the way down a marble staircase to the foyer reception area of the hotel, out the front door, across the courtyard and up the steps into the back of the mobile unit. I think that setup led to capturing some spontaneity, because once we got to the truck for a playback, even if we didn’t think it was a perfect take, we’d go, ‘Yeah, that’s good enough.’ Because we just couldn’t stand going back again.”</p> <p>But while the vibe may have been loose, Blackmore’s solo on ‘Highway Star’ was well planned. “I wrote that out note for note about a week before we recorded it,” says the guitarist. “And that is one of the only times I have ever done that. I wanted it to sound like someone driving in a fast car, for it to be one of those songs you would listen to while speeding. And I wanted a very definite Bach sound, which is why I wrote it out—and why I played those very rigid arpeggios across that very familiar Bach progression—Dm, Gm, Cmaj, Amaj. I believe that I was the first person to do that so obviously on the guitar, and I believe that that’s why it stood out and why people have enjoyed it so much.</p> <p>“[<em>Keyboardist</em>] Jon Lord worked his part out to mine. Initially, I was going to play my solo over the chords he had planned out. But I couldn’t get off on them, so I made up my own chords and we left the spot for him to write a melody. The keyboard solo is quite a bit more difficult than mine because of all those 16th notes. </p> <p>"Over the years, I’ve always played that solo note for note—again, one of the few where I’ve done that—but it just got faster and faster onstage because we would drink more and more whiskey. Jon would have to play his already difficult part faster and faster and he would get very annoyed about it.”</p> <p><strong>Deep Purple (with Ritchie Blackmore) perform "Highway Star" in 1972:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kb5EfvVkcfA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Chickenfoot (with Joe Satriani) perform "Highway Star":</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GQVTtpE9J7s" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Street musician Damian Salazar plays "Highway Star":</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zQKDhIKxgAQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Deep Purple (with Steve Morse) perform "Highway Star" in 1999:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7FNPwEK9HgU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Dream Theater perform "Highway Star":</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gy1Rxjfinq4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Deep Purple, "Highway Star" isolated guitar track (studio version):</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/lJH90H531hw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/deep-purple">Deep Purple</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/chickenfoot">Chickenfoot</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/steve-morse">Steve Morse</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-purple-ritchie-blackmore-highway-star-solo-covers-john-petrucci-joe-satriani#comments Deep Purple Dream Theater Joe Satriani Ritchie Blackmore Steve Morse Videos News Tue, 14 Apr 2015 11:56:44 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24281 at http://www.guitarworld.com Romancing the Fretboard: Chopin Arranged for Guitar, Part 1 http://www.guitarworld.com/romancing-fretboard-chopin-arranged-guitar-part-1 <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's the first installment of Chopin's Piano Concerto in A minor, Opus No. 2. I've arranged it for guitar, and as you can see, it's not for the meek. </p> <p>But if you've been diligently practicing the chromatic exercises from my past few lessons, you should be ready to tackle it.</p> <p>This etude is an excellent study in the use of chromatic tones in a melody. I've included chord symbols above the staff to give you an idea of the melody's harmonic context. These chord symbols reflect the basic underlying harmony originally provided by the left hand part on the piano. </p> <p>Studying classical music, especially pieces from the Romantic period such as this, will give you serious insight into how to use chromatic passages in a composition or improvisation and have them make sense.</p> <p>You might be wondering, how the hell can you use this chromatic stuff in a rock song? All you have to do is listen to some Dream Theater tunes for the answer. </p> <p>For example, "Caught in a Web" has an extended chromatic passage [see the complete transcription in the Jan. '95 issue of Guitar School-Ed.]. The chromatic scale offers great material for writing cool riffs, but, more importantly, it gives you options for smoothly weaving in and out of a key center.