Gear http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/6/www.szcda.cn/www.szcda.cn en John Petrucci Demos Ernie Ball Music Man JPBFR6 John Petrucci Ball Family Reserve Guitar — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-demos-ernie-ball-music-man-jpbfr6-john-petrucci-ball-family-reserve-guitar-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In this brand-new video below, Dream Theater guitarist John Petrucci walks you through the features of the JPBFR6 John Petrucci Ball Family Reserve (BFR) guitar from Ernie Ball Music Man. </p> <p>Intrigued? Watch the video and visit <a href="http://www.music-man.com/instruments/guitars/john-petrucci-bfr.html">music-man.com.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/D0ib2j3LF48" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/john-petrucci-demos-ernie-ball-music-man-jpbfr6-john-petrucci-ball-family-reserve-guitar-video#comments Dream Theater Ernie Ball John Petrucci Music Man Videos News Gear Fri, 24 Apr 2015 16:09:38 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24377 at http://www.guitarworld.com Review: Strymon Deco Tape Saturation and Doubletracker Pedal — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/review-strymon-deco-tape-saturation-and-doubletracker-pedal-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the June 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-june-15-van-halen?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=June2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p><strong><em>PLATINUM AWARD WINNER</em></strong></p> <p>Chances are, many younger guitarists have never recorded with a vintage studio reel-to-reel tape deck, much less witnessed one that wasn’t covered in dust. </p> <p>And it’s a shame, because they’ve missed out on the warm compression analog that tape decks produce as well as the soft distortion that occurs when a guitar signal is overloaded into it. In addition, other natural-sounding tape-based effects, like flanging, chorusing and slapback echo have been replaced with strident digital imitations. </p> <p>All things considered, a reel-to-reel deck is an impractical option for most guitarists. Fortunately, the Strymon Deco Tape Saturation and Doubletracker vividly emulates all of those superb analog sounds in a pedalboard-friendly, digital stompbox that brilliantly enhances your guitar tone with fullness and colorful effects. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-june-15-van-halen?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=June2015VideosPage">For the rest of this review, including FEATURES, PERFORMANCE, the BOTTOM LINE and more, check out the June 2015 issue of Guitar World.</a></strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience4186638697001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="4186638697001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-strymon-deco-tape-saturation-and-doubletracker-pedal-video#comments June 2015 Strymon Videos Effects News Gear Magazine Fri, 24 Apr 2015 14:37:13 +0000 Paul Riario 24350 at http://www.guitarworld.com Electro-Harmonix Unveils the Nano POG Pedal, "the Smallest Polyphonic Octave Generator" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/electro-harmonix-unveils-nano-pog-pedal-smallest-polyphonic-octave-generator-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Electro-Harmonix has introduced its new Nano POG pedal, which the company calls "the Smallest Polyphonic Octave Generator."</p> <p>From EHX:</p> <p>The new Nano POG, which expands EHX’s line of polyphonic octave generators (including the POG2 and the Micro POG), delivers flawless tracking and sound in a compact package.</p> <p>An advanced algorithm ensures that the most fleet-fingered guitarists will enjoy glitch-free tracking while the sub-octave and octave up deliver the clarity and sound quality EHX’s POG Series is renowned for. </p> <p>Separate level controls for dry, sub-octave and octave up let the player create a variety of sounds ranging from a convincing bass guitar to a sweet mandolin-like chime and rich organesque tones. A separate Dry output is included which enables the player to split their signal for greater flexibility and control.</p> <p>The Nano POG is equipped with reliable silent footswitching which can be especially useful in various scenarios such as recording sessions or with acoustic musicians whose instruments are mic’d.</p> <p>The Nano POG includes an EHX9.6DC power adapter and also runs on 9V battery. The new pedal carries a U.S. List Price of $270.50.</p> <p><strong>For more about EHX, visit <a href="http://www.ehx.com/">ehx.com.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YNjeuEugRvA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/electro-harmonix-unveils-nano-pog-pedal-smallest-polyphonic-octave-generator-video#comments EHX Electro-Harmonix Videos Effects News Gear Thu, 23 Apr 2015 20:10:52 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24373 at http://www.guitarworld.com Review: Jericho Guitars Fusion — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/review-jericho-guitars-fusion-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the June 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-june-15-van-halen?