Dave Reffett http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/603/all en Harmonic Minor and Beyond: Killer Scales for Modern Heavy Metal Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/harmonic-minor-and-beyond-great-scales-heavy-metal-guitar-playing <!--paging_filter--><p>For this column, I've responded to a great question from a reader — Zachary in Houston, Texas.</p> <p><em>"Dave: What is your favorite scale to use when playing heavy metal?"</em></p> <p>Thanks for the question! Harmonic minor is always a very cool choice and a favorite of mine. It’s great to use when you’re improvising or coming up with song ideas and lead parts. </p> <p>So many impressive players have made great use of it in their songs—guys like Uli Jon Roth, Yngwie Malmsteen, Ritchie Blackmore, Steve Vai and many others. Mozart also was a big fan.</p> <p>If you want to hear how I use it, check out my song “Devils Roadmap” below: </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/t1nDO69kLxY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Listen to my guitar solo from 3:22 to 3:40 to hear the scale in action. It’s a fun scale; you can map out crazy three-note-per-string runs all across the fretboard.</p> <p>I also like the pentatonic scale. Pentatonic is huge in metal for a reason: It sounds good in so many situations. Zakk Wylde, Frank Marino and Dave Mustaine are amazing players who have used it to great effect over the decades.</p> <p>• <strong>Pentatonic Scale</strong> (1, b3, 4, 5, b7). For example, in the key of E, that would be E, G, A, B, D.</p> <p>My solo on “I Just Don’t Want to Say Goodbye” is a favorite of mine, and I basically stick to straight-up minor pentatonic. The solo is from 3:26 to 4:37:</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ObL-XYTdy24" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Even though I'm a trained musician, I'm still very much a self-taught player in my heart and mind and in the way I think and approach things. </p> <p>I use the approach of just going for it and seeing what happens when I play leads and improvise. Knowledge is great as a guide, but when I’m writing, I just go for it. Usually, my best stuff happens when I'm not over-thinking it.</p> <p>I come from the Marty Friedman school of thought when it comes to scales. Marty had a great instructional DVD out where he talked about how players can get caught up thinking that they need to know tons of scales. He goes on to say you can just make up your own scales.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/uSaTAGsIBEI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>I teach my students to think in this freethinking style. For example, take the simple pentatonic scale and improvise over a riff or chord progression and throw in any chromatic passing tones you like. Practice this approach and see what sounds cool to your ears!</p> <p>The so-called “wrong notes” people might tell you to not play are sometimes the ones that sound amazing against the riff and really make your playing stand out. Take Marty's playing on Megadeth's <em>Rust In Peace.</em> He is throwing in all kinds of exotic scales and interesting note choices all over the place. </p> <p>Below, check out some great scales to add into your arsenal when you're trying to write. I’ll put these in the key of E to keep it easy, but you can move these to any key.</p> <p>• <strong>Harmonic Minor</strong> (1, 2, b3, 4, 5 b6, 7) or (E, F#, G, A, B, C, D#). Like I said, Yngwie Malmsteen and Uli Jon Roth love this scale, but you can hear it from Michael Schenker, Ritchie Blackmore and many others.</p> <p>• <strong>Phrygian Dominant</strong> (1, b2, 3, 4, 5, b6, b7) or (E, F, G#, A, B, C, D). This scale is simply the 5th mode of the harmonic minor scale. If you listen to Iron Maiden’s “Powerslave” you can hear this scale in action: </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/0NYiOHGapRk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Al Di Meola’s “Egyptian Danza” is another great example of this scale in action. Notice a theme? This scale gets a very Egyptian-type sound! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/XrO29hsWgto" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>• <strong>Gypsy Scale</strong> (1, b2, 3, 4, 5, b6, 7) or (E, F, G#, A, B, C, D#). This scale is the same as Phrygian dominant except for the natural 7, which this scale has. Any time you are improvising over a chord progression that has major chords that are a half step apart, this scale (as well as the Phrygian dominant) is a good choice. The Gypsy scale is cool to use when you're going for that whole snake-charming, exotic, "magic carpet ride" sound. Blackmore captured it very well on many tunes. “Gates of Babylon” by the Ronnie James Dio-fronted Rainbow is a good example.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/qu8HiZepRWo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>• <strong>Hungarian Minor</strong> (1, 2, b3, #4, 5, b6, 7) or (E, F#, G, A#, B, C, D#). This is a cool-sounding scale. This works well over a minor (major 7) chord. The Hungarian gypsy minor and harmonic minor scales are used on Chris Broderick’s solo on Megadeth's “Head Crusher” from 2:58 to 3:24.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/XurU3TPHjzY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>• <strong>Persian</strong> (1, b2, 3, 4, b5, b6, 7) or (E, F, G#, A, Bb, C, D#). This scale is cool and has that whole dark Middle Eastern feel to it. It’s got the flat 5 or “tri-tone” in there, which is always great for metal. That’s the interval that Marilyn Manson used on “The Beautiful People” or that Black Sabbath used on one of my all-time favorite songs, “Symptom of the Universe." You can get some crazy-sounding metal riffs out of this scale. It also works well for soloing over a (maj 7 #11) chord.</p> <p>• <strong>Japanese Scale</strong> (1, b2, 4, 5, b6) or (E, F, A, B, C). Friedman, Jason Becker and so many other greats have used this one. Give it a try in your soloing. It works well in minor and major key progressions. Also, with the b2 in there, it makes for a good choice when working in a Phrygian-style situation. </p> <p>• <strong>Chinese Scale</strong> (1, 2, 3, 5, 6) or (E, F#, G#, B, C#) In the Western world, we know this scale by its other name: major pentatonic. Bands like the Allman Brothers really dig its sound and use it quite a bit, as well as bluesmen like B.B. King.</p> <p>Don’t forget the different modes of the major scale. These can be very helpful. Learn them and practice how to apply them all over your fretboard. I will put these in C to keep things easy.</p> <p>• Ionian (Major Scale) (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7) or (C, D, E, F, G, A, B)<br /> • Dorian (1, 2, b3, 4, 5, 6, b7) or (D, E, F, G, A, B, C)<br /> • Phrygian (1, b2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7) or (E, F, G, A, B, C, D)<br /> • Lydian (1, 2, 3, #4, 5, 6, 7) or (F, G, A, B, C, D, E)<br /> • Mixolydian (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, b7) or (G, A, B, C, D, E, F)<br /> • Aeolian (Minor Scale) (1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7) or (A, B, C, D, E, F, G)<br /> • Locrian (1, b2, b3, 4, b5, b6, b7) or (B, C, D, E, F, G, A)</p> <p>Here's a cool trick someone showed me to help remember what order these modes go in: “I Don’t Punch Like Muhammad A Li.”</p> <p>I= Ionian<br /> Don’t= Dorian<br /> Punch= Phrygian<br /> Like= Lydian<br /> Muhammad= Mixolydian<br /> A= Aeolian<br /> Li= Locrian.</p> <p><em><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Reffett">Dave Reffett</a> is a Berklee College of Music graduate and has worked with some of the best players in rock and metal. He is an instructor at (and the head of) the Hard Rock and Heavy Metal department at The Real School of Music in the metro Boston area. He also is a master clinician and a highly-in-demand private guitar teacher. He teaches lessons in person and worldwide via Skype. As an artist and performer, he is working on some soon-to-be revealed high-profile projects with A-list players in rock and metal. In 2009, he formed the musical project Shredding The Envelope and released the critically acclaimed album The Call Of The Flames. Dave also is an official artist endorsee for companies like Seymour Duncan, Gibson, Eminence and Esoterik Guitars, which in 2011 released a Dave Reffett signature model guitar, the DR-1. Dave has worked in the past at Sanctuary Records and Virgin Records, where he promoting acts like the Rolling Stones, Janet Jackson, Korn and Meat Loaf.</em></p> <p><em>Dave Reffett headshot photo by Yolanda Sutherland</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/deep-purple">Deep Purple</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/harmonic-minor-and-beyond-great-scales-heavy-metal-guitar-playing#comments Dave Reffett Blogs Features Lessons Mon, 01 Jun 2015 14:18:01 +0000 Dave Reffett 12389 at http://www.guitarworld.com New Guitar World DVD: Dave Reffett Teaches You 'Metal and Thrash Rhythm Guitar' http://www.guitarworld.com/new-guitar-world-dvd-dave-reffett-teaches-you-metal-and-thrash-rhythm-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p>A new DVD, <em>Metal and Thrash Rhythm Guitar</em>, is <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/dvds/products/metal-and-thrash-rhythm-guitar/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=MetalThrashDVD">available now at the Guitar World Online Store for $14.95.</a></p> <p>With <em>Metal and Thrash Rhythm Guitar</em>, you'll learn the secret techniques of metal’s greatest riffmasters, plus: </p> <p> • Gallop and reverse-gallop rhythms in the styles of bands like Metallica, Megadeth, Anthrax and Slayer<br /> • Palm muting and chugging<br /> • Double and quadruple picking<br /> • Machine-gun-like bursts punctuated by “holes of silence”<br /> • Chromatic alternate-picking exercises<br /> • Chord stabs and jabs<br /> • Power chord riffs with pedal tones<br /> • String skipping, raking and fret-hand muting<br /> • Natural-and pinch-harmonic “squeals”<br /> • Integrating riffing up and down one string with fret-hand muting<br /> • Stacked power chords, and much more!</p> <p>The DVD features 100 minutes of Instruction!</p> <p><strong>Your instructor</strong></p> <p>Hailed for his incendiary picking technique, Dave Reffett is a fast-rising star in the world of metal guitar and has worked with such renowned artists as Guthrie Govan, Jeff Loomis, Michael Romeo, Mike Mangini, George Lynch, Michael Angelo Batio, Chris Poland, Glen Drover, Glen Sobel, Derek St. Holmes, Michael Devin, Rusty Cooley, Craig Goldy and Annie Grunwald. He produced the critically acclaimed album The Call of the Flames and also played a big role on Batio's album Intermezzo.</p> <p>A graduate of Berklee College of Music, Dave teaches countless students across the globe via live guitar clinics, private lessons and videos and was a recipient of the Berklee World Scholarship Tour award and the Berklee Best award. Dave is an Official artist endorsee for the Dean Guitars, Eminence Speakers, Seymour Duncan Pickups, Mogami Cables, D'Addario Strings and Stone Tone Rock Blocks and has appeared on the covers of Gitar Plus and Heavy Riff Magazines in Asia and Mexico, respectively.</p> <p>Please note: This product includes a PDF booklet on the DVD and can be retrieved by opening the DVD on your computer.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/dvds/products/metal-and-thrash-rhythm-guitar/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=MetalThrashDVD">Head to the Guitar World Online Store now!</a></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/new-guitar-world-dvd-dave-reffett-teaches-you-metal-and-thrash-rhythm-guitar#comments Dave Reffett News Features Tue, 20 Jan 2015 17:35:15 +0000 Guitar World Staff 22953 at http://www.guitarworld.com Betcha Can't Play This: Dave Reffett — "Caravan of Cannibals" http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-dave-reffett-caravan-cannibals <!--paging_filter--><p> This is a two-part run in A minor that I play in my solo to "Caravan of Cannibals," on Shredding the Envelope’s debut CD, <em>The Call of the Flames</em>. </p> <p> The first three bars are based mostly on the A Dorian mode [A B C D E F# G], with a couple of "outside" notes thrown in, namely D# and F. </p> <p>I begin in second position on the low E string’s second-fret F# and move across the strings and up the neck through three-notes-per-string fingering patterns, picking only the first note on each string and using multiple hammer-ons and pull-offs to articulate all the other notes.