Gear http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/6/beijinghuisuo.com/beijinghuisuo.com en Review: Schecter Guitars Jeff Loomis JL-7 — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/review-schecter-guitars-jeff-loomis-jl-7-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the April 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-april-15-abasi-satriani-govan?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=April2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>A true guitarist’s guitarist, Jeff Loomis is no stranger to readers of this magazine for his work as a solo artist and with the bands Nevermore and Arch Enemy. </p> <p>Eight years ago Schecter introduced its first Jeff Loomis signature model, a seven-string guitar based on Schecter’s C-7 Hellraiser but with various modifications requested by Loomis. </p> <p>The Jeff Loomis JL-7 is Schecter’s most recent Jeff Loomis signature model, which features numerous significant refinements that make it one of the most impressive products in Schecter’s current lineup of nearly three-dozen seven-string models.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-april-15-abasi-satriani-govan?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=April2015VideosPage">For the rest of this review, including FEATURES, PERFORMANCE, the BOTTOM LINE and more, check out the April 2015 issue of Guitar World.</a></strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience4079860264001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="4079860264001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jeff-loomis">Jeff Loomis</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-schecter-guitars-jeff-loomis-jl-7-video#comments April 2015 Jeff Loomis Schecter Guitars Videos Electric Guitars News Gear Magazine Wed, 25 Feb 2015 22:48:53 +0000 Chris Gill, Video by Paul Riario http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23599 Have We Accidentally Spotted a Prototype Orange Amps Effect Pedal? http://www.guitarworld.com/orange-amps-making-effect-pedals <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>NOTE: Updated Thursday, February 26</strong></p> <p>Yesterday, the gang at Orange Amps posted this photo (below) to the company's official <a href="https://www.facebook.com/OrangeAmps/photos/a.402464620245.369672.14717465245/10155218837550246/?type=1">Facebook page.</a></p> <p>The photo was accompanied by the harmless caption, "Orange Ambassadors Monolord took a tour of Orange HQ and met with our Lead Designer and Mad Scientist Adrian Emsley."</p> <p>That's very nice and all, but what's that, um, pedal behind the denim-clad blond-haired guy on our far left?</p> <p>The effect pedal, which is of the large, rectangular variety, is black with orange knobs and clearly sports an Orange Amps logo. If this is what we think it is (an effect pedal made by Orange Amps), it's sort of a big deal, since the U.K.-based amp maker does not currently make effect pedals!</p> <p>We can't make out what the knobs are for, but we can see a word on the chassis; it's something that looks like "RangeeTar," whatever that is. Care to speculate?</p> <p><strong>UPDATE: It seems Orange has mysteriously deleted the photo in question! Stay tuned for updates!</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/secret%20pedal%203.JPG" width="620" height="349" alt="secret pedal 3.JPG" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/orange-amps-making-effect-pedals#comments Orange Orange Amplification Effects News Gear Wed, 25 Feb 2015 21:15:57 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23594 The Beatles' Secret Weapon: George Harrison’s 1963 Rickenbacker 360/12 http://www.guitarworld.com/beatles-secret-weapon-george-harrison-s-1963-rickenbacker-36012 <!--paging_filter--><p>Although the last thing the red-hot Beatles needed in early 1964 was a “secret weapon,” that’s exactly what they got when George Harrison received his first Rickenbacker 12-string, in a beautiful Fireglo finish, in February of that year, during the Beatles’ first U.S. tour. </p> <p>The guitar was given to him by Francis C. Hall, owner and president of the California-based Rickenbacker company, which is now celebrating its 80th anniversary.</p> <p>Hall spoke to Brian Epstein before the Beatles arrived in the U.S. and arranged a meeting with the group. On February 8 at the Savoy Hilton in New York City, he showed the band several different models. Lennon tried out the 360/12 but thought it would be better for Harrison, who was sick in bed at the Plaza Hotel. When Harrison finally got to see it, he loved it immediately. </p> <p>“Straight away I liked that you knew exactly which string was which,” Harrison said, referring to how the guitar’s 12 tuners are grouped in top- and side-mounted pairs on the headstock. “[On some] 12-strings, you spend hours trying to tune it.” </p> <p>Harrison’s first 360/12 was the second Rickenbacker 12-string ever made; its serial number—CM107—dates it to December 1963. The main difference between it and the prototype is how they are strung. The first model had a conventional 12-string setup, in which the octave string is the first to be struck in each string pair. On Harrison’s model and subsequent Rickenbacker 12-strings, the octave strings occur second in the string pairs and the lower-pitched string is struck first.</p> <p>Harrison’s guitar has a trapeze tailpiece, triangle inlays, double white pickguards, black control knobs and mono and stereo (Rick-O-Sound) outputs mounted on a chrome plate on the side of the guitar.</p> <p>The guitar, with its unique, chiming sound, can be heard on "You Can't Do That," the bulk of the <em>A Hard Day’s Night</em> album, “I Call Your Name,” “What You’re Doing”—and several other songs, up to and including “Ticket to Ride.” His second 360/12, a 1965 model with rounded cutaways, is heard on “If I Needed Someone.”</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Rickenbacker.JPG" width="620" height="248" alt="Rickenbacker.JPG" /></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/94LH3oYJEFs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Photo: Nigel Osbourne / Redferns / Getty Images</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beatles">The Beatles</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/george-harrison">George Harrison</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/beatles-secret-weapon-george-harrison-s-1963-rickenbacker-36012#comments 2011 George Harrison GWLinotte Holiday 2011 John Lennon The Beatles Holiday Electric Guitars News Features Gear Magazine Wed, 25 Feb 2015 13:25:42 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/13691 Electro-Harmonix Introduces Good Vibes Vintage-Style Chorus/Vibrato Pedal — Demo Video http://www.guitarworld.com/electro-harmonix-introduces-good-vibes-vintage-style-chorusvibrato-pedal-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Electro-Harmonix has introduced its new Good Vibes Modulator pedal.</p> <p>The pedal, a demo of which you can check out below, is a re-creation of classic “flower power”-era chorus/vibrato pedals.</p> <p>“We designed it to take you on a trip back to the Sixties so it delivers the warm, liquid groove we associate with that time in music," says EHX President and Founder Mike Matthews. "But we also updated it to meet the needs of contemporary players.”