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=June2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p><strong><em>GOLD AWARD WINNER</em></strong></p> <p>Tuning a guitar down a whole step or more puts players in the fast lane of the heavy highway, but the downside to down-tuning on a standard guitar is that the strings can get overly floppy and proper intonation can be difficult to attain. </p> <p>Using heavier strings or a baritone guitar with a longer scale length can be a solution, but heavy strings don’t really make it easy to shred on solos. </p> <p>Jericho Guitars offers a variety of models that solve these dilemmas. The necks of these guitars have longer scale lengths but they are set up to accommodate standard light string gauges. </p> <p>We took a look at Jericho’s Fusion model, which is designed to appeal more to traditional-minded players who prefer the look and features of a classic guitar over those of a modern hot rod.</p> <p><strong>FEATURES</strong> Jericho describes the Fusion as “a modern hybrid of all classically built American guitars.” The single-cutaway body shape, mahogany body with flame maple top, contoured cutaway, and recessed controls are obviously inspired by certain American guitars, but the sum of these parts is a distinctive and different guitar. </p> <p>Of course, the most distinguishing feature is the neck’s long 26.9-inch scale, which allows players to comfortably tune down to C or even drop the lowest string to Bb (for a drop D-equivalent tuning) while maintaining ideal string tension for playing and perfectly accurate intonation. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-june-15-van-halen?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=June2015VideosPage">For the rest of this review, including FEATURES, PERFORMANCE, the BOTTOM LINE and more, check out the June 2015 issue of Guitar World.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xXekmYPPpF0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-jericho-guitars-fusion-video#comments Jericho Guitars June 2015 Videos Electric Guitars News Gear Thu, 23 Apr 2015 16:25:32 +0000 Chris Gill, Video by Nick Vallese 24351 at http://www.guitarworld.com Review: Fishman Fluence Modern Humbuckers — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/review-fishman-fluence-modern-humbuckers-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the June 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-june-15-van-halen?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=June2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p><strong><em>GOLD AWARD WINNER</em></strong></p> <p>From the introduction of the single-coil pickup in the Thirties through the development of the humbucker during the Fifties to the first active pickup designs that emerged in the mid Seventies, innovations in commercially successful electric guitar pickup designs have been relatively few and far between. </p> <p>Fishman’s new Fluence pickups, however, are truly the most innovative electric guitar pickup design introduced since the first single-coil pickups. We took a look at Fishman’s Fluence Modern Alnico and Ceramic Humbucker set, which is perfectly voiced for drop tunings and modern metal.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-june-15-van-halen?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=June2015VideosPage">For the rest of this review, including FEATURES, PERFORMANCE, the BOTTOM LINE and more, check out the June 2015 issue of Guitar World.</a></strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience4186667179001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="4186667179001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-fishman-fluence-modern-humbuckers-video#comments Fishman June 2015 Videos News Gear Magazine Thu, 23 Apr 2015 14:29:38 +0000 Chris Gill, Video by Nick Vallese 24342 at http://www.guitarworld.com Ritchie Blackmore Shows Off His Favorite Guitars — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/ritchie-blackmore-shows-his-favorite-guitars-video-0 <!--paging_filter--><p>In the video below, former Deep Purple and Rainbow guitarist Ritchie Blackmore—who now plies his trade with Blackmore’s Night—shows off and discusses several of his guitars.</p> <p>The video also features his wife, Candice Night, another key figure in Blackmore’s Night.</p> <p>The clip includes instruments Blackmore used during his Deep Purple and Rainbow days, including his main Fender Strat, which he says he’s played for the past 30-plus years. </p> <p>He also discusses scalloping his fretboards, a process that takes him three days to achieve, and shares a story about a luthier who undid his scalloping handiwork by replaning the fretboard to make it flat again. Enjoy!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/M-jP38If6CA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/ritchie-blackmore-shows-his-favorite-guitars-video-0#comments Ritchie Blackmore Acoustic Guitars Videos Electric Guitars News Gear Wed, 22 Apr 2015 19:39:15 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24359 at http://www.guitarworld.com Ritchie Blackmore Shows Off His Favorite Guitars — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/ritchie-blackmore-shows-his-favorite-guitars-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In the video below, former Deep Purple and Rainbow guitarist Ritchie Blackmore—who now plies his trade with Blackmore’s Night—shows off and discusses several of his guitars.</p> <p>The video also features his wife, Candice Night, another key figure in Blackmore’s Night.