Lessons http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/8/all en Stevie Ray Vaughan Lesson: How to Play "Couldn't Stand the Weather" http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-stevie-ray-vaughans-playing-couldnt-stand-weather <!--paging_filter--><p>Stevie Ray Vaughan’s distinctive playing style is earmarked by equal parts pure power, intensity of focus, razor-sharp precision and deeply emotional conviction. And then there’s his tone—probably the best Stratocaster-derived sound ever evoked from the instrument. </p> <p>Stevie tuned his guitar down one half step (low to high, Eb Ab Db Gb Bb Eb), a move inspired by one of his biggest influences, Jimi Hendrix. He also preferred heavy gauge strings: high to low, .013, .015, .019, .028, .038, .058, occasionally switching the high E string to either a .012 or .011. To facilitate the use of such heavy strings, Stevie’s guitars were re-fretted with large Dunlop 6100 or Stewart-MacDonald 150 fretwire.</p> <p>Let’s begin this lesson with a look at the title track from Stevie’s second album, <em>Couldn’t Stand the Weather</em>. The song begins in “free time” (no strict tempo). </p> <p>While brother Jimmie Vaughan tremolo-strums the opening chords—Bm-A7-G7-F#7—Stevie adds improvised solo lines (see transcription bars 1-8): over Bm, Stevie sticks with the B blues scale (B D E F F# A), over A7 he utilizes the A blues scale (A C D Eb E G) and over G7 he uses G blues (G Bb C Db D F). Strive to recreate Stevie’s precision when it comes to his articulation. </p> <p>Over Jimmie’s F#7 chord, Stevie plays a first inversion F#7#9, which places the third of the chord, A#, in the bass (as the lowest note). (Stevie employed this same unusual voicing for E7#9 in “Cold Shot.”) </p> <p>A four-bar, R&amp;B/soul-style single-note riff follows, doubled in octaves by guitar and bass (see bars 9-17). Played four times, two extra beats of rest are added the third time through. This is shown as a bar of 6/4 in bar 13 of the transcription.</p> <p>In bars 18-23, Stevie adds a very Hendrix-y rhythm guitar part, played in 10th position and beginning on beat two with an F octave fretted on the G and high E strings, strummed in 16th notes. Stevie maintains the rhythmic push of steady 16ths through most of the riff by consistently strumming in a down-up-down-up “one-ee-and-a” pattern. </p> <p>At the end of bar 18, barre your middle finger across the top three strings at the 12th fret, and then bend and release the G and B strings one half step. As the notes are held into the next bar, add subtle finger vibrato. Keep your fret-hand thumb wrapped over the top of the fretboard throughout the riff, using it to fret the D root note on the low E string’s 10th fret. Stevie intersperses this low root note into the lick in a few essential spots, akin to Hendrix on his songs “Freedom” and “Izabella.” </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/HppszdNQNXs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_1.jpg" /></p> <p>Stevie displays his true brilliance as an improviser when playing over a slow blues. All of the following examples are played in the key of G, utilizing the G blues scale (G Bb C Db D F) as a basis. Across the first two bars of <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I play two- and three-note chord figures against the low G and C root notes, fretted with the thumb. On beat three of both bars, I play a trill by barring the index finger across the D and G strings and then quickly hammering on and pulling off with the middle finger one fret higher on the G string. </p> <p>When playing bar 3, keep your index finger barred across the top two strings at the third fret while bending notes on the G and B strings. On beat two, quickly hammer on and pull off to the fourth fret on the high E string. This G-Ab-G hammer/pull is a staple for Stevie, used in myriad different and creative ways.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_2.jpg" /></p> <p>Another essential element of Stevie’s slow-blues lead playing approach is the use of Albert King–style multiple-string bends. As shown in <strong>FIGURE 2a</strong>, I bend the high E string up one whole step at the eighth fret using the ring finger (supported by the middle) and simultaneously catch the B string under the fingertip and bend it up a whole step as well so that it “goes along for the ride.” In <strong>FIGURE 2b</strong>, I catch the top three strings under the fingertip. It will take practice to build up the strength and “finger traction” to execute these bends properly.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_3ab.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_3c4a.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_4b.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>FIGURES 3a and 3b</strong> illustrate another way to add pull-offs on the high E string, this time fretting A and then pulling back from Ab to G. This is followed by repeated pull-offs on the B string, illustrated more clearly in <strong>FIGURE 3c. FIGURES 4a and 4b</strong> offer two more permutations of this idea.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5ab.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5c.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5de.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5f.jpg" /></p> <p>Another nod to Albert is the use of fingerpicking to accent notes on the high E string. I use my middle finger to pick and snap the string back against the fretboard, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURES 5a–5f</strong>. Notice in <strong>FIGURES 5b, 5c and 5e</strong> the use of a half-step bend at the seventh fret on the high E string. Albert was a master of microtonal bending, a technique learned well by Stevie.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_6.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_7.jpg" /></p> <p>Stevie devised some unique position shifts, utilizing bends and slides on the G string. <strong>FIGURES 6a–c</strong> present three examples. </p> <p>The use of the notes A, Ab and G on the high E string allude to the V (five) chord, D, and the D blues scale (D F G Gb A C). <strong>FIGURE 8a</strong> illustrates the scale, and <strong>FIGURES 7 and 8b–d</strong> offer examples played over the V chord. Another staple of Stevie’s style is the use of slides on the G string, exemplified in <strong>FIGURES 9a–c</strong>.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_8ab.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_8c.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_8d.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_9a.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_9b.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_9c.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/stevie-ray-vaughan">Stevie Ray Vaughan</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmie-vaughan">Jimmie Vaughan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-stevie-ray-vaughans-playing-couldnt-stand-weather#comments In Deep Jimmie Vaughan July 2010 Stevie Ray Vaughan Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort Blogs Lessons Magazine Thu, 27 Aug 2015 14:23:58 +0000 Andy Aledort 17124 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: Five Steps to Walking Basslines on Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-five-steps-walking-basslines-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p>When learning how to play jazz guitar, one of the things that many players want to explore and get under their fingers is walking basslines.</p> <p>Though learning how to walk a bassline (and comp at the same time) can take a lot of experience and time in the woodshed, there are a few rules and pointers you can follow in order to get you off on the right foot as you begin to explore the world of basslines for jazz guitar.</p> <p>In this lesson, we’ll be looking at five easy steps you can take to create a cool-sounding and fun-to-play bassline over a ii-V-I chord progression. </p> <p>Check out the notation examples below as a reference, and then view the video for an in-depth look at each of the five steps, including hearing these lines in action. </p> <p>To read more about walking basslines for guitar, check out my series “<a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/category/jazz-guitar-basslines">How to Walk Basslines for Jazz Guitar</a>.” And be sure to read <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/user/161515">my other Jazz Guitar Corner columns here!</a></p> <p><strong>Step 1: ii V I Chords</strong></p> <p>Start off by finding the chord voicings for the ii V I you want to practice with a bassline. In this lesson, we’re using the following chords in the key of G major. Get these chords under your fingers first before moving on to the bassline section of the lesson. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%201%20jPG.jpg" width="620" height="154" alt="Example 1 jPG.jpg" /> </p> <p><strong>Step 2: Add Root on Beat 1</strong></p> <p>Once you have the chords down, you can now start building your bassline by adding in a root note on the first beat of each bar. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%202%20JPG_6.jpg" width="620" height="165" alt="Example 2 JPG_6.jpg" /> </p> <p><strong>Step 3: Add Chromatic Note on Beat 4</strong></p> <p>Once you have the root note on the first beat, you can add a chromatic approach note on beat 4 that leads into the next chord by a half-step above or below that root note. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%203%20JPG_7.jpg" width="620" height="165" alt="Example 3 JPG_7.jpg" /> </p> <p><strong>Step 4: Add Chromatic Note on Beat 3</strong></p> <p>You can now add another chromatic note on beat 3 of the bar. Again, you can use two chromatic notes below the next root, two above the next root, one above and one below, or one below and one above the next root note in the progression. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%204%20JPG_3.jpg" width="620" height="165" alt="Example 4 JPG_3.jpg" /> </p> <p><strong>Step 5: Add Diatonic Note on Beat 2</strong></p> <p>Lastly, you add a diatonic note from the chord or scale you are on to beat 2 of the bar. This completes all four quarter notes and you are now walking a bassline over a ii V I chord progression. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%205%20J.jpg" width="620" height="165" alt="Example 5 J.jpg" /> </p> <p>Learn how to play walking basslines can seem tough at first. But, with a few simple guidelines such as the five presented above, you’ll be walking basslines on your guitar in no time. </p> <p>How do you practice Walking Basslines for guitar? Share your thoughts in the Comments section below! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/IxelR5unAPk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a senior lecturer at the Leeds College of Music and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-five-steps-walking-basslines-guitar#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Wed, 26 Aug 2015 19:33:22 +0000 Matt Warnock 16839 at http://www.guitarworld.com Three Essential Rockabilly Guitar Licks — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/three-essential-rockabilly-guitar-licks-video/25354 <!--paging_filter--><p>Hey there.</p> <p>This time around, I decided to grab my rapidly aging black Levi's shirt, my awesome new <a href="http://www.levysleathers.com/music">Levy's guitar strap</a> and my <a href="http://www.gibson.com/Products/Electric-Guitars/Les-Paul/Gibson-USA/Music-City-Jr-B-Bender.aspx">Gibson Music City Jr. with B-Bender</a> and show you three essential rockabilly licks.</p> <p>Bear in mind, I could've chosen three <em>other</em> "essential" rockabilly licks, but these seemed like nice ones to start with. Hey, there's always next month.</p> <p>I'm really sorry for the lack of tabs, but I think the video does a fine job of showing my fingering, plus there's not really any "shredding" going on here.</p> <p>So, to elaborate (a bit) on the three licks in the video ... </p> <p><strong>The first lick</strong> is a great way to kick off a rockabilly guitar solo; also, since I probably absorbed it as a result of listening to Stevie Ray Vaughan's "Scuttle Buttin'" for three decades, it can be used in upbeat blues situations and maybe even country (the good kind of country; not the crap they play on country radio in 2015). </p> <p>Although a mere word probably won't help anyone, I always imagine that the lick is just "rolling" off the fretboard. I start things off with the open G string, followed quickly by a hammer-on on the first fret (a G#), followed quickly by an open B and an open E—and the rest of it just sort of happens. Sorry I can't be more technical; that's just not gonna happen.</p> <p><strong>The second lick:</strong> As I say in the clip, it's the perfect way to end the I (one) portion of a rockabilly solo or intro before going into the IV. I've heard Brian Setzer do this a million times with Stray Cats. To hear how he uses it (on a nice, newish high-quality studio recording), check out "Rooster Rock," a track from his often-overlooked 2001 rockabilly masterpiece, <em>Ignition!</em> In fact, I've included the song below (second/middle YouTube clip). The lick occurs within the first four seconds.</p> <p>Seriously, if you want to hear one hell of a guitar album, check out <em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/68-Comeback-Special-Brian-Setzer/dp/B00005JIWV">Ignition!</a></em> It's one of my top 10 "guitar albums" of all time. Maybe top 15, but you get the idea.</p> <p><strong>The third lick:</strong> Some of you might recognize this sort of thing from Gene Vincent's "Be-Bob-A-Lula" (which features the great <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-keith-wyatt-tribute-cliff-gallup-s-legendary-flash">Cliff Gallup</a> on lead guitar) or, now that I think about it, John Lennon's cool mid-Seventies version of "Be-Bob-A-Lula" (bottom YouTube clip). The first guitar solo, and this very lick, starts at the 54-second mark in the Lennon clip below.</p> <p>Stay tuned for more videos like this ... although I think I'll use a different guitar in my next video. I feel sorry for the other ones. Whatever. Enjoy! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/t-Rf-QK5sQo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="100" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/m2vhS_PP010" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="100" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RtLnZnxSF7E" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em><a href="https://soundcloud.com/damian-fanelli/mister-neutron-comanchero-1">Damian Fanelli</a> is the online managing editor at </em>Guitar World<em> and </em><a href="http://www.guitaraficionado.com/">Guitar Aficionado</a><em>. His New York-based band, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Blue-Meanies/226938220688464?fref=ts">the Blue Meanies,</a> has toured the world and elsewhere. Fanelli, a former member of Brooklyn jump-blues/swing/rockabilly band <a href="http://www.thegashousegorillas.com/">the Gas House Gorillas</a> and New York City instrumental surf-rock band <a href="http://www.cdbaby.com/Artist/MisterNeutron">Mister Neutron,</a> also <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsQ9pIkLXiA">composes</a> and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7ICimc774Y">records film soundtracks.</a> He writes GuitarWorld.com's <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/next-bend-clarence-white-inspired-country-b-bender-lick-video">The Next Bend</a> column, which is dedicated to <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/next-bend-10-essential-b-bender-guitar-songs-damian-fanelli">B-bender guitars and guitarists.</a> His latest liner notes can be found in Sony/Legacy's </em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/The-Complete-Epic-Recordings-Collection/dp/B00MJFQ24W">Stevie Ray Vaughan: The Complete Epic Recordings Collection.</a><em> Follow him on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/damianfanelliguitar">Facebook,</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/damianfanelli">Twitter</a> and/or <a href="https://instagram.com/damianfanelligw/">Instagram.</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/john-lennon">John Lennon</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/three-essential-rockabilly-guitar-licks-video/25354#comments Brian Setzer Cliff Gallup Damian Fanelli John Lennon rockabilly Videos Blogs Lessons Wed, 26 Aug 2015 16:58:48 +0000 Damian Fanelli 25354 at http://www.guitarworld.com Joe Satriani Lesson: Go "Pick Surfing" with Satch! — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-joe-satriani-goes-pick-surfing-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Earlier this summer, Joe Satriani visited <em>Guitar World</em> to shoot a few lesson videos. In fact, you can see his new column in the October 2015 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>—<a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/shredding-alien-joe-satriani-two-effective-approaches-building-melodies/25278">or right here.</a></p> <p>Anyway, he had some time left over to shoot a few licks. We've shared two of them already, and here's the third!</p> <p>This lick features fast pick tapping on the high E string, with a wah pedal used as a filter effect. You might recognize it from <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-30-surfing-alien-joe-satriani">"Surfing with the Alien."</a></p> <p>We're calling it "Pick Surfing." Enjoy!</p> <p><strong>For more about Satch and his new studio album, <em>Shockwave Supernova,</em> visit <a href="http://www.satriani.com/splash/">satriani.com.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tvZYWoRjMPE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-joe-satriani-goes-pick-surfing-video#comments Joe Satriani Surfing With the Alien Videos News Lessons Wed, 26 Aug 2015 15:04:13 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24820 at http://www.guitarworld.com Time to Burn with Michael Angelo Batio: Using Tapping to Extend Sweep Arpeggios — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/time-burn-michael-angelo-batio-using-tapping-extend-sweep-arpeggios/25275 <!--paging_filter--><p>In the last three columns, I demonstrated the mechanics of my technique for sweep picking arpeggios and some of my go-to shapes. This month, I’d like to show you a great way to expand upon these shapes, by adding a fretboard tap above the highest note played in the sweep. </p> <p>There are different technical approaches to tapping: there’s the “Van Halen” method, wherein you clasp the pick between your thumb and middle finger and use the index finger to tap; I prefer to hold the pick conventionally—between my thumb and index finger—and use my middle finger for tapping. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> depicts an Am arpeggio played in 12th position, starting on the fifth string and moving across the top five strings to the high E. The first note, A, is fretted with the index finger at the 12th fret, after which I hammer-on with my pinkie up to C at the 15th fret. </p> <p>I use a downstroke to sound the subsequent notes up to the high E on the first string’s 12th fret, after which I hammer-on with my pinkie up to the 17th fret. On the downbeat of beat two, I tap a high C note at the 20th fret on that same string and then perform a double pull-off back down to the A and E notes, followed by an upstroke sweep that moves back down across the top five strings. The figure then repeats.