Lessons http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/8/all en Hole Notes: The Acoustic Stylings of the Grateful Dead's Jerry Garcia http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-acoustic-stylings-late-jerry-garcia <!--paging_filter--><p>Jerry Garcia is best known as the lead guitar player and primary singer/songwriter of the Grateful Dead. </p> <p>Though they are regarded as pioneers of the “jam band” genre that rose to prominence in the late Sixties, the Grateful Dead, unlike many of their counterculture contemporaries, never faltered with the changing times. </p> <p>Up until Garcia’s passing in 1995, they toured tirelessly, followed on the road by their loyal Deadhead fans for months—or years—on end. </p> <p>The Dead (as the surviving members rechristened themselves in 2003) still thrive, honoring Garcia’s memory with shows that feature superpickers like Jimmy Herring and/or Warren Haynes playing in Garcia’s place. </p> <p>This month, I want to honor Jerry with an examination of his funky bluegrass- and folk-tinged acoustic passages, all of which take place in open position. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holesnotes1213_1.jpg" /></p> <p>Garcia’s bluegrass influences—he was a huge fan of Doc Watson and Arthur Smith—inform his tasty picking on “Ripple” (American Beauty), which inspires <strong>FIGURE 1,</strong> a passage comprising melody (notes coinciding with accent marks, “>”) and strums of fragmented open G, C and D chords. </p> <p>Garcia really cut his teeth on this style in the early-to-mid Sixties with Sleepy Hollow Hog Stompers and Mother McCree’s Uptown Jug Champions (the latter of which morphed into the Grateful Dead in 1965). In this example, as you hold each chord shape, alternate-pick swing eighth notes, hitting the strings in the prescribed rhythm. The majority of non-open-string melody notes can be fretted with the middle finger. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holesnotes1213_2.jpg" /></p> <p>In 1972, Jerry released his first solo album, <em>Garcia.</em> Many of the album’s tracks, including “Bird Song,” which informs <strong>FIGURE 2,</strong> found a permanent home in the Grateful Dead’s set lists. “Bird Song” showcases Garcia’s funky, syncopated approach to playing, as its groovy strums (bars 1 and 3) and single-note riffs (bars 2 and 4) indicate. (Note that most of these riffs are derived from arpeggiated C, G and D chords.) </p> <p>To cop the intended feel of this passage, play with a “bouncy” 16th-note swing feel, and be sure to heed the 16th-note rests (don’t play each time you see the symbol that first appears during beat three in bar 1). </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holesnotes1213_3.jpg" /></p> <p>Though the traditional blues “Deep Elem Blues,” similar to what’s shown in <Strong>FIGURE 3,</strong> had been a Grateful Dead concert staple since 1966, they never recorded it until their live acoustic release, <em>Reckoning,</em> in 1981. Played on the bottom three strings, this riff is essentially a supercharged blues boogie pattern—a guitaristic adaptation of “boogie-woogie” blues piano accompaniment, coupling a root-fifth power chord with additional tones (usually the sixth and flat-seventh). </p> <p>These are played on higher strings in alternation with the chord’s fifth. Garcia takes this framework and funks up the joint with a slinky 16th-note groove, squeezing out numerous variations as the form unfolds (refer to the original recording). For another classic “Jerry” interpretation of this track (and “Ripple”), check out <em>Almost Acoustic,</em> the first of a pair of releases by the Jerry Garcia Acoustic Band. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_YP4050e6hs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/grateful-dead">Grateful Dead</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-acoustic-stylings-late-jerry-garcia#comments Dale Turner Hole Notes Holiday 2012 Jerry Garcia 2012 Blogs Lessons Magazine Sun, 05 Jul 2015 15:43:27 +0000 Dale Turner 17475 at http://www.guitarworld.com Betcha Can't Play This: Ethan Brosh's Cascading Harmonics — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-cascading-harmonics-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In this new edition of Betcha Can't Play This, guitarist Ethan Brosh demonstrates his way of playing cascading harmonics.</p> <p>You'll notice this video is much longer than the typical Betcha Can't Play This video, since it goes into greater left- and right-hand detail—and into greater detail across the board. You'll also notice there's no tab included (Again, the longer video explains the fret positions and a whole lot more).</p> <p>For two other Betcha Can't Play This columns by Brosh, check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-guitarist-ethan-brosh-lays-down-challenge">Betcha Can't Play This: Guitarist Ethan Brosh Lays Down the Challenge</a> and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-diminished-madness-guitarist-ethan-brosh">Betcha Can't Play This: Diminished Madness with Guitarist Ethan Brosh</a>. You'll find a third one under RELATED CONTENT, below the photo.</p> <p><strong>For more about Brosh, visit <a href="http://ethanbrosh.com/">ethanbrosh.com</a>.</strong></p> <p>As always, good luck! We have more on the way!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/-VIGjUeI8uw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-cascading-harmonics-video#comments Betcha Can't Play This Ethan Brosh Videos Betcha Can't Play This News Lessons Thu, 02 Jul 2015 14:51:14 +0000 Guitar World Staff 22094 at http://www.guitarworld.com Betcha Can't Play This: Nita Strauss Solo Lick from Alice Cooper Tour http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-nita-strauss-solo-lick-alice-cooper-tour <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's a brand-new edition of Betcha Can't Play This featuring Alice Cooper guitarist Nita Strauss, who recently visited <em>Guitar World</em> HQ.</p> <p>Last time, she played a <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-nita-strauss-descending-legato-lick-video">Descending Legato Lick.</a> This time, she demonstrates a lick from her solo spotlight section from her shows with Cooper.</p> <p>As with the other <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-cascading-harmonics-video">new "Betcha Can't Play This" videos</a>, this is an expanded version of the usually brief "Betcha" videos on GuitarWorld.com.</p> <p>Also, note that there are no tabs, since Strauss explains key left- and right-hand techniques in the clip. </p> <p>For other recent Betcha Can't Play This columns, check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-guitarist-ethan-brosh-lays-down-challenge">Betcha Can't Play This: Guitarist Ethan Brosh Lays Down the Challenge</a> and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-diminished-madness-guitarist-ethan-brosh">Betcha Can't Play This: Diminished Madness with Guitarist Ethan Brosh</a>. </p> <p>As always, good luck! We have more on the way!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/f7W24uUt4Qo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/alice-cooper">Alice Cooper</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-nita-strauss-solo-lick-alice-cooper-tour#comments Alice Cooper Betcha Can't Play This Nita Strauss Videos News Lessons Thu, 02 Jul 2015 14:49:02 +0000 Guitar World Staff 22935 at http://www.guitarworld.com Betcha Can't Play This: Eric Johnson-Inspired Blues Shred in A Minor by Elliott Klein http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-eric-johnson-inspired-blues-shred-minor-elliott-klein <!--paging_filter--><p>It's time for another edition of Betcha Can't Play This!