</p> <p>Like the original Uni-Vibe, it uses photocells for a sound and response that’s true to the classic design. However, boosted power rails provide 21st-century definition and headroom, while true bypass switching ensures maximum signal path integrity. An expression pedal input was added and puts control of speed and intensity at the player’s feet.</p> <p>The Good Vibes features easy-to-use controls consisting of Volume, Speed and Intensity knobs, plus two switches: a Chorus/Vibrato selector and an EXP Speed/Intensity switch that lets the player choose EXP pedal control of either. The pedal is housed in a rugged, compact die-cast chassis and is powered by a standard center negative 9V power supply, which is included. </p> <p>An always-on speed indicator is also included. The Good Vibes has a U.S. list price of $179.99.</p> <p>For more information, visit <a href="http://www.ehx.com/">ehx.com.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OjH73rPH6sY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/electro-harmonix-introduces-good-vibes-vintage-style-chorusvibrato-pedal-video#comments EHX Electro-Harmonix Videos Effects News Gear Tue, 24 Feb 2015 20:57:41 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23590 Seymour Duncan Vise Grip Compressor — Exclusive Demo Video http://www.guitarworld.com/seymour-duncan-vise-grip-compressor-exclusive-demo-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Today we have an exclusive demo video of Seymour Duncan's Vise Grip compressor pedal, which was introduced at the 2015 Winter NAMM Show.</p> <p>The video stars guitarist Steve Booke, who also happens to write the <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/what-world">"What in the World"</a> lessons for GuitarWorld.com.</p> <p>Here's more information about the Vise Grip:</p> <p>The Seymour Duncan Vise Grip Compressor is a studio-grade soft-knee compressor designed for guitarists who want to take control of the dynamics of their sound, from a subtle smoothing-out of peaks and valleys to the most squished and pinched extremes and everywhere in between. </p> <p>The Blend knob lets you add as much or as little of the original signal as you like to the compressed sound, while the Mid/Full/High lets you choose the character of the blended signal by deciding what frequency range of the dry signal is blended in with the wet. </p> <p>The Sustain knob determines how long your notes will ring out and the Attack control regulates how quickly the compressor reacts to your initial pick attack. Higher settings give you a late attack that lets your picking dynamics come through before the compression kicks in. And the Volume control does more than just let you match the output with your bypassed sound: you can also use it as a boost while taking advantage of the Blend and Mid/Full/High controls. </p> <p>The Vise Grip can give you a simple dynamics adjustment—like a subtle or extreme increase in sustain for country "chicken pick'n” or a little extra clarity, body and volume for a clean solo—or you can use it for more intense effects like a classic 'squished funk' rhythm scratch or to introduce a lo-fi, treble-heavy edge which is perfect for a garage-band vibe. </p> <p>Then you can blend in just the right amount of the uncompressed signal and let the Mid/Full/High switch restore sparkle to the high end, fatten up the uncompressed signal for increased harmonic overtones, or simply make sure your effected sound remains consistent with your bypassed guitar tone. It's also useful for keyboard, mandolin or any instrument where excessive dynamic range is an issue. </p> <p>The Vise Grip Compressor is assembled at the Seymour Duncan Factory in Santa Barbara, California, and like all Seymour Duncan Effects Pedals is 100 percent true-bypass.</p> <p><strong>For more information, visit <a href="http://www.seymourduncan.com/">SeymourDuncan.com.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tqo2x0fzFXs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/seymour-duncan-vise-grip-compressor-exclusive-demo-video#comments Seymour Duncan Steve Booke Videos Effects News Gear Tue, 24 Feb 2015 18:18:47 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23587 The DIY Musician: Frankenstein Guitars and the Pizza Dobro http://www.guitarworld.com/diy-musician-frankenstein-guitars-and-pizza-dobro <!--paging_filter--><p>In the past month, Eddie Van Halen donated a replica of his Frankenstein guitar to the Smithsonian—and Les Paul’s Black Beauty sells for $335,500 at auction. </p> <p>Both guitars are iconic and have created legendary music. And both guitars look like they’ve been hacked at with chisels, cut with coping saws and fitted with mismatched parts.</p> <p>They’re sound searchers. For them, a guitar is a tool that sometimes needs to be modified … vintage status be damned. </p> <p>Like Les and Eddie, I’ve modded and destroyed more collectible and vintage guitars than many people have ever owned…and these zombified creations have been used in concert, on albums and provided inspiration for other instruments that I’ve built. </p> <p>My Pizza Dobro is a perfect example.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wdcRksJsNOc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>The Pizza Dobro is mashup instrument I built from yard sale parts, thrift store finds and a pizza pan: </p> <p>· The body is from an old Sixties Teisco ET-200 "tulip" guitar. I love the shape!<br /> · The ¾ scale neck was taken from a broken First Act kids guitar.<br /> · The Pizza Dobro gets its name from the shallow pizza pan I embedded in the body, creating a poor man’s version of a Dobro cone. I simply cut a hole through the entire guitar body that was big enough for the pan. A lid from a cigar box provides the backplate. Oh, and there’s no worries on having the body buckle under pressure. These Teisco bodies were made of industrial-grade plywood!<br /> · An old Stella trapeze tailpiece holds the strings, and a bolt I found at a flea market is the perfect bridge.<br /> · Topping it off (pun intended) is a <a href="http://www.cbgitty.com/guitar-electronics/pickups/vintage-style-chrome-lipstick-tube-single-coil-pickup/">C.B. Gitty lipstick tube pickup</a> screwed right into the pizza pan and hard-wired to an upside-down Strat jack. (At less than $18 each, the lipstick pickups are deliciously under-priced. I buy ‘em by the dozen.)</p> <p>I have the Pizza Dobro tuned to a dizzying open D tuning (A, D, A, F#, A, low to high), and the metal pan gives a bit of banjo snap. It’s pretty and delicate sounding and the perfect guitar for some Appalachian blues. </p> <p>For all the online discussions I see about fitting necks perfectly into the pocket and upgrading electronics for perfect tones, I bask in the glory of this guitar’s shittiness. The pickup wire is exposed. The bridge is nothing but a bolt sitting on a piece of wood. Hell, even the string spacing isn’t perfect. Yet this guitar kicks butt! I’m actually proud of the sneers I get from people when they comment on this. Yes, I destroyed a vintage Teisco tulip body. So what? There are thousands more still out there. There’s no other guitar on the market like this, and it only cost me $50 in parts.