</p> <p>The clip includes instruments Blackmore used during his Deep Purple and Rainbow days, including his main Fender Strat, which he says he’s played for the past 30-plus years. </p> <p>He also discusses scalloping his fretboards, a process that takes him three days to achieve, and shares a story about a luthier who undid his scalloping handiwork by replaning the fretboard to make it flat again. Enjoy!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/M-jP38If6CA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/ritchie-blackmore-shows-his-favorite-guitars-video#comments Ritchie Blackmore Videos News Gear Tue, 21 Apr 2015 19:19:54 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24343 at http://www.guitarworld.com Zakk Wylde Shreds and Discusses Wylde Audio Guitars and Amps on 'That Metal Show' — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/zakk-wylde-shreds-and-discusses-wylde-audio-guitars-and-amps-metal-show-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Inspired by <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/kirk-hammett-and-michael-schenker-jam-behind-scenes-metal-show-video">this morning's post about Kirk Hammett and Michael Schenker's jam session</a> on the April 18 edition of <em>That Metal Show</em>, we thought we'd share this clip of Zakk Wylde's recent visit to the VH1 show.</p> <p>In the video, which you can check out below, Wylde plays one of his new Wylde Audio guitars through one of his new Wylde Audio amps.</p> <p>Then, as part of Mark Strigl's "That Metal Gear" segment of the show, Wylde discusses his new company and gear in great detail. It turns out Wylde's company is not only building the amps—but he's also building the speakers and tubes that go <em>inside</em> the amps. To found out more, and to get a good look at Wylde's new gear, check out the video below.</p> <p><strong>For more about Wylde Audio, visit <a href="http://wyldeaudio.com/">wyldeaudio.com.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ql9rZOt6oUc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/zakk-wylde">Zakk Wylde</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/zakk-wylde-shreds-and-discusses-wylde-audio-guitars-and-amps-metal-show-video#comments That Metal Show Wylde Audio Zakk Wylde Videos Amps Electric Guitars News Gear Mon, 20 Apr 2015 16:23:19 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24329 at http://www.guitarworld.com Taylor Guitars Introduces Two New 600 Series Models at Musikmesse http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-taylor-guitars-introduce-two-new-600-series-models-at-musikmesse <!--paging_filter--><p>After unveiling a transformative redesign of its maple 600 Series acoustic guitars earlier this year at the Winter NAMM Show, Taylor Guitars is expanding the rollout this spring.</p> <p>The new 600s, which were revoiced to bring out a richer, warmer maple sound and given a major aesthetic makeover, made their debut with an initial release of four models — the 614ce, 616ce, 618ce and 12-string 656ce.</p> <p>In the wake of rave reviews from industry leaders, dealers and media, two Grand Concert models join the series this spring: the 612ce and 612ce 12-Fret.</p> <p>The new models embody the same tone-forward vision as their 600 Series siblings, with shape-specific bracing and wood thicknesses, thin finish, and new seasoning processes like torrefaction, which together expand maple’s tone profile to include more complexity and overall playing versatility. Despite the smaller dimensions of the Grand Concert body style, Taylor Master Builder Andy Powers was able to elicit a surprisingly potent sound. “It has a delicate, articulate voice, but it’s not a quiet or weak-sounding guitar,” he says. “It’s actually really loud and powerful. But because the shape is a smaller outline, it will emphasize a certain clarity in its articulation and a certain high-end chime that a larger guitar won’t.”</p> <p>Specifically with the 612ce 12-Fret model, the geometry of the bridge to shorter neck results in a different voicing option for fans of the Grand Concert shape. “By making a shorter neck, you shift where the strings fall in relation to the body,” Powers says. “The bridge sits in a different spot on the body, so the way the player drives the top is different, with an extra robust punch in the midrange. It makes for dramatically present notes.”</p> <p>Notable design innovations on the new 600 Series models include:</p> <p><strong>Customized Wood Thicknesses and Bracing:</strong> The top and back thicknesses have been specially gauged for each body shape. Powers also optimized the bracing for each shape. The backs feature new maple-specific bracing profiles and patterns to enhance the responsiveness. As a result, he says, “the backs of these guitars work a lot like an archtop guitar or a violin if you were to delete its soundpost. These braces allow the back to move in a much warmer, stronger way. Players will hear more volume, more projection, and more low-end warmth than a maple guitar they’ve heard in the past.” The back and sides also undergo a special seasoning process to enhance the resonance and stability.