</p> <p><img src="http://www.guitarworld.com/files/JPchopin1.gif" /><br /> <img src="http://www.guitarworld.com/files/JPchopin2.gif" /><br /> <img src="http://www.guitarworld.com/files/JPchopin3.gif" /><br /> <img src="http://www.guitarworld.com/files/JPchopin4.gif" /><br /> <img src="http://www.guitarworld.com/files/JPchopin5.gif" /><br /> <img src="http://www.guitarworld.com/files/JPchopin6.gif" /></p> <p>After playing this piece for a while, you should be able to pick up a few chromatic ideas to apply to your own solos. You'll start to see how you don't have to be tied to a particular scale or fingering pattern-you'll feel more comfortable playing notes that are out of the key center. </p> <p>And by intelligently applying chromatic notes to your lines, such as using them as passing tones to connect chord tones that fall on the strong beats, they can become more original-sounding while still retaining harmonic logic. Of course, you can just play random chromatic lines all over the place, but that's a different, more atonal style of music.</p> <p><strong>Here are a few performance tips:</strong></p> <p>Notice that there are quite a few position changes. As such, the left-hand fingerings have to be arranged to make shifting positions as easy as possible. That's why, though the music may be the same (as in measures 1-2 and 5-6), the tablature is different on the repeat (use the tablature on the bottom the second time through). Carefully follow the left-hand fingerings provided beneath the tablature-these are the ones that I use.</p> <p>My arrangement is just for the melody line, but since this is a piano piece, it was originally written so the left hand would play chords and the right hand would play the melody. To truly appreciate the richness and depth of Chopin's melodic and harmonic style, you might want to record yourself strumming the chord changes (or have a friend play them) while you play the melody.</p> <p>Chopin was a master of melody, harmony and voice leading--the art of smoothly moving from chord to chord. Though the melody of this piece is mostly chromatic, notice how he targets a chord tone on the first 16th note of each beat. Let's look at the first measure: although it's written using an ascending chromatic scale starting on A, notice how, when the chord changes from Am to Dm, the melody lands on F, which is the third of Dm. Over the E7 chord in the third measure, Chopin targets the third of that chord (G#). If you follow along, you can see other prominent examples of this harmonic device, such as targeting the lowered fifth of F7b5 (B) and the lowered seventh of B7 (A). This is what I referred to earlier as the logic of writing chromatic lines. This should give you plenty to work with. Next time, Part 2!</p> <p><strong>This column originally appeared in <em>Guitar World</em> as part of John Petrucci's "Wild Stringdom" column.</strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/romancing-fretboard-chopin-arranged-guitar-part-1#comments Dream Theater John Petrucci Blogs News Features Lessons Magazine Mon, 06 Apr 2015 12:14:58 +0000 John Petrucci 14929 at http://www.guitarworld.com Wild Stringdom with John Petrucci: Visualizing Melodic Shapes on the Fretboard http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-visualizing-melodic-shapes-fretboard <!--paging_filter--><p>This month, I’d like to delve deeper into concepts for expanding scalar ideas across the fretboard. </p> <p>As in the previous columns, I’ll demonstrate how to move diagonally across the fretboard to connect scale positions, an approach that I employ to a great extent to play melodic phrases and solos. </p> <p>Let’s start with a series of phrases that are all based on the E Aeolian mode, or E natural minor scale (E F# G A B C D). <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> details a series of three different three-note phrases, each played in a three-notes-per-string pattern and starting with the index finger. I begin in seventh position and play through the first six notes of E Aeolian. </p> <p>In bar 2, I shift up to ninth position and play a six-note pattern that begins on the fifth degree of E Aeolian, B, sounding the notes B C D E F# G. Finally, I move up to 11th position to play a six-note pattern beginning on the second, or ninth, F#, sounding the notes F# G A B C D. </p> <p> The high D at the end of the phrase is useful, because it can easily be bent up one whole step to the E root. By connecting all three patterns this way, I am moving up the fretboard in a diagonal path that covers a lot of range. </p> <p> A great way to practice this pattern is within a steady series of eighth-note triplets, as seen in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>. Use alternate (down-up) picking throughout, and strive to make the position shifts seamless. Once you have these “shapes” for each six-note group under your fingers, you should be able to move freely from the A string to the D and G and back, using just your ear to guide the melodic phrases you create.