</p> <p> Strive to get good "traction" with your fret hand and make the hammered and pulled notes the same volume as the picked notes. Use a light touch with the pick. In bar 4, I use notes from the A harmonic minor scale [A B C D E F G#] to add a neoclassical flavor, and in bar 5, I switch to palm-muted alternate picking, running up and across the strings in ninth position through a symmetrical fingering pattern that includes notes from A Dorian and A harmonic minor.</p> <p> The run climaxes in bars 7 and 8 with a legato climb up the B and high E strings, culminating in a high bend from G up to the A root note, which I adorn with some wide finger vibrato, using my ring finger, supported by the middle, to bend the string. </p> <p> Strive for even note volume and economy of pick-hand movement. Mute the idle bass strings with your pick-hand palm to suppress unwanted string noise. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Pse_85b4nAA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-05-16%20at%2011.19.02%20AM.png" width="620" height="541" alt="Screen Shot 2014-05-16 at 11.19.02 AM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-dave-reffett-caravan-cannibals#comments Betcha Can't Play This Dave Reffett November 2010 News Lessons Magazine Fri, 16 May 2014 15:26:26 +0000 Dave Reffett 21272 at http://www.guitarworld.com Guitarist and Berklee Professor Scott Tarulli Discusses His New Album, 'Anytime, Anywhere' http://www.guitarworld.com/guitarist-and-berklee-professor-scott-tarulli-discusses-his-new-album-anytime-anywhere <!--paging_filter--><p>As a Berklee College of Music professor, Scott Tarulli is well versed in all things rock, blues and jazz (His friends know he also happens to be a closet Dio-loving metal head). </p> <p>His new album, <em>Anytime, Anywhere</em>, features a treasure trove of hooks and catchy songs; it also happens to feature special guests including bebop slide guitar legend David Tronzo, bassist Tony Levin and Jerry Marotta. I recently caught up with Tarulli to discuss the new album.</p> <p><strong>What was it like working with David Tronzo on the song "One Year"?</strong></p> <p>Dave is a great guy, and we've known each other for years but never got a chance to play music together. </p> <p>I've always been a big fan of his, and the song "One Year" on my new album was perfect for him. It was a great session. He came in and the band sat in a circle and we tracked it live. No fixes or overdubs. It came out to be a great dialogue between us. It my favorite track on the album.</p> <p><strong>You’re a very active sideman. What gear do you use for your projects, as compared to session work?</strong></p> <p>I do a good amount of live and studio work as a sideman. For my music, my live rig is strictly an Orange OR50 head through an Orange 2x12 or 4x12 closed-back cab. I love my Music Man Silhouette guitars. I have those stocked with Seymour Duncan pickups. I use Xotic pedals like the BB, AC and RC for boost/gain tones, and then various vintage modulation pedals. I also use the MXR Carbon Copy delay, and I also have a Mike Battle Tube Tape Echo.</p> <p>As for sideman work, it really comes down to the artist and genre. I'm more likely to play old Fender, Vox or Marshall amps in the studio for other artists, and Telecasters, Gibsons, etc. Most of the sideman work I do is classic-sounding tones and textures, so I stick with that kind of gear. I use pedals for effects, and that totally depends on the gig.</p> <p><strong>How might an album go down that you get hired for?</strong></p> <p>If the artist/producer wants the band to play live, there is usually a rehearsal, but I find a lot of what I get called for is coming in to add textures, rhythm parts and leads to existing tracks. I usually show up with various guitars and amps and hear the stuff for the first time in the session. Then it’s all about hashing out ideas to give the song shape. I am a big fan of that type of guitar playing, the old Philly soul records, Beatles albums, James Brown and even pop albums. I always loved how theses great guitar players brought the songs to life with tiny parts or groove. But basically, I think about intonation, tone and taste when I show up. The studio can get tense at times. Keeping the vibe light and not taking life so serious is a big help in the recording process. </p> <p><strong>Some of the songs were tracked totally live without fixes or overdubs. On some you added overdubs to pan out the arrangements. Can you discuss this approach?</strong></p> <p>Yes, I was so lucky to have players on board who were great listeners and great players. I have to admit, I was nervous I might hate a solo I played in a take. There are a few tunes I redid solos on, but songs like "Awake," "One Year" and "1 AM" were totally live, including the solos. Even if I didn't think the solo was perfect, It was hard to change because the band was gelling. In the end it was more important to keep the band's vibe rather than replace the solo for demonstration purposes.</p> <p><strong>You also worked with Jerry Marotta (Peter Gabriel. Paul McCartney, David Foster, Hall &amp; Oates), and Tony Levin (King Crimson, Peter Gabriel, Alice Cooper, John Lennon). That must have been pretty amazing.</strong></p> <p>Working with Jerry Marotta and Tony Levin was a dream come true. I met them while doing a singer songwriter album at Jerry's Dreamland studio in Woodstock, New York. He was producing the album and we hit it off as players and as people. Tony was also on this album; I ended up going out to Dreamland and tracking two songs for my album ("1 AM" and "Last Time"). The basics were tracked live. It was surreal for me sitting across from Tony and playing live with them. These two have been heroes of mine for decades. I've also seen them on big stages while growing up. And let me tell you, they couldn't be kinder people.</p> <p><strong>Who are some of your other influences?</strong></p> <p>I picked up the guitar at 12 because of Buck Dharma's solo on "Veteran of the Psychic Wars" from Blue Oyster Cult's live album. Also, REO Speedwagon was so cool to me. That is when <em>Hi Infidelity</em> came out. Then I was totally into Joe Satriani, Def Leppard, Whitesnake, Ozzy and Richie Sambora. I still am. But then I got into soul albums and went into a heavy jazz phase. I guess if I had to name big inspirations, I'd say Herbie Hancock, Jimi Hendrix, Cornell Dupree, later-era John Coltrane, Bill Evans, Jeff Beck, Steve Lukather, James Burton and anyone who played guitar on all of the wonderful pop albums I love.</p> <p><strong>You told me the album was written and recorded a little over a year after your divorce. How did this affect the writing?</strong></p> <p>Yes, there were huge changes in my life while writing and tracking this album. So the performance and the songs are a product of that part of my life. I'll never relive that era again, and this album is a snapshot of how I felt, what I was or wasn't eating, what I was drinking and the sleep I never got. I think you hear it all in my playing. </p> <p>To be honest, the year was crazy, almost a blur. But it makes the album that much more special to me. I chose the sequence of songs very carefully. It’s meant to be heard in one sitting. I reference melodies throughout the album and connect it that way. And there is a shape to the album. Life in real time.</p> <p><em>For more about Tarulli, visit <a href="http://www.scotttarulli.com/">scotttarulli.com</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitarist-and-berklee-professor-scott-tarulli-discusses-his-new-album-anytime-anywhere#comments Dave Reffett Scott Tarulli Interviews News Features Fri, 11 Apr 2014 19:26:22 +0000 Dave Reffett 20997 at http://www.guitarworld.com Betcha Can't Play This: Dave Reffett's Symmetrical Spider http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-dave-reffetts-symmetrical-spider <!--paging_filter--><p> This is a wide-stretch, legato string-skipping idea that’s based on a symmetrical fretboard shape that moves across the neck in a single position. </p> <p> It’s articulated entirely with fret-hand hammer-ons and pull-offs and, as demonstrated in the video below, I use my pick hand as a string damper by reaching over behind the fret hand and lightly grabbing the neck to mute the idle strings and prevent them from ringing.</p> <p> This lick requires quite a wide stretch, so make sure your fret hand is warmed and limbered up. All the notes except for the very last one fall on the 12th, 15th and 19th frets, fingered with the index finger, middle finger and pinkie, respectively. </p> <p> The first note on each string is initiated with a tap, or "hammer-on from nowhere," at either the 12th or 19th fret, followed by conventional hammer-ons or pull-offs. The goal here is even note volume, so make sure each hammer-on is quick and firm, and when pulling off, be sure to yank the string in toward the palm as you let go of it.</p> <p> I stay on the top three strings for the first two bars, then make my way over to the lower strings in bars 3 and 4. When I get to the low E, I go 19, 12, 15, then slide the middle finger from the 15th fret up to the 21st and perform a wide pull-down bend, decorating it with some fierce vibrato. Be sure to reinforce the bend and vibrato with the index finger.</p> <p> The lick sounds pretty cool and dissonant when played over Em or E5. You could also try playing it conventionally, attacking the first note on each string with the pick.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Px59CFAicnE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-09%20at%2010.49.09%20AM.png" width="620" height="223" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-09 at 10.49.09 AM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-dave-reffetts-symmetrical-spider#comments Betcha Can't Play This Dave Reffett October 2010 Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Wed, 09 Apr 2014 14:54:20 +0000 Dave Reffett 20974 at http://www.guitarworld.com Michael Angelo Batio Premieres "8 Pillars of Steel" Music Video Featuring George Lynch, Jeff Loomis, Dio's Craig Goldy and More http://www.guitarworld.com/michael-angelo-batio-premieres-8-pillars-steel-music-video-featuring-george-lynch-jeff-loomis-dios-craig-goldy-and-more <!--paging_filter--><p>Michael Angelo Batio has released the music video for a new song, "8 Pillars of Steel."</p> <p>The guitar-heavy instrumental track, which is from Batio's new album, <em>Intermezzo</em>, was written by Batio and features guest appearances — and solos — by George Lynch, bassist Elliott Dean Rubinson (Uli Jon Roth, Michael Schenker), Jeff Loomis (Conquering Dystopia, Nevermore), Craig Goldy (Dio), Dave Reffett (Shredding The Envelope), Andrea Martongelli (Arthemis) and Rusty Cooley (Day Of Reckoning).</p> <p>That's drummer Joe Babiak behind the kit.</p> <p>"8 Pillars Of Steel" is the first single from the new album, which is Batio's first album to feature his new signature model Dean MAB 7 Warrior seven-string guitar. </p> <p>Other guest stars on the album include Guthrie Govan, Michael Romeo (Symphony X), Chris Poland (ex-Megadeth, OHM), Mike Lepond (Symphony X), Joe Stump (Holy Hell), Andrea Martongelli, Alex Stornello, Bill Peck, Maxxxwell Carlisle, Florent Atem, Annie Grunwald (Formless), Tobias Hurwitz, Joe Rose and more.</p> <p>Check out the complete track listing below the video. </p> <p>The album is available at <a href="http://angelo.com/cds.html">angelo.com</a> and <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/intermezzo/id776312146">iTunes.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/QT_3xwqVmt0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong><em>Intermezzo</em> Track Listing</strong></p> <p>01. Intermezzo<br /> 02. Kaleidoscope Images<br /> 03. Oceans of Time<br /> 04. I Pray the Lord<br /> 05. 8 Pillars of Steel (featuring Elliott Dean Rubinson on bass; solos by, in order, Dave Reffett, Jeff Loomis, MAB, Rusty Cooley, George Lynch, Andrea Martongelli and Craig Goldy)<br /> 06. The Possession – A Tone Poem<br /> 07. 