</p> <p><strong>Torrefaction:</strong> This carefully controlled, high-temperature roasting process is applied to the Sitka spruce tops to give a new guitar an aged or played-in sound. By aging the wood on a molecular level, torrefaction makes the top warmer and more responsive. “There’s less resistance in the wood,” Powers explains. “As a result, it allows a more efficient energy transfer from the strings. A new piece of wood has quite a bit of resistance to moving. It’s not used to vibrating at a high frequency like that. An aged or played-in top is just waiting to be set in motion. For a player, it feels like the notes are just falling out of the guitar. As soon as you touch the strings, it takes hardly any effort; it doesn’t feel like you have to pry the sound out.”</p> <p><strong>Hand-Rubbed Color and Finish:</strong> Not only do the new 600s feature the same ultra-thin 3.5-mil clear gloss finish developed for the 800 Series, the maple back and sides boast an additional breakthrough: the inclusion of a proprietary hand-rubbed color application process that adds no additional thickness to the finish. The stain enhances maple’s visual aesthetic without causing any damping in the natural movement of the guitar body, helping to boost the tonal projection and sustain. The new color, “Brown Sugar,” complements the slightly darker color of the spruce tops, a result of the torrefaction process.</p> <p><strong>Protein Glue:</strong> The same protein glues used in the company’s redesigned 800 Series are used in the 600 Series for the critical tone-producing parts, namely for the “power train” components: the bracing and bridge-to-top joint.</p> <p><strong>Expression System® 2 Pickup:</strong> The acoustic voicing enhancements designed for the new 600 Series translate into amplified form with Taylor’s new Expression System® 2 (ES2) electronics. The ES2 incorporates three uniquely positioned and individually calibrated pickup sensors. These are installed behind the saddle, through the bridge, and effectively capture more of each guitar’s dynamic properties and acoustic energy.</p> <p><strong>First World Tonewood:</strong> Maple is a tonewood that can be harvested specifically for instruments here in the United States, a project that longtime tonewood supply partner Steve McMinn of Pacific Rim Tonewoods is undertaking. Given its geographical location, maple grows in politically and economically stable environments and is considered to be “conflict free” and well-managed. This is important to Taylor co-founder Bob Taylor. “Now and in the future, maple forests will be among the healthiest and most sustainable sources of instrument wood,” he says. “This is a species from our own backyard that can be formed into world-class instruments for generations to come. So, it is an important wood for us as a forward-thinking instrument manufacturer. This redesign is our way of showing players how great a maple and spruce instrument can look and sound.”</p> <p><em>Taylor Guitars 612ce 12-Fret (L) and 612ce (R):</em></p> <p><em></em><img src="/files/imce-images/newtaylors2015.jpg" alt="newtaylors2015.jpg" width="620" height="606" /></p> <p>The newly redesigned 600 Series is also available in the 614ce (Grand Auditorium), 616ce (Grand Symphony), 618ce (Grand Orchestra) and 656ce (12-String Grand Symphony). Models are available at authorized Taylor dealers. To locate a dealer, please visit <a href="http://www.taylorguitars.com/dealers">www.taylorguitars.com/dealers</a>.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-taylor-guitars-introduce-two-new-600-series-models-at-musikmesse#comments Acoustic Nation News Taylor Guitars Gear Gear Fri, 17 Apr 2015 18:40:09 +0000 Acoustic Nation 24318 at http://www.guitarworld.com How to Buy an Acoustic Guitar: A Guide for the First-Time Buyer http://www.guitarworld.com/how-buy-acoustic-guitar-guide-first-time-buyer <!--paging_filter--><p>You've got the bug—you’ve decided to buy an acoustic guitar—and nothing will stop you, not even the haunted, hungry look in your children’s eyes. So you empty your bank account, raid your kids’ college fund and head down to a local house of ill repute: a music store. You’re gonna get that acoustic, practicality and your wife’s entreaties be damned. </p> <p>You navigate your way through the racks of gear and gaggle of fools trying to play the solo to “Stairway to Heaven” to find the acoustic guitar room in the far reaches of the building. </p> <p>As you close the glass doors, you take a deep breath and survey the room. Hundreds of acoustics of all sizes, shapes and colors hang, meat-like, from the walls and ceiling. You really want to take one of those lovelies home today, right now, but a sudden thought stays your trembling hands: I don’t have a clue what I’m looking for. </p> <p>My task here is to give you that clue—to ensure that prior to entering the unfriendly confines of a big, gleaming music store you’ll have a pretty good idea of what you’d like in an acoustic guitar. </p> <p><strong>The Buck Stops Where?