</p> <p>The Pizza Dobro is definitely a keeper and will probably have my future grandkids scratching their heads when they divvy up my estate after I die. Then again, they might see this guitar-with-personality as more valuable than the store-bought axes in my collection. </p> <p><strong>I WANT TO SEE YOUR FRANKENSTEINS FOR A FUTURE COLUMN! </strong>Send two to three photos and a two-paragraph description of your hacked/chopped/zombified guitar to shane@shanespeal.com. Tell me what you did to it and why you love it so much. Send your submissions before March 1, 2015. My favorite submission will get featured in this column, and I’ll even send the builder a handmade <a href="http://www.shanespeal.com/shop-cigar-box-guitars">Shane Speal cigar box guitar</a> as a thank-you.</p> <p>Oh…one more thing: If you haven’t watched <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/eddie-van-halen-plays-guitar-innovation-smithsonian-video">Eddie Van Halen Plays Guitar (and Discusses Innovation) at the Smithsonian — Video | Guitar World</a>, budget one hour of your time this week and do so. It’s friggin’ awesome.</p> <p><em>Shane Speal is "King of the Cigar Box Guitar" and the creator of the modern cigar box guitar movement. Hear the music, see the instruments and read about his Cigar Box Guitar Museum at <a href="http://www.shanespeal.com/">ShaneSpeal.com</a>. Speal's latest album, </em><a href="http://shanespeal.com/holler">Holler!</a><em> is on C. B. Gitty Records.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/diy-musician-frankenstein-guitars-and-pizza-dobro#comments Shane Speal The DIY Musician Electric Guitars Blogs Gear Mon, 23 Feb 2015 15:49:23 +0000 Shane Speal http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23575 Skate Guitar Project Turns Broken Skateboard Decks Into Eco-Friendly Instruments — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/skate-guitar-project-turns-broken-skateboard-decks-eco-friendly-instruments-video <!--paging_filter--><p>This guitar-centric video comes to us courtesy of the <em><a href="http://www.latimes.com/local/la-me-skate-guitar-project-recycles-broken-decks-into-instruments-20150220-premiumvideo.html">Los Angeles Times</a></em>.</p> <p>Find out about the Skate Guitar project, the brainchild of three friends from Argentina who transform beat-up skateboard decks into unique, one-of-a-kind guitars. </p> <p>The project promotes the trio's combined passions of recycling, rock and roll and skateboarding.</p> <p>For more information about (or to support) the Skate Guitar project, follow along on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/sktgtr">Facebook.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZLYP6hh-h2U" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/skate-guitar-project-turns-broken-skateboard-decks-eco-friendly-instruments-video#comments Skate Guitar Project Videos Electric Guitars News Gear Sun, 22 Feb 2015 20:35:36 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23570 Gear Review: GMF Ai1 Acoustic Pre-Amp/DI http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-gear-review-gmf-ai1-acoustic-pre-ampdi <!--paging_filter--><p>Sending your dry guitar signal to a sound man is a bit like that team-building exercise where a blindfolded individual is instructed to fall backwards into a group of people who might (or might not) catch him or her. </p> <p>GMF's Ai1 offers guitarists more control over their DI tone, with a preamp and headphone amp to boot. If GMF sounds like a new brand to you, the CEO also happens to be the founder of Ultrasound Amps.</p> <p>Let’s take a look at the controls: Treble, Bass, Level and Gain. Toggle switches include a Ground Lift, Phase In/Out and a Shape On/Off. Shape is a mid-scoop when engaged. The ins and outs are ¼-inch jacks, a balanced XLR out, ⅛-inch headphone jack and a pair of stereo RCA in/out. The Ai1 can be powered by 9-volt battery or a power supply.</p> <p>With the RCA ins and the ⅛-inch headphone jack, I was able to jam along with music on my phone. Measurements are roughly 4-by-4-by-2 inches, which fits comfortably into most gigbag or case pockets. </p> <p><strong>Let's go to the audio clips!</strong></p> <p>For all the clips below, I used a Taylor 314 I borrowed without asking. Thanks, Dad!</p> <p><strong>Clip 1</strong>: Is the Ai1 straight ahead with a little onboard EQ’ing.<br /> <strong>Clip 2</strong>: The same as Clip 2, but with the Shape function on.<br /> <strong>Clip 3</strong>: Some fingerpicking to show off the Ai1’s clarity without harshness.</p> <p><strong>Web:</strong> <a href="http://www.gmfamps.com/">gmfamps.com</a><br /> <strong>MSRP:</strong> $199</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/83355807&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> <p><em>You can't believe everything you read on the Internet, but Billy Voight is a gear reviewer, bassist and guitarist from Pennsylvania. He has Hartke bass amps and Walden acoustic guitars to thank for supplying some of the finest gear on his musical journey. Need Billy's help in creating noise for your next project? Drop him a line at thisguyonbass@gmail.com.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-gear-review-gmf-ai1-acoustic-pre-ampdi#comments Acoustic Nation Billy Voight Billy's Breakdown Accessories Gear Blogs Blogs Gear Sun, 22 Feb 2015 17:50:57 +0000 Billy Voight http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23566 Caparison Guitars Introduces TAT Special7, a Seven-String, 27-Fret Shred Machine http://www.guitarworld.com/caparison-guitars-introduces-tat-special7-seven-string-27-fret-shred-machine <!--paging_filter--><p>Caparison Guitars has almost completely re-modelled its TAT (TAT = Through And Through) Special Custom Line for 2015.</p> <p>The Japanese-made Caparison TAT Special7 is an extended-range guitar that takes every feature that made the original TAT model so special and adds an extra lower string.</p> <p>From the company:</p> <p>Clarity, power and refinement are keys to making the exquisite tone of this guitar match its unsurpassed playability and good looks. It features an elegant curve-top body with a neck- through, slant-heel design. On the reverse, the gloss finish of the body blends almost seamlessly into the oil finish of the neck, making for an incredible playing experience. </p> <p>Custom switching options give you a rich pallet of tones, which makes the TAT Special7 as versatile as it is beautiful.</p> <p>Available in three new Transparent Spectrum “Pearlescent Aura” colors.</p> <p>• Five-Piece Through-Neck Construction (with Slant Heel)<br /> • Custom Switching<br /> • Seven-String<br /> • Caparison Design Pickups<br /> • 27 frets<br /> • Trans-Spectrum "Pearlescent Aura" finishes</p> <p>The Caparison TAT Special7 is available for $3,449 (excluding sales tax). </p> <p>For more about Caparison Guitars, visit <a href="http://www.caparisonguitars.com/en/">caparisonguitars.com.</a></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-02-20%20at%202.32.31%20PM.png" width="620" height="220" alt="Screen Shot 2015-02-20 at 2.32.31 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/caparison-guitars-introduces-tat-special7-seven-string-27-fret-shred-machine#comments Caparison Guitars Electric Guitars News Gear Fri, 20 Feb 2015 19:34:57 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23562 Super-Vee Tremolo Systems Upgrades Blade Technology on BladeRunner http://www.guitarworld.com/super-vee-tremolo-systems-upgrades-blade-technology-bladerunner-tremolos <!