Lessons http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/8/0 en Freddie King Lesson: Going In Deep with a Blues Guitar Legend — with Video and Tab http://www.guitarworld.com/freddie-king-lesson-texas-blues-video-tab-andy-aledort-in-deep <!--paging_filter--><p>Freddie King is among the triumvirate of the greatest and most influential electric blues guitarists ever, revered with equal respect alongside the legendary blues gods B.B. King and Albert King. </p> <p>Together, they are often referred to as "The Three Kings"—all complete masters of their craft and essential subjects of study for any inspiring blues guitar enthusiast. </p> <p>In this edition of In Deep, we'll examine a few of the trademark Freddie King-isms that have earned him his rightful place as the forefront of electric blues guitar.</p> <p>Of the three Kings, Freddie had a hard-driving intensity that gave his guitar lines and solos a fiery spirit. And though he was blessed with what were arguably the most powerful vocal pipes of the three, he distinguished himself as a player and composer by penning the greatest blues guitar instrumentals in the genre’s history, such as the classic masterpieces “Hideaway,” “The Stumble,” “Sen-Sa- Shun,” “San-Ho-Zay,” “Side Tracked,” “In the Open,” and many others, all songs that have been covered brilliantly by such blues-rock heroes as Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Johnny Winter, ZZ Top and Stevie Ray Vaughan.</p> <p>Freddie King was born as Frederick Christian on September 3, 1934. Though his mother’s maiden name was King, in his early days as a performer he was thought to have changed his last name to King to align himself with B.B. King, then a rising star of blues guitar. </p> <p>His earliest records are credited to “Freddy,” but by 1968 he changed the spelling to “Freddie.” His recording career began in 1956, and by 1960 he had recorded the soon-to-be hit songs “Have You Ever Loved a Woman?,” “Love Her with a Feeling” and the instrumental smash "Hideaway," covered brilliantly by Eric Clapton with John Mayall on the <em>Blues Breakers</em> album, recorded in 1966. </p> <p>Early photos of King show him playing a mid-Fifties Gibson gold-top Les Paul with P-90 pickups, which he used along with a Gibson GA-40 amplifier. Shortly thereafter, he switched to his trademark Gibson ES-345 guitars, cranked to massive volume through Fender Quad Reverbs. </p> <p>He picked with his fingers, using a plastic thumb pick along with a metal index-finger pick, and his string gauges were very unusual: the top three string gauges were .010, .011 and .012—very light for the B and especially the G—while the wound strings were normal light-medium-gauge electric strings.</p> <p>King scored many early instrumental hits, the biggest being the aforementioned “Hideaway,” an easy-grooving 12-bar shuffle in E with a distinct, memorable melody. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates a similar melody played within the 12-bar form. </p> <p>As melodic lines are played on the top two strings with abundant use of open notes—akin to the country blues of Lightnin’ Hopkins—a rhythm part is equally attended to, built from palm-muted two-note forms on the bottom two strings and balanced against the melodic development.</p> <p>In bar 2 of the example, a simple open- to-second-fret hammer-on is replaced with a “rolling” hammer-on, wherein the middle finger is hammered onto the first fret, instead of the second, followed by a slide up to the second fret. (This more intricate technique was later adopted and employed frequently by Stevie Ray Vaughan.) </p> <p>Throughout this example, notice the subtle inclusion of single-note phrases that serve to connect the elements of the part while keeping it moving forward.</p> <p>Freddie revisited this melody for another of his classic instrumentals, “The Stumble.” <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> illustrates a similar form, which begins with a melodic line close to that of “Hideaway” but is played over a different chord progression, starting on the IV(four) chord, A, in the key of E. </p> <p>In this 16-bar form, a descending sliding double-stop lick, based on a sixth interval, is played on the G and high E strings, executed by picking the G string with the thumb and the high E string with either the index or middle finger. Pick each pair sharply and in a staccato manner (short and detached), and strive for absolute accuracy as you move quickly down the fretboard.