</strong><br /> Unless your dying aunt has willed you the vintage six-string that’s been gathering dust and accruing value in her attic all these years, your first question must be: How much do I want to spend? While there are respectable guitars to be had in any price range, the fact is that you do get what you pay for. And if a wily salesman convinces you that he’s got “just what you’re looking for, and it’s only a tad more expensive,” you need to be able to make an informed decision. </p> <p>If you’re a beginner or just want something to bang around on in your bedroom or at the beach, you’ll still probably want to spend at least $300 for a guitar. Anything less will almost certainly get you something that not only will be very difficult to play but will sound lousy, besides. Say you’ve got a spending ceiling of around $700. Guitars at this price range should have a solid spruce stop. Raise that to $1,200 and you’re talking about a solid- wood instrument. The word “laminate” should not appear in descriptions of guitars that cost close to or above four figures. </p> <p>Guitars in the range of $1,200 and $2,500 must get you nothing less than a pro-level instrument that you will love and never outgrow. Anything above that, and you’re in highly specialized and hand-crafted territory—a danger zone because if you buy a lemon for this kind of money nothing will ever blunt that sour feeling in your stomach. </p> <p>If you are particularly budget conscious, here are a couple of friendly suggestions. Don’t put your cash into expensive accessories—say, handtooled leather straps, or even more practical items like a high-end tuner. Instead, put all that money into the best guitar you can get. Remember that nobody in his right mind pays list price these days; discounts of ten to thirty (and often forty) percent are standard. Large music stores are no different from cut-rate clothing establishments and audio shops—they’ll use any holiday or other excuse to have a “Blowout Sales Event of the Century” that in truth won’t offer you much of a real savings. </p> <p><strong>Choosing Your Weapon</strong><br /> There is no such thing as right or wrong when it comes to choosing a guitar. Bigger does not always mean better, and the popularity of a particular guitar does not necessarily mean that it’s for you. Acoustics come in all shapes and sizes, and (this should be your mantra) what someone else finds appealing may not be right for you. </p> <p>The traditional workhorse of acoustic guitars is the dreadnought, of which the Martin D-28 is the standard bearer. Powerful, versatile and extremely coollooking, this model has graced countless recordings and is the classic rock acoustic guitar. The D-28’s success over the years has spawned countless imitations, good and bad. Pick one out, give it a few good strums and then go on to something with a different look, feel and sound—a small guitar, like a Grand Concert size Taylor, a jumbo Gibson or an Ovation Adamas. Even if you can’t afford any of these instruments, playing them will give you at least an idea of the kind of guitar you’re most comfortable with. </p> <p><strong>Set Up, Man</strong><br /> Obviously, whatever guitar you ultimately choose must be comfortable to play. If the action is too high—the strings are too far from the fretboard— your fingers will pay a price, and it may be an indication that the neck is bowed. Look for low, even action up and down the fretboard, with the strings slightly higher at the 12th fret. Check for fret buzz by playing chords and single notes at different spots on the neck. Some pro players like their action higher for a clearer, punchier sound, but if you are a beginner or an electric player buying your first acoustic, you will probably find light strings and a low action to be more suited to your needs. </p> <p>You may have heard players discuss how good or bad the “intonation” is on a particular guitar. This refers to how well a guitar is in tune up and down the neck. The easiest way to check this is to play an open D chord and then play the same D chord at the 14th fret. If the guitar sounds out of tune up there you know it’s got a problem. </p> <p>Although tuning and other problems like fret buzz can often be alleviated with simple neck adjustments, they sometimes require more involved bridge work. The odds are that this is something you don’t want to get into when buying a brand new guitar. On the other hand, if you’ve really fallen in love with a particular instrument that needs a little work, have the dealer take care of the necessary repairs and then try the guitar again before finalizing your purchase.</p> <hr /> <p><strong>Sound Decisions</strong><br /> How does one confidently access something as subjective as sound After all, a guitar whose deep bass knocks me out may strike you as being too boomy. Every guitar style—every individual guitar, really—is unique, and there are no universal guidelines for what constitutes a “good”- or “bad”- sounding guitar. Again, you are the final arbiter—it’s your money, and your ears are the only judge and jury that matter. </p> <p>The best way to really hear how a guitar sounds is to have someone else strum it as you listen from a distance of a few feet. A guitar heard from this vantage point will sound completely different than it does when you play it. </p> <p><strong>Lumber Party</strong><br /> The type, quality and combination of woods used in the construction of a guitar all help determine its tone. Entry-level models are typically made of laminated wood, which does not mature as it gets older; what you hear is what you get. Intermediate guitars, on the other hand, generally feature solid wood tops combined with laminated back and sides. And the best instruments are made of solid wood, which produce a richer and more resonant sound. </p> <p>Guitar tops are most commonly made of spruce or cedar, while standard woods for the back and sides are rosewood, mahogany and maple. Synthetic materials are also used effectively by companies like Ovation and Rainsong. </p> <p><strong>Spruce</strong> - The most common choice for an acoustic guitar top. It has a very good strength-to-weight ratio that makes it possible for the top to be relatively thin yet still be