5 Four Ever (featuring Alex Stornello from 2:34 to 3:07 and Guthrie Govan from 3:22 to 4:08)<br /> 08. Juggernaut (featuring solos by MAB, Chris Poland, Dave Reffett, Annie Grunwald, Guthrie Govan, Mike Lepond and Michael Romeo)<br /> 09. Overload Intro (featuring Florent Atem)<br /> 10. Overload (featuring solos by Tobias Hurwitz, Ken and Darren Burridge, Bill Peck, Peter Ema, Joe Rose, Joe Stump, Florent Atem, Maxxxwell Carlisle and MAB)</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/michael-angelo-batio-0">Michael Angelo Batio</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/michael-angelo-batio-premieres-8-pillars-steel-music-video-featuring-george-lynch-jeff-loomis-dios-craig-goldy-and-more#comments Craig Goldy Dave Reffett Jeff Loomis Michael Angelo Batio Videos News Wed, 05 Mar 2014 18:53:18 +0000 Guitar World Staff 20653 at http://www.guitarworld.com Kill the Power: Five Questions with Skindred Guitarist Mikey Demus http://www.guitarworld.com/kill-power-five-questions-skindred-guitarist-mikey-demus <!--paging_filter--><p>On February 18, tenacious U.K. rockers Skindred released a new album, <me>Kill The Power, via Red River Entertainment/Sony RED. The disc is getting rave reviews across the board.</me></p> <p>We recently tracked down Skindred guitarist Mikey Demus — just as he was gearing up for a tour with Seether and Black Stone Cherry — and subjected him to the "five questions" treatment. You can check out our full conversation below.</p> <p><strong>01. How does it feel for Skindred to be back? Why the long hiatus?</strong></p> <p>We are stoked to be heading back to the U.S. this year. We’ve never gone away; we've just been touring our asses off in Japan, Europe, Australia and the U.K. Due to some label issues beyond our control, we were unable to release our last album, <em>Union Black</em>, in the U.S. Now <em>Kill The Power</em> is out, and we’re coming to spread it around. I can’t wait!</p> <p><strong>02. Has it been tough as a heavy band with a reggae influence, or has it been a blessing, something that makes you stand apart from the crowd?</strong></p> <p>It’s more of a blessing. We’ve never wanted to be part of any scene. Standing apart has kept us going so we have no intention on changing what Skindred is about. I can’t stand going to a show when four bands are playing, all of whom sound exactly the same. How boring! We’ve got tons of influences in our music. It’s grown these days into something much grander than reggae/metal. The new album is varied and full of big tunes. We can’t wait for our fans in the U.S. to hear it.</p> <p><strong>03. On this record, you guys have tapped songwriting legend Russ Ballard. What was it like working with him? Why did you guys decide to go that route?</strong></p> <p>Working with Russ was a personal highlight. We've always been up for collaborating, but it’s hard to know who to go with. Luckily Russ was totally into the idea of working with us. We weren’t looking for help writing detuned metal riffs; it was always about writing better songs and bigger choruses. Russ brought insight and changed all our perspectives, furthered our horizons. We did "Saturday," "We Live" and "More Fire" with Russ. He' a wonderful guy, and I’d love to work with him again.</p> <p><strong>04. Your new music video was shot in the slums of India. What prompted this, and is there any special meaning you're trying to get across with this song?</strong></p> <p>It was kind of serendipitous. We had a U.K. shoot all planned and scheduled, but in classic last-minute style, it fell to pieces for one reason or another. We had impending touring commitments in India. I think Arya, our drummer, had a brainwave that we should try to make something happen while we were there. Within a few emails and phone calls, we had locked down a reputed director and full crew, including the location guy from <em>Slumdog Millionaire</em>. It was a surreal experience that worked out for the best. </p> <p>We never really thought about it until afterwards, but it was a great document of a few days in our lives. We get to do all this incredible stuff — going to places like India, Russia, South America. We are constantly doing weird and wonderful stuff a lot of touring bands never get to do. It was beautiful to capture. The people of India are amazing. I can’t wait to go back.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/DSFnygzsLnk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>05. What can the world expect from Skindred on this tour? And what's the main thing you want music fans to take away from the tour?</strong></p> <p>I wonder what people will think of the new songs. I know there’s stuff out there on the Internet, but we never released <em>Union Black</em> in the U.S. officially. We’re working on that now. It’s a big piece of the sonic pie and what we’re about these days. </p> <p>I think the whole world has caught up to the idea of mixing genres. As a U.K. band, electronic/urban influences and U.K. subculture have crept into our music steadily over the last decade. I really feel we’ve nailed it more on the last two records than ever before, so I’m excited to see what the U.S. makes of it. It’s all a bit more realized these days; we have a firmer identity. Anything before now was a warmup. Get ready for the main event!</p> <p><em>For more about Skindred, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/skindredofficial"> follow them on Facebook</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/kill-power-five-questions-skindred-guitarist-mikey-demus#comments Dave Reffett Mikey Demus Skindred Interviews News Features Wed, 19 Feb 2014 20:10:34 +0000 Dave Reffett 20527 at http://www.guitarworld.com 10 Questions with Saxon Guitarist Paul Quinn http://www.guitarworld.com/10-questions-saxon-guitarist-paul-quinn <!--paging_filter--><p>As a founding member of UK metal pioneers Saxon, guitarist Paul Quinn is still rocking as hard as ever. </p> <p>The band, led by Quinn and singer Biff Byford, are nearing the end of a lengthy US tour in support of their 2013 album, <em>Sacrifice</em>, along with Fozzy. You can check out the band's current tour dates <a href="http://www.saxon747.com/en/index.php/tourdates">right here.</a></p> <p>We recently tracked down Quinn to discuss the tour, the band's legacy and the hard-rocking <em>Sacrifice</em>.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: I'm loving the new Saxon album, <em>Sacrifice</em>. What was the recording process like?</strong></p> <p>We took a mobile studio into a room, we built a windowed wall — and away we went! It was great.</p> <p><strong>The booklet, layout and overall theme of the CD packaging is very strong and eye-catching.</strong></p> <p>Thanks. We really wanted to make it memorable and collectible for the fans. The lyrics and pictures in there came out cool.</p> <p><strong>What gear did you use on the album?</strong></p> <p>We play through Marshall JVM heads, and we usually will run another head along with it. For guitars, I love my Gibson Les Pauls.</p> <p><strong>Was there a statement of overall vibe you were going for on the album?</strong></p> <p>Yeah, we wanted it to be very "in your face." We really went for it on this one.</p> <p><strong>You guys are touring the US. What can fans expect in terms of your set list?</strong></p> <p>We will play anything they shout for, plus the new album material. It's really fun to play because it's so fresh for us, especially for me, "Guardians of the Tomb" is my favorite.</p> <p><strong>Here's a question a reader, Tim Hanson in Massachusetts: How has the songwriting changed since the departure of Graham Oliver and Steve Dawson?</strong></p> <p>They don't have any input anymore, simply put [laughs].</p> <p><strong>What is your process for composing your guitar solos?</strong></p> <p>I try to get melody, blues and shred all into the one solo.</p> <p><strong>Here's on from Jason Salger of Wisconsin: What's your favorite food?</strong></p> <p>Chicken Jalfrezi from India. Love it!</p> <p><strong>Do you have any favorite places to play?</strong></p> <p>It's so hard to choose. We are lucky enough to get to play great gigs all over the world.</p> <p><strong>How does it feel to have influenced so many great bands, including Megadeth and Metallica?</strong></p> <p>It's great. They're not overly fawning when we meet, as we wouldn't be if we met Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck or Ritchie Blackmore. It's great because we can just hang out. It's very cool to have made an influence.</p> <p><em>For more about Saxon, visit their <a href="https://www.facebook.com/saxon">Facebook page.</a></em></p> <p><em><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Reffett">Dave Reffett</a> is a Berklee College of Music graduate and has worked with some of the best players in rock and metal. He is an instructor at (and the head of) the Hard Rock and Heavy Metal department at The Real School of Music in the metro Boston area. He also is a master clinician and a highly-in-demand private guitar teacher. He teaches lessons in person and worldwide via Skype. As an artist and performer, he is working on some soon-to-be revealed high-profile projects with A-list players in rock and metal. In 2009, he formed the musical project Shredding The Envelope and released the critically acclaimed album The Call Of The Flames. Dave also is an official artist endorsee for companies like Seymour Duncan, Gibson, Eminence and Esoterik Guitars, which in 2011 released a Dave Reffett signature model guitar, the DR-1. Dave has worked in the past at Sanctuary Records and Virgin Records, where he promoting acts like The Rolling Stones, Janet Jackson, Korn and Meat Loaf.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/10-questions-saxon-guitarist-paul-quinn#comments Dave Reffett Paul Quinn Saxon Interviews News Features Mon, 30 Sep 2013 17:24:13 +0000 Dave Reffett 19351 at http://www.guitarworld.com 'Runnin' With The Wolf': Omar Dykes Discusses His New Album, a Tribute to Blues Legend Howlin' Wolf http://www.guitarworld.com/runnin-wolf-omar-dykes-discusses-his-new-album-tribute-blues-legend-howlin-wolf <!--paging_filter--><p>Austin-based blues singer/guitarist Omar Dykes (also known as Omar Kent Dykes) hails from McComb, Mississippi, not far from the birthplace of one of his biggest musical heroes, blues legend Howlin’ Wolf. </p> <p>Earlier this summer, Dykes released <em>Runnin’ with the Wolf</em> (Provogue), a powerful tribute to Howlin' Wolf. </p> <p>The album's 14 covers are far from carbon copies of the original versions. Dykes and his band, the Howlers, have been performing many of these songs for decades, so Dykes' own groove, vibe and spin shine through loud and clear.</p> <p>"I do my little versions of the songs," Dykes said. "If Howlin’ Wolf were a 500-pound steel anvil, then I’m a little piece of steel wool that fell out of the pack.”</p> <p>The album also features an original track, "Runnin' with the Wolf," which you can check out below.</p> <p>We recently caught up with Dykes to discuss the new album, his other blues influences and future plans. For more about Dykes, check out his <a href="http://www.omarandthehowlers.com/snippet0.htm">official website.</a></p> <p><strong>[[ GuitarWorld.com premiered <em>Runnin’ with the Wolf</em> in July. <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/exclusive-album-premiere-omar-dykes-runnin-wolf">You can listen to the entire album here. ]]</a></strong> </p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: How did you choose the 14 Howlin' Wolf covers that appear on <em>Runnin' with the Wolf</em>?</strong></p> <p>I worked on choosing the Howlin’ Wolf songs for about six months before I made the final track list. I’ve played and listened to Howlin’ Wolf my entire career. At first I wanted to do all of them, but I knew that wouldn't be impossible. I basically started with a list of all the tracks I love, which gave me about 30 songs. Then I had to consider what musicians I wanted to play on the songs and make decisions of instruments, harp, horns and all of that. </p> <p>I had to decide if I wanted to do the most-recognized songs, the least-recognized songs or a combination. I was a little skeptical about doing the most famous songs because so many other artists have already done them. At one point, I thought I should divide the songs into two releases because there were so many songs I wanted to record. I finally was able to narrow it down to 14 songs, but it was really hard. There are still more I want to do someday.</p> <p><strong>Do you have a favorite track on the album?</strong></p> <p>If I had to choose, “Riding in the Moonlight” would be one because I've played that song for so many years. “The Red Rooster” has been one of my favorites since I was a teenager. I bought the 45 when I was about 13. In my hometown, you could only buy records at one store, so the ones I bought there all became treasures to me.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/cmXCRLYHMLo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>This is your 23rd album. What prompted the return to the Provogue label for this one?