</p> <p>Freddie showcased a similar lick in “Hideaway,” with a band “breakdown” (the band lays out from playing the groove, supplying accented chordal stabs only). <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> offers a lick along these lines, initiated with a very cool and unusual E7add2 chord voicing. The band comes back in at bar 5, over A, and, in this example, further melodic development is performed on the top two strings.</p> <p>A great example of King’s relentlessly hard-driving style is a song called “Boogie Funk,” essentially a one-chord vamp played in A. The roots of this song can be found in the John Lee Hooker classic, “Boogie Chillen.”</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 4</strong> presents a repeating riff, built around an A5 chord, that features muted- string accents along with subtle half-step bends on the low E and A strings. This is played with a “triplet feel,” so what is written as eighth notes is intended to be played as a quarter-note/eighth-note combo within a triplet bracket. I use a pick to play this part, alternating evenly between downstrokes and upstrokes, but Freddie would fingerpick such a part, so try using the thumb for the downstrokes and the index or middle finger (or both) for the upstrokes. In <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>, I add a melodic figure to the form.</p> <p>After building intensity by riding on the I (one) chord, Freddie would switch briefly to the IV (four) chord and play a similar rhythmic lick. <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> offers a part along these lines, to be performed with the pick hand in the same manner as <strong>FIGURES 4</strong> and <strong>5</strong>.</p> <p>These examples just scratch the surface of Freddie King’s genius, so dig deep into his catalog to discover even more for yourself.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1699133089001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1699133089001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <br /></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1699133013001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1699133013001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2011.35.41%20AM.png" width="620" height="442" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 11.35.41 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2011.36.04%20AM.png" width="620" height="584" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 11.36.04 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2011.37.10%20AM.png" width="620" height="589" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 11.37.10 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2011.38.06%20AM.png" width="620" height="461" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 11.38.06 AM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/freddie-king">Freddie King</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/freddie-king-lesson-texas-blues-video-tab-andy-aledort-in-deep#comments August 2012 blues Freddie King In Deep 2012 Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Thu, 03 Sep 2015 11:26:25 +0000 Andy Aledort 16113 at http://www.guitarworld.com Five Finger Death Punch Guitarist Jason Hook Says "Betcha Can't Play This" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/five-finger-death-punch-guitarist-jason-hook-says-betcha-cant-play-video/25397 <!--paging_filter--><p>This just-posted "Betcha Can't Play This" video features Five Finger Death Punch guitarist Jason Hook.</p> <p>Check it out below and have a crack at his lick!</p> <p>The band's new album, <em>Got Your Six,</em> will be released this Friday, September 4.</p> <p>For more about Hook and Five Finger Death Punch, visit <a href="http://www.fivefingerdeathpunch.com/">fivefingerdeathpunch.com.</a></p> <p><strong>Be sure to subscribe to <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqHkFMEmOPFO3ahcrrBAj4w">Guitar World's YouTube channel,</a> where you'll find new videos every day.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/88q9R4LILns" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/five-finger-death-punch-guitarist-jason-hook-says-betcha-cant-play-video/25397#comments 5FDP Betcha Can't Play This FFDP Five Finger Death Punch Jason Hook Videos News Lessons Wed, 02 Sep 2015 17:58:57 +0000 Guitar World Staff 25397 at http://www.guitarworld.com Talkin’ Blues Lesson: Cliff Gallup’s Smooth, Lyrical Ballad-Playing Style — with Tab and Audio http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-keith-wyatt-cliff-gallup-s-smooth-lyrical-ballad-playing-style <!