strong and very resonant. Spruce tops can take whatever you dish out and will remain responsive even when played very hard. Spruce is perfect for strumming and flatpicking styles. </p> <p><strong>Cedar</strong> - You will recognize a cedar top because it has a darker color than spruce and has a slight reddish hue. Cedar responds nicely to a light attack, and is an excellent choice for fingerpicking and lowered tension tunings. Because it is softer and not as strong as spruce, cedar can be overdriven if played too hard, causing the sound to compress and lose some integrity. </p> <p><strong>Rosewood </strong>- This darkcolored wood imparts a deep warmth and complex richness to the tone of a guitar. Brazilian rosewood is the holy grail of tone woods and is much prized by luthiers and players alike. The scarcity of Brazilian, however, makes it very expensive. Indian rosewood has similar timbre qualities but is not as striking visually. </p> <p><strong>Mahogany</strong> - This is an excellent wood that falls in the middle of the tonal spectrum, imparting a bright and warm sound with sweet highs. </p> <p><strong>Maple</strong> - A maple body will produce a bright, dry tone with a very clear, well-defined high end. Quilted or tiger maple can be quite dramatic visually. </p> <p><strong>Synthetics</strong> – Although synthetic guitars will never totally replace the wooden variety, they have been around for decades and are quite popular. Ovation uses a fiberglass composite for the body and sides of its rounded body guitars, combined with a solid wood top, while Rainsong produces instruments made mostly of graphite. In general, synthetic guitars are less susceptible than wood to climatic changes and offer distinctive tonal characteristics. On the other hand, they tend not to improve with age. </p> <p><strong>Beauty Marks</strong><br /> Most acoustic guitars feature clear, natural finishes. Sunbursts and other colors have their unique appeal, but be aware that a heavier finish may hinder the sound. Look for a translucent finish through which you can see the wood grain. </p> <p>Mother-pearl-inlays, herringbone trim, gold-plated tuners and other decorative options certainly can add to the beauty of a guitar, but they do not necessarily make it a better instrument. On the other hand, if having your name inlaid on the fretboard makes you think you sound better, it might be worth looking into. </p> <p><em>Footnote: Some of the best-sounding acoustic guitars I’ve ever played were also the ugliest.</em> </p> <p><strong>Shop Talk</strong><br /> There are advantages to buying at a large national chain or regional music store. On the one hand, they usually carry a large selection of guitars and are well stocked. On the other hand, they are less likely to carry unusual or so-called “boutique”—extremely high-end—instruments. </p> <p>Specialty acoustic guitar shops offer very specific advantages, such as knowledgeable sales staffers who are more likely to spend a lot of time with you, as well as a wide selection of guitars with everything from drool-worthy boutique items to tried.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/how-buy-acoustic-guitar-guide-first-time-buyer#comments Acoustic Nation News Gear Acoustic Guitars Blogs Gear Fri, 17 Apr 2015 14:10:12 +0000 Chris Gill 24310 at http://www.guitarworld.com Guitarist Michael Hermes, 14, Demos Kiesel/Carvin Guitars' Jason Becker "Numbers" Tribute Model — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/guitarist-michael-hermes-14-demos-kieselcarvin-guitars-jason-becker-numbers-tribute-model-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Below, check out a recently posted holdover from the 2015 Winter NAMM Show.</p> <p>It's a video of young guitarist Michael Hermes demoing Kiesel Guitars/Carvin Guitars' new Jason Becker "Numbers" Tribute model at the Kiesel/Carvin NAMM booth at the January show.</p> <p>Says Jeff Kiesel on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/kieselguitars?fref=ts">the company's Facebook page:</a></p> <p>"I'm excited to announce that [Kiesel/Carvin] and Michael are now working together! Michael may very well be the youngest endorser to grace our roster. His weapon of choice [is the] Carvin CT624T carved-top guitar.</p> <p>"For the past eight years, Michael has played at various venues throughout the Northwest, alongside some very seasoned and well-known musicians and onstage with the Portland School of Rock.</p> <p>"At 14, Michael is an accomplished musician and songwriter. He plays classical guitar (studying under Scott Kritzer), electric guitar and piano and writes music on the keyboard. His influences include Hans Zimmer, Steve Vai, Paul Gilbert, Jeff Beck and Andrés Segovia."</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>For more information about this guitar, visit its page on <a href="http://www.carvinguitars.com/catalog/guitars/jb24">carvinguitars.com.</a> For more about Michael Hermes, follow him on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Michael-Hermes/259320457431049?fref=ts">Facebook.