</p> <p>We can also add a high tap to other, lower Am sweep arpeggio shapes, as demonstrated in <strong>FIGURES 2</strong> and <strong>3</strong>: individual notes are sounded on each of the five highest strings until I reach the high E, at which point I hammer-on from C up to E then apply a tap on the high A root note at the 17th fret. In <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, as in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, the tap occurs right on beat two. </p> <p>Back in the early Eighties, when many of these rock guitar playing techniques were first being explored, a slick tapping technique became popular that involved sliding a tapped note up and down before pulling back off to a lower note. I like to refer to this technique as the “MI sweep,” in reference to Musician’s Institute in Los Angeles, the guitar school where many great players either attended or taught. </p> <p>As demonstrated in <strong>FIGURES 4–6</strong>, I tap at a given fret and then slide up one or two frets and back before pulling-off from the tap and moving back down through the sweep arpeggio. When pulling off from a tapped note, you’ll want to flick the string slightly sideways to keep the string vibrating and the notes ringing with sufficient volume. This may be accomplished by flicking the string either upward (toward the sky) or downward (toward the ground).</p> <p>This technique also works well with major arpeggios: <strong>FIGURES 7–9</strong> illustrate taps and sliding taps within major triad shapes on different areas of the fretboard. Be sure to play through each figure slowly at first and strive to sound each note clearly and evenly.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WudzjzFzppw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-13%20at%2011.25.40%20AM.png" width="620" height="422" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-13 at 11.25.40 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-13%20at%2011.26.52%20AM.png" width="620" height="376" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-13 at 11.26.52 AM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/michael-angelo-batio-0">Michael Angelo Batio</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/time-burn-michael-angelo-batio-using-tapping-extend-sweep-arpeggios/25275#comments Michael Angelo Batio October 2015 Time to Burn Artist Lessons Videos Lessons Magazine Wed, 26 Aug 2015 14:22:21 +0000 Michael Angelo Batio 25275 at http://www.guitarworld.com Musical Fluency: Stealing From Drummers — Single Paradiddle http://www.guitarworld.com/musical-fluency-stealing-drummers-single-paradiddle <!--paging_filter--><p>When you’re running low on ideas, a great place to turn for inspiration is other instruments. Learning a sax lick, a piano chord voicing or a vocal melody can allow you to approach music from an entirely new angle.</p> <p>Getting a peek at how other instrumentalists think also can help you get in sync with your bandmates. </p> <p>If you know what your bass player is trying to do, then you can complement his basslines better with your guitar part. If you understand your drummer’s fills, you can strum along in a way that matches or accents his drum parts.</p> <p>In this post, we’re going to check out a common rhythmic pattern used by drummers called the single paradiddle. Then we'll look at how you can use this sort of pattern to come up with new ideas on the guitar.</p> <p><strong>Single Paradiddle</strong></p> <p>The single paradiddle is an example of what’s known as a drum rudiment. Guitarists practice chord changes and scale runs; drummers practice rudiments. They’re basic drum-stroke patterns that are learned on one drum and can then be applied to different drums or used in a beat.</p> <p>The single paradiddle follows this pattern of right-hand (R) and left-hand (L) drum strokes:</p> <p>R L R R L R L L</p> <p>You can even say the word “paradiddle” twice along with the pattern to help you get a feel for the rhythm. Para-diddle para-diddle.</p> <p>OK, so how does this help us out on the guitar? Let’s take a look at just a few possibilities.</p> <p><strong>Riff Rhythm</strong></p> <p>One way to use the paradiddle pattern on the guitar is to develop accented rhythms for guitar riffs. For example, let's assign each drum stroke to a string or set of strings. For every right-hand stroke in the paradiddle pattern, hit the sixth string. For every left-hand stroke, hit the fifth and fourth strings together.</p> <p>Let’s take this new paradiddle picking and apply it to just a couple of chords to see how it sounds. Here’s an example in drop D tuning using Bsus2 and Gsus2 chords.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%201.png" width="620" height="315" alt="Example 1.png" /></p> <p>If this sounds familiar, it may remind you of “Everlong” by the Foo Fighters, which uses a similar rhythm with these types of chord voicings. Since Dave Grohl is a drummer, it makes sense that he would look at the guitar as if the strings are different drums on a kit.</p> <p><strong>Lead Licks</strong></p> <p>Now let’s take the same idea of assigned different drum strokes to different strings, but apply it to a lick on the top two strings. The right-hand stroke becomes the 2nd string, and the left-hand stroke becomes the first string. </p> <p>Here’s an example in the key of B minor, with a couple of slides thrown in to give the lick a smoother sound.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%202.png" width="620" height="155" alt="Example 2.png" /></p> <p><strong>Getting Creative</strong></p> <p>There are so many more uses for this basic single paradiddle rhythm. The idea is to think of the pattern as just A-B-A-A, B-A-B-B, where the A’s and B’s can stand for anything that you want.</p> <p>Like we’ve done in this post, the A could be one string and the B another. Or you could create fingerpicking patterns. The A could stand for one finger in your plucking hand, while B stands for another finger or group of fingers.</p> <p>Or you could make the A’s and B’s stand for two different notes in a scale or arpeggio. The possibilities really are endless, so see what you can come up with!</p> <p><em>Ben Rainey works as a guitar teacher and freelance guitarist in the Pittsburgh area. He's also in charge of music content at <a href="https://tunessence.com/">Tunessence.com.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/musical-fluency-stealing-drummers-single-paradiddle#comments Ben Rainey Musical Fluency Blogs Lessons Tue, 25 Aug 2015 18:18:32 +0000 Ben Rainey 20192 at http://www.guitarworld.com The Genius of Guitarist Chet Atkins — Lesson with Tab and Video http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-genius-chet-atkins <!--paging_filter--><p>Chet Atkins made countless recordings as a studio musician, producer and solo artist. </p> <p>Many of his recordings—particularly those of the artists he produced in Nashville, like Elvis Presley, Roy Orbison and the Everly Brothers—laid the foundation for early rock and roll. Though Atkins played many styles, he is most often associated with country music and acoustic guitars. </p> <p>By using a combination of thumbpick and fingers, Chet created his signature “fingerpicking” sound. This month, I’m going to look at two patented Chet Atkins techniques. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> shows an approach Atkins often used when playing scales. With the fret hand near fourth position, ascend/descend A Mixolydian (A B C# D E F# G), grabbing each successive scale tone on a neighboring string and mixing in all available open notes. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holenotes0910_1.jpg" /></p> <p>It should sound similar to playing a scale on a harp, or on a piano with the sustain pedal held down. Keep your fret-hand fingers depressed as long as possible so that notes overlap, and follow the indicated picking/fingerstyle indications to get the full effect. This “harp trick” is common in the lines of country players like Albert Lee and Brent Mason, and can be done with any scale, provided the open strings are “in key.” </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holenotes0910_2.jpg" /></p> <p>The last note of each chord in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> is a harp harmonic, another technique pioneered by Atkins (and later taken to new heights by Lenny Breau, Ted Greene and Tommy Emmanuel). On beat four of each bar, you will see “H.H.” Touch a fretted string with the plucking-hand’s index finger precisely 12 frets higher than the note appearing parenthetically in tab, then pluck that string behind your index finger’s point of contact, using the thumb (or thumbpick) to produce a chiming “octave overtone” harmonic. The preceding notes of each chord are played using traditional fingerstyle technique (without harmonics). </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holenotes0910_3.jpg" /></p> <p>Atkins often wove the aforementioned techniques (and more) into stunning solo guitar arrangements rooted in Travis picking (named after Travis). This somewhat country-like fingerstyle approach involves thumbpicking alternating bass notes (usually the root and fifth) on different strings while sounding melodic parts (typically built around a fretted chord shape) with the plucking hand’s remaining fingers. In <strong>FIGURE 3,</strong> a 12-bar blues in A, you’ll see this technique in action with a variety of A7, D7 and E7 shapes. </p> <p>Familiarize yourself with each chord voicing first, study the structure of each bass note pattern and practice repeatedly (while chord shapes are held down) until the bass line feels automatic. Then slowly add the melody notes, focusing on one bar at a time until you have it perfected.