</strong></p> <p>[Label founder Ed Van Zijl] asked me if I was interested in recording another project with him, and I was glad to do it. I thought the Howlin’ Wolf material would be a perfect release on Provogue because it is something I've always wanted to record. They gave me a very generous recording budget for the studio so I could do the project justice. I used the best musicians, who are also my best friends and Howlin’ Wolf fanatics themselves, and we are all very proud of the end result. </p> <p>I was not trying to copy Howlin’ Wolf because nobody can. I did want to put my own spin on the Howlin’ Wolf songs I've been playing for years. I'm grateful to Provogue for the opportunity to record this material after all this time. This is my 11th release on Provogue. I did my first release with them in 1990 and my last in 2001, so I've worked with Provogue for a long time. It seemed like it was the right time to do another release with them.</p> <p><strong>For people who are new to Howlin' Wolf, what five definitive Howlin' Wolf recordings should they download ASAP?</strong></p> <p>“Wang Dang Doodle,” “The Red Rooster,” “Smokestack Lightnin’,” “Spoonful” and “Killing Floor."</p> <p><strong>You dedicated one track to the late Hubert Sumlin. Did you ever get to play with him?</strong></p> <p>I had the privilege of playing with Hubert a couple of times. Both times were at Antone’s Blues Club in Austin. Hubert used to hang out there. One night I went to Antone’s when it was on Guadalupe Street, and Angela Strehli was playing with her band at the time. Mel Brown was there, and Denny Freeman. Hubert was also there and they asked me to come up and play with them on a few songs. I played Denny’s guitar and we did a couple of songs. The second time I got to play with Hubert was at the Antone’s location on 5th Street. I did a radio show with Ray Wylie Hubbard and stopped in Antone’s after the show. Jimmie Vaughan, Derek O’Brien, Scott Nelson, Chris Layton and Hubert were there, and I got up to play with them. I played and sang a few Howlin’ Wolf songs, and we all had a blast.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/5v-ETKPp4Z8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>You've done two Jimmy Reed tribute records and now a Howlin' Wolf tribute album. Who might be next? Who are your other big heroes?</strong> </p> <p>I will definitely do a tribute to Bo Diddley at some point. Bo Diddley and I are from the same hometown, McComb, Mississippi, and I've written a lot of songs with the Bo Diddley beat. I could do so many tributes mixed in with my Howlers releases because they're so fun to do. I love Elmore James, Robert Johnson, Hound Dog Taylor and Freddie King. I don’t know that I will do a tribute to all of these, but they are all worthy of being recognized by everybody.</p> <p><strong>What wah pedal is used on "Ooh Baby Hold Me," and who's playing guitar on the track?</strong></p> <p>The guitarist using the wah pedal on “Ooh Baby Hold Me” is the incredible Casper Rawls. The pedal is the Morley Bad Horsie. A guy gave it to Casper as part of his pay for a recording session. As I was selecting the songs, I had my girlfriend listen to Howlin’ Wolf’s version of “Ooh Baby Hold Me.” As soon as she heard the song, she told me it was perfect for me to sing because of my voice, and she could hear Casper playing wah and Kaz playing sax on the track. The final result is really her initial vision of the song, so I dedicated it to her.</p> <p><strong>What will the next original Omar Dykes album be like?</strong></p> <p>I like to mix up the material on my original releases. There have been so many musical influences in my life that it makes sense to include many genres of music on these later releases in my career. I just write and record what I really like and hope fans will like it too. My 2012 release, <em>I’m Gone</em>, includes blues, rockabilly, country and a ballad. I like to play everything, so that is what will be on my next Omar and the Howlers record. A little bit of everything.</p> <p><em><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Reffett">Dave Reffett</a> is a Berklee College of Music graduate and has worked with some of the best players in rock and metal. He is an instructor at (and the head of) the Hard Rock and Heavy Metal department at The Real School of Music in the metro Boston area. He also is a master clinician and a highly-in-demand private guitar teacher. He teaches lessons in person and worldwide via Skype. As an artist and performer, he is working on some soon-to-be revealed high-profile projects with A-list players in rock and metal. In 2009, he formed the musical project Shredding The Envelope and released the critically acclaimed album The Call Of The Flames. Dave also is an official artist endorsee for companies like Seymour Duncan, Gibson, Eminence and Esoterik Guitars, which in 2011 released a Dave Reffett signature model guitar, the DR-1. Dave has worked in the past at Sanctuary Records and Virgin Records, where he promoting acts like The Rolling Stones, Janet Jackson, Korn and Meat Loaf.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/runnin-wolf-omar-dykes-discusses-his-new-album-tribute-blues-legend-howlin-wolf#comments Dave Reffett Howlin' Wolf Omar Dykes Omar Kent Dykes Interviews News Features Tue, 03 Sep 2013 15:38:15 +0000 Dave Reffett 19125 at http://www.guitarworld.com Interview: Bad Company's Paul Rodgers Discusses Free Guitarist Paul Kossoff, The 40 Tour and New Material http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-bad-companys-paul-rodgers-discusses-free-guitarist-paul-kossoff-40-tour-and-new-material <!--paging_filter--><p>Lynyrd Skynyrd and Bad Company — both of whom are celebrating their 40th anniversaries in 2013 — recently teamed up for a co-headling US tour. </p> <p>The 40 Tour, which kicked off June 20 in Auburn, Washington, draws to a close July 27 in Bethel, New York.</p> <p>“The Skynyrds and I go back to the '70s and the days and nights at the Hyatt House on Sunset in L.A. aka the Riot House,” Rodgers said. ”In the '90s the band introduced me to my wife, Cynthia, and that’s why I am so damned happy and healthy these years.”</p> <p>When we spoke to Rodgers before the tour, he was particularly thrilled to be catching up with his old friends. "It’s going to be an exceptional tour," he said. "It will be great to be back with my old bandmates playing these songs again.”</p> <p>We recently caught up with Rodgers, who discussed the tour, his charities, Bad Company and much more. Check out our entire conversation below. For information on The 40 Tour, check out <a href="http://www.badcompany.com/concerts.html">badcompany.com</a>.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: What can fans expect from Bad Company on this tour? Will there be any jams with the guys from Skynyrd?</strong></p> <p>Well, what I’m working on right now is our set list. I’m digging deeper into the songs we have available and I’m putting an exciting set together. I hope it’s exciting, anyway. We want to come out kicking! I think a set has to have light and shade and dynamics and certain elements — like a sense of intimacy at some point where the band and the audience come together. Where the crowd feels like they’re a part of what’s going on. We will put all of the elements together and hope for the best. I don’t know if we’ll be jamming with Skynyrd, though. We might have to be focusing on our individual sets. But in the past we’ve toured with other bands and they have came out and jammed with us, so who knows?</p> <p><strong>Animal-themed charities are near and dear to your heart. Why is that, and how can fans help out with some of these causes?</strong></p> <p>My wife really is the instigator of that, and I enjoy it too. She loves all animals. She will not see an animal be mistreated. We were down in Memphis, where I was recording, and there was a stray dog she rescued and found a home for. </p> <p>We are very involved in the Willows Sanctuary for Animals. They take all animals in — horses, pigs, sheep, anything unwanted. They recently had a lamb that was pulled out of a flooded river. We had heard they were in desperate trouble and they were about to close down due to their government funding being cut. So we stepped in and did a concert for them and raised a bunch of funds and kept them going. What’s cool is that they’ve now been approached by a company that makes windmill turbines; in exchange for putting some turbines on their property, they will now have all the funding that they will need. Brian May also is really helping out a great deal with the charity. </p> <p>People can visit <a href="http://www.willowsanimals.com/">willowsanimals.com</a> if they wish to help out. They can sponsor an animal or help in a number of ways.</p> <p><strong>Your new song, “With Our Love,” is doing well on radio. Can people expect more new material like this in the near future?</strong></p> <p>That’s great that it’s doing good. I haven’t checked, actually; I’ve been in Germany. But yes, that’s an example of one of the songs I’ve been working on with a friend of mine, Perry Margouleff, who has an analog studio in New York. We’ve been writing songs together for the past couple of years. He’s been sending demos and I’ve been dealing with the lyrics. </p> <p>We’ve been going back and forth, and we had that track “With Our Love” pretty much finished. So we figured we’d finish it and put it out and we made it so that all the proceeds will go to the animal causes. So that song is in the vein of where we are at with that. We’ll hopefully be releasing something next year with that.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/dum6G4qdiM0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Here are a few questions from readers. Rich asks, "How did you come across [guitarist] Paul Kossoff? How did you approach your vocal delivery and manner of phrasing when playing with Kossoff specifically?"</strong></p> <p>Wow, that’s a great question. I met Paul Kossoff for the first time when I was playing in the back of a pub room in Finsbury Park in London in 1967. It was kind of a blues thing going on, and he came up and said, “I’d like to have a jam.” So he came up and jammed with me and I just loved his playing right from the start. We had been listening to the same people — Albert King, B.B. King and a lot of Elmore James. We had a love of the great blues players and we just naturally flowed together. </p> <p>There was a kind of sense of breathing naturally with the music, and it was so great. When I would sing something, he would respond with the guitar and it was just such a natural chemistry. We decided we had to put a band together right there on the spot.</p> <p><strong>Jeanne asks, "If you could compare the music industry now with the way it was 20 years ago, what would you say are the biggest changes in terms of new bands trying to break out?</strong></p> <p>I think it’s always been tough for new bands. It might be tougher now. There are just so many people making music out there. I’ve always promoted the idea that everybody needs to make music. I think the more music there is in the world, the better, but it does make it highly competitive. </p> <p>Something that comes to mind is that technology has completely exploded since we kicked off in the '70s. How it is now compared to then is beyond anything we could’ve dreamed up in our wildest imaginations. It has good and bad elements. One good thing is that the communication all around the world is fantastic. It’s great that we can instantly communicate. But one of the things in the studio that I find is that the industry is using too much technology. You can get to the point where you mix the balls out of the thing by overproducing it. </p> <p>Now you can actually correct everything to an insane degree. Auto-tune things, you can correct wrong beats and all that, but a lot of the slightly out-of-tune and out-of-beat stuff can really be a part of the spirit of the music. A lot of those early blues records and soul records were pretty much live. It was what it was, and they had goofs and mistakes, but it still kept its charm. We have to remember to keep the feel. It’s so important. </p> <p>It’s so tempting when you’re in the studio to fix a little teeny mistake, but when I listen back now to my early records, there are all kinds of goofs, and I think, “Holy smokes, how did we let that one go?” But no one ever complained. I never heard anyone say, “You made a mistake in the second bar on the second chorus” or whatever. As long as the feel was there and the overall sound touched people and moved them, that’s what we cared about. So we have to remember that the groove and the feel are so important.