--paging_filter--><p>Super-Vee, manufacturer of tremolo bridges and accessories, announced today that the patented Blade technology found in its current line of tremolo bridges has been redesigned to improve all facets of performance.</p> <p>From the company:</p> <p>The original Blade, bonded between the anchor plate and bridge plate, relied on short penetration on each side. The new Blade design spans the full area of the anchor plate and bridge plate and is secured with the mounting screws and the tone block screws.</p> <p>This new design creates an unobstructed voicing flow from the strings into the body of the guitar through the Blade; allowing greater tonal clarity with an optimal boost in sustain.</p> <p>The new design is found in right handed, two-post and six-screw nickel BladeRunners and will migrate to other models in the near future.</p> <p>For more about Super-Vee, visit <a href="http://super-vee.com/">super-vee.com.</a></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-02-20%20at%201.59.20%20PM_0.png" width="620" height="384" alt="Screen Shot 2015-02-20 at 1.59.20 PM_0.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/super-vee-tremolo-systems-upgrades-blade-technology-bladerunner-tremolos#comments Accessories News Gear Fri, 20 Feb 2015 19:11:26 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23561 Zakk Wylde Discusses Wylde Audio, His New Line of Guitars, Amps and Effects — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/zakk-wylde-discusses-wylde-audio-his-new-line-guitars-amps-and-effects-video <!--paging_filter--><p>“This is my new paper route!” Wylde tells <em>Guitar World</em> in the upcoming April 2015 issue. </p> <p>And while the notion of the mammoth metal guitar legend slinging newspapers from the back of a 10-speed bike offers up an intriguing visual, the reality is that Wylde is announcing a very different type of business venture: Wylde Audio. </p> <p>Call it your one-stop-shop for all Zakk-related gear; with Wylde Audio, the 47-year-old musician, who over the years has become synonymous with signature equipment like his bull’s-eye Gibson Les Pauls and JCM-800-style Marshall amps, is unveiling his own line of guitars, amplifiers and effect pedals. </p> <p>“It’s the next logical step for me,” Wylde explains. “I’ve been blessed in my career so far; all my years with Ozz, all the companies I’ve worked with—it’s like putting the pinstripes on and playing for the Yankees. But I’ve always been a player. Now it’s time to go out and own a franchise.”</p> <p>Among Wylde Audio’s first offerings will be a diverse line of guitars featuring distinct body shapes with both modern and retro twists. “I’m known as a Les Paul Custom guy, and then I also have the [Gibson] Vs and Moderne [of Doom], the signature things,” Wylde says. “But I want to do all different types of body shapes, because I’m a fan of all guitars.” </p> <p><strong>For more information, watch this new video from BackstageAxxess, where you'll hear things like, “Basically once it goes into production, what I’ll do is just eventually retire my Gibsons and retire my Marshalls." And be sure to check out the April 2015 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qlXPfBZZGCw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/zakk-wylde">Zakk Wylde</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/zakk-wylde-discusses-wylde-audio-his-new-line-guitars-amps-and-effects-video#comments Wylde Audio Zakk Wylde Videos Electric Guitars News Gear Fri, 20 Feb 2015 16:27:49 +0000 Richard Bienstock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23557 From the Archive: The Definitive Kurt Cobain Gear Guide http://www.guitarworld.com/archive-definitive-kurt-cobain-gear-guide <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This classic article from the August 1997 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> serves as the definitive guide to Kurt Cobain's grungy assortment of pawn shop prizes, turbo-charged stomp boxes and blown woofers.</em></p> <p>Kurt Cobain must have been amused when magazines like <em>Guitar World</em> and <em>Guitar Player</em> requested interviews and when Fender approached him to design a guitar. But here's where another irony exists — although Cobain often said he didn't care very much about equipment, he certainly possessed more than a passing interest in the tools of his trade. </p> <p>Cobain may not have collected vintage <strong>Gibsons, Martins, D'Angelicos</strong> and what-not, but he owned an eccentric cache of budget models, low-end imports and pawn shop prizes — most pursued with the same passion as a Gibson collector seeking a mint '59 Les Paul. Even when he could afford the best, Cobain's taste in instruments never changed. "Junk is always best," Cobain stated matter-of-factly to Jeff Gilbert in a February 1992 <em>Guitar World</em> interview. "I use whatever I can find at junk shops."</p> <p>Over the years, rumors about Cobain using special processors and studio trickery to obtain his sound have proliferated, so we figured the time had come to get to the real bottom of the truth about Cobain's equipment to be revealed. To do so, we contacted the most reliable sources available — the dealers who sold him his equipment, the engineers and producers who worked with him in the studio and the technicians who looked after his gear on the road. </p> <p>A couple of well-researched websites, Chris Lawrence's site and Brian Haberman's site [<em>2013 Editor's Note: These websites no longer exist. Remember this story is from 1997!</em>], also supplied many useful details. Michael Azerrad's <em>Come As You Are: The Story of Nirvana</em> (Main Street/Doubleday) provided excellent background information and photographs, and we also pored over the few interviews on the subject granted by Cobain himself.</p> <p>Cobain almost certainly would have laughed at the idea of a magazine scrutinizing the minute details of his gear. "I've never considered musical equipment very sacred," he once said. But for the thousands of guitarists who consider Cobain's music sacred, it's important to understand what he played and why he played it.</p> <p><strong>SCENTLESS APPRENTICE: COBAIN'S VIRGIN MUSICAL YEARS</strong></p> <p>Kurt Donald Cobain was born in Aberdeen, Washington, on February 20, 1967. His first guitar, a used electric, was a 14th birthday present from his uncle Chuck. "As soon as I got my guitar, I just became so obsessed with it," Cobain told Michael Azerrad. "I don't think it was even a Harmony. I think it was a Sears." </p> <p>Cobain took guitar lessons for less than a month — just long enough to learn how to play AC/DC's "Back in Black." Those three chords served him well when he began writing his own songs shortly thereafter.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/kurt-cobain-talks-gear-and-more-his-final-guitar-world-interview-1992">[[ Read Guitar World's Final Interview with Kurt Cobain from the February 1992 Issue ]]</a></strong></p> <p>Cobain soon set his sights on forming a band. One day, a couple of friends invited him to jam in an abandoned meat locker they used as a practice space. Afterwards, Cobain foolishly left his guitar in the locker and was subsequently unable to return and get it back. </p> <p>When he finally made it back to the rehearsal space a few months later, he found his guitar in pieces. He salvaged the neck, hardware and electronics and made a new body for the guitar in wood shop, but Cobain lacked the skills to make the restored instrument intonate properly.