</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1739754493001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1739754493001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <br /><strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1739715226001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1739715226001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <br /><strong>Part 3</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1739665132001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1739665132001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-genius-chet-atkins#comments Chet Atkins Hole Notes 2012 Videos Blogs Lessons Magazine Mon, 24 Aug 2015 21:08:31 +0000 Dale Turner 16332 at http://www.guitarworld.com Holcomb-Mania with Mark Holcomb: Using Quick Shifts and Long Slides to Add Interesting Movement to Licks — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/holcomb-mania-mark-holcomb-using-quick-shifts-and-long-slides-add-interesting-movement-licks-video/25276 <!--paging_filter--><p>In writing riffs and song parts for the music of Periphery, it’s important to me to evoke a sense of movement and fluidity. </p> <p>If you’re familiar with the band’s music, you’re well aware that we have a penchant for employing unusual meters that shift unexpectedly, as well as harmonically dense chord progressions and polytonal chordal allusions. </p> <p>One of my favorite ways to achieve a sense of movement is to perform single-note riffs that incorporate dramatic position shifts up and down the fretboard, necessitating very specific movement that is often articulated with extended finger slides. </p> <p>And keep in mind that I almost always tune my guitar to drop-D down one whole step (low to high, C G C F A D), which many players refer to as “drop-C” tuning. </p> <p>There are a couple of leads on the new Periphery album, <em>Juggernaut: Omega</em> that I perform by sliding around through different registers of the fretboard. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, an excerpt from my solo in the song “The Bad Thing,” is one of those passages. </p> <p>I begin on the upbeat of beat one, with a pull-off from D to C# on the G string in sixth position. The third note, F#, falls on beat two, and after picking the last note of this beat, E, I slide up to the 16th fret to sound B and then G and F# on the D string in the same position. I then slide from the F# note on the D string’s 16th fret down to ninth position. </p> <p>Starting on beat four, I perform four ascending slides on the B string, the notes of which alternate with higher-pitched notes fretted on the high E string that are whole- and half-steps apart. Then, on beat four, I quickly jump from 15th to 19th position and perform a wide stretch from the 19th to the 24th fret. </p> <p>I could have alternatively played the first bar of this passage in sixth position, without the shifts up and down the fretboard, as demonstrated in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, but, to my ears, playing the same notes while sliding up to different areas of the fretboard adds a new and different “layer” of sound to the line. Also, the implied tonality of the lick is ambiguous, as it suggests either D major or B minor. </p> <p>The song “Priestess,” also from Juggernaut: Omega, features a solo lick that’s very similar in approach, in regard to my use of long finger slides and frequent position shifts. As shown in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I begin on beat four of the pickup bar and then slide up to the ninth fret to quickly jump between the G and A strings to sound individual notes. </p> <p>As in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, the first two notes on the A string are palm-muted. In bar 3, I use consecutive ascending slides on the B string, played alternately against notes on the high E string, followed by a dramatic slide back down the G string to 12th position, where the majority of the remainder of the lick is played, culminating in a slide back up the 15th position. </p> <p>Notice that all these position shifts require some thinking ahead, in terms of what fingers to slide with, so that the fret hand will be optimally positioned for the next phrase. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3rRXDBS8suw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-13%20at%2011.39.09%20AM.png" width="620" height="353" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-13 at 11.39.09 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-13%20at%2011.39.21%20AM.png" width="620" height="288" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-13 at 11.39.21 AM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/holcomb-mania-mark-holcomb-using-quick-shifts-and-long-slides-add-interesting-movement-licks-video/25276#comments Holcomb-Mania Mark Holcomb October 2015 Periphery Artist Lessons Videos Blogs Lessons Magazine Fri, 21 Aug 2015 15:19:45 +0000 Mark Holcomb 25276 at http://www.guitarworld.com Acoustic Nation with Dale Turner: Pat Metheny's Enigmatic Acoustic Work http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-dale-turner-pat-methenys-enigmatic-acoustic-work/25280 <!--paging_filter--><p>Pat Metheny mastered jazz at an uncommonly young age, touring with legendary vibraphonist Gary Burton while still in his teens. Time spent as a student (and quickly, instructor) at the University of Miami led to many collaborations with bass icon Jaco Pastorius. </p> <p>By the 1975 recording of his solo debut, <em>Bright Size Life</em>, Metheny’s signature modern jazz guitar style—characterized by slippery, horn-like legato phrasing and finger slides, crafty use of chromatics, unpredictable, syncopated rhythms, broad dynamic range and superb tone—was already honed. </p> <p>For 40 years, Metheny’s musical path continuously evolved, embracing acoustic, electronic and symphonic sounds, pitting him alongside disparate luminaries like David Bowie, Joni Mitchell, Ornette Coleman, Steve Reich, Bruce Hornsby, Carlos Santana and Herbie Hancock. </p> <p>Pat’s pioneering use of guitar synths, such as the Synclavier (early digital sampler/workstation), unusual “harp” guitars (including a 42-string Pikasso) and the Orchestrion (a player-piano-inspired robotic mini orchestra controlled by guitar) puts him in a league of his own. Today, with 20 Grammy Awards (in 10 different categories) among his numerous accolades, we celebrate Pat Metheny with a lesson examining his acoustic output.</p> <p>After his <em>Bright Size Life</em> and <em>Watercolors</em> albums, the Pat Metheny Group, featuring Lyle Mays (piano/synth), Mark Egan (bass) and Danny Gottlieb (drums), was formed, issuing their self-tilted debut in 1978. “Phase Dance,” propelled by a Latin-flavored acoustic picking riff akin to <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, contributed much to PMG’s success. </p> <p>The tune has since become a concert-opening Metheny standard. Pat employed “Nashville tuning” for this song, replacing the guitar’s lowest four strings with much thinner strings tuned one octave higher, like the additional “small strings” on a 12-string guitar.</p> <p>In 1979, Metheny released the solo album <em>New Chautauqua</em>, which features the master musician wielding a host of stringed instruments (all elaborately overdubbed), including a 15-string harp guitar. Standout tracks include Nashville-tuned nuggets like “Country Poem” and “Sueno Con Mexico,” along with conventional acoustic pieces like “Heritage,” its fingerpicked, low-register chords informing <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>.</p> <p>Metheny and Mays combined forces in 1981 for the duo project, <em>As Falls Wichita, So Falls Wichita Falls</em>, which also features vocalist/percussionist Nana Vasconcelos. The composition “September Fifteenth” was penned for that album in honor of the late jazz pianist Bill Evans, deceased on that date the previous year; the track features unpredictable harmonic shifts and lush voicings like those in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>.</p> <p><em>First Circle</em> marked a huge leap forward for the Pat Metheny Group, its deep musical explorations, top-notch performances and stellar production netting 1985’s Best Jazz Fusion Performance Grammy. The Group’s core lineup would remain unchanged for 15 years, paving the way for future successes like <em>Still Life (Talking)</em> and <em>Letter from Home</em>. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 4</strong> illustrates a variation on Metheny’s oddly grouped arpeggios heard midway through the latter album’s title track.</p> <p>For 2003’s <em>One Quiet Night</em>, Metheny rolled tape in his home studio and cut a handful of beautiful solo acoustic arrangements—songs like the Norah Jones hit “I Don’t Know Why,” along with some originals—on his Linda Manzer baritone acoustic [standard tuning, down a perfect fifth (A D G C E A), with the middle two strings tuned up one octave]. <strong>FIGURE 5</strong> is a nod to his solo rendition of “Last Train Home,” a classic Metheny instrumental first released on <em>Still Life (Talking).</em></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/134350980&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-13%20at%202.15.00%20PM.png" width="620" height="398" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-13 at 2.15.00 PM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-13%20at%202.15.14%20PM.png" width="620" height="244" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-13 at 2.15.14 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-dale-turner-pat-methenys-enigmatic-acoustic-work/25280#comments Acoustic Nation acoustic nation Dale Turner October 2015 Pat Metheny Lessons Blogs Blogs Lessons Magazine Thu, 13 Aug 2015 20:40:31 +0000 Dale Turner 25280 at http://www.guitarworld.com String Theory with Jimmy Brown: The Conclusion of Frédéric Chopin’s “Prelude in E Minor” — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-jimmy-brown-conclusion-fr-d-ric-chopin-s-prelude-e-minor/25277 <!