</p> <p><strong>Vykki asks, "What do you do to keep your voice in amazing shape? What’s the secret?</strong></p> <p>I just keep doing it. I enjoy what I do and I just try to stay vocally in shape by doing different things all the time. For instance, I just came back from Germany and I did a 20-show tour over there with a 50-piece orchestra. They orchestrated some of my songs; stuff like “Shooting Star," “Wishing Well" and “Feel Like Makin’ Love." It was very challenging and very interesting. So I do different things. I also went to Memphis and sang soul music recently — and, like, with Queen. Queen was very different; it keeps me fresh, excited and challenged. That’s a big part of it.</p> <p><strong>You’ve played with everyone, including Jeff Beck, Brian May, Jimmy Page, and more. Is there a particular guitarist you truly enjoyed working with? Someone with whom you feel you made your best work?</strong></p> <p>I enjoyed playing with Joe Bonamassa in New York. We did that for a DVD last year. He’s fantastic, a real blues guy.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/fWu110jGQqU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>I must say, though, that I’ve enjoyed working with everybody. Everybody’s been great, but I really loved being in Memphis recently playing with Al Green's band at the Royal studio. The studio hasn’t changed since the '60s. It’s still dusty around the edges and it’s still funky and has a really great sound. It’s almost like as the evening wears on, the place seems to warm up and the spirit seems to generate. </p> <p>We were just laying tracks down left and right, everything from Sam &amp; Dave tracks to Otis Redding tracks, the Temptations, etc. We focused on Stax records material, and I was in heaven. It was paradise because with these guys, you could snap your fingers and they could just play anything you could name and play it amazingly with the brass and everything! It felt great, like I was standing in Otis Redding’s shoes. So that is my current favorite thing [laughs].</p> <p><strong>What new artists out there, if any, would you really love to work with?</strong></p> <p>Adele. I love her. I think she has just got it going on. There’s a real great feel to what she does. I loved Amy Winehouse, too, I must say. I think as an artist and a singer she was awesome, absolutely fantastic. That’s what inspires me, is that there are people who can still really turn it up and make music that gets to you. Makes you stop in your tracks and say, “Wow." Makes you feel it.</p> <p><strong>Back in the day, did you have any idea Bad Company would have the impact they've had?</strong></p> <p>We did — and we didn’t. When we first started out, it was very organic. When we did the first album, we were just a bunch of guys writing songs and playing music we loved. We wanted to record it and get out and play. We were very fortunate that Peter Grant and Led Zeppelin took an interest in us. They got behind us and gave it to the world and everybody heard it. </p> <p>We were pretty knocked out with the reaction we got, and it was the fact that it was very easy to identify with. We identified with it, it was real simple and we played it from the heart. I think people were receiving it in the heart too because our intentions were so clear.</p> <p>After we did the first album, it was like, “Wow, what did we do again?" And then we tried to write the songs to live up to that to some extent, and I think we did. We came up with “Feel Like Makin’ Love," “Rock ‘N’ Roll Fantasy,” and now we were established in a way. Now we had to deliver, so it was a different way of looking at it. “Simple Man” was a really cool song too. We were always very much true to ourselves in terms of the music. That was very key to the character of Bad Company.</p> <p><strong>Dave T. asks, "Who influenced you? Who are your favorite singers?"</strong></p> <p>I have so many! Otis Redding comes straight to mind, the Temptations, the Four Tops, Sam Moore, Sam &amp; Dave, Aretha Franklin, Elmore James, B.B. King, Albert King, Wilson Pickett, Muddy Waters and so many blues and soul singers. Rod Stewart and Elton John are also great. I could go on and on.</p> <p><strong>The <em>Live in Glasgow</em> DVD looks incredible. What do you remember from that show; anything new or special?</strong></p> <p>It was a great tour throughout. We played in Newcastle the night before and it was absolutely wonderful. You could cut the atmosphere with a knife. I wanted to take that show home and put it on the mantelpiece, it was so great. So was the Glasgow show. The vibe, the fans and the energy were incredible. And then I played in Chichester for the Willows Animal Sanctuary, and I played only Free songs. Free was very beloved in England, so it was very special also.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/HfFPMlvLSHU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>I heard you once worked with Paul McCartney. Is that true?</strong></p> <p>Not exactly. I’ve yet to meet Sir Paul, but I did do a song that they wanted to record, and it’s in the can. I did “Let Me Roll It." They called me up and asked, “Would you like to sing on this?” and I said, “Sure." I always liked that song, so I recorded it in Los Angeles. d I’m waiting to hear what’s happening with that, so we’ll see.</p> <p><strong>You’re considered one of the all-time best singers by guys like Eric Clapton, Ozzy Osbourne, Brian May, Paul Stanley, Sam Moore and more. What would you like to be remembered for?</strong></p> <p>For my music, I guess. For me it’s always been about the music. I’m not really a showbiz type of guy. Show is not really the thing for me. I admire people that it is part of their thing, but for me it’s all about the music. For me, the show is secondary. The connection you make with the audience is everything.</p> <p><em><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Reffett">Dave Reffett</a> is a Berklee College of Music graduate and has worked with some of the best players in rock and metal. He is an instructor at (and the head of) the Hard Rock and Heavy Metal department at The Real School of Music in the metro Boston area. He also is a master clinician and a highly-in-demand private guitar teacher. He teaches lessons in person and worldwide via Skype. As an artist and performer, he is working on some soon-to-be revealed high-profile projects with A-list players in rock and metal. In 2009, he formed the musical project Shredding The Envelope and released the critically acclaimed album The Call Of The Flames. Dave also is an official artist endorsee for companies like Seymour Duncan, Gibson, Eminence and Esoterik Guitars, which in 2011 released a Dave Reffett signature model guitar, the DR-1. Dave has worked in the past at Sanctuary Records and Virgin Records, where he promoting acts like The Rolling Stones, Janet Jackson, Korn and Meat Loaf.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-bad-companys-paul-rodgers-discusses-free-guitarist-paul-kossoff-40-tour-and-new-material#comments Bad Company Dave Reffett Free Paul Rodgers Interviews News Features Wed, 10 Jul 2013 18:47:35 +0000 Dave Reffett 18772 at http://www.guitarworld.com Interview: Angra Guitarist Kiko Loureiro Discusses His New Solo Album, 'Sounds of Innocence' http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-angra-guitarist-kiko-loureiro-discusses-his-new-solo-album-sounds-innocence <!--paging_filter--><p>Guitarist Kiko Loureiro, who, as a member of Brazilian power metal juggernaut Angra, has earned his claim to fame and has nothing more to prove. His technical prowess and exciting playing have garnered him fans and admirers from across the globe. </p> <p>We recently tracked down Loureiro to discuss his fourth solo album, <em>Sounds of Innocence</em>, which came out June 18 via Norcal Studios.</p> <p>For more about Loureiro, visit his <a href="http://kikoloureiro.com.br/en/">official website</a> and follow him on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/KIKOLOUREIROofficial?fref=ts">Facebook</a>.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: This is your fourth album. What differentiates it from your previous releases, and do you consider it your best work yet?</strong></p> <p>I believe so. Not because the songs are better, but because this is a great moment in my life. I love all my work, and they really represent me in each moment or stage of my life. The composition period for this album, looking back on it now, was a great period because I was a few months into being a new father during the demo and album recordings. </p> <p>This was a great inspiration, especially after 20 years. It is such a long time, and it can be dangerous to start playing only past ideas and having problems coming up with something new that pleases me and everyone else. </p> <p>The moment, and consequently, the album, brought out the experience and yet, the innocence. It is the result of the dilemma of experience versus innocence. Experience meaning the good and bad. The good side of when you know what you have to do and the bad side when you have that feeling that you’ve done it already, or you know someone else has. The experience takes you out of the “Let’s conquer the world with my music," when you lose the faith in the industry and all that. </p> <p>Now the innocence takes you back to the playful moments of creating art, without worrying whether or not someone will like it. I’m very happy with this album because I believe I found a good balance between my experience and my innocence. That's also the reason behind the name of the album. </p> <p><strong>What songs from <em>Sounds of Innocence</em> are you particularly proud of and why?</strong></p> <p>"Reflective" represents the innocence. It is a very simple song. The melody, the structure, etc. It has very few challenging things to play, but the simplicity of it is the key. It was a song that came naturally, and it just feels so good to play and listen. I also love "Mãe D'Água" (It means "mother of water," a native Brazilian’s river mermaid) where it's all about Brazilian groove (Ijexá) mixed with a beautiful melody. I believe I found a good balance again with "Mãe D’Água." It's a very relaxing song. "The Hymn" was kind of a tribute to Jeff Beck. I'm quite proud of the composition and grooves I got for that tune.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/knFAJruzCbI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>You have a lot of fans out there who say things like, "Kiko's skills are unreal." What advice do you have for players who want to reach your skill level?</strong></p> <p>I believe there are many important factors, but here are the most important things to do:</p> <p>• Be constantly motivated by references and be self-motivated: Your guitar heroes, your teacher, books, movies, DVDs, shows, master classes, friends who play better than you, etc. Surround yourself with that and never give up.</p> <p>• Discipline: Being motivated is the first step. Naturally the next step is to be excited and play every day. This is when you should get yourself organized to get the best of your practice time.</p> <p>• Power of habits: As Aristotle said, “We are what we constantly do. Excellence it is not an act but a habit." So when you're motivated, disciplined and focused, all of this becomes a part of your life and turns into a habit you can carry on for your life. Naturally then, your skill set will get constantly sharpened. </p> <p><strong>Did you experience any epiphanies in your younger days — practice- or learning-wise — that helped your playing in a huge way? Also, were there any instructors or DVDs that helped you a great deal?</strong></p> <p>I admit I'm not as disciplined as I was during my teenage years, and I believe knowing what I was going to practice beforehand every day was really important to me. Figuring out what you’re already good at and what you need to develop, and building a strategy for practicing for the week or the month. Aligned with that, I had a great teacher in Sao Paulo called Mozart Mello, and all my VHS tapes and DVDs helped me with all of my rock-based techniques. The first instructional videos from Frank Gambale, Paul Gilbert, Robben Ford, etc.