</p> <p>Welcome a new Betcha Can't Play This guitarist—Elliott Klein—and his first lick, a bit of Eric Johnson-inspired blues shred in A minor.</p> <p>As with the other <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-cascading-harmonics-video">new "Betcha Can't Play This" videos</a>, this is an expanded version of the usually brief "Betcha" videos on GuitarWorld.com.</p> <p>Also, note that there are no tabs, since Klein explains key left- and right-hand techniques in the clip. </p> <p>For other recent Betcha Can't Play This columns, check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-guitarist-ethan-brosh-lays-down-challenge">Betcha Can't Play This: Guitarist Ethan Brosh Lays Down the Challenge</a> and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-diminished-madness-guitarist-ethan-brosh">Betcha Can't Play This: Diminished Madness with Guitarist Ethan Brosh</a>. You'll find more under RELATED CONTENT, below the photo.</p> <p>For more from Klein, check out his lessons on <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/elliott-klein">guitarworld.com</a>.</p> <p>As always, good luck! We have more on the way!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/3iGfMs3xaLM?list=UUqHkFMEmOPFO3ahcrrBAj4w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eric-johnson">Eric Johnson</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-eric-johnson-inspired-blues-shred-minor-elliott-klein#comments Betcha Can't Play This Elliott Klein Eric Johnson Videos Lessons Wed, 01 Jul 2015 21:34:36 +0000 Guitar World Staff 22697 at http://www.guitarworld.com Get a Free 'Mastering Arpeggios Part 2' Lesson at the 'Guitar World Lessons' Store — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/get-free-mastering-arpeggios-part-2-lesson-guitar-world-lessons-store-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2,</em> an impressive compilation of nine instructional video lessons and tabs by Jimmy Brown, is now available through the Guitar World Lessons <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/EF57BA06-4DBD-DB72-635C-2E213E3A8004?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=arpeggios2">Webstore</a> and <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-world-lessons/id942720009?mt=8">App.</a></p> <p>It joins the ranks of the many lessons already available through <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/EF57BA06-4DBD-DB72-635C-2E213E3A8004?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=arpeggios2">Guitar World Lessons.</a></p> <p>To celebrate this new release, <em>Guitar World</em> is offering the first <em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2</em> lesson, "G Major Seven Arpeggios in Positions," as a FREE download! Note that all nine <em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2</em> lessons are available—as a package—for only $14.99.</p> <p>You can watch the trailer for <em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2</em> below.</p> <p><a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/EF57BA06-4DBD-DB72-635C-2E213E3A8004?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=arpeggios2">This new collection</a> is the 90-minute-plus follow-up to <em>Mastering Arpeggios</em>. It introduces and covers everything you need to know about the five essential seventh-chord arpeggio qualities: major seven, dominant seven, minor seven, minor-seven flat-five and diminished seven. </p> <p>Again focusing on the popular guitar key of G, your instructor, longtime GW Senior Music Editor Jimmy Brown, presents all possible fretboard positions and two-octave fingering patterns for these arpeggios and shows you ways to transpose them to any other key, either by progressing through the cycle of fourths/fifths or taking each shape you’ve learned and moving up or down the fretboard chromatically (in one-fret increments). </p> <p>Jimmy then shows you extended two-notes-per-string “monster” patterns that move diagonally up and across the neck, spanning three octaves. Also covered are the seven diatonic seventh-chord arpeggios that live in the key of G major, demonstrated in all positions, and interval patterns of fourths, fifths, sixths and sevenths applied to the arpeggios. The lesson product concludes with an entertaining performance of an original interpretation and tab arrangement of “Presto” from “Sonata 1 For Solo Violin” by Johann Sebastian Bach, which serves as an effective and musically satisfying practice piece.</p> <p><em>Mastering Arpeggios Part 2</em> includes:</p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 1 (Part 1): G Major Seven Arpeggios in Positions</strong> his first part of Chapter 1 begins with a quick review of the G major scale and G major triad arpeggio, played up and down one string for purposes of illustration. Jimmy then demonstrates all of the fixed-position two-octave fingerings for a G major seven arpeggio between fourth and seventh positions, along the way showing you a bunch of useful “alternate picking shred cells” and a neat application for improvisation—playing Gmaj7 over an E bass note or Em or Em7 chord to create a cool, jazzy Em9 sound. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 1 (Part 2): G Major Seven Arpeggios in Positions (continued)</strong> This conclusion of Chapter 1 demonstrates all the remaining possible fretboard positions and fingerings for playing G major-seven arpeggios across two octaves, with additional “speed picking cells” presented along the way that reside within the larger patterns. Also covered are patterns in first and second position that combine open strings with fretted notes. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 2: G Dominant Seven and Minor Seven Arpeggios in Positions</strong> Using all the two-octave G major-seven shapes shown in the previous segment, this chapter shows you how to convert them to G dominant- and minor-seven shapes, by “flatting” the seventh and third. Necessary fingering adjustments are covered, as the shapes morph from major-seven to dominant-seven to minor-seven. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/L8Y3aXxGiwQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 3: G Minor Seven Flat-five and Diminished Seven Arpeggios in Positions</strong> Working off of all the G minor-seven shapes presented in the previous chapter, this lesson shows you how to go from minor-seven to minor-seven flat-five to fully diminished-seven, including any necessary fingering adjustments that need to be made to accommodate the lowering of certain notes by one fret. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 4: The Circle of Fifths/Fourths and Practicing Drills</strong> Before continuing with extended arpeggio shapes and applications, this chapter presents a concise review of what is called the “circle of fifths,” or “circle of fourths,” and demonstrates a couple of easy ways to visually remember the cycle on the fretboard and ways to use it to practice all arpeggio shapes learned thus far in all 12 keys. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 5: Two-notes-per-string Patterns</strong> This chapter shows you how to take the five seventh-chord arpeggio qualities covered in the previous chapters and expand them into extended “monster” runs that span three octaves by moving diagonally across the fretboard using two notes per string with quick position shifts. Different “launching points” are presented, starting on the root, third, fifth and seventh of any given arpeggio. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 6: Diatonic Seventh-chord Arpeggios in G</strong> This lesson offers some practical, useful music theory and technical studies by presenting a set of seven different seventh-chord arpeggios that live within the key of G major, consisting of Gmaj7, Am7, Bm7, Cmaj7, D7, Em7 and F#m7b5. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 7: Interval Patterns</strong> This chapter takes the two-octave shapes for the seven diatonic seventh-chord arpeggios from the previous lesson and shows you how to “scramble” the notes by playing them in melodic patterns of fourth and fifth intervals that have you continually crossing strings, which makes for a great alternate picking workout, as well as some neat sounds. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 8: “Presto,” from “Sonata 1 For Solo Violin” by Johann Sebastian Bach</strong> This final chapter presents a performance of Jimmy’s own guitar adaptation and fingering arrangement of a beautiful violin piece by legendary classical composer Johann Sebastian Bach called “Presto,” from “Sonata 1 for Solo Violin.” </p> <p><strong>For more information, visit the Guitar World Lessons <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/EF57BA06-4DBD-DB72-635C-2E213E3A8004?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=arpeggios2">Webstore</a> and download the <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-world-lessons/id942720009?mt=8">App</a> now.</strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-brown">Jimmy Brown</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/get-free-mastering-arpeggios-part-2-lesson-guitar-world-lessons-store-video#comments arpeggios Guitar World Lessons Jimmy Brown Videos News Features Lessons Wed, 01 Jul 2015 20:54:39 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24859 at http://www.guitarworld.com Quick Lick: Pantera — "Cowboys from Hell" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/quick-lick-pantera-cowboys-hell <!--paging_filter--><p><em>In Quick Licks, we bringing you short, bite-sized video lessons that show you how to play classic riffs from your favorite songs.</em></p> <p>In this Quick Lick, Matt Scharfglass shows you how to play the intro to Pantera's "Cowboys from Hell." </p> <p>The song begins with a lick that's based on an E-minor blues scale played in the 12th position before sliding down to play a slightly altered version an octave lower.</p> <p>Since you're in a "Cowboys from Hell" mood, <a href="http://www.revolvermag.com/news/viral-video-panteras-cowboys-from-hell-ukulele-cover.html">check out Rob Scallon's new ukulele cover of the tune.</a> </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience963446465001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="963446465001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/pantera">Pantera</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dimebag-darrell">Dimebag Darrell</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/quick-lick-pantera-cowboys-hell#comments Dimebag Darrell Pantera Quick Licks Videos Lessons Tue, 30 Jun 2015 17:06:15 +0000 Matt Scharfglass 11032 at http://www.guitarworld.com Acoustic Nation with Dale Turner: The Complex and Groovy Fingerpicking of Guitarist/Actor Jerry Reed http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-dale-turner-complex-and-groovy-fingerpicking-guitaristactor-jerry-reed <!--paging_filter--><p>Jerry Reed (1937–2008), known by many as Burt Reynolds’ truck-driving partner in crime in the 1977 film <em>Smokey and the Bandit</em>, was also a highly accomplished and influential guitar picker—influencing the likes of Eric Johnson, Brent Mason, John Jorgensen, Tommy Emmanuel, Steve Morse and countless others—revered for his mind-boggling “guitar dueling” records with Chet Atkins, as well as a thriving songwriting career that spawned tunes that even Elvis Presley covered (“Guitar Man”). </p> <p>How Reed managed to maintain his guitar chops while being a major film star—in later years, Jerry also appeared in Adam Sandler’s <em>The Waterboy</em> and with Robin Williams in <em>The Survivors</em>—is anyone’s guess.</p> <p>Let’s look at some of the technical and stylistic elements that made Reed a great player. </p> <p>He used a thumbpick, so if you have one, use it in every instance a thumbstroke (p) is indicated in the following examples.</p> <p>In 1967, after having had songwriter success with “Crazy Legs” (as recorded by Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps) and “That’s All You Gotta Do” (as recorded by Brenda Lee), Reed struck gold with “Guitar Man” (<em>The Unbelievable Guitar and Voice of Jerry Reed</em>), a groovy acoustic blues played in the highly unusual Dbmaj9sus4 tuning (low to high, Db Ab Db Gb C Db). (Think “drop-D, down a half step,” with the B string then tuned up a whole step.) </p> <p>The song is propelled by a bass line similar to that in <strong>FIGURE 1a</strong>. Fret the bass notes with your index and middle fingers, reserving the ring finger and pinkie for the double-stop in <strong>FIGURE 1b</strong>; pick as indicated for the complete verse riff.</p> <p>Atkins, long enamored with Reed’s playing (Chet produced JR’s “If I Don’t Live Up to It” single in 1965), joined forces with Reed in 1970 on the devastating guitar duo record, <em>Me &amp; Jerry</em>, earning the two a Grammy for Best Instrumental Performance. </p> <p>They paired up again in 1972 with <em>Chet &amp; Me</em> (Jerry in the left speaker, Chet in the right), which opens with the blistering “Jerry’s Breakdown,” the signature line from which informs <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>. Fingerpick as indicated and let the notes ring together as much as possible. <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> is similar to the tune’s middle section, where Reed fingerpicks arpeggios at lightning speed. Perfect the pattern in bar 1 first; in later bars, the fourth string’s notes descend in half steps.</p> <p>In 1975, Reed issued <em>Mind Your Love</em>, an album ending with the drop-D-tuned solo guitar piece, “Struttin’,” its fret-hand insanity hinted at in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>. Barre your index finger across the top four strings, then fret the opening chord, add an extra note, A (first string, fifth fret), with the middle finger “pre-fretting” a chord fragment that opens bar 2, and don’t move the fingers otherwise. You can then barre all the seventh-fret partial chords in measures 1 and 2 with the pinkie.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 5</strong> is inspired by the “free-time” ending of Reed’s signature solo instrumental “The Claw,” one of the most covered “super chops” solo guitar pieces by students interested in Reed/Atkins/Travis–style fingerpicking.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/85760640&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-06-29%20at%2011.11.11%20AM.png" width="620" height="470" alt="Screen shot 2015-06-29 at 11.11.11 AM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-06-29%20at%2011.11.33%20AM.png" width="620" height="337" alt="Screen shot 2015-06-29 at 11.11.33 AM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-dale-turner-complex-and-groovy-fingerpicking-guitaristactor-jerry-reed#comments Acoustic Nation acoustic nation April 2015 Dale Turner Jerry Reed Lessons Blogs Lessons Magazine Mon, 29 Jun 2015 20:30:14 +0000 Dale Turner 23633 at http://www.guitarworld.com Beyond the Fretboard: Visualizing Your Own Scales, Part 1 http://www.guitarworld.com/beyond-fretboard-visualizing-your-own-scales-part-1 <!--paging_filter--><p>As guitar players, we sometimes get too comfortable with certain scale shapes because they can be easy to remember.</p> <p>For example, think about the minor pentatonic scale; almost immediately, the mental image of that familiar box shape is probably conjured in your mind's eye. The fact that we can instantly recall various patterns due to their spacial layout over the fretboard is a great thing. But what if we're relying too heavily on existing scale shapes?