--paging_filter--><p>Last month, I presented the first half (bars 1–12) of my two-guitar arrangement of classical music great Frédéric Chopin’s piano masterpiece, “Prelude in E Minor, Opus 28, Number 4.” </p> <p>I now offer the conclusion of my arrangement, which, as I stated previously, may be performed either on acoustic or electric guitars, in either case with a generous amount of hall reverb, with the accompaniment (labeled the left-hand piano part in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>) performed fingerstyle for a pianistic, simultaneous note attack, and the melody played with a pick or fingerstyle. If playing electric guitar, a piano-like tone is best achieved by using your bridge pickup (preferably a humbucker) for both parts, with a bit of roll-off in the high frequencies.</p> <p>We begin where we left off, in bar 13, with a modified restatement of the piece’s initial 12-bar theme that starts out the same way but soon veers off into new melodic and harmonic territory in bar 14, with both parts building up to a dramatic, tension-filled climax in bars 16–18, followed by a “cool down” and then a “soft landing” in the final four bars. </p> <p>Again, start out using a very light touch in both parts, so that you have a greater dynamic range to work with, and feel free to add a slight, subtle vibrato to the held melody notes, which adds an expressive, vocal-like element that goes beyond what a piano can offer. </p> <p>The Italian word rubato, literally meaning “robbed time,” is used in classical music to indicate a loose adherence to tempo, with a momentary slackening followed by a quickening, so as to “catch up” to the metronome. </p> <p>This, combined with volume contrasts and swells (“ebb and flow”), enables the performer to put a unique, expressive stamp on his or her interpretation of a piece. In this case, I chose to gradually slow down—ritardando—for dramatic effect, beginning in bar 20. Again, you can find many examples on YouTube of world-class concert pianists performing the piece, each performance a little different. </p> <p>Harmonically, the melody and chords, when heard together, imply, or “paint,” some beautifully sophisticated musical colors, such as ninth and 11th chord types. Bar 21 features what is known as a deceptive cadence, as the previous measure’s five chord, B7, resolves not to the one chord, Em, as expected, but surprisingly up a half step to C, the six chord (a slick move exploited often and popularized by Beethoven and Brahms). </p> <p>To play the final four chords, you could either strum the strings with your thumb or quickly arpeggiate them with thumb and fingers in a quick rolling motion, low to high. The softer the better. The piece should end at a musical whisper.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience4413681801001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="4413681801001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-13%20at%2011.52.18%20AM.png" width="620" height="424" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-13 at 11.52.18 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-13%20at%2011.52.31%20AM.png" width="620" height="344" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-13 at 11.52.31 AM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-brown">Jimmy Brown</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-jimmy-brown-conclusion-fr-d-ric-chopin-s-prelude-e-minor/25277#comments Frédéric Chopin Jimmy Brown October 2015 Artist Lessons Videos Blogs Lessons Magazine Thu, 13 Aug 2015 16:39:48 +0000 Jimmy Brown 25277 at http://www.guitarworld.com Joe Satriani's Shredding with the Alien: Two Effective Approaches to Building Melodies — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/shredding-alien-joe-satriani-two-effective-approaches-building-melodies/25278 <!--paging_filter--><p>Hello, and welcome to the first installment of my new <em>GW</em> instructional column! </p> <p>Over the next few months, I’d like to demonstrate some of the many different concepts and elements that comprise my personal approach to playing the guitar. It is my hope that these columns will help you discover some new things about the instrument and about music in general that appeal to you and prove useful. </p> <p>I’d like to begin by talking about melody and how to approach crafting a melodic line for either a song’s theme or an improvised solo. It may seem like a relatively simply task: you get some chords together, focus on the key you’re in, and play a few lines. But in reality there are so many different routes one can go when tasked with this creative endeavor. </p> <p>To me, oftentimes, the “story” of the melody can be told too soon or unfold too quickly. </p> <p>A great way to stretch out the story is to end phrases on suspended notes, so that the listener will have to wait a little longer for the next phrase to come, in order to hear where the whole thing is going. As demonstrated in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, if your chord progression begins, for example, with a big E major chord, playing one of the triadic chord tones—E G# or B—will not offer the listener much. </p> <p>But if you were to instead begin your melody with an A note, the fourth in the key of E, then you create the impression that the melody needs to go somewhere else, in effect drawing the listener in. That A note, the “sus4,” can be quickly resolved by moving to one of the aforementioned chord tones. </p> <p>In bar 1 of <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, I resolve the line by moving from A down to Gs, the major third. But if we were to instead move from A to F#, the major second, as shown in bar 2, the line still retains that suspended quality and maintains the feeling that it is yet to be resolved. </p> <p>With an awareness of melodic-harmonic suspension and resolution, one can take as long as one wants to resolve a line. <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> offers a four-bar improvised melody in which the first three bars are spent moving freely from one “suspended” note to another, and the line is not resolved until I finally land on E, the root note, in bar 4. The opposite approach would be to resolve the fourth to a chord tone immediately, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>, with A moving to E, G# and B right away.</p> <p>Another cool, useful melodic concept is to have a melody note stay the same while the chords underneath it change. In this sense, the feeling of suspension is achieved in a different way, as the listener has to wait for the musical idea to be concluded. </p> <p>In <strong>FIGURES 5</strong> and <strong>6</strong>, I change the chords beneath the fourth, A, and the root note E, respectively, as a way to demonstrate that, even with a one-note melody, musical interest can be instilled in the listener while the story of the melody gradually unfolds. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GAckLGgA86o" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-13%20at%2012.06.44%20PM.png" width="620" height="386" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-13 at 12.06.44 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-13%20at%2012.07.23%20PM.png" width="620" height="396" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-13 at 12.07.23 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/shredding-alien-joe-satriani-two-effective-approaches-building-melodies/25278#comments Joe Satriani October 2015 Shredding With the Alien Artist Lessons Videos Blogs Lessons Magazine Thu, 13 Aug 2015 16:29:01 +0000 Joe Satriani 25278 at http://www.guitarworld.com Cracking the Code with Troy Grady: Albert Lee's Country Curve http://www.guitarworld.com/cracking-code-troy-grady-albert-lees-country-curve/25271 <!--paging_filter--><p>When I first heard Albert Lee's <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iywt3tbGbSE">"Fun Ranch Frolic"</a> when I was in high school, I was floored by its precision and unstoppable groove. </p> <p>It was a decade of plectrum prowess, and there was no shortage of muscular technique to go around. </p> <p>Yngwie Malmsteen was, of course, famous for his ability to play full-picked lines across the strings with seemingly impossible accuracy. And even Eddie Van Halen could sting unexpectedly with blasts of right-hand wizardry.</p> <p>But Albert did all of that with a clean tone. And without so much as a Marshall stack or a 9-volt battery in sight, Albert's relentlessly rhythmic riffing was all the more impressive:</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/lAX9_UoCyYw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Down Home Slant</strong></p> <p>The ability to play lines that weave effortlessly across the strings was pure sorcery to me as a teenager. With the benefit of hindsight, and a little knowledge of the picking mechanics that we've uncovered in the journey Cracking the Code, the source of at least part of Albert's mystical power is readily apparent:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/lee-downwardpickslant.jpg" width="620" height="349" alt="lee-downwardpickslant.jpg" /></p> <p>Of course, it's downward pickslanting. We've written about this often in this space before, for example in our investigation of <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/cracking-code-eric-johnsons-pickslanting-pentatonics" target="_blank">Eric Johnson's</a> picking technique. A brief detour through that articles is a good quick refresher on how the technique works. But to summarize, pickslanting isn't so much a way to move the pick. Rather, it's a way to take whatever picking motion you already have, and allow it to move cleanly across the strings without slowing down for the string changes.