</p> <p>I was also fortunate to grow up in Brazil, where I listening to a lot of our rich music. I incorporated that to my rock skills in order to find a flavor for my own playing, find my own style, in a way. </p> <p><strong>What can you tell us about your "Conflicted" music video?</strong></p> <p>It is always hard to choose just one song for a music video, especially from an album with so many different styles. I believe “Conflicted” is a song with great energy for a video, and I believe because of that, guitarists and non-guitarists would enjoy it. It has many prog moments, and it's a colorful tune with many different moments and atmospheres.</p> <p><strong>In a recent interview, Andre Matos said Angra should call it quits following their split with Edu Falaschi. What do you think of that?</strong></p> <p>This reminds me of when Prince said he would quit music because of the lack of regulation, piracy, downloads, etc. Prince said it was a mess, like the gold rush. Sometimes we get frustrated with what we do, and we have the tendency to over-react when we go through hard times like this. The point is, we all love what we do and we try our best to make things happen in any scenario. Angra has its legacy in the Brazilian metal scene. We have a tour coming up in August, and lots of fans want to listen to the songs, so we think, why not? Being on stage is the best moment for an artist.</p> <p><strong>Would you like to see Angra reunite with Matos?</strong></p> <p>Fans would love to see us together, for sure, but I feel it's more important to share the good stage moments with those who are a part of it now. I respect the ones who want to leave the past in the past. I believe legacy is very important and that celebrating it is sometimes necessary.</p> <p><em><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Reffett">Dave Reffett</a> is a Berklee College of Music graduate and has worked with some of the best players in rock and metal. He is an instructor at (and the head of) the Hard Rock and Heavy Metal department at The Real School of Music in the metro Boston area. He also is a master clinician and a highly-in-demand private guitar teacher. He teaches lessons in person and worldwide via Skype. As an artist and performer, he is working on some soon-to-be revealed high-profile projects with A-list players in rock and metal. In 2009, he formed the musical project Shredding The Envelope and released the critically acclaimed album The Call Of The Flames. Dave also is an official artist endorsee for companies like Seymour Duncan, Gibson, Eminence and Esoterik Guitars, which in 2011 released a Dave Reffett signature model guitar, the DR-1. Dave has worked in the past at Sanctuary Records and Virgin Records, where he promoting acts like The Rolling Stones, Janet Jackson, Korn and Meat Loaf.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-angra-guitarist-kiko-loureiro-discusses-his-new-solo-album-sounds-innocence#comments Angra Dave Reffett Kiko Loureiro Interviews News Features Mon, 01 Jul 2013 21:01:37 +0000 Dave Reffett 18695 at http://www.guitarworld.com Strat Outta Hell: Shredder Joe Stump Talks New Album, 'Revenge of the Shredlord' http://www.guitarworld.com/strat-outta-hell-shredder-joe-stump-talks-new-album-revenge-shredlord <!--paging_filter--><p>Joe Stump, who was ranked the <a href="http://www.randyciak.com/guitar/top_shredders_of_all_time.htm">Number 6 Fastest Shredder of All Time</a> by <em>Guitar One</em> magazine, is a legend in many circles and has released an impressive number of solo and group efforts over the years.</p> <p>But he recently released what might be his greatest album to date, <em>Revenge of the Shredlord</em>, via Lion Music in Europe.</p> <p>Although Stump keeps busy — he's an <a href="http://www.berklee.edu/faculty/detail/joseph-stump">associate professor at Berklee College of Music</a>, and he just wrapped up a tour with Raven Lord — he recently found time to discuss practicing, his work ethic, the new album and a lot more. </p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: How did you prepare for <em>Revenge of the Shredlord</em>?</strong></p> <p>I didn’t necessarily have a practice routine other than to just go into my workroom and start playing. Sometimes it might be some kind of groove I’m working on, and then I start to come up with different things to add to my playing vocabulary. Or I might try to improve upon things that are inside my vocabulary already. Then the ideas just start to flow.</p> <p><strong>Can you discuss the recording process for the new album?</strong></p> <p>On this particular record, I recorded all of the guitars at home. I had a bunch of the tunes composed and did everything at home, and I knew what all of the solos, melodies and harmonies were going to be. Then we put the bass and drums on afterwards in a studio. But I have a fairly modest home recording setup and get a killer tone. So while I can’t make a whole record at my place, I can certainly record killer guitar tracks. As you listen to the new record, all of the guitar tones you'll hear on there are killer and it's just with my modest recording setup.</p> <p><strong>Grammy-winning engineer Ducky Carlisle (Buddy Guy, Johnny Winter) handled mixing duties. What was that like?</strong> </p> <p>Ducky has worked on so many great records. He's also mixed a bunch of my past records. He lives like three doors down from me, too, so you can't get much can more convenient than that. He's done a ton of heavy-duty stuff and not really very many metal things. He's great sonically, and he's got a great place with a combination of killer analog gear and every single plug-in known to man. I am fairly in tune with what I want sonically, and he can get it. Plus he is a close friend, so we get to hang out when making a record together, which is also cool.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/PhgwuGzwAKY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Take us back to your beginnings. How and why did you start playing?</strong></p> <p>I started playing when I was 10 growing up in New York. In the '70s I used to watch Johnny Cash's show and then Glen Campbell's show, and playing guitar always looked cool. So I played for a little bit and then I stopped playing. Then I took it up again when I was 13, all because of the hard rock that was out at the time — Deep Purple, Jimi Hendrix, Jeff Beck, UFO and so on. </p> <p>Then, in my final year of high school, I discovered Al Di Meola’s <em>Elegant Gypsy</em> record, and that made me want to play guitar even more and really pursue extreme fast playing. Al is one of the forefathers of blazing playing. I had already gotten into stuff like Michael Schenker and Uli Jon Roth with the Scorpions' stuff like “Taken By Force." But when I heard “Race with Devil on Spanish Highway” and “Mediterranean Sundance” I was hooked. </p> <p>One of the things that drew me to Berklee was that Al had studied there. So I went and studied jazz and fusion there and classical stuff, but then I went back to rock full on, halfway through Berklee. I got back to my roots with Blackmore, Uli Jon Roth, Gary Moore and Schenker. I love all of the European hard rock masters. I always tell everybody, “The only guy I listen to who is actually from America is Jimi Hendrix.”</p> <p><strong>You’ve been an associate professor at Berklee for a long time. What has it taught you?</strong></p> <p>When I’m working with players and discussing things, I'll occasionally come up with different ways to practice stuff. Inside my playing vocabulary, teaching may help me come up with some kind of variation on something. One thing I really do try to convey to my students is that I love to play and that I'm extremely motivated. I'm always playing, and I tell them that if you're here at Berklee, you should be sleeping, eating and breathing music. Waking up every day extremely excited about it. That's the way I was when I was young and I'm still that way. To me, if you don’t have that kind of enthusiasm, love and passion for it, then you should get out of the game, because there is no room for you there. </p> <p><strong>You have had some high-profile students over the years at Berklee — Gus G., Metal Mike, and more. How does that make you feel?</strong></p> <p>It's great that I’ve had contact with a bunch of players that have gone on to do well, and it's nice that I've inspired them and influenced them. But you know, those guys were great players and worked their asses off to get where they are. I'm extremely happy for them, and if I helped them in some way and they took some influence from the help and it turned up positive, that’s great. But no one gets there without breaking their balls. Everybody does it on their own to a certain extent.</p> <p><strong>What do you know now that you wish you'd known then?</strong></p> <p>Tough question. You know, the times change so drastically that it's tough to answer that. The music industry in general, as anybody would know, is full of highs and lows. Great things happen, and then you also have disappointments. So I rarely look back and say, "Well, I should have done that differently,” because many times things that are disappointments a lot of times are not within your control. You know, maybe you make a killer record and it’s not promoted properly, stuff like that. There are just so many things that are not in your control.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/xuLSy0afMrk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>What would you say are your career highlights?</strong></p> <p>I’d say this record certainly is a crowning achievement. It is the pinnacle of my playing and composing as far as my solo career goes. It’s also been great in the past to be listed along with players who are heroes that I respect and look up to. Having great reviews of some of my past records in prominent publications also has been an honor. </p> <p>And I've had many great shows. Whether it's on huge stages on European festivals or at small pubs, I’ve had great memorable shows at both. So it's tough for me to pinpoint specific things. Like back in 1994, which seems like ages ago, my second record came out and I remember it was a big deal for me, because Yngwie Malmsteen actually hung around and watched my set and let me know that he liked it, and we hung out backstage. So it was a huge deal getting to open up for one of my heroes and one of my main influences. He did a clinic once at Berklee years ago, maybe around 2007, and he's always been very nice to me and very cool. It's certainly no secret that he's one of my main influences.</p> <p><strong>Who do you think are some really underrated players out there?</strong></p> <p>One really criminally underrated player I really love is Walter Giardino from a band called Rata Blanca from South America. He’s a Blackmore disciple like myself, and he just rocks. He's got a great modern tone and great feel. He's somebody I really love to listen to. Another guy that's a buddy of mine that I think is a killer player that can shred his ass is Toby Knapp. Toby was on Shrapnel Records years ago and he's done a couple of solo records since. We trade CDs back and forth; he's a cool old-school shred guy that has elements of black metal and thrash in his stuff. I really enjoy listening to him. </p> <p><strong>Any advice for younger players who want to get really good at guitar and have a career in music?</strong></p> <p>The best advice I can give anybody is that in this day and age, there is no exact plan in the industry, and everything changes fast and drastically. The bottom line is the more you play and the harder you work, the faster you’re going to get better. There are no shortcuts or technologies that can save you from the work that it takes to obtain skill. And there is no substitute for completely dedicating yourself to the guitar.</p> <p><em><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Reffett">Dave Reffett</a> is a Berklee College of Music graduate and has worked with some of the best players in rock and metal. He is an instructor at (and the head of) the Hard Rock and Heavy Metal department at The Real School of Music in the metro Boston area. He also is a master clinician and a highly-in-demand private guitar teacher. He teaches lessons in person and worldwide via Skype. As an artist and performer, he is working on some soon-to-be revealed high-profile projects with A-list players in rock and metal. In 2009, he formed the musical project Shredding The Envelope and released the critically acclaimed album The Call Of The Flames. Dave also is an official artist endorsee for companies like Seymour Duncan, Gibson, Eminence and Esoterik Guitars, which in 2011 released a Dave Reffett signature model guitar, the DR-1. Dave has worked in the past at Sanctuary Records and Virgin Records, where he promoting acts like The Rolling Stones, Janet Jackson, Korn and Meat Loaf.