</p> <p>Scales are just pre-determined paths that get us from point A (root note) to point B (the octave). Some scales sound very musical, while others have a less-conventional harmonic architecture.</p> <p>For some younger rock guitarists, the process of learning and memorizing existing scales might be the extent of their development when it comes to improvising.</p> <p>But what about arpeggios? Arpeggios seem to be an intimidating concept to beginners, intermediates and even some advanced players for a few reasons:</p> <p>01. The name seems "elitist" in nature and sounds like it should be reserved for classical music.</p> <p>It simply comes from the italian word "arpeggiare," which either translates to "play on a harp" or "broken chord." All this means is we're playing each note of a chord separately, without any of the notes ringing out simultaneously. On a theoretical level, arpeggios and chords are basically the same thing. The only difference is in their execution; one is monophonic (one note at a time), while the other is polyphonic (multiple notes at the same time).</p> <p>02. Arpeggios are viewed as being "synonymous with sweep picking."</p> <p>Not everyone wants to be a shredder. For this reason, some people tend to underestimate or even completely ignore arpeggios because they have been popularly linked with sweep picking. Yes, a lot of technically advanced axe-slingers love using arpeggios. But truth be told, you NEVER have to learn sweep picking in order to effectively use arpeggios.</p> <p>03. Some of the more popular arpeggio shapes seem difficult to play and memorize.</p> <p>Since arpeggios are 'broken chord' patterns, they're usually laid out over the fretboard in familiar chord shapes (derived from the CAGE system). But this brings us back to the previous problem. After all, the most economical way to execute a "C shape" minor arpeggio would be to sweep pick it (because that shape consists of a one-note-per-string sequence).</p> <p>So what's the best way to make arpeggios accessible to ALL guitarists? One way is to visualize them as if they are scales (the only difference is that they consist of chord tones).</p> <p>That sounds reasonable, but there are a few practical limitations to this proposal. First, the most basic arpeggio (triad) is comprised of a meager 3-note grouping. This makes it rather difficult to plot the notes on the fretboard in a 'boxed' format without invoking the sweep picking approach.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/diagram%201.png" width="620" height="855" alt="diagram 1.png" /></p> <p>As you can see, it's doable but challenging if you're not used to a wide shape, which involves tough hand stretching and some tricky finger rolling. But if you're up to the task, these patterns can definitely be useful.</p> <p>Let's try adding an additional note to the mix. The most obvious way to do this would be to experiment with 7th arpeggios (or 7th chords). These chords definitely have a unique harmonic texture that distinguishes itself from the more conventional-sounding triads.</p> <p>The quick theoretical explanation as to why they're called "7th chords" is pretty straightforward; both the major and minor scales each contain seven notes. Triads are simply the first, third and fifth notes of a particular scale played together (becoming a chord) or individually (becoming an arpeggio). If we add the seventh note in a scale to the existing triad, we arrive at a 7th chord (essentially, all of the odd-numbered notes in a 7-note scale played simultaneously; 1,3,5,7).</p> <p>So let's see how these guys help in our quest of creating visually friendly shapes on the fretboard without resorting to sweep picking. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/diagram%202.png" width="620" height="858" alt="diagram 2.png" /></p> <p>(Note: the numbers inside the circles are suggestions for which fingers to use for each note. These are just suggestions, so feel free to use alternate fingering schemes and even slides in some instances) </p> <p>Not bad, but there's still some stretching involved and the shapes are a little too abstract. But at least we've started to look at arpeggios in a two-note-per-string context. Hopefully this is helpful for those of you who do not sweep pick and aren't interested in learning the technique anytime soon. </p> <p>In my next column, we'll dig deeper and try to arrive at some comfortable box shapes rooted in the concept of more extended arpeggios. We might even sprinkle in a few passing tones.</p> <p><em>Chris Breen is a New Jersey-based guitarist with 14 years of experience under his belt. He, along with his brother Jon (on drums) started the two-piece metal project known as <a href="https://www.facebook.com/ScarsicBand">SCARSIC</a> in 2011. They've recently been joined by bassist Bill Loucas and have released an album, </em>A Tale of Two Worlds<em> (available on iTunes, Amazon and Spotify). Chris also is part of an all-acoustic side project called <a href="http://www.reverbnation.com/EyesTurnStone">Eyes Turn Stone</a>. Chris teaches guitar lessons (in person or via Skype). For more information, visit <a href="http://www.breenmusiclessons.com/">BreenMusicLessons.com</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/beyond-fretboard-visualizing-your-own-scales-part-1#comments Beyond the Fretboard Chris Breen Blogs Lessons Mon, 29 Jun 2015 18:40:32 +0000 Chris Breen 21251 at http://www.guitarworld.com Metal for Life with Metal Mike: How to Reinvent a Modal Melody by Changing Only One Note — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-how-reinvent-modal-melody-changing-only-one-note-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Most of us are familiar with at least a few of the modes, which are various reorientations of the notes of a standard scale, such as the major scale, around a different root note. </p> <p>To review, the major scale’s minor modes are Dorian (intervallically spelled 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7), Aeolian (1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7), Phrygian (1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7), and Locrian (1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7), and its major modes are Ionian, which is the major scale itself (1 2 3 4 5 6 7), Lydian (1 2 3 #4 5 6 7) and Mixolydian (1 2 3 4 5 6 b7). </p> <p>The great majority of metal music is based on the Aeolian mode, and in this month’s column I’d like to show you a simple, effective way to take any Aeolian line and change and mutate its character, which entails altering only one note. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> is a single-note run based on the A Aeolian mode (A B C D E F G), which is comprised of the same seven notes as the C major scale but rooted on A instead of C. The line is performed with alternate picking (down-up-down-up) throughout, so strive to maintain an even and consistently precise articulation. </p> <p>The line’s melodic contour begins with four ascending notes, followed by three descending notes, then five ascending notes, and then 11 descending notes, after which the pattern of five ascending notes followed by 11 descending notes repeats. </p> <p>In <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, I use essentially the same structure but move the minor, or “flatted,” seventh, G, up a half step to the major seventh, G#, which mutates the scale to A harmonic minor (A B C D E F G#), intervallically spelled 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7. Using a similar melodic approach, I begin by ascending through one and a half octaves of the scale, followed by a three-note descent and then an eight-note ascent. </p> <p>Using this pattern, the phrase gradually works its way up the fretboard. Notice how, by simply changing the flatted seventh, G, to the major seventh, G#, the musical character and mood of the line is altered in a very distinct way, illustrating how one can easily substitute one note in any Aeolian melody to transform it into a harmonic-minor melody. </p> <p>Now let’s try doing this same sort of thing in E minor. The first three bars of <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> consist of a long, descending line played in steady 16ths and based on E Aeolian (E F# G A B C D), played in 15th position. </p> <p>In bar 5, I switch to ascending eighth notes based on the same scale, but then, in the next bar, I substitute the major seventh, D#, for the minor, or flatted, seventh, D. The reason this note stands out from the rest is it functions as a brief allusion to the major five chord, B, as D# is that chord’s major third. </p> <p>Try taking any other E Aeolian-based melody you know and changing the D notes to D# to transform it to an E harmonic minor melody. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hNnp1Ty_J8M" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-06-17%20at%201.51.33%20PM.png" width="620" height="460" alt="Screen shot 2015-06-17 at 1.51.33 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-06-17%20at%201.52.11%20PM.png" width="620" height="288" alt="Screen shot 2015-06-17 at 1.52.11 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-how-reinvent-modal-melody-changing-only-one-note-video#comments August 2015 Metal For Life Metal Mike Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos Lessons Magazine Mon, 29 Jun 2015 14:47:15 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak 24745 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep: Stevie Ray Vaughan's Playing on "Couldn't Stand the Weather" http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-stevie-ray-vaughans-playing-couldnt-stand-weather <!--paging_filter--><p>Stevie Ray Vaughan’s distinctive playing style is earmarked by equal parts pure power, intensity of focus, razor-sharp precision and deeply emotional conviction. And then there’s his tone—probably the best Stratocaster-derived sound ever evoked from the instrument. </p> <p>Stevie tuned his guitar down one half step (low to high, Eb Ab Db Gb Bb Eb), a move inspired by one of his biggest influences, Jimi Hendrix. He also preferred heavy gauge strings: high to low, .013, .015, .019, .028, .038, .058, occasionally switching the high E string to either a .012 or .011. To facilitate the use of such heavy strings, Stevie’s guitars were re-fretted with large Dunlop 6100 or Stewart-MacDonald 150 fretwire.</p> <p>Let’s begin this lesson with a look at the title track from Stevie’s second album, <em>Couldn’t Stand the Weather</em>, transcribed in this issue (see page 110). The song begins in “free time” (no strict tempo). </p> <p>While brother Jimmie Vaughan tremolo-strums the opening chords—Bm-A7-G7-F#7—Stevie adds improvised solo lines (see transcription bars 1-8): over Bm, Stevie sticks with the B blues scale (B D E F F# A), over A7 he utilizes the A blues scale (A C D Eb E G) and over G7 he uses G blues (G Bb C Db D F). Strive to recreate Stevie’s precision when it comes to his articulation. </p> <p>Over Jimmie’s F#7 chord, Stevie plays a first inversion F#7#9, which places the third of the chord, A#, in the bass (as the lowest note). (Stevie employed this same unusual voicing for E7#9 in “Cold Shot.”) </p> <p>A four-bar, R&amp;B/soul-style single-note riff follows, doubled in octaves by guitar and bass (see bars 9-17). Played four times, two extra beats of rest are added the third time through. This is shown as a bar of 6/4 in bar 13 of the transcription.</p> <p>In bars 18-23, Stevie adds a very Hendrix-y rhythm guitar part, played in 10th position and beginning on beat two with an F octave fretted on the G and high E strings, strummed in 16th notes. Stevie maintains the rhythmic push of steady 16ths through most of the riff by consistently strumming in a down-up-down-up “one-ee-and-a” pattern. </p> <p>At the end of bar 18, barre your middle finger across the top three strings at the 12th fret, and then bend and release the G and B strings one half step. As the notes are held into the next bar, add subtle finger vibrato. Keep your fret-hand thumb wrapped over the top of the fretboard throughout the riff, using it to fret the D root note on the low E string’s 10th fret. Stevie intersperses this low root note into the lick in a few essential spots, akin to Hendrix on his songs “Freedom” and “Izabella.” </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/HppszdNQNXs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_1.jpg" /></p> <p>Stevie displays his true brilliance as an improviser when playing over a slow blues. All of the following examples are played in the key of G, utilizing the G blues scale (G Bb C Db D F) as a basis. Across the first two bars of <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I play two- and three-note chord figures against the low G and C root notes, fretted with the thumb. On beat three of both bars, I play a trill by barring the index finger across the D and G strings and then quickly hammering on and pulling off with the middle finger one fret higher on the G string. </p> <p>When playing bar 3, keep your index finger barred across the top two strings at the third fret while bending notes on the G and B strings. On beat two, quickly hammer on and pull off to the fourth fret on the high E string. This G-Ab-G hammer/pull is a staple for Stevie, used in myriad different and creative ways.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_2.jpg" /></p> <p>Another essential element of Stevie’s slow-blues lead playing approach is the use of Albert King–style multiple-string bends. As shown in <strong>FIGURE 2a</strong>, I bend the high E string up one whole step at the eighth fret using the ring finger (supported by the middle) and simultaneously catch the B string under the fingertip and bend it up a whole step as well so that it “goes along for the ride.” In <strong>FIGURE 2b</strong>, I catch the top three strings under the fingertip. It will take practice to build up the strength and “finger traction” to execute these bends properly.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_3ab.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_3c4a.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_4b.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>FIGURES 3a and 3b</strong> illustrate another way to add pull-offs on the high E string, this time fretting A and then pulling back from Ab to G. This is followed by repeated pull-offs on the B string, illustrated more clearly in <strong>FIGURE 3c. FIGURES 4a and 4b</strong> offer two more permutations of this idea.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5ab.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5c.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5de.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5f.jpg" /></p> <p>Another nod to Albert is the use of fingerpicking to accent notes on the high E string. I use my middle finger to pick and snap the string back against the fretboard, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURES 5a–5f</strong>. Notice in <strong>FIGURES 5b, 5c and 5e</strong> the use of a half-step bend at the seventh fret on the high E string. Albert was a master of microtonal bending, a technique learned well by Stevie.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_6.