</p> <p>When Cobain was 17, his mother married Pat O'Connor, whose ensuing infidelity led to a situation that greatly facilitated Cobain's acquisition of musical gear. After Cobain's mother learned that Pat was cheating on her, she dumped his gun collection in the river. Cobain observed his mother's antics and later encouraged some of the neighborhood kids to fish his stepdad's weapons out. Cobain sold the guns and bought a used <strong>Peavey Vintage</strong> amplifier with two 12-inch speakers with the proceeds.</p> <p>In early 1985, Cobain moved in with his natural father who discouraged his son's musical pursuits and convinced him to pawn his guitar. After about a week, Cobain got his guitar out of hock and moved out. He almost lost the guitar again when he loaned it to a drug dealer, but managed to repossess it a few months later. With this unknown guitar and the Peavey amp in hand, Cobain formed his first band, Fecal Matter, in late 1985.</p> <p>The Peavey amp disappeared sometime between early 1986 and late 1987. Krist Novoselic remembers that Cobain gave the amp to him for about a week, in what apparently was a friendly attempt to get him to join Fecal Matter. Novoselic declined on both offers. </p> <p>The amp disappeared sometime after that. By late 1987 Novoselic finally agreed to form a band with Cobain and drummer Aaron Burckhard, which they called Skid Row. Photos from this era show Cobain playing a right-hand model sunburst <strong>Univox Hi-Flyer</strong> flipped over and strung for left-handed playing. According to Azerrad, Cobain's amp during this period was a tiny <strong>Fender Champ</strong>. Also around this time, Cobain acquired a <strong>Univox Superfuzz</strong>, but it was stolen from his rehearsal space.</p> <p>The band's name changed frequently, from Fecal Matter to such similarly choice monikers as Ted Ed Fred, Pen Cap Chew, Throat Oyster, Windowpane and Bliss. Eventually they settled on Nirvana. When Burckhard proved too unreliable, Cobain and Novoselic kicked him out of the band and enlisted drummer Dale Crover, who they temporarily stole from the Melvins. Three weeks later, on January 23, 1988, Nirvana recorded its first studio demo at Reciprocal Studio with Jack Endino-whose early production/engineering/mixing credits include Soundgarden, Green River, Tad and Mudhoney-behind the board.</p> <p><strong>BLOND AMBITION: THE <em>BLEACH</em> YEARS</strong></p> <p>A few months after working with Nirvana for the first time, Endino played the band's demo tape for Jonathan Poneman of Sub Pop Records, who signed the band to the label. Three of the songs that Nirvana recorded during that session ended up on <em>Bleach</em>, the band's first album.</p> <p>The band liked working with Endino, and they returned to Reciprocal Studios several times during the year to record more songs, although Chad Channing replaced Crover on drums. Nirvana signed a contract with Sub Pop, and in late December 1988, they entered Reciprocal Studios to record <em>Bleach</em>. The album was recorded in three days for $606.16, although five tracks from earlier sessions were included on the final album. Most of the remaining songs from the various Reciprocal sessions were released several years later on <em>Incesticide</em>.</p> <p>"When they recorded <em>Bleach</em>, Kurt's <strong>Randall</strong> was in the shop so they borrowed my amp, which was a Sixties <strong>Fender Twin</strong>," Endino recalls. "I'm a tube nut, so everything was tweaked and up to spec on that amp, but it didn't have speakers because I had fried them. Kurt brought in a little closed-back 2x12 cabinet with two <strong>Celestions</strong>, most likely 70-watt models. He was using a little orange <strong>Boss DS-1</strong> distortion pedal and these Univox guitars [Hi-Flyers] that looked like <strong>Mosrites</strong>. The pickups were stock. I ended up getting one of those pickups from him once, because he was smashing those guitars all the time. I said, `You must have some extra pickups,' and he said, `Oh yeah. Here's one.' It was in two pieces. I was able to stick the wires together and use it. It's not the greatest sounding pickup in the world, but it seemed to work for him."</p> <hr /> <p>In 1989, Nirvana went on its first American tour. According to Earnie Bailey, a Seattle guitar repairman who was friends with Novoselic and who often worked as a technician for the band, Cobain's live rig during this period was a red <strong>Epiphone ET270</strong>, a solid-state <strong>Randall</strong> amp head, a <strong>BFI Bullfrog</strong> 4x12 cabinet and a <strong>Boss DS-1</strong> distortion. When his guitar was destroyed beyond repair, Cobain would look for cheap replacements in pawn shops or have Sub Pop ship him guitars via Federal Express.</p> <p>"I heard stories about Kurt's guitar destruction from the Sub Pop people early on," says Endino. "When he was out on the road he'd call them up and say, `I don't know what got into me, but I just smashed up my guitar.' I don't think he was planning on smashing guitars from day one. It was just something he did. The poor Sub Pop people would call all the pawn shops up and down the coast, looking for Univox guitars."</p> <p>Between tours, Cobain often bought equipment from Guitar Maniacs in Tacoma, Washington, and Danny's Music in Everett, Washington. According to Rick King, owner of Guitar Maniacs, Cobain "bought a whole bunch of <strong>Univox Hi-Flyers</strong> — both the P-90 version and ones with humbuckers. Those pickups have huge output and are completely over the top. He broke a lot of those guitars. We sold him several of them for an average of $100 each over the course of five years."</p> <p>Although humbucker-equipped Univox Hi-Flyers apparently were Cobain's favorite guitars in the pre-<em>Nevermind</em> days, he often appeared on stage with other models, including a blue Gibson SG and a sunburst left-handed Greco Mustang copy he bought from Guitar Maniacs.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/kurt-cobain-talks-gear-and-more-his-final-guitar-world-interview-1992">[[ Read Guitar World's Final Interview with Kurt Cobain from the February 1992 Issue ]]</a></strong></p> <p>Cobain purchased what probably was his first acoustic guitar, a <strong>Stella</strong> 12-string, for $31.21 on October 12, 1989. He brought the Stella to Smart Studios in Wisconsin to record some demos with Butch Vig in April 1990. The guitar wasn't exactly a studio musician's dream. </p> <p>"It barely stays in tune," Cobain told Jeff Gilbert in a February 1992 <em>Guitar World</em> interview. "I have to use duct tape to hold the tuning keys in place." At some point in the Stella's history, the steel strings had been replaced with six nylon strings, only five of which were intact during the session. However, the guitar sounded good enough to Vig, who recorded Cobain playing a solo acoustic version of "Polly" on that guitar. That track can be heard on <em>Nevermind</em>.