</a></strong></p> <div id="fb-root" class=" fb_reset"> <script src="http://connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js"></script><div style="position: absolute; top: -10000px; height: 0px; width: 0px;"> <div><iframe src="http://static.ak.facebook.com/connect/xd_arbiter/KvoNGODIqPG.js?version=41#channel=fd9fbae6c3c5e&amp;origin=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.guitarworld.com" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe> <iframe src="https://s-static.ak.facebook.com/connect/xd_arbiter/KvoNGODIqPG.js?version=41#channel=fd9fbae6c3c5e&amp;origin=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.guitarworld.com" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe></div> </div> <div style="position: absolute; top: -10000px; height: 0px; width: 0px;"></div> </div> <p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&amp;version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk')); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <div class="fb-video fb_iframe_widget fb_iframe_widget_fluid_desktop" style="width: 100%;"><span style="vertical-align: bottom; width: 620px; height: 348px;"><iframe src="http://www.facebook.com/v2.3/plugins/video.php?allowfullscreen=true&amp;app_id=&amp;channel=http%3A%2F%2Fstatic.ak.facebook.com%2Fconnect%2Fxd_arbiter%2FKvoNGODIqPG.js%3Fversion%3D41%23cb%3Df1aca847aa7a50c%26domain%3Dwww.guitarworld.com%26origin%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.guitarworld.com%252Ffd9fbae6c3c5e%26relation%3Dparent.parent&amp;container_width=620&amp;href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fvideo.php%3Fv%3D1568591436757486&amp;locale=en_US&amp;sdk=joey" width="1000px" height="1000px" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe></span></div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jason-becker">Jason Becker</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitarist-michael-hermes-14-demos-kieselcarvin-guitars-jason-becker-numbers-tribute-model-video#comments Carvin Jason Becker Kiesel Guitars NAMM 2015 Videos Electric Guitars News Gear Thu, 16 Apr 2015 14:29:39 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24300 at http://www.guitarworld.com The DIY Musician: Handmade Copper Pipe Guitars and Scrap Iron Guitars http://www.guitarworld.com/diy-musician-handmade-copper-pipe-guitars-and-scrap-iron-guitars <!--paging_filter--><p>Two of the most freakish guitars in my extremely weird guitar collection were made by Tone-A-Cane Copper Pipe Guitars and Pete Regan’s Metal Guitars. </p> <p>Both were crafted using metal for body and necks. And both are so damn heavy, you could win bar fights with them.</p> <p>The Tone-A-Cane Guitar is the brainchild of Worcester, Massachusetts, artist Timothy Dlugasz, and—with the exception of the wood fretboard—is made completely of copper pipes. In the case of my Tone-A-Cane (an early version, serial Number 03), the body is mostly non-existent, with small shrimp-fork wings coming out of the sides. More recent Tone-A-Canes have a Les Paul-ish body outline made from copper for better ergonomics.</p> <p>I appreciate a baseball-bat neck, and the Tone-A-Cane has the fattest, most massive neck I’ve ever seen. The neck consists of three copper pipes that run the length of the body. Two smaller pipes flank the sides while a thicker pipe goes up the middle. A wooden fretboard is glued to them (The intonation is perfect, by the way) and the headstock is formed from the two outside pipes joined with a few elbow connectors.</p> <p>The humbucking pickup delivers a surprisingly warm jazz tone when plugged into my 30-watt Musicvox MVX-30 amp. I’ve used the Tone-A-Cane at several shows, and it’s always a crowd pleaser, causing cellphones to pop up for pictures and videos.</p> <p>Tone-A-Cane Guitars are sold through <a href="http://www.copperguitars.com/">copperguitars.com</a>. You also can see the newer Ghost Body versions at the website.</p> <p>Pete Regan Guitars look like modernist sculptures that should be hanging in an art gallery. Huntsville, Alabama, based Regan uses hunks of scrap iron, rebars and welding joints to create super-heavy Mad Max guitar/weapons that have sustain for days.</p> <p>The Pete Regan guitar in my collection is a two-string slide instrument inspired by cigar box guitars. Regan started with a narrow rectangle body crafted from rebar and flat metal, adding disappearing circle “sound holes” and loading an EMG single coil. He added a bottom hunk of rebar to rest on your lap when sitting, providing enough weight to cut off circulation to leg. </p> <p>The neck is simply two hunks of salvaged rebar with a nut also made of rebar. There’s no warping here!</p> <p>I’ve tried several string combinations with the Pete Regan. One incarnation was to use the low and high E strings from a standard pack of electric strings and tune it E to E'. Here’s a quick demo:</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/37jiXUT3Ojk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>In addition to making the scrap iron guitars, Regan has invented a percussion instrument that gives the sound of prisoners hammering railroad spikes with their chains clanging. The pedal (which I call the "John Henry") is simply an old ball-peen hammer with chain links attached to the back, mounted to a lever pedal. At the top of it is an actual railroad spike. When you stomp on it, the hammer slams the rail spike and then crashes back with a shattering rattle of chains.</p> <p>Since prison chants and field hollers provided the continuing concept of my latest album, <em><a href="http://shanespeal.com/shop-music">Holler!,</a></em> we used this stomper everywhere. Here’s just one example, “Big Leg Woman/Swing the Hammer.”