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_7.jpg" /></p> <p>Stevie devised some unique position shifts, utilizing bends and slides on the G string. <strong>FIGURES 6a–c</strong> present three examples. </p> <p>The use of the notes A, Ab and G on the high E string allude to the V (five) chord, D, and the D blues scale (D F G Gb A C). <strong>FIGURE 8a</strong> illustrates the scale, and <strong>FIGURES 7 and 8b–d</strong> offer examples played over the V chord. Another staple of Stevie’s style is the use of slides on the G string, exemplified in <strong>FIGURES 9a–c</strong>.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_8ab.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_8c.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_8d.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_9a.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_9b.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_9c.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/stevie-ray-vaughan">Stevie Ray Vaughan</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmie-vaughan">Jimmie Vaughan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-stevie-ray-vaughans-playing-couldnt-stand-weather#comments In Deep Jimmie Vaughan July 2010 Stevie Ray Vaughan Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort Blogs Lessons Magazine Mon, 29 Jun 2015 14:27:20 +0000 Andy Aledort 17124 at http://www.guitarworld.com Download a Free 'Talkin' Blues, Part 1' Lesson at the 'Guitar World Lessons' Store — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/get-your-free-talkin-blues-lesson-guitar-world-lessons-store-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Talkin’ Blues, Part 1,</em> an impressive compilation of 10 instructional video lessons and tabs by Keith Wyatt, is now available through the Guitar World Lessons <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/CBEB4D84-3F62-A0EB-E670-4FD53D1B33F9?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=TalkinBluesP1">Webstore</a> and <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-world-lessons/id942720009?mt=8">App.</a></p> <p>It joins the ranks of the many lessons already available through <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/CBEB4D84-3F62-A0EB-E670-4FD53D1B33F9?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=TalkinBluesP1">Guitar World Lessons.</a></p> <p>To celebrate this new release, <em>Guitar World</em> is offering the first <em>Talkin’ Blues, Part 1</em> lesson, "Stretch Marks," as a FREE download! Note that all 10 <em>Talkin' Blues, Part 1</em> lessons are available—as a package—for only $14.99.</p> <p>Below, you can watch the trailer for lesson 1, "Stretch Marks," which tackles the mechanics of proper string bending.</p> <p><a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/CBEB4D84-3F62-A0EB-E670-4FD53D1B33F9?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=TalkinBluesP1">This new collection,</a> which was produced by Wyatt for his <em>Guitar World</em> print column, "Talkin' Blues," offers a gold mine of blues guitar knowledge and stylistic authority. </p> <p>Wyatt skillfully teaches and inspires as he shows you how to play convincingly in the styles of such legendary guitarists as <strong>Chuck Berry, Albert King, Jimi Hendrix, B.B. King, T-Bone Walker, Albert Collins, Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown, Freddie King, Howlin’ Wolf, Bo Diddley, Johnny “Guitar” Watson</strong> and others. </p> <p>Topics include how and when to use fills effectively, making licks groove with accents and swinging eighth notes, jazz-blues chord extensions and substitutions, “chicken pickin’,” low-register phrasing and more, including:</p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 1: Stretch Marks</strong> Keith explains and demonstrates the mechanics of proper string bending technique and provides examples of how to incorporate half-step and whole-step bends into the A Dorian mode and the A minor pentatonic scale, with an emphasis on achieving good intonation (pitch accuracy). He then offers a stylistically authentic 12-bar blues guitar solo, inspired by Albert King, B.B. King and T-Bone Walker, that features a variety of bends applied to the one, four and five chords in the progression. Check out the trailer below.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EbRmoDK840o" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 2: Hey, Bo Diddley</strong> This chapter pays tribute to the rhythm guitar grooves, chord riffs and bass-line figures pioneered by Bo Diddley, with a look at their musical and cultural origins and their impact on other distinguished blues and rock guitarists who were inspired by Diddley, such as Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly, Pete Townshend, George Thorogood and the Edge. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 3: The Art of the Fill</strong> This chapter covers the art of playing interactive, “call-and-response”-type lead guitar fills between a blues vocalists’ phrases and using good taste and discretion, so as to not to interrupt or overshadow a singer’s melody. Keith offers abundant examples of short and sweet licks inspired by such great players as Bobby Bland, Albert King, B.B. King, Freddie King and Guitar Slim. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 4: Three Into Two</strong> This lesson addresses the musically exciting “clash” that occurs between even, or “straight,” eighth notes played on the guitar and swing eighth notes played by a drummer, as pioneered by legendary players like T-Bone Walker on “Strollin’ with Bone,” and, more famously, by Chuck Berry on “Johnny B. Goode.” </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 5: Lowdown and Dirty</strong> Keith explores the guitar’s low register and demonstrates how it can be effectively used when soloing to expand one’s range and put a fresh, ear-catching spin on phrases. Drawing inspiration from players like Freddie King, Johnny “Guitar” Watson, Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown and Albert Collins, Wyatt crafts an appealing 12-bar solo that’s played entirely on the guitar’s bottom two strings and mostly within the first five frets, employing a combination of open and fretted notes. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 6: Accented Speech</strong> This chapter focuses on the importance and musical effectiveness of using accents and varied articulations to make certain notes stand out among others in a melodic phrase, in the same way that a dynamic public speaker enthralls an audience by varying pitch and volume word to word. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 7: Chicken Pickin’</strong> Keith begins by offering one-string exercises that have you alternating between picked downstrokes and upstrokes plucked with the bare middle finger, a technique known as hybrid picking, then shows you how to combine hybrid picking with some fret-hand muting to create pitchless “clucks” and how to craft soulful, rhythmically animated licks that also incorporate string bends, using the key of C and the C minor pentatonic scale to demonstrate. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 8: “Ain’t Got that Swing?”