</p> <p>In the case of the downward style of pickslanting, its string-switching power is activated specifically when you play an upstroke. That's when the pick rises up out of the strings, and lets you move to a new string with perfect efficiency:</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/o17MqDU-s8Y" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/finale.png" width="620" height="398" alt="finale.png" /></p> <p>This blast of snapping country funk is classic Albert Lee. It's virtuosic, but never gratuitous, and moves forward under its own pulsing sense of time. And as we can clearly in the slow-motion segment, most of the string changes in the lick occur on strings were the final note is an upstroke. This is when the pick escapes the strings, so there's no danger of hitting any of the others. And this is precisely what we'd expect of a downward pickslanter.<br /> <br /><br /> <strong>The Country Curve</strong></p> <p>But that's only half the story. Because when we look at other examples of Lee's playing, we see some unexpected things:</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9YaEG-i9_v0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/curves.png" width="620" height="382" alt="curves.png" /></p> <p>Downstrokes! In this excerpt of Lee's improvisational power, the upstrokes still lift out of the strings. But when we look at the slow motion segment, we can also see that downstrokes often do too, just in the opposite direction.</p> <p>And this is fascinating. Switching strings after a downstroke is strictly verboten for downward pickslanters, because it usually sends the pick crashing into the next higher string. But Lee is no ordinary downward pickslanter. Somehow, he's figured out a way to get the pick to curve gracefully out of the strings on downstrokes.</p> <p>This curvature allows Lee to switch strings with high efficiency regardless of which pickstroke he uses to finish a string. This is quite different from the picking motion of players like Eric Johnson, which moves straight into and out of the strings, and where high-speed string changes usually only occur after upstrokes.</p> <p>In fact, in our last column we've already looked at another highly unique rock player with a distinctly curved picking motion:</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0QgLrC5Fe0E" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Of course, we're talking about the incomparable Steve Morse. Steve's ability to use alternate picking to play arpeggios is legendary in rock and fusion. And the curved movement of his pickstrokes it what allows him to do this.<br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Solving the Curve</strong></p> <p>But how do you actually perform the movement? One guess would be forearm rotation. It's a common approach for fast picking, used perhaps most famously by gypsy jazz players. And it would seem like a logical choice because it does indeed cause the pick to move in a curve in exactly the plane we'd require. Except for the fact that it's simply not happening:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/lee-morse-forearms.jpg" width="620" height="349" alt="lee-morse-forearms.jpg" /></p> <p>The perplexing observation here, when we examine the slow motion footage again, is that there is no overt forearm twisting visible at in either Morse or Lee's playing. And to paraphrase a famous detective, when you've eliminated the impossible, the only remaining possibility, no matter how counterintuitive, must be the answer:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/wrist-movements.jpg" width="620" height="349" alt="wrist-movements.jpg" /></p> <p>And that possibility is wrist movement. The wrist is an amazingly flexible joint system capable of 360-degree motion without no additional arm or finger movement required. And what's even cooler is that it does this by combining only two basic movements, deviation and flexion/extension.</p> <p>The side-to-side, "clock face" movement of the wrist is deviation. This is an extremely common approach for alternate picking movement, and we see it in the playing of picking legends like Al Di Meola:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/dimeola-deviation_0.jpg" width="620" height="349" alt="dimeola-deviation_0.jpg" /></p> <p>Operating a right angle to this is wrist flexion and extension. This the bending movement that you use when knocking on a door. We don't normally associate this kind of movement with picking technique, but it turns out to be critical to creating Lee's graceful "country curve":</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CL_K-Bu8Tic" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>And the secret, once again, is pickslanting. By simply tilting the axis of the forearm with respect to the guitar's body, and entering into downward pickslanting, the 90-degree separation between deviation and flexion/extension creates a Batman and Robin-style partnership. Deviation now moves the pick into and out of the strings, just as we've seen in Johnson and Di Meola's technique. But flexion/extension now also moves the pick into and out of the strings, just in the opposite direction.</p> <p>It's basically two picking movements in one. Above the string, we use a deviation movement, and below the string we use flexion and extension. Blending between the two creates the perfect curvature that we see in both Lee and Morse's techniques, without any forearm rotation at all. Here's the most basic version of the formula:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/compound-pickstroke.jpg" width="620" height="349" alt="compound-pickstroke.jpg" /></p> <p>On the surface, it seems totally counter-intuitive to try and make two separate movements for each pickstroke. But neither Morse nor Lee lack for speed. The reason is that the upstroke and the downstroke each use completely different chains of movement, with no overlap between the muscle groups. This is a picking system that truly alternates, and that's why it can be done fast.</p> <p>The upside of this compound movement is large. It lets us move across the strings no matter what kind of pickstroke we're using. And it's the reason that players like Lee and Morse seem so unbound by the traditional challenges that most alternate pickers battle, even when they're picking only one note on a string.</p> <p>That Lee and Morse were able to devise this ingenious mechanical solution by intuition and feel, without anyone specifically showing them how to do it, and without the vast instructional resources of modern camera technology and the internet, is nothing short of amazing.</p> <p><strong>For more on Lee's incredibly fluid country picking, watch the complete Albert Lee interview in <a href="http://www.troygrady.com/mechanics/" target="_blank">Masters in Mechanics.</a></strong></p> <p><em>Troy Grady is the creator of <a href="http://troygrady.com/code/">Cracking the Code</a>, a documentary series with a unique analytical approach to understanding guitar technique. Melding archival footage, in-depth interviews, painstakingly crafted animation and custom soundtrack, it’s a pop-science investigation of an age-old mystery: Why are some players seemingly super-powered?</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/cracking-code-troy-grady-albert-lees-country-curve/25271#comments Albert Lee Albert Lee lesson Cracking the Code tab Troy Grady Video Videos Features Lessons Thu, 13 Aug 2015 14:57:03 +0000 Troy Grady 25271 at http://www.guitarworld.com The Art of Shredding with Megadeth, Lamb of God, Trivium, Arch Enemy and More http://www.guitarworld.com/art-shredding-megadeth-lamb-god-trivium-arch-enemy-and-more <!--paging_filter--><p>In this <em>Guitar World</em> exclusive, we’ve gathered together Mustaine and his Megadeth coguitarist, Glen Drover, Lamb of God’s Mark Morton and Willie Adler, Arch Enemy’s Michael Amott and Fredrik Akesson, and Trivium’s Matt Heafy and Corey Beaulieu to teach you the essential skills of modern shred. </p> <p>Using their own examples, we’ll show you everything from rhythm and lead playing to speed picking and sweep arpeggios. So grab your guitar and get ready for the ultimate lesson in shredding—21st century style. </p> <p>[Note: Due to an unforeseen issue, there are gaps in the figure numbers in the following lesson. Rest assured, however, no content is missing!] </p> <p><strong>CHAPTER 1 “Sport Metal”: Modern Rhythm Methods</strong></p> <p>All the guitarists involved in this lesson have one thing in common: they are passionate and dedicated players who write great riffs, many of which are quite challenging to play. In fact, Arch Enemy’s Michael Amott described this type of playing as “sport metal.” </p> <p>“Michael’s right: it is sport metal,” says Willie Adler. “There’s a real finesse to a lot of the riffs, and they’re physically challenging every time you play them. With the new songs we’re playing from <em>Sacrament</em>, I’ve got to warm up for at least an hour before we go onstage.” </p> <p>We asked Adler’s co-axman, the always eloquent Mark Morton, to explain some of the rhythm playing differences between metal’s “old-school” and “nu-school.” Despite a brutal hangover, Morton not only stepped up to the plate but also came up with “the hangover riff” to illustrate his point.