</p> <p> Within the first six-note phrase, we have the notes of an E minor triad: E G B. Now let’s look at how we can apply notes from this series to create different chord types. In <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I demonstrate voicings of Em, Esus2 and another “wide-stretch” Em voicing from the notes found in this pattern. I can then play melodic fills based on it. </p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 4 </strong> offers a more expanded example of this concept. I’ll often use this approach to create chordmelody-type ideas, such as that shown in <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>. Here, I’m using the open low E note as a pedal tone played against various two-note chords. I also like incorporating the ninth, F#, into Em voicings, resulting in the wide-stretch Em(add9) shapes shown in <strong>FIGURE 6.</strong> </p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 7</strong> puts a twist on this idea by adding the second, also F#, to an E minor triad, E G B. Lastly, I use note combinations from the pattern to create a series of two-note chords that live in E Aeolian, as demonstrated in <strong>FIGURE 8.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/APity4lRWgs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-10%20at%202.09.53%20PM.png" width="580" height="604" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-10 at 2.09.53 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-10%20at%202.10.09%20PM.png" width="580" height="334" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-10 at 2.10.09 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-visualizing-melodic-shapes-fretboard#comments Dream Theater January 2014 John Petrucci Wild Stringdom Artist Lessons Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Wed, 11 Mar 2015 15:04:33 +0000 John Petrucci 19912 at http://www.guitarworld.com Sterling by Music Man Previews New JP60-MGR John Petrucci Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/sterling-music-man-previews-new-jp60-mgr-john-petrucci-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p>If you read the <a href="http://forums.ernieball.com/music-man-guitars/60084-sbmm-new-2015-preview-jp60-mystic-green.html">Ernie Ball forum</a>, you'll already have noticed the company has sort of announced the new Sterling by Music Man JP60-MGR guitar.</p> <p>If not, check out the recent post about the new John Petrucci model right here:</p> <p>"Here's a quick preview of the new-for-2015 JP60-MGR: Mystic Green finish!</p> <p>"It's our first SBMM 'Chameleon' finish, and was selected by JP himself earlier this year between DT tours. Needless to say, it's probably our most requested finish since day one, and we searched high and low for something that could be our counterpart to EBMM's Mystic Dream finish. John personally selected this out of several samples we sent him.</p> <p>"This finish will only be available on JP60, and will be hitting stores in late January. $619 USA Street Price!</p> <p>"I'll be unveiling the entire New for 2015 SBMM lineup right here on the forum from now through New Year's."</p> <p>Stay tuned for more. Again, remember the Winter NAMM Show is coming up!</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/620%20version.jpg" width="620" height="432" alt="620 version.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/sterling-music-man-previews-new-jp60-mgr-john-petrucci-guitar#comments Dream Theater John Petrucci Sterling by Music Man Electric Guitars News Gear Fri, 19 Dec 2014 18:53:06 +0000 Damian Fanelli 23154 at http://www.guitarworld.com Wild Stringdom with John Petrucci: Recognizing Repetitive Fretboard Shapes on All String Groups http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-recognizing-repetitive-fretboard-shapes-all-string-groups <!--paging_filter--><p>Hello, and welcome to my new <em>Guitar World</em> instructional column. </p> <p>In the coming months, I’ll share with you some of the guitar-playing concepts and approaches that have helped me develop my technique and overall playing style. I’d like to start off with an examination of ascending scalar shapes that, by design, cover the majority of the fretboard. </p> <p>I have found such patterns to be very useful for both melodic and shred-style playing and also very helpful in regard to the “greater mission,” which is to gain a fuller and deeper understanding of the construction of musical ideas within the framework of the guitar’s fretboard. </p> <p>The following examples are built from phrases made up of three notes per string that are played across two strings, resulting in various six-note shapes. I play these shapes in a rhythm of straight 16th notes, however, so there is an inherent “threes on twos” kind of rhythm that is alluded to throughout. </p> <p>All of the phrases in this lesson are based on the E natural minor scale (E F# G A B C D), also known as the E Aeolian mode. </p> <p>In <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, using alternate (down-up-downup) picking throughout, I ascend the D and G strings, beginning on the note E on the D string’s second fret, fretted with the index finger. I follow with two more notes on the D string, fretted with the ring finger and pinkie, and then I move over to the G string and play three ascending notes fretted in exactly the same manner—index to ring to pinkie.