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/strat-outta-hell-shredder-joe-stump-talks-new-album-revenge-shredlord#comments Dave Reffett Joe Stump Interviews News Features Wed, 26 Jun 2013 16:21:18 +0000 Dave Reffett 18592 at http://www.guitarworld.com Interview: Guitarist Maxxxwell Carlisle Talks Gear, the LA Scene and His Latest EP, 'Full Metal Thunder' http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-guitarist-maxxxwell-carlisle-talks-gear-la-scene-and-his-latest-ep-full-metal-thunder <!--paging_filter--><p>Maxxxwell Carlisle is an up-and-coming guitarist on LA's metal scene. He has released two EP’s in only six months, and he's working on even more projects at the moment. We recently spoke to Carlisle — who has played with Death Riders and other notable LA-based bands — about what it's like to have so many irons in the fire.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: Tell us about the new recordings you have out now. Both EPs feature different singers, correct?</strong></p> <p>I've released two EP's in the past six months: <em>Visions of Victory</em> in November and <em>Full Metal Thunder</em> on April 3. Originally I was going to do a full-length power-and-shred metal album with two singers, one male and one female, each singing half the album. But as the songs started to come together, I felt their voices were too different to put on the same project. </p> <p>Caro Lion, who sings on the first EP, has a classic '80s female rock voice. Michael Yancy sings on the second EP, and his voice is much more "metal" — raspier, kind of a cross between Udo Dirkschneider and Jeff Scott Soto, if you can imagine that. I made the decision to release them as two EPs. I'm glad I did it that way. </p> <p>It's hard for me to pick which EP is my favorite. They're quite different. <em>Visions of Victory</em> is more melodic power metal, and <em>Full Metal Thunder</em> has a heavier thrash feel to it. My favorite track from that one is the title track. From the first EP, it would be "Power Angel," which we also shot a video for. That's had a great response, and we're going to be doing another video for the new release as well. </p> <p><strong>Do you have special guests on any of the tracks?</strong></p> <p>One of my favorite things about releasing anything is when I get to include some killer guest artists. Between the two EP's, Ethan Brosh, Rick Renstrom, Nita Strauss and Dannyjoe Carter do guest solos. I've been fortunate to work with great people in the past, like Michael Angelo Batio and electric cellist Tina Guo. I always dig hearing other people play on my tunes. It pushes me harder as a player, because they can all shred their asses off.</p> <p><strong>What main guitars were used on the EP's?</strong></p> <p>I used three guitars for the bulk of the tracks: an older Ibanez RG that's a hard tail, no whammy bar; and my two Jackson DK2Ms. Those are basically Dinkys with maple fret boards. The Ibanez has the classic EMG 81/85 combo, and one Jackson has a Seymour Duncan JB and '59. The other one has Blackouts. I've gotta say, the Blackouts are my favorite! I used the Ibanez for most of the rhythm parts and the Jacksons for the leads. Live, I've been using the Jacksons mostly. </p> <p><strong>What do you want the guitar community out there to know about you?</strong></p> <p>I think a lot of people look at what I'm doing and think I'm crazy. Here's this guy, a bodybuilder with a Mohawk who plays shred metal in a sea of Indie rock and metalcore bands. I want people to know that musically I take what I do very seriously. I put a lot of work into my chops and the whole package of what I'm doing. But on the other hand, I don't take myself too seriously and I'm in this to have a good time. I can laugh at myself, and I'm fine with the fact that not everyone will like or "get" what I do. I've got a photo from a few years back of me and Herman Li. He's got me in a choke hold and I'm holding up a sign that says "Dragonforce Sucks!" I love crazy stuff like that. By the way, did you know he's a Jiu-Jitsu expert? Hardly anyone knows that, but it's true! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Q9N01H6l6QA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>What do you use in terms of amps and pedals?</strong></p> <p>For the EPs, I basically used two different amps: a Marshall 50-watt DSL 2000 and a Bugera 6262. I would run one of those into a Carvin Legacy 4x12 loaded with Celestion Vintage 30s. I also did some extra guitar layers recording direct, but that ends up buried in the mix. I still prefer the sound of a mic'd-up, cranked tube amp! </p> <p>For pedals I always use a Maxon OD808 to boost my amps. I can't get enough of the sustain and fatness that thing brings to the table. I also use the Ibanez Paul Gilbert Airplane Flanger, although only on one song. Gotta have it though; it has a totally unique sound. Plus I'm a firm believer that anything related to Paul Gilbert makes your rig sound better! It makes you big in Japan too! </p> <p>For all my other effects I use a Boss GT8, which is actually an older model of their big multi-effects floorboard. I've got it programmed and setup perfectly for my rig so I've kind of been putting off upgrading it, and I use it in "4-cable mode," which basically means I run the preamp of my head through the effects loop of the GT. That way I'm using my actually preamp tone and not a simulated preamp. </p> <p><strong>Who are your influences? When was the moment that you realized that you wanted to play?</strong></p> <p>I remember watching the movie <em>Crossroads</em> as a kid. I thought everything about it was just sort of cool, until they get to the scene at the end with Steve Vai. When he comes out as this bad ass shredder guy in the final guitar battle, that was what really blew my mind. It wasn't until years later that I actually started playing guitar seriously, but that was what first put the idea in my head. I still love that scene. </p> <p>As far as influences, I draw from the people who I consider to be the technical masters. Guys like Chris Impellitteri, Michael Angelo Batio, Rusty Cooley, Tony MacAlpine, Luca Turilli, Paul Gilbert, Akira Takasaki and Yngwie Malmsteen, just to name a few. Some of them influenced me just from a playing standpoint and with others it's more about the songwriting or just how they present themselves. I really admire guys who stand the test of time too, and are not just a flash in the pan. That's something I'm hoping will happen with my own career. I'd like to still be playing blazing solos in 40 years. </p> <p><strong>You're an avid body building enthusiast. Does it affect your playing? Was it harder to play when you were competitively training?</strong></p> <p>People ask me all the time, "Doesn't lifting weights interfere with your playing?" The answer is no. I have heard about other people having problems, but I've never had any issues. I do make an effort to not beat up my hands, like I don't do boxing or anything like that, but as far as weight training, even heavy stuff, I've had zero problems. I've been doing it a long time too, like lifting and playing for 15 years each. If anything there are actually a lot of parallels between the two. The way you build up a muscle over time is very similar to developing a technique or developing speed in your playing. They both take a lot of time and consistency, and they're both fun as hell. Plus, there are chicks at the gym, chicks at shows, so it's all good. </p> <p><strong>You live and play in Los Angeles. Tell us about the general state of the industry out there as you see it. Where do you think it's going? </strong></p> <p>I think the scene in LA is pretty representative of the state of the industry in the US in general. And I have to say, I'm not stoked about it. As far as rock and metal bands, you basically have two dominating genres. That would be metalcore and Indie rock. The indie stuff I hate with a passion. It's pretentious and provides a way for people to pass off bad musicianship as art. Metalcore I can handle in small doses, but you never, ever get it in small doses! </p> <p>There's just too many bands! And I know this is a cliche thing to say, but every fucking band sounds the same! Every song sounds the same! Shit, even the stuff the singer says to the crowd in between songs is the same. "Let me see your hands in the air!" "Are you with us!" "Let's tear this up!" And don't get me wrong, there are actually a lot of really great musicians in that scene. But come on. It's OK to do something different! </p> <p>I think the problems the industry is going through right now have created a huge lack of diversity. The thought process that most bands have is, "OK, we want to get signed. Labels are making a lot less money, and they don't want to take any financial risks, so we need to do whatever is most popular, mainstream and safe." </p> <p>And then you just end up with a million bands all doing the same thing. That's what killed hair metal! And that was even back when people still paid for music! When you think about it, the bands that really are making it these days are always bands that are doing something different and stand out from the pack. Look at Steel Panther! Who would have thought that a throw-back glam metal band would be as big as they are today? They're different, unique and let's face it, kick all kinds of musical ass, so people pay attention to them. </p> <p><em><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Reffett">Dave Reffett</a> is a Berklee College of Music graduate and has worked with some of the best players in rock and metal. He is an instructor at (and the head of) the Hard Rock and Heavy Metal department at The Real School of Music in the metro Boston area. He also is a master clinician and a highly-in-demand private guitar teacher. He teaches lessons in person and worldwide via Skype. As an artist and performer, he is working on some soon-to-be revealed high-profile projects with A-list players in rock and metal. In 2009, he formed the musical project Shredding The Envelope and released the critically acclaimed album The Call Of The Flames. Dave also is an official artist endorsee for companies like Seymour Duncan, Gibson, Eminence and Esoterik Guitars, which in 2011 released a Dave Reffett signature model guitar, the DR-1. Dave has worked in the past at Sanctuary Records and Virgin Records, where he promoting acts like The Rolling Stones, Janet Jackson, Korn and Meat Loaf.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-guitarist-maxxxwell-carlisle-talks-gear-la-scene-and-his-latest-ep-full-metal-thunder#comments Dave Reffett Maxxxwell Carlisle Interviews Features Wed, 19 Jun 2013 20:31:43 +0000 Dave Reffett 18615 at http://www.guitarworld.com Lift Off: Shock Rocket Guitarist Marty Favento Talks Roots, Gear and New Album http://www.guitarworld.com/lift-shock-rocket-guitarist-marty-favento-talks-roots-gear-and-new-album <!--paging_filter--><p>Marty Favento, who was born and raised in a small town called Koper in Slovenia, started playing guitar at age 10. </p> <p>His father, an accomplished blues guitarist, got him into guitar playing and sent him to a private music school, where he spent five years studying. </p> <p>GuitarWorld.com caught up with Favento to discuss his band <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/SHOCK-ROCKET/295046930538305?fref=ts">Shock Rocket</a>’s new album. <em>Lift Off</em>, which is getting some cool buzz in the European metal underground.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: You recently did a video you jam with Michael Angelo Batio. Where was this and what was that like?</strong></p> <p>Yes, true! I jammed with legendary shredder Michael Angelo Batio in Ljubljana, Slovenia. It was totally amazing. I was so scared to stand next to such an accomplished guitar player and jam with him. I was really nervous at the beginning, but I made it through well, I guess. I had sent him a CD from my previous band. and he replied to me that he really liked it. Since then we've known each other. When he had a guitar clinic, we talked and then I randomly asked him if we could jam together, he agreed and we played "Nuclear Blues."</p> <p><strong>Who are your main influences?