</p> <p>Cobain didn't seem to be exceptionally particular about what equipment he was playing through, with the notable exception of his effects pedals. Sometime in 1990, he bought an <em>Electro-Harmonix Small Clone</em> from Guitar Maniacs, and it remained a favorite and essential part of his setup to the end of his life. On January 1, 1991, Cobain used the Small Clone to record "Aneurysm," which later was issued as the b-side to the "Smells Like Teen Spirit" single. </p> <p><strong>BREEDING GROUND: THE RECORDING OF <em>NEVERMIND</em></strong></p> <p>Prior to formally signing with Geffen Records on April 30, 1991, Nirvana received a $287,000 advance for the recording of <em>Nevermind</em>. The advance was somewhat meager, but it gave the band some freedom in choosing equipment. However, Cobain didn't exactly go wild with his spending.</p> <p>"I sold Kurt a bunch of guitars and effects for the <em>Nevermind</em> album," says Rick King. "When they got signed to Geffen and started getting money, Kurt was still very frugal. He bought some Japanese left-handed Strats and had humbuckers installed in the Strats' lead position. He didn't spend very much money on guitars."</p> <p>Apparently Cobain developed a taste for Fender guitars just prior to recording <em>Nevermind</em>. "I like guitars in the Fender style because they have skinny necks," said Cobain in a late 1991 interview. "I've resorted to Japanese-made Fender Stratocasters because they're the most available left-handed guitars." During this period, he also acquired a left-handed <strong>'65 Jaguar</strong> that had a <strong>DiMarzio Super Distortion</strong> humbucker in the bridge position and a <strong>DiMarzio PAF</strong> in the neck position in place of the guitar's stock single-coil pickups. These modifications were made before Cobain purchased the guitar. Cobain also bought a left-handed, Lake Placid Blue <strong>'69 Fender Competition Mustang</strong> around then.</p> <p>"Out of all the guitars in the whole world, the Fender Mustang is my favorite," Cobain told GW. "They're cheap and totally inefficient, and they sound like crap and are very small. They also don't stay in tune, and when you want to raise the string action on the fretboard, you have to loosen all the strings and completely remove the bridge. You have to turn these little screws with your fingers and hope that you've estimated it right. If you screw up, you have to repeat the process over and over until you get it right. Whoever invented that guitar was a dork. I guess I'm calling Leo Fender, the dead guy, a dork." To overcome these tuning problems, Cobain had his '69 Mustang fitted with a <strong>Gotoh Tune-O-Matic</strong> bridge, a modification that was routinely performed on the Mustangs he subsequently acquired.</p> <p>Some claim that Cobain's preference for low-end guitars was a punk statement, but he insisted that it was a matter of necessity. "I don't favor them," Cobain told <em>Guitar World</em> in 1992. "I can afford them. I'm left-handed and it's not very easy to find reasonably priced, high-quality left-handed guitars." Before entering the studio, Cobain purchased a rack rig consisting of a Mesa/Boogie Studio preamp, a Crown power amp and a variety of Marshall 4x12 cabinets. "I can never find an amp that's powerful enough," Cobain told GW. "And I don't want to deal with hauling 10 Marshall heads. I'm lazy-I like to have it all in one package. For a preamp I have a Mesa/Boogie, and I turn all the midrange up." Cobain brought this rig along with his Mustang, Jaguar, a Japanese Strat and his Boss DS-1 and Electro-Harmonix Small Clone pedals to Sound City Studios in Van Nuys, California, where the band recorded Nevermind with Butch Vig.</p> <p>"Kurt had a Mesa/Boogie, but we also used a Fender Bassman a lot and a Vox AC30 on Nevermind," Vig recalls. "I prefer getting the amp to sound distorted instead of using special effects or pedals, which lose body and the fullness of the bottom end."</p> <p>Still, Vig allowed Cobain to use a few pedals on the album, especially since the guitarist felt that the DS-1 was the main factor in his tone. Cobain also used the Small Clone liberally. "That's making the watery guitar sound you hear on the pre-chorus build-up of `Smells Like Teen Spirit' and also `Come As You Are,'" says Vig. "We used an Electro-Harmonix Big Muff fuzz box through a Fender Bassman on `Lithium' to get that thumpier, darker sound."</p> <p>Cobain's pawn shop Stella was used again for "Something in the Way." Vig recorded the performance while Cobain sat on a couch in the control room. Against Vig's wishes, Cobain plugged his guitar direct into the board for "Territorial Pissings." During the recording of "Lithium," Cobain instigated the noise jam that became the "hidden" track "Endless, Nameless." (This track does not appear on the first 50,000 copies of the CD.) Towards the end of the track, Cobain can be heard smashing his Japanese Stratocaster.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nirvana">Nirvana</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/kurt-cobain">Kurt Cobain</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/archive-definitive-kurt-cobain-gear-guide#comments August 1997 GW Archive Kurt Cobain Nirvana News Features Gear Magazine Fri, 20 Feb 2015 13:17:33 +0000 Chris Gill http://www.guitarworld.com/article/11150 Weird Science: The 10 Strangest Vintage Effects of All Time http://www.guitarworld.com/weird-science-10-strangest-vintage-effects-all-time <!--paging_filter--><p>It’s probably not a coincidence that effects such as wah pedals and fuzz boxes started appearing en masse about the same time that recreational drugs like marijuana and LSD became popular with rock musicians. </p> <p>Indeed, it would take the mind of an incredibly stoned individual — someone deprived of exposure to the sun’s rays, fed a diet of lukewarm Mountain Dew and stale frozen pizza and kept awake for days by snorting lines of Instant Maxwell House — to even conceive of the idea for some of the music industry’s many audio oddities. </p> <p>In salute to effect innovators like <a href="http://www.ehx.com/">Electro-Harmonix</a>’s Mike Matthews and Zachary Vex of Z.Vex (both of whom may be as straight and unpolluted as an Iowa highway, for all we know), we present to you our selections for the strangest and most wonderful guitar effects ever unleashed upon the unsuspecting public. </p> <p>Plugging into one of the following effects is like discovering an ancient Mayan city of gold on the tip of your fingernail while your cat pontificates, in Lebanese, about Proust. Or whacking yourself in the head really hard with a sledgehammer. </p> <p>To find out more about these pedals (and hear more audio examples), check out <a href="http://www.effectsdatabase.com/">Discofreq’s FX Site</a> or <a href="http://tonefrenzy.com/">Tonefrenzy.com</a>. If you’d like to take a crack at building your own, visit <a href="http://www.diystompboxes.com/wpress/">DIYstompboxes.com</a>. </p> <p>Note that, since it's unusual to come across two or three of these effects, let alone all 10, we do not have consistent photos or videos of the effects presented below. Luckily, there's this thing called YouTube.com. We tried to find the most to-the-point and least-annoying video for each effect. (We admit we really love the video for Number 5, the Maestro Rover!)</p> <p>Enjoy!