</strong> Wyatt delves into jazz-blues rhythm guitar playing and introduces big-band-style seventh-chord voicings and the signature “four-on-the-floor” comping (accompaniment) style popularized by guitarist Freddie Green in Count Basie’s rhythm section, as well as Jimi Hendrix on songs like “Up from the Skies.” </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 9: Taking it Uptown</strong> Building upon the previous chapter, this lesson explores more sophisticated, “uptown” jazz harmony and chord voicings that utilize harmonic “extensions,” such as ninths, 11ths and 13ths, and alterations, such as flat-fives and flat-nines, to inject an exciting feeling of harmonic “tension and release” into a blues progression without fundamentally altering it. </p> <p>• <strong>Chapter 10: Substitute Teacher</strong> This final chapter completes Keith’s fascinating three-part exploration of jazz-blues guitar playing with examples of how great guitarsts like Walker employ passing chords and substitutions within a blues progression to create constant harmonic motion within the 12-bar framework. Keith demonstrates how to use altered dominant chords—dominant seven chords with a sharped or flatted fifth and/or ninth—and diminished-seven chords in conjunction with a chromatic root-note approach to a subsequent chord from a half step above or below to create smooth, slick voice-leading and a dramatically rich harmonic environment. </p> <p><strong>For more information, visit the Guitar World Lessons <a href="https://guitarworldlessons.com/product/CBEB4D84-3F62-A0EB-E670-4FD53D1B33F9?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=TalkinBluesP1">Webstore</a> and download the <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-world-lessons/id942720009?mt=8">App</a> now.</strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/get-your-free-talkin-blues-lesson-guitar-world-lessons-store-video#comments free lesson Guitar World Lessons Keith Wyatt Talkin Blues Videos News Features Lessons Thu, 25 Jun 2015 17:52:32 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24805 at http://www.guitarworld.com Playing Tips: Joe Satriani on Improving Your Legato Technique http://www.guitarworld.com/playing-tips-joe-satriani-improving-your-legato-technique <!--paging_filter--><p>In this bite-sized lesson, Joe Satriani provides some useful exercises for improving your legato technique. </p> <p>From Satch: </p> <p>"Here’s a great exercise that’s cool because it’s a repeated symmetrical pattern that has nothing to do with any specific key signature [<strong>FIGURE 17</strong>]. </p> <p>"I play three notes per string, picking each string only once and then sounding the next two notes with hammer-ons. Then you can change the fingering to this [<strong>FIGURE 18</strong>] or this chromatic pattern [<strong>FIGURE 18,</strong> the last pattern]. You will find that every note that you play on every fret will require a slightly different attack with the fretting fingertip."</p> <p>For more from this lesson, consider our <em>Play Like a Guitar Wizard</em> special issue—which also includes lessons from Steve Vai, Zakk Wylde, Michael Angelo Batio and more—in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/products/guitar-legends-play-like-a-guitar-wizaard">online store</a>.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/satchlegato.jpg" width="620" height="261" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/playing-tips-joe-satriani-improving-your-legato-technique#comments Joe Satriani Playing Tips Blogs Lessons Thu, 25 Jun 2015 16:41:16 +0000 Guitar World Staff 17432 at http://www.guitarworld.com Robert Johnson's Ferocious Guitar Style — Lesson with Tab and Audio http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-robert-johnsons-ferocious-guitar-style <!--paging_filter--><p>Regarded as one of the greatest guitarists of all time, Delta blues wizard Robert Johnson recorded only 29 songs (plus 13 alternate takes, in two sessions) during his 27 years of life. </p> <p>They were cut when he wasn’t playing for tips on street corners, in juke joints or in front of barbershops and other commercial establishments. </p> <p>In his youth, Johnson copped licks directly from Son House, who later in his life vividly recalled how Johnson developed from a bad guitarist to a “master” in just two years. </p> <p>Ike Zinnerman allegedly inspired Johnson to practice guitar in a graveyard at night while perched atop tombstones. These are only a few of the stories that helped cultivate the legend that Johnson earned his chops by making a deal with the devil. </p> <p>Johnson played his Gibson L-1 using a thumb pick and occasionally used a slide. His recordings were largely unknown until they were rereleased in 1961. Their raw intensity and gut-wrenching soulfulness laid the foundation for bands like the Rolling Stones, Cream and Led Zeppelin as well as players like Jimi Hendrix, Billy Gibbons and Jack White. </p> <p>In this column I’ll examine Johnson’s genius with a study of “Cross Road Blues,” “Walking Blues” and other songs. All examples are in open-G tuning (low to high, DGDGBD), though Johnson employed numerous other tunings, often in conjunction with a capo.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> mimics Johnson’s hugely influential “boogie blues” riff, as heard in “I Believe I’ll Dust My Broom.” Prior to Johnson’s recording of the song, this groove was played only on piano, but it became the basis for countless guitar-based tunes after he used it. </p> <p>Thumb-picked thumps of low-register notes like these are at the core of Johnson’s style, and they often support a melodic component,such as that shown in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, which is reminiscent of Johnson’s moves in “Love in Vain.” Though these passages work only in open position, others, like <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, lend themselves to higher fretting positions, as Johnson used in “Walking Blues.”</p> <p>Another key component of Johnson’s style was his use of a slide. <strong>FIGURES 4</strong> and <strong>5</strong> illustrate two of Johnson’s favorite slide phrase styles, informed by “Traveling Riverside Blues” and “Walking Blues,” respectively. </p> <p>Wear the slide on your fret-hand’s ring finger or pinkie, and use your remaining digits to dampen the strings behind the slide to lessen extraneous string noise. Position the slide parallel to and directly over the indicated frets for intonation accuracy, and lay the slide lightly against the strings, making sure they don’t touch the frets. Pluck the indicated strings with your bare fingers, and try to dampen strings you don’t wish to sound by touching them with your unused pick-hand fingers.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 6</strong>, a composite of “Cross Road Blues” and “Walking Blues,” weaves many of the above approaches—including a tasty turnaround move (bars 5–6)—into an extended stylistic tribute.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="http://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F3516148%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-u6l6U&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;secret_url=true"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-06-23%20at%2011.12.28%20AM.png" width="620" height="528" alt="Screen shot 2015-06-23 at 11.12.28 AM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-06-23%20at%2011.12.43%20AM.png" width="620" height="342" alt="Screen shot 2015-06-23 at 11.12.43 AM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/robert-johnson">Robert Johnson</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-robert-johnsons-ferocious-guitar-style#comments acoustic nation Dale Turner Hole Notes March 2013 Robert Johnson Lessons Magazine Wed, 24 Jun 2015 14:33:41 +0000 Dale Turner 17693 at http://www.guitarworld.com Playing Tips: Derek Trucks on Incorporating Harmonics Into Your Slide Playing http://www.guitarworld.com/playing-tips-derek-trucks-incorporating-harmonics-your-slide-playing <!--paging_filter--><p>In this bite-sized lesson, Derek Trucks gives you some insights on incorporating natural and artificial harmonics into your slide lines.