</strong></p> <p>Joe Satriani, John Petrucci, Michael Angelo Batio, Paul Gilbert, Steve Vai, Eddie Van Halen, Vito Bratta, Reb Beach, Guy Mann-Dude, Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page, Angus Young, Frank Marino and many more.</p> <p><strong>On the new album, your lead chops are quite impressive. Do you have any advice for young players? Are there any particular practice routines or DVDs you'd recommend?</strong></p> <p>I appreciate it! Well, it's probably nothing you haven't heard before. It takes a lot of practicing, dedication, listening to music and trying to figure out some progressions. I always think, "OK, let's practice, so when I wake up tomorrow I'll be better than I was yesterday." I always loved to play and never struggled for inspiration to pick up my guitar. </p> <p>I've got to send special thanks to Michael Angelo Batio because of his <em>Speed Kills</em> DVD, which taught me one very important thing: "In order to play fast, you’ve got to first learn how to play slow.: In my teens, I played fast but really needed to master the technique, and I did this through learning to play slow first and knowing what I was actually playing. That's the only way to learn how to play fast!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/xBsV1KLbRSY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>In the US, glam and '80s-style rock has become more of an underground sort of thing, but people still love that style of music. Is this music still big in Europe? Are the crowds very open to it?</strong></p> <p>Yes, absolutely, and I've noticed that somehow '80s rock &amp; metal is coming back. I'm seeing 80's American hair bands doing reunions again and playing in front of huge crowds, and bands like Steel Panther are getting quite popular. Music from the '80s is timeless, and it's been listened to for many generations. In Europe I think it's doing well — especially in Scandinavia, the UK and Germany. For now, I’ve got to say that we're getting really amazing feedback from fans all around the world, and I'm really grateful for that. </p> <p><strong>What is your rig like, and what guitars do you use?</strong></p> <p>I've been using Jackson guitars since I was 15. They get a great rock and metal sound, have amazing necks, and the playability is at the top. I use a Marshall JCM 2000 with a Marshall cabinet that has 2x12 Celestion Vintage 30s inside. The only pedal I have is a T-REX M.A.B. overdrive, which is really good. I've been using the same rig live as for the studio, only in the studio I use my father's 1983 Gibson Les Paul Deluxe for some extra rhythm parts. That's It! I like to keep it simple. I use Dunlop Jazz III XL guitar picks, Elixir cables, DiMarzio pickups, DiMarzio clip-lock straps, original Floyd Rose guitar bridges — and that's really it.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/-VEeB8wItSY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> </p> <p><strong>What was the recording and writing process like for the new album?</strong></p> <p>It was really cool. I wrote the music for the album and I also produced. I always write riffs and melodies for Shock Rocket songs, and then we arrange it together. The singer, Andrew D, wrote most of the lyrics. The whole recording process took us only about three weeks, but the mixing process was long. Our mixer, Denis Scher, did a really good job!</p> <p><strong>In the CD booklet, you thank Guy Mann-Dude. Any news on him?</strong></p> <p>Guy is a great person. He's one of my biggest influences. While I was recording this album, he gave me tips about what to do and what not to do. He has a lot of experience from sitting next to Desmond Child, who produced Alice Cooper's <em>Trash</em> album, along with many other platinum releases. Guy played some guitar on that album and also recorded his solo album on MCA Records in 1989. </p> <p>Unfortunately, he's not playing guitar anymore. That's really a pity because he had a great technique and his own style and sound. He told me he's playing jazz piano now as a hobby. He is a multi-instrumentalist. As a matter of fact, he played drums before guitar with Steve Vai and on Jon Anderson from Yes’ solo tour in 1982. He always has an honest opinion; sometimes it's not something you want to hear, but that's something that helps me improve all the time. I'm sure my future material will be even better because of his assistance.</p> <p><strong>Anything you want to say to everyone out there?</strong></p> <p>First of all, I want to thank <em>Guitar World</em> for this interview. It's a huge honor. To all of the readers, guitarists and musicians, I want to say this: Keep on dreaming and never give up. Keep on practicing and song writing. And check out my band, Shock Rocket. If you like the sound of bands like Ratt, Dokken, Extreme and Mr.Big. you will dig our music!</p> <p><em>For more about Shock Rocket, check them out on <as href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/SHOCK-ROCKET/295046930538305?fref=ts">Facebook.</as></em></p> <p><em><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Reffett">Dave Reffett</a> is a Berklee College of Music graduate and has worked with some of the best players in rock and metal. He is an instructor at (and the head of) the Hard Rock and Heavy Metal department at The Real School of Music in the metro Boston area. He also is a master clinician and a highly-in-demand private guitar teacher. He teaches lessons in person and worldwide via Skype. As an artist and performer, he is working on some soon-to-be revealed high-profile projects with A-list players in rock and metal. In 2009, he formed the musical project Shredding The Envelope and released the critically acclaimed album The Call Of The Flames. Dave also is an official artist endorsee for companies like Seymour Duncan, Gibson, Eminence and Esoterik Guitars, which in 2011 released a Dave Reffett signature model guitar, the DR-1. Dave has worked in the past at Sanctuary Records and Virgin Records, where he promoting acts like The Rolling Stones, Janet Jackson, Korn and Meat Loaf.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/lift-shock-rocket-guitarist-marty-favento-talks-roots-gear-and-new-album#comments Dave Reffett Marty Favento Shock Rocket Interviews News Features Fri, 14 Jun 2013 17:28:51 +0000 Dave Reffett 18574 at http://www.guitarworld.com Interview: Blues Guitarist Popa Chubby Discusses His New Album, 'Universal Breakdown Blues' http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-blues-guitarist-popa-chubby-discusses-his-new-album-universal-breakdown-blues <!--paging_filter--><p>Popa Chubby, a larger-than-life figure on the blues scene, has built a rabid following around the world through his relentless touring schedule and ever-expanding discography. His latest album, <em>Universal Breakdown Blues</em>, will be released May 28 via Provogue Records. </p> <p>Chubby describes his performance style as, “the Stooges meet Buddy Guy, Motörhead meet Muddy Waters and Jimi Hendrix meets Robert Johnson." His eclectic tastes and approach brings with it a straight-ahead, no-BS attitude — and lots of passion. </p> <p>We recently sat down to talk touring (His current dates are available <a href="http://popachubby.wix.com/popachubby#!tour">here</a>) and to hear all about his new album.</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: You've been in this business for a few decades. Does <em>Universal Breakdown Blues</em> bear witness to your finding your voice and place in the blues?</strong></p> <p>It's been an organic progression of owning who I am. The music comes and instructs the soul. Life’s lessons add to the mix. Pain is a factor. Carlos Santana used to say he took LSD to suffer. I don’t need the substance. Life provides enough opportunity. The blues becomes a conduit. One day you wake up and you get what all the old cats were saying. It's like standing on at the crossroads, and as the devil hands you the contract to sign, he says, "Son, if there is anything else you can do, do it." You sign 'cause you have no choice, that’s the blues.</p> <p><strong>I love the lead-off track, “I Don’t Want Nobody,” in particular. Which songs are your favorites on the new album?</strong></p> <p>A new CD is like having multiple births. You can't really play favorites, but I hit some highs on this one, guitar-wise! Check out the solo work on “Rock Me Baby.”</p> <p><strong>You're known for your relentless touring schedule. How many days out of the year are you on the road? Also, please talk a bit about your “road warrior” lifestyle. How do you unwind when not touring?</strong></p> <p>I’m a single dad of 17-year-old twin girls who are about to enter college. I tour constantly because if I stop for a month, I'm broke! Welcome to the blues. Europe is big for me. I sell out 3,000-plus in France. We are taking America by storm on this record! Unwind? What is that? Hookers and Champagne, of course [laughs]! Just joking! Tai Chi and green tea. I’m looking for a mama to rub my feet [laughs].</p> <p><strong>If you could play a song with three other blues greats, living or dead, who would you choose and why?</strong></p> <p>Jimi Hendrix because he was God! Freddie King because he was the second coming, and Hubert Sumlin, just to do it one more time. I miss you, Hubert.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/VahLJj82Mwk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>What do you want to say with this album?</strong></p> <p>The message of this album is hope. Don't give up. Let the blues flow through you and give you solace in a broken-down, broke-ass universe.</p> <p><strong>What's your writing process like?</strong></p> <p>Live, suffer, inspire, catalog, hammer out, demo and record. Usually a lyric first.</p> <p><strong>Here's a reader question from George Longhurst, who asks, "What do you do to keep the blues fresh and new?"</strong></p> <p>You can only play the blues in the moment. If you rely on yesterday or think of tomorrow, you miss the point.</p> <p><strong>You've said, "Rock and roll and the blues should be dangerous." How do you mix the "poetry," as you have put it, with the danger in your music?</strong></p> <p>I'm a Cadillac with a power pack. I'm the man of steel with killer feel. I'm your Kundalini — be my Lil Queenie. Who uses Kundalini in a blues song besides me? I'm the danger man! I'm glorious, laborious, calculated, elevated, updated, majestic and domestic.</p> <p><strong>Are there any new artists out there that you really dig?</strong></p> <p>Brand new? Alabama Shakes. I'm in love with that girl, Brittany Howard. The Black Keys. I wish Jack White would cut the crap and just sing the blues. Lots of good stuff out there.</p> <p><strong>Here's a reader question from Alexander Caraballo: "I'm a huge believer that learning to play the blues is essential for all guitar players. Do you agree, and if so, why?"</strong></p> <p>Alexander, you must feel the blues. Like Luke Skywalker in <em>Star Wars</em>! Feel the force! You can learn all the technique, but you must feel what you play. May the blues be with you!</p> <p><strong>What would you like to say to your fans out there reading this?</strong></p> <p>If nobody told you they love you today, Popa Chubby loves you!</p> <p><em>For more about Popa Chubby, check out his <a href="http://popachubby.wix.com/popachubby">official website</a>.</em></p> <p><em><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Reffett">Dave Reffett</a> is a Berklee College of Music graduate and has worked with some of the best players in rock and metal. He is an instructor at (and the head of) the Hard Rock and Heavy Metal department at The Real School of Music in the metro Boston area. He also is a master clinician and a highly-in-demand private guitar teacher. He teaches lessons in person and worldwide via Skype. As an artist and performer, he is working on some soon-to-be revealed high-profile projects with A-list players in rock and metal. In 2009, he formed the musical project Shredding The Envelope and released the critically acclaimed album The Call Of The Flames. Dave also is an official artist endorsee for companies like Seymour Duncan, Gibson, Eminence and Esoterik Guitars, which in 2011 released a Dave Reffett signature model guitar, the DR-1. Dave has worked in the past at Sanctuary Records and Virgin Records, where he promoting acts like The Rolling Stones, Janet Jackson, Korn and Meat Loaf.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-blues-guitarist-popa-chubby-discusses-his-new-album-universal-breakdown-blues#comments Dave Reffett Popa Chubby Interviews News Features Wed, 15 May 2013 19:37:52 +0000 Dave Reffett 18370 at http://www.guitarworld.com