</p> <div style="padding:10px;background:#eeeeee;margin:10px 0;"> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;margin-bottom:20px;">01. Ludwig Phase II synthesizer</span> <p>What could possibly be weirder than a guitar synthesizer pedal made in the early Seventies by a drum company? Like many so-called guitar synthesizers from this era, the Ludwig Phase II is not a synth but actually several effects, including fuzz, voltage-controlled filters and gating, combined in a box that unfolds to reveal a rocker pedal, several oversized mushroom-shaped footswitches and a control panel placed at a height only Verne Troyer would find comfortable. </p> <p>With a little patient tweaking, the Phase II can produce the sound of anything from alien conversations to spaceship landings—the kind of weirdness that’s made it a favorite of Sonic Youth (<em>Washing Machine</em>), Primus’ Larry Lalonde (<em>Pork Soda</em>) and Pearl Jam’s Mike McCready (<em>Binaural</em>).</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ikraEyAaBFA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p></div> <div style="padding:10px;background:#eeeeee;margin:10px 0;"> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">02. Ampeg Scrambler</span> <p>Ampeg is best known for its big ’n’ beefy bass amps, but the company also attempted to exploit the pedal market in a few rare instances. Ampeg’s first effort, the Scrambler, bewildered even acid casualties upon its introduction in 1969, but today’s bizarro stomp box aficionados consider it the Holy Grail. Although these pedals are rarer than Paris Hilton’s brain cells, they were built to withstand nuclear war, so units that turn up are usually in fine working condition. Its two controls (texture and balance) generate a mutated rainbow of fuzz tones ranging from metallic ring modulation with buzzing octave-up overtones to the flatulence of a 400-pound chili cook-off judge.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/JYpuXHqSFpM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p></div> <div style="padding:10px;background:#eeeeee;margin:10px 0;"> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">03. DeArmond Tremolo Control</span> <p>Tremolo effects aren’t particularly strange, but this early Fifties contraption, the first mass-produced external effect device for the electric guitar, earns distinction for its primitive design and clunky aesthetics. (And it was manufactured in Toledo, Ohio — isn’t that weird?) Instead of employing components like transistors, resistors and diodes to generate its on/off effect, the Tremolo Control used a motor to rock a glass tube filled with mercury (the original heavy metal) back and forth across an electrical contact to open and close the circuit. Unfortunately, mercury deteriorates over time, but Windex makes a safe alternative (and it provides “clean” tone). This effect is a favorite of Billy Gibbons, Ry Cooder and Duane Eddy.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/smzp6LsPKTc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p></div> <div style="padding:10px;background:#eeeeee;margin:10px 0;"> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">04. EMS Synthi Hi-Fli</span> <p>Another so-called guitar synthesizer from the Seventies, the EMS Synthi Hi-Fli was mounted on a waist-high stand and looked like a prop from Dr. Who (EMS actually made the synths used to create sound effects for the show). Originally (and appropriately) called the Sound Freak, the Hi-Fli was essentially an early multi-effect unit that combined fuzz, octave shift, ring modulation, phasing and resonant filters to generate synthlike tones. David Gilmour used a Synthi Hi-Fli on <em>The Dark Side of the Moon</em>, and other fans include Steve Hackett (when he was with Genesis) and the Chemical Brothers.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/nwdUWAzBQbs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p></div> <div style="padding:10px;background:#eeeeee;margin:10px 0;"> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">05. Maestro Rover</span> <p>Someone must have spiked the water coolers at Maestro with Blue Sunshine — how else to explain sonic oddities like Maestro’s Bass Brassmaster, Filter Sample and Hold, Ring Modulator and the world’s first fuzz box? The Maestro Rover is a rotating speaker unit that not only looks like a UFO but sounds like one, too, as the speaker can rotate at exceptionally high speeds to create watery, warbling Doppler effects. A built-in crossover routes low frequencies to a guitar amp while it directs treble frequencies to the Rover’s rather low-powered internal amp, which isn’t loud enough to irk even a Ladies’ Auxiliary tea party. That’s why David Gilmour’s Rover is, uh, house trained.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/FDxESYBw2YE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p></div> <div style="padding:10px;background:#eeeeee;margin:10px 0;"> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">06. Electro-Harmonix Frequency Analyzer/Maestro Ring Modulator</span> <p>You know those bizarre, dissonant metallic boinks on ZZ Top’s “Cheap Sunglasses” and the closing theme of South Park? That’s the sound of a ring modulator. Electro-Harmonix and Maestro unleashed this atonal beast of an effect on unsuspecting musicians during the early Seventies, and guitarists have been struggling to tame them ever since. By moving the controls while you play (the EHX Hotfoot makes a handy “third hand”), you can imitate the sounds of extraterrestrial radio transmissions, drunken calypso steel drummers and screaming robot elephants. Who hasn’t wanted their guitar to sound like that?</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/XrJ-2_qk9zM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p></div> <div style="padding:10px;background:#eeeeee;margin:10px 0;"> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">07. ADA Flanger</span> <p>One of the finest pedal flangers ever made, the ADA Flanger generates a wide variety of impressive effects, from jetlike whooshes to shimmering chorus. But spend a little extra time tweaking the controls and some truly bizarre sounds emerge, such as ring modulator–like percussive metal overtones and ghostly moans. Its best (i.e., weirdest) effect is a sort of “auto whammy” that is coaxed out of the pedal by turning the enhance control all the way up. Engage the effect and your guitar’s pitch will rise and fall dramatically and uncontrollably, even if you aren’t playing anything at all. How cool is that?</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/SBJDTPL-RZ0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> </p></div> <div style="padding:10px;background:#eeeeee;margin:10px 0;"> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">08. Roland Funny Cat</span> <p>Perhaps the most appropriately named pedal of all time, the Roland Funny Cat sounds like a feline that has huffed a spray can of Rust-Oleum and downed a bottle of Jäger — and is being whipped. Kind of a fuzz/envelope-follower combination, the Funny Cat spews and mews unpredictably, with the effect often becoming more pronounced the softer, or the higher up the neck, you play. Considering how hard it was to get killer buds (an essential part of good pedal design) in Japan during the early Seventies, the Roland engineer who designed this probably smoked a lot of catnip instead.