</p> <p>From Derek: "I learned this technique from the sacred steel players. Using harmonics is a great way to get a phrase to jump out of the mix, especially when playing live.</p> <p>"There are two types of harmonics: artificial harmonics [A.H.], which are sounded from “fretted” notes, and natural harmonics [N.H.], which are sounded from open strings. In this lick [FIGURE 5a], I generate an artificial harmonic by placing the slide on the high E string at the eighth fret while simultaneously picking the string and lightly touching it with my pick-hand index finger exactly 12 frets higher, directly above the 20th fret. The result is an artificial harmonic that sounds one octave higher than the original note. </p> <p>"In this lick [FIGURE 5b], I start with a natural harmonic that’s sounded by lightly touching the high E string at the 12th fret while picking it conventionally. This produces a harmonic one octave higher than the open string. I then begin with the slide from behind the nut and quickly slide up to the 17th fret so that it raises the pitch of the harmonic."</p> <p>For more from this lesson, pick up our <em>Play Like a Guitar Wizard</em> special issue — which also includes lessons from Joe Satriani, Steve Vai, Zakk Wylde, Michael Angelo Batio and more — in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/products/guitar-legends-play-like-a-guitar-wizaard">online store</a>.</p> <p><strong>All examples are performed fingerstyle in open E tuning (low to high: E B E G# B E).</strong></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/derektruckstip.jpg" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/playing-tips-derek-trucks-incorporating-harmonics-your-slide-playing#comments Derek Trucks The Allman Brothers Band Blogs News Lessons Tue, 23 Jun 2015 16:20:04 +0000 Guitar World Staff 17510 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: 9th Chords Made Easy http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-9th-chords-made-easy <!--paging_filter--><p>As many of you readers begin to dig deeper into learning jazz guitar harmony and voicings, you'll undoubtedly come across various 9th chords, Maj9, m9, 9 etc., in your jazz-guitar explorations. </p> <p>Since these chords pop up time and again, it is important to have a variety of 9th chords under your fingers so that you can bring them into your comping, chord melody and chord soloing ideas when needed. But this doesn’t mean you have to learn a bunch of new chords. You can use previous knowledge to build great-sounding and authentic jazzy 9th chords. </p> <p>In today’s lesson, we’ll be looking at how you can use “rootless” 9th chords to expand your jazz-guitar chord vocabulary without having to learn any new shapes, simply adapting four-note chords you already have under your fingers to a new musical situation. </p> <p><strong>Building 9th Chords With Common Voicings</strong></p> <p>To begin, let’s take a look at four common jazz chords with their 1357 and rootless 9th-chord voicings. </p> <p>Notice that each chord pair shares three notes in common: the 3-5-7 of each chord, but that in the second voicing the 9th has replaced the root, which is why we call them “rootless” 9th chords, as they contain no root in the voicing. </p> <p>To get you started, here's a quick reference for the four chords used below. </p> <p>• Maj7 - m7 from the 3rd<br /> • 7 - m7b5 from the 3rd<br /> • m7 - Maj7 from the 3rd<br /> • mMaj7 - Maj7#5 from the 3rd</p> <p>This means that if you see a Dm7 and you want to make it Dm9, you simply play Fmaj7, a Maj7 chord starting on the 3rd of Dm7. Try this out with each of the following chords, Maj7-7-m7-mMaj7, using the quick guide above as a reference, through all 12 keys and with as many voicings for each 9th as you can come up with. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Jazz%20Guitar%209th%20Chords%201%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="169" alt="Jazz Guitar 9th Chords 1 JPG.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Major ii V I With 9th Chords</strong></p> <p>Here are two examples of how you can apply rootless 9th chords to a Major Key ii V I progression, one using Drop 2 and one using Drop 3 chord voicings. As a quick reference, here are the three normal chords, 1357, next to the related rootless 9th chords. If you can memorize these formulas, you will be able to quickly and easily use these chords in any jam or gig you’re on. </p> <p>• m7 - Maj7 from 3rd<br /> • 7 - m7b5 from 3rd<br /> • Maj7 - m7 from 3rd</p> <p>Try these chords out in all 12 keys, both all Drop 2 and Drop 3, then come up with your own rootless 9th chords and bring them into your Major ii V I progressions as you explore this concept further in the woodshed. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F91114182%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-Rfitv"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Jazz%20Guitar%209th%20Chords%202%20JPg.jpg" width="620" height="169" alt="Jazz Guitar 9th Chords 2 JPg.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Minor ii V I With 9th Chords</strong></p> <p>To help get you started in the minor-key area, here is an example of a minor ii-V-I chord progression using both Drop 2 and Drop 3 rootless 9th chords. </p> <p>For the m7b5, we don’t normally include a 9th with that voicing, and so you will notice that I used a plain, 1357 chord in those instances. For the other two chords, G7b9 and CmMaj7, I used a Bdim7 over G7b9, producing a rootless 7b9 chord, and an Ebmaj7#5 over CmMaj7, producing a rootless mMaj9 chord. </p> <p>As a quick guide, here are the three chords and their related 9th versions: </p> <p>• m7b5 - stays as is<br /> • 7b9 - dim7 from the 3rd<br /> • mMaj7 - Maj7#5 from the 3rd</p> <p>Check out the example below, taking it to all 12 keys if possible, and then build your own 9th voicings for minor ii V I progressions using the rules given above. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F91114223%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-i88UT"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Jazz%20Guitar%209th%20Chords%203%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="182" alt="Jazz Guitar 9th Chords 3 JPG.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>9th Chord Practice Guide</strong></p> <p>After you have checked out the different examples above, here are a number of ways that you can explore 9th chords further in your jazz guitar practicing schedule. </p> <p>01. Play any/all of the above examples in all 12 keys at various tempos.<br /> 02. Play the rootless 9th chord for any voicing you are working on and sing the root below the chord.<br /> 03. Take a tune you are working on and learn all of the chords as rootless 9th voicings, using the above lesson as a guide to find each 9th chord in the tune.<br /> 04. Practice any 9th chord that you learn with a number of different jazz guitar chords such as Drop 2 Chords, Drop 3 Chords and Drop 2 and 4 Chords.<br /> 05. Practice arpeggiating each of the rootless 9th chords in the above examples and begin to bring this concept into your soloing ideas as well. </p> <p>Playing 9th chords, and especially rootless 9ths, is an important skill for any jazz guitarist to have under their fingers. </p> <p>Check out the above examples and exercises to get started in your exploration of these handy and cool-sounding jazz guitar chords. If you have any questions about these chords, or anything jazz-guitar related, feel free to post it in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a senior lecturer at the Leeds College of Music and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-9th-chords-made-easy#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Tue, 23 Jun 2015 14:27:16 +0000 Matt Warnock 18316 at http://www.guitarworld.com