</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/200751450&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> <p>Pete Regan doesn’t have a standard website. (I don’t even think that’s his real name!) However, if you want to see more of his instruments or contact him about building you an iron battle axe guitar, you can <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pete.regan.3950?fref=ts">find him on Facebook.</a></p> <p><em>Shane Speal is the "King of the Cigar Box Guitar" and the creator of the modern cigar box guitar movement. Hear the music, see the instruments and read about his Cigar Box Guitar Museum at <a href="http://www.shanespeal.com/">ShaneSpeal.com</a>. Speal's latest album, </em><a href="http://shanespeal.com/holler">Holler!</a><em> is on C.B. Gitty Records.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/diy-musician-handmade-copper-pipe-guitars-and-scrap-iron-guitars#comments Shane Speal The DIY Musician Videos Blogs Gear Tue, 14 Apr 2015 15:05:52 +0000 Shane Speal 24282 at http://www.guitarworld.com Practice Made Perfect: Guitar World Rounds Up 17 Amazing Practice Amps http://www.guitarworld.com/practice-makes-perfect-five-amazing-practice-amps <!--paging_filter--><p>Playing live might be the best way to hone your performance skills, but when it comes to technique, you need practice, practice, practice. If you play an electric guitar, your woodshedding sessions demand an amp that not only reveals the details and nuance of your playing but also sounds great—so great that it makes you want to practice more and become the best guitarist you can. Of course, it’s even better if it has built-in effects, a tuner, a metronome, and connectivity to the world of digital apps, downloads and MP3 players. With that in mind, we set out to find the best-sounding and best-outfitted practice amps currently on the market. Over the next pages, you’ll find practice combos and heads that pull double-duty as studio and rehearsal powerhouses and others that offer computer, USB, Bluetooth, iOS and Android connectivity. Whether you love an all-tube rig, solid-state power, or feature-laden digital/modeling amps, you’re sure to find that one of these tone machines makes practice perfect.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/practice-makes-perfect-five-amazing-practice-amps#comments Carr Amplifiers Epiphone Fender Ibanez Peavey Roland September 2014 Amps News Features Gear Magazine Mon, 13 Apr 2015 13:59:40 +0000 Paul Riario 21835 at http://www.guitarworld.com Paul Riario Demos John Page Classic Ashburn Guitar — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/paul-riario-demos-john-page-classic-ashburn-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In the video below, <em>Guitar World</em> Tech Editor Paul Riario demos the new double-cutaway, hard-body Ashburn model from John Page Classic. The Ashburn, which was designed by John Page, co-founder of the Fender Custom Shop and one of the greatest living custom luthiers, is a production guitar ($1,499 MSRP) with all the custom features of the custom guitars Page builds himself. The Ashburn is produced to Page’s exacting design specs in a state-of-the-art workshop in Japan, then set up in the U.S. by authorized John Page Classic techs. “The Ashburn has all the design features of my hand-built custom guitars,” Page says. “It’s the culmination of my nearly 40 years building custom guitars. Through John Page Classic, I’m now able to make the Page custom-design experience available to more people.” <strong>For more information about John Page Classic and the Ashburn, visit <a href="http://www.johnpageclassic.com/">johnpageclassic.com</a>.</strong> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dgJD_96ndyA" width="620" height="365" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/paul-riario-demos-john-page-classic-ashburn-video#comments Fender Custom Shop John Page John Page Classic Paul Riario Videos Electric Guitars News Gear Mon, 13 Apr 2015 10:05:56 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24270 at http://www.guitarworld.com Paul Gilbert Demos His Signature Ibanez FRM150 Guitar — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/paul-gilbert-demos-his-signature-ibanez-frm150-guitar-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In this video, which was posted by Ibanez earlier this year, Paul Gilbert demos his latest signature guitar, the Ibanez FRM150. </p> <p>"When I pick up my Ibanez Fireman, I know that everything is going to be all right," says the Mr. Big guitarist. </p> <p>"It is truly a pleasure to be able to express my anger, explore my melodic imagination and simply play good rock and roll, with such a world-class instrument."</p> <p>From the company:</p> <p>Building on the classic foundation of his Fireman models before it, the FRM150 has some new features, including DiMarzio Air Classic humbucking pickups and a new black pick guard. </p> <p><strong>For more about the FRM150 and all of Ibanez's Paul Gilbert signature models, <a href="http://www.ibanez.co.jp/products/u_eg_sig_series15.php?year=2015&amp;cat_id=1&amp;series_id=18">head here.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/190BsmNuZj0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/paul-gilbert">Paul Gilbert</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/paul-gilbert-demos-his-signature-ibanez-frm150-guitar-video#comments Ibanez Paul Gilbert Videos Electric Guitars News Gear Wed, 08 Apr 2015 17:07:51 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24251 at http://www.guitarworld.com