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/MY33v7c_tD4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p></div> <div style="padding:10px;background:#eeeeee;margin:10px 0;"> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">09. Oberheim Voltage Controlled Filter/Maestro Filter Sample and Hold</span> <p>These pedals are identical in every way except for their paint jobs. Controls consist of knobs for range (depth) and sample-and-hold speed, and a switch that engages either the sample-and-hold random-filter effect or an envelope follower, for autowah effects. Even with this limited feature set, the pedals can generate a surprisingly vast palette of strange but wonderful tones, ranging from juicy, drippy envelope-follower funk to guttural auto-arpeggiator stutters. Frank Zappa used one on “Ship Ahoy,” “Black Napkins” and several other songs, so if it’s weird enough for the man who wrote “Poofter’s Froth Wyoming Plans Ahead,” it’s certainly weird enough for you.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/W_ZDsQbBSlQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p></div> <div style="padding:10px;background:#eeeeee;margin:10px 0;"> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">10. Electro-Harmonix Talking Pedal </span> <p>While honorable mention must be made to the Heil Talk Box (which provides guitarists with a tube that they stick in their mouths to duplicate the sound of a stomach being pumped and other barfy delights), the Electro-Harmonix Talking Pedal enables your guitar to speak through purely electronic means. Actually, it only produces “A-E-I-O-U” vowel sounds, but it does give a guitar an uncanny vocallike tonality that is reminiscent of Yoda speaking Cantonese. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/38tDo_1O0uk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p></div> http://www.guitarworld.com/weird-science-10-strangest-vintage-effects-all-time#comments GW Archive Guitar World Lists Videos Effects News Features Gear Magazine Fri, 20 Feb 2015 13:12:10 +0000 Chris Gill http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17446 The DIY Musician: Freak of the Week — 1996 Musicvox Spaceranger Prototype http://www.guitarworld.com/diy-musician-freak-week-1996-musicvox-spaceranger-prototype <!--paging_filter--><p>This Freak of the Week is one of the very first Musicvox Spacerangers ever produced. </p> <p>The seafoam green model was part of the original 10 prototypes designed and commissioned by Musicvox CEO, Matt Eichen. </p> <p>The New Jersey-based Musicvox was the first modern company in the Nineties to embrace freakish retro designs of Wandre, Teisco Del Rey and countless no-name brands that graced the walls of music stores in the Sixties.</p> <p>Let me just say this seafoam green Spaceranger prototype is a real freak!</p> <p>All Musicvox Spacerangers sorta look like a single cutaway guitar that was designed by the Toxic Avenger and mutated by nuclear waste. The cutaway horn and headstock are shaped like amoebic globules. I own several modern Spacerangers and love the way the weird body fits into my lap when sitting down. They’re the most comfortable guitars I own.</p> <p>This seafoam green prototype, however, takes those aesthetics and adds several freakish designs. First off, all electronics are housed in a bizarre top-mounted compartment that doubles as a pickguard. </p> <p>The compartment also serves as an attachment to the floating jazz pickups. In other words, the body of the guitar is one big slab of un-routed mahogany and the pickups and electronics are placed on top. Eichen told me the inspiration for the design was from an old Supro Ozark electric guitar from the late Forties.</p> <p>Musicvox was one of the first guitar companies to spur the retro guitar design movement in the Nineties. In 1996, Eichen designed the Spaceranger as his flagship model and took the sketchings to Jim Jameson of Exotic Woods/Musikraft in Buena, New Jerset. Jameson digitized the drawing and made the first 10 maple necks and mahogany bodies on a CNC machine. The parts were then delivered to a Philadelphia-based guitar tech who installed the pickups, tailpieces and electronics.</p> <p>The trapeze tailpieces used were 1967 new-old-stock parts from the defunct Kay guitar factory in Chicago. Pickups are Bill Lawrence floating jazz types that you would see on an archtop guitar. </p> <p>Note: These pickups float 3/8th of an inch above the body! (Lawrence became good friends with Eichen after seeing his pickups in the prototypes. He got a kick out of them!) Each of the 10 prototypes were finished in a vintage relic style nitro lacquer. With the raised pickguard/electronics compartment, the entire thing has the appearance of a prop from an Ed Wood movie.</p> <p><strong>So let’s talk tone</strong>. The Spaceranger prototype is the jazziest-sounding guitar I’ve ever owned. It has the sound of a fine archtop jazzer because of the floating pickups. The light coated mahogany body sings with a purr and the maple neck adds the right amount of snap to pull it together. </p> <p>Alas, the top-mounted electronics and floating pickup design were abandoned after the first 10 prototypes in order to facilitate a bigger production. Musicvox Spacerangers are still produced today and can be seen in the hands of Mark Mothersbaugh of Devo, Mark Pirro of Tripping Daisy/Polyphonic Spree, Matthew Sweet and Keith Urban. Find out more about Musicvox at <a href="http://www.musicvox.com/">Musicvox.com.</a></p> <p><strong>One extra note: </strong>In addition to my ever-growing Musicvox guitar collection, I crank my electric cigar box guitars through Musicvox amplifiers in my band, <a href="http://www.shanespeal.com">Shane Speal’s Snake Oil Band</a>. The volume knobs are printed so they go to 12!</p> <p><em>Shane Speal is "King of the Cigar Box Guitar" and the creator of the modern cigar box guitar movement. Hear the music, see the instruments and read about his Cigar Box Guitar Museum at <a href="http://www.shanespeal.com/">ShaneSpeal.com</a>. Speal's latest album, </em><a href="http://shanespeal.com/holler">Holler!</a><em> is on C. B. Gitty Records.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/diy-musician-freak-week-1996-musicvox-spaceranger-prototype#comments Musicvox Shane Speal The DIY Musician Electric Guitars Blogs Gear Thu, 19 Feb 2015 20:44:55 +0000 Shane Speal http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23551 Brian Setzer Demos and Discusses Gretsch Guitars — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-demos-and-discusses-gretsch-guitars-videos <!--paging_filter--><p>In this new video, created and posted in time for this year's Winter NAMM Show, longtime Gretsch signature artist Brian Setzer plays and discusses Gretsch guitars.</p> <p>He also describes his love affair with the brand and how guitarists like George Harrison and Eddie Cochran exposed him to Gretsch in his formative years.</p> <p>For more about Gretsch's Setzer models, visit <a href="http://gretschguitars.com/features/briansetzer2015">gretschguitars.com.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/K-VUGeKT0M4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/brian-setzer-demos-and-discusses-gretsch-guitars-videos#comments Brian Setzer FMIC Specialty Brands Gretsch Videos Electric Guitars News Gear Thu, 19 Feb 2015 19:08:52 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23547