</p> <p>On the upbeat of beat two, I shift up to the next fretboard position of E natural minor and use my index finger, middle finger and pinkie to sound three notes per string on the D and G strings. A third six-note shape then appears when we move up one more time, with the index finger, middle finger and pinkie employed for the wider stretch needed for the subsequent pair of three-note shapes.</p> <p>Notice that, as you ascend through this riff, there are slight variances in the shapes used on each specific string in order to accommodate the notes of E natural minor. If we move the idea down to the bottom two strings, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, we find that the same fretting shapes are used, albeit in a different sequence. </p> <p>And the same is true when we move the idea up to the top two strings, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>. Only three different physical shapes are used to form the three-note patterns, and this is good, because it enables one to develop muscle memory in the fret-hand, which is immeasurably beneficial.</p> <p>The only exception to this consistency of shapes occurs when playing similar patterns on the G and B strings. That’s because these two strings are tuned a major third apart, whereas the adjacent strings in the other pairs are tuned a perfect fourth apart. </p> <p>As shown in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>, one must move up an additional half step—one fret—when crossing from the G string to the B. <strong>FIGURE 5</strong> offers a clearer representation of this B-string shift within a longer example that moves across all of the strings. Once you have these shapes under your fingers, experiment with moving them to every area of the fretboard, and then transpose the patterns to all 12 keys.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-03-13%20at%2011.10.34%20AM.png" width="620" height="530" alt="Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 11.10.34 AM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-03-13%20at%2011.10.45%20AM.png" width="620" height="305" alt="Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 11.10.45 AM.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART ONE</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/e3qIi5FA7AQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2717386885001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2717386885001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-recognizing-repetitive-fretboard-shapes-all-string-groups#comments December 2013 Dream Theater John Petrucci Wild Stringdom Blogs News Lessons Magazine Wed, 17 Dec 2014 19:10:28 +0000 John Petrucci 19402 at http://www.guitarworld.com Essential Listening: 10 Stellar Headphone Albums http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-albums-headphone-listening <!--paging_filter--><p>What, exactly, is a headphone album? Well, the definition changes depending on who you are. </p> <p>For audiophiles, a headphone album is a work that is so exquisitely recorded that it demands you listen to each beautifully recorded note under a sonic microscope. Miles Davis’ <em>Kind of Blue</em> fits that bill. </p> <p>For others, a great headphone album is one that makes an intimate album more intimate (such as Bob Dylan’s original mono recordings), or a loud album louder (Rage Against the Machine’s debut album).</p> <p>We’re an unsubtle and hyperactive bunch at <em>Guitar World</em>, so our favorite headphone albums are those that have a lot of activity in the stereo field. As dumb as it sounds, we love it every time a guitar solo takes a shortcut through our skulls as it zooms from one ear to the other. </p> <p>If you don’t know what we’re talking about or you’ve never experienced any of these great albums under the influence of some high-end ear buds, we suggest you go home, put on your best set of ‘phones, turn out the lights, turn up the volume and prepare to have your mind blown sky high.</p> <p><strong>The Jimi Hendrix Experience, <em>Electric Ladyland</em> (1968)</strong></p> <p>If you haven't taken LSD, the good news is you don’t have to. Save your brain cells and listen to this masterpiece under a good set of headphones to get the complete psychedelic picture. On <em>Electric Ladyland</em>, Jimi Hendrix and his brilliant engineer, Eddie Kramer, create a wonderful, three-dimensional sonic world and invite you to step in. This album is not necessarily stoned, but it certainly is beautiful. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/TLV4_xaYynY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Pink Floyd, <em>The Dark Side of the Moon</em> (1973)</strong></p> <p>TICK TOCK, TICK TOCK. DING DONG! BRRRRRRRANG!!!! WIIRRRRRRRRLLLLLLYYYYYY WHIRL…HA HA HA HA! I mean, what else can you say about the <em>Citizen Kane</em> of headphone albums? </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/nDbeqj-1XOo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>The Edgar Winter Group, <em>They Only Come Out At Night</em> (1972)</strong></p> <p>This is a little on the obscure side, but it ranks right up there with <em>Dark Side</em> as an essential Seventies listening experience. The star of the show is the extended version of the hit instrumental “Frankenstein,” but almost every song on the album is a sonic thrill ride.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/kbr4qNnffi8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Santana, <em>Caravanserai</em> (1972)</strong></p> <p>This album was originally mixed and released in both stereo and quadrophonic. Designed to be an all-encompassing, complex and exotic listening experience, the percussion surrounds you while the soaring guitars lift you to the heavens. This is the best-recorded album of Carlos Santana’s career, and probably his best album overall. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/XdmevPWZTRg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Dukes of the Stratosphear, <em>Psonic Psunspot</em> (1987)</strong></p> <p>The Dukes of the Stratosphear was a pseudonym used by the British rock band XTC in the mid-to-late Eighties, and their <em>Psonic Psunspot</em> album was a brilliant homage to the Sixties psychedelic pop of the Beatles, Pink Floyd and the Zombies. While the project was a bit of a joke, the songs are brilliant and, due to advancements in recording technology, the sound of the album eclipses anything actually recorded in London in 1967.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/0bbqezgfqD8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>The Cure, <em>Disintegration</em> (1989)</strong></p> <p>They say that guitarist Robert Smith was using hallucinogenic drugs throughout the coarse of this beautifully textured album. Like Hendrix’s <em>Electric Ladyland</em>, the sound of the album reflects his trippy state of mind. Listening to <em>Disintegration</em> under headphones is like stepping into someone else’s dream—and a rather dark one, at that. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/X8UR2TFUp8w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Radiohead, <em>Kid A</em> (2000)</strong></p> <p>In the late Nineties, Radiohead wanted to shake up their music. Their solution was to work as a collective—one that would make interesting “sounds”—rather than with each person in band playing a prescribed role. The result was an album that sounded unlike anything else before or since. This philosophy extended to the album’s sumptuous mix, which can only truly be truly appreciated with a pair of speakers right next to your ears.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/X3pPvCo-Rt0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Tool, <em>Lateralus</em> (2001)</strong></p> <p>In 2005, four years after its original release, Tool’s <em>Lateralus</em> was released as a limited-edition two-picture-disc vinyl LP in a holographic gatefold package. It took them a while to do it, but they were finally able to create a package that adequately reflected the multi-dimensional music offered inside.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/EDlC7oG_2W4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Dream Theater, <em>A Dramatic Turn of Events</em> (2011)</strong></p> <p>While everything sounds “good” these days, it’s hard to find albums that sound “great.” Everything is engineered so loud and compressed that most modern recorded music lacks the kind of space and depth that allows for a true headphone experience. Dream Theater probably doesn’t really give a damn about what is happening in popular music, which is why this album sounds as good as it does. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zJYcVwOP-Gg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>The Beatles, <em>Abbey Road</em> (1969)</strong></p> <p>Every collection has to have some Beatles, and this is by far their best and most modern-sounding album. Enjoy.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/IrW7dlDHH28" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Brad Tolinski is the editor-in-chief at </em>Guitar World.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/tool">Tool</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beatles">The Beatles</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/carlos-santana">Carlos Santana</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/pink-floyd">Pink Floyd</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/radiohead">Radiohead</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-albums-headphone-listening#comments Brad Tolinski Dream Theater Essential Listening Pink Floyd The Beatles Tool Guitar World Lists News Features Thu, 28 Aug 2014 14:43:52 +0000 Brad Tolinski 22195 at http://www.guitarworld.com