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding1.jpg" /></p> <p>“Here’s an example of what I would consider more of a late-Eighties, Bay Area–thrash take on the riff. And here’s a more contemporary style of doing the same riff,” Morton says as he performs FIGURE 1:1 then FIGURE 1:2. “As you can see, they’re the same pattern, the same note choices, but with a different and faster right-hand cadence, giving it a more modern, ‘deathy’ feel.”</p> <p>As you can see and hear, the “right hand cadences” Morton is referring to involve “gallop” and “reverse gallop” picking patterns plus double picking a lot of the notes.</p> <p>We asked all our guest teachers to name a few albums that they consider vital references to great metal rhythm work. In addition to Metallica’s seminal <em>Master of Puppets</em> and Pantera’s <em>Vulgar Display of Power</em>, Megadeth’s classic <em>Rust in Peace</em> topped the tally. Says Amott, “That album definitely set the bar pretty high for music like this. It’s full of ‘Hall of Fame’ riffs.” </p> <p>Glen Drover, Megadeth’s lead guitarist, has a pretty challenging role—not only does he have to perform leads by his virtuoso predecessors Chris Poland and Marty Friedman; he also has to double Mustaine’s vast repertoire of “Hall of Fame” riffs. “Some of the rhythm patterns are equally demanding to play as the solos,” says Drover. “Take a song like ‘Holy Wars’—it’s incredibly busy, and there’s so much stuff in there that you’ve really got to be on top of your game.”</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding2.jpg" /></p> <p>In addition to his ultraprecise picking and knack for writing riffs, Mustaine is the master of rhythmic nuance. “One thing I’ll often do with my rhythm playing is slide into a chord,” says Mustaine as he plays FIGURE 1:4. “That makes the chords really growl, like in ‘Ashes in My Mouth.” Another must-know Mustaine technique is his “spider finger” chord-grabbing technique, which he demonstrates in FIGURE 1:5 and PHOTOS A and B. “Alternating pairs of fingers like this is definitely easier than having to move your entire hand back and forth [see the “regular” fingering under the tablature]. If you have to move your hand, your timing is gonna be off and there will be string noise. Plus, you’ll be relying too much on guesswork.”</p> <p>Like all metal masters, Mustaine uses palm muting (p.m.) to great effect. Palm muting is the technique of rolling the fleshy part of your palm [PHOTO C] forward from the bridge to dampen the strings. But as Mustaine points out, there is another way to stop notes from ringing, and you can do it with your pick. “So many people think picking is just about moving the pick up and down,” he says. “But you’ve also got to think about how to kill the string’s vibration to give the line articulation. On a riff like the one from ‘Hanger 18,’ I’m not really palm-muting the D string with my right hand; I do it all with pick articulation.”</p> <p>Mustaine explains that this involves playing in a strict staccato fashion. “The note dies when the pick touches the string again,” he says. Furthermore, it requires using less of the guitar pick’s point. “When I’m really pedaling, the amount of pick sticking out from my fingers is minute [PHOTO D],” says Mustaine. “But when I’m doing percussive stuff, like ‘Train of Consequences,' I slide my fingers away from the tip of the pick [PHOTO E].”</p> <p>In conclusion, Mustaine offers this advice: “I think the secret to accurate picking is slowly speeding up. It’s really easy to play rhythm super fast, but with most guitarists, if you slow down their recordings you’ll see that they aren’t very accurate at all. Most of the time they’re terrible. If you want to be fast and accurate, learn your rhythm parts by playing them slow and then gradually bring them up to speed, concentrating the whole time on being accurate. There is no other way.”</p> <p><strong>CHAPTER II “No Pain, No Gain”: Warming Up</strong></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding3.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding4.jpg" /></p> <p>As Lamb of God’s Willie Adler has already stated, warming up for an hour or more is vital for “Sport Metal” participants. “We’ve got some riffs similar to this that are hard as shit,” he says while playing FIGURE 2:1. “So I have to warm up for an hour or more before every show, mainly by playing the riffs in our set that I find the most demanding. I work on my picking speed and stamina by doing simple, quick chugs with triplets [gallops] thrown in [FIGURES 2:2a and b], repeating them over and over and speeding them up as fast as I can. I’ll also do string jumping and wide-stretch riffs [PHOTO F and FIGURE 2:3].”</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding5.jpg" /></p> <p>Michael Amott has a similar and equally lengthy pre-gig warm up. Two Arch Enemy riffs he often uses in this ritual are from “I Am Legend” (FIGURE 2:5) and “Nemesis” (FIGURE 2:6). </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding6.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding6cont.jpg" /></p> <p>FIGURE 2:7 is a cool, off-kilter offering from Trivium’s Matt Heafy that uses all six strings, “gets all your fingers working and also gets a gallop pick going.”</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding7.jpg" /></p> <p>FIGURE 2:8 is from Heafy’s bandmate, Corey Beaulieu, and is a great F# minor example of “getting a picking pattern going and then throwing in a same-key, scale-type run to make it more interesting,” a ploy endorsed by Dragonforce.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding8.jpg" /></p> <p>This section closes with a riff offered by Fredrik Akesson of Arch Enemy. “This is a rhythm riff I came up with [FIGURE 2:9]. It’s got gallops in the first part and 16th notes and octaves in the second part. I also use my second finger to fret the bass notes on the bottom string [PHOTO K].”</p> <p><strong>CHAPTER 3 Lead Workout I: Speed Picking</strong></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding9.jpg" /></p> <p>There’s only one way to master this: “Practice…a lot of fucking practice,” says Megadeth’s Glen Drover. “It takes dedication and a sense that you’re never totally comfortable with your skill level. That’s absolutely a healthy attitude for growth as a guitarist.” Drover then proceeds to show us three simple “start out slowly and build up speed sensibly” alternate (down-up) picking exercises in E minor, FIGURE 3:4 a–c , that enable you to focus on your picking technique and “really get the blood pumping.” </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding10.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding10cont.jpg" /></p> <p>Once you’ve paid your dues practicing these essential chop builders, you’re ready for the big leagues and FIGURE 3:5, a blistering, exotic-sounding E minor based workout from Akesson that involves the “Hungarian scale [FIGURE 3:6] combined with some chromatic stuff and alternate picking all the way.” FIGURE 3:7 is a simpler but equally effective E minor, Hungarian-spiced lick.</p> <p><strong>CHAPTER 4 Lead Workout II: Sweep Picking Arpeggios</strong></p> <p>Sweep picking is probably the most famous shred technique out there. Yngwie Malmsteen is its undisputed master and the guy who put it on the metal map. But as he explains, most players don’t know or employ the necessary rules. </p> <p>“Most guitarists have a general idea of how to approximate the technique, but only a few do it correctly,” he says. “The rest of them let the notes ring too long or try to play too fast and sacrifice precision and clarity. Either way, it sounds like shit.” As he explains, the only way to correct these errors is to separate the right- and left-hand components of sweep picking, master them separately and then coordinate them with one another. Of course, it’s not easy. You’ll have to put in a lot of practice time to get it right. </p> <p>To get a feel for the right-hand picking technique, says Yngwie, “You have to let the pick ‘fall’ from string to string, as if you were strumming a chord. It’s important that you don’t separate the pick strokes. When executing an upward sweep, drag the pick upward over the strings in one fluid motion. Again, it’s imperative that you don’t use individual upstrokes.”</p> <p>The fret-hand component is equally important. “You need to mute each string with the fret-hand immediately after picking it by lightly lifting or ‘rolling’ your fretting finger to keep the notes from ‘bleeding’ into one another and sounding like a strummed chord.” </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding11.jpg" /></p> <p>Heeding Yngwie’s words, work on FIGURE 4:4, a three-string A minor arpeggio from Trivium’s Matt Heafy. Once you’ve mastered that, check out the more challenging five-string version he offers in FIGURE 4:5. As Heafy says, “It’s all a matter of starting them off really slow and working your way up.” When you have those under your belt, try FIGURE 4:10, Fredrik Akesson’s slippery Bm7f5 diminished arpeggio (B D F A) that continually goes back on itself and repeats.</p> <p><strong>CHAPTER 5 Lead Workout III: Legato Leads</strong></p> <p>“Legato” is a fancy Italian musical term for “smooth.” For shred guitarists, playing legato requires using numerous hammer-on and pull-off combinations to make lines sound as smooth as possible. Once again, there is no magic shortcut. Mastering this way of playing will take practice, and lots of it. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding12.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding13.jpg" /></p> <p>When pulling off, pull the string slightly in toward the palm. This will help keep the string vibrating and prevent the note from dying. When you’re ready, check out the molten-lava example from Glen Drover in the key of F# minor shown in FIGURE 5:5 and the demented, diminished-flavored FIGURE 5:7, a lick inspired by what Glen calls the “Randy Rhoads diminished run” (FIGURE 5:6) And don’t be afraid to break these phrases into “bite-size chunks” and chew them slowly. </p> <p><strong>CHAPTER 6 Lead Workout IV: Pentatonic Power</strong></p> <p>With sweep arpeggios, diminished licks and Hungarian scales being tossed about, let’s not forget the almighty minor pentatonic and blues scales. Sure, they’re simple and ubiquitous, but these five- and six-note scales are responsible for more great metal riffs and leads than all other scales combined. Sometimes, the best way to break up all the sweep-picking, legato and speed-picked madness is with a burst of pentatonic purity or ballsy blues. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding14.jpg" /></p> <p>Check out Michael Amott’s simple but effective E minor blues scale (E G A Bb B D) wide-stretch burst in FIGURE 6:5a. As he correctly points out, it’s merely an extension of the more common E minor pentatonic (E G A B D) cliché shown in the first half of FIGURE 6:5b, but it definitely makes a mark.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/artofshredding15.jpg" /></p> <p>The undeniable impact of pentatonic and blues scales is illustrated perfectly in FIGURE 6:6, a brilliant blast from Dave Mustaine. Similar to a lead he plays in “Holy Wars,” this is a textbook example of “less is more.” As he points out, his wide-stretch, six-bar chromatic climb is made even more climactic by the fact that there’s an “almost subliminal overtone from the high E string because that string is also fretted while I’m fretting the G and B strings.”</p> <p><strong>CONCLUSION: The Journey Never Ends</strong></p> <p>For every serious guitarist, playing the guitar is a lifetime achievement. As Mark Morton wisely notes, “There’s no time spent playing guitar that’s wasted time."</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/art-shredding-megadeth-lamb-god-trivium-arch-enemy-and-more#comments Arch Enemy Dave Mustaine December 2010 GW Archive Lamb of God Megadeth Opeth Trivium Blogs News Features Lessons Magazine Tue, 11 Aug 2015 14:29:57 +0000 Nick Bowcott, Photo by Angela Boatwright 17137 at http://www.guitarworld.com Monster Licks Unleashed: Getting Demonic with the B Minor Pentatonic — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/monster-licks-unleashed-getting-demonic-b-minor-pentatonic-video/25245 <!--paging_filter--><p>In this Monster Lick, I'm using the B minor pentatonic scale. The notes are B, D, E, F#, A. </p> <p>A lot of players find the minor pentatonic scale a little limiting at times. I admit that I felt the same way. It took years of hard work to come up with techniques to help get the sound in my head out onto the fretboard. </p> <p>Some of the hurdles players face with this scale is the way it is traditionally taught, as in the two-note-per-string approach. My goal was to use this tonality but have the ferociousness of a player like Steve Vai. </p> <p>I started to experiment using three notes per string instead of the traditional two notes. Immediately this started to open up a whole new world of possibilities. I was able to inject legato patterns and arpeggios and move up and down the neck with freedom.</p> <p>This lick is a prime example of how I construct runs and licks for my soling or while improvising. Obviously, every song or jam is different, but if you can grasp these essential tools, you can then adapt them into any situation. </p> <p><strong>The Lick:</strong></p> <p>I start this lick with a combination of arpeggios. You'll notice all these arpeggios are grouped on three strings. I use these to transition between the pentatonic boxes. At the end of every arpeggio I finish with a three-note-per-string fingering to help transition between the shapes. </p> <p>The thing to note here is how I transition from pentatonic box to box; it is essential that you understand the shapes of the scale, otherwise it will simply just be a bunch of random notes to you. If you don't know the patterns of the pentatonic scale, I recommend you learn them before starting on this lick. It will help you understand what is happening here. </p> <p>As I move up the scale I start to set up the tapping section of the lick. The notes that are tapped are marked "T" on the transcript. The tapping section is a little tricky as I'm using my second and third fingers to do the tapping while still gripping the pick. The reason for this is to make the transition back to picked notes smoothly and seamlessly. </p> <p>I recommend you break this lick down and focus on sections at a time. Although this lick is short, there's a lot of information in here, so the best result would be if you work through it slowly and make sure you master it all! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FogNP5nQvc4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/proud_0.jpg" width="620" height="507" alt="proud_0.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>I hope you enjoy this Monster Lick Unleashed! Join me on <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/atomicguitaraudio">YouTube right here!</a> Contact me through <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a> or <a href="https://www.facebook.com/glenn.proudfoot">my Facebook page</a>.</strong></p> <p><em>Australia's Glenn Proudfoot has played and toured with major signed bands and artists in Europe and Australia, including progressive rockers Prazsky Vyber. Glenn released his first instrumental solo album, </em>Lick Em<em>, in 2010. It's available on iTunes and at <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a>. His brand-new instrumental album — </em>Ineffable<em> — is out now and is available through <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a> and <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/au/album/ineffable/id914342943">iTunes</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/monster-licks-unleashed-getting-demonic-b-minor-pentatonic-video/25245#comments Glenn Proudfoot Monster Licks Monster Licks Unleashed Videos Blogs Lessons Mon, 10 Aug 2015 20:19:21 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot 25245 at http://www.guitarworld.com Killer Vibrato: How to Master Five Essential Performance Techniques http://www.guitarworld.com/killer-vibrato-how-master-five-essential-performance-techniques/25237 <!--paging_filter--><p>How many times have you read an interview in which a guitarist talks of “speaking through” the instrument or making it “sing”? </p> <p>This is because emulating the sound of the human voice is a great way to add personality to your playing. In this lesson, we’ll cover a form of vocal mimicry called “vibrato”—the repeated fluctuation of a note’s pitch.</p> <p>B.B. King’s singing lines and less-is-more approach to soloing were legendary. His much-emulated “butterfly vibrato”—named for the visual effect created by shaking a note with the first finger while fanning out the other three fingers—used perpendicular-to-the-string finger movement to achieve tight, rapid pitch fluctuations. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> is a King-like line in B minor pentatonic (B D E F# A). To achieve his trademark vibrato (notated in wavy horizontal lines), anchor your thumb at the top edge of the neck and rotate your wrist back and forth, producing a series of slight bends and releases.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-08-10%20at%2012.12.42%20PM.png" width="620" height="198" alt="Screen Shot 2015-08-10 at 12.12.42 PM.png" /></p> <p>Eric Clapton also opts for perpendicular movement, but he gets a free-floating effect by rotating his elbow rather than his wrist. This results in slower, more even pitch fluctuations. <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> is a Clapton-inspired line over a blues turnaround in Bb. Use your 3rd finger to fret both vibratoed notes.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-08-10%20at%2012.12.51%20PM.png" width="620" height="187" alt="Screen Shot 2015-08-10 at 12.12.51 PM.png" /></p> <p>Parallel vibrato—favored by classical guitarist as well as rockers like George Lynch and Warren DeMartini—is achieved by rocking a finger along the length of (or parallel to) a string, between two frets. As you move your finger toward the bridge, there is a slight decrease in the string’s tension, resulting in a lowering of pitch. Conversely, as you move toward the nut, the pitch is raised due to an increase in tension. The fingerstyle example in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> contains parallel vibrato.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-08-10%20at%2012.12.59%20PM.png" width="620" height="210" alt="Screen Shot 2015-08-10 at 12.12.59 PM.png" /></p> <p>Some players prefer to use whammy-bar vibrato. Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour is a master of this technique. To achieve his vibrato (<strong>FIGURE 4</strong> à la “Comfortably Numb”), repeatedly depress your whammy bar and return the note to pitch in a tight, controlled motion.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-08-10%20at%2012.13.05%20PM.png" width="620" height="210" alt="Screen Shot 2015-08-10 at 12.13.05 PM.png" /></p> <p>You can also top off bends with vibrato. In <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>—rooted in E minor pentatonic (E G A B D)—first reach the target pitch, then shake the string without releasing the bend.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-08-10%20at%2012.13.13%20PM.png" width="620" height="196" alt="Screen Shot 2015-08-10 at 12.13.13 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/killer-vibrato-how-master-five-essential-performance-techniques/25237#comments Guitar One Lessons Mon, 10 Aug 2015 16:22:18 +0000 Guitar World Staff 25237 at http://www.guitarworld.com