--paging_filter--><p><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-keith-wyatt-tribute-cliff-gallup-s-legendary-flash">Last time,</a> we examined the high-energy style of Cliff Gallup, whose innovative solos with rockabilly icons Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps set a new standard for sound, technique and imagination. </p> <p>Below, we’ll look at how Gallup explored the opposite end of the musical universe—romantic ballads—with an equally successful balance of skill and attitude.</p> <p>While best known for sweat-soaked rockers, Vincent filled out his repertoire by recording a number of pre-Fifties standards from the “Great American Songbook” era, including chestnuts such as “Peg O’ My Heart,” “Ain’t She Sweet” and “Up a Lazy River.” </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates a ballad combining melodic and harmonic features typical of countless pop songs like these, including a six-two-five-one harmonic cycle in the key of G (E7-A7-D7-G), a melody closely based on the chord structure, and strong, recurring rhythmic motifs. </p> <p>Although quite sophisticated by today’s standards, pop songs then as now were built around catchy, intuitive melodies and rhythms––not coincidentally, the same values we look for in a well-phrased solo.</p> <p>Compare this melody to <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, which shows a Gallup-style solo built on the same song. His approach generally alternated between quoting the vocal melody, which gives the solo a strong backbone, and inserting improvised phrases to provide the (even then) dated material with a dose of spontaneity and energy. </p> <p>Analysis reveals that bars 1 and 2 repeat the vocal melody with some bluesy adornments, and bars 3 and 4 combine the same melodic rhythm with an improvised melody based on an A9 arpeggio (A C# E G B). The vocal melody returns in bars 5 and 6, answered by a straight-up rock and roll lick in bars 7 and 8. After more melodic embellishment in bars 9 and 10, the solo takes another unexpected turn with a double-timed blues lick in bars 11 and 12 before settling back into the vocal melody for the final few bars. </p> <p>For guitarists learning to “play changes,” ballad solos like this demonstrate how to navigate through chords without getting tangled up in theory and technique or sacrificing style and energy. Gallup erased the perceived lines between rock and roll, blues, rockabilly, pop, country, and jazz, and his approach directly inspired generations of eclectic and sophisticated electric guitar stylists, including Jeff Beck and Brian Setzer. </p> <p>Given his impact on rock guitar, it is ironic to note that Gallup’s professional career lasted barely six months before he left the band, returned to his home and family in Virginia and took a job outside music. He continued to play locally until his death in 1988, but his obituary mentioned nothing of his days as a Blue Cap. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/46871673&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Talkin%3B%20Blues.png" width="620" height="302" alt="Talkin; Blues.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Talkin%27%20Blues.png" width="620" height="486" alt="Talkin' Blues.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-keith-wyatt-cliff-gallup-s-smooth-lyrical-ballad-playing-style#comments Cliff Gallup Gene Vincent October 2014 Talkin Blues Lessons Magazine Wed, 02 Sep 2015 17:27:55 +0000 Keith Wyatt 22119 at http://www.guitarworld.com "Boogie Uproar" — The Up-Tempo Soloing Style of Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-signature-tempo-soloing-style-clarence-gatemouth-brown <!--paging_filter--><p>Sixty years ago, barely a decade into the electric guitar era, Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown unleashed one of the wildest guitar instrumentals ever captured on record. </p> <p>“Boogie Uproar” was just that, a dose of pure, in-your-face electric energy that musically linked the past—the sophistication of swing—to the future: the raw ferocity of rock and roll.</p> <p>Brown launched his career in 1947 on the heels of fellow Texas guitarist T-Bone Walker, the original architect of the electric blues guitar single-note soloing style. While influenced by Walker, Brown favored a far more aggressive barehanded attack through a cranked-up amp, a sound that he further enhanced by ditching his hollowbody Gibson L-5 for the radical new Telecaster. </p> <p>Combined with an impeccable sense of rhythm and a wild imagination, the result was a distinctive, white-knuckled style that inspired players like Guitar Slim, Johnny “Guitar” Watson and Albert Collins.</p> <p>“Boogie Uproar” is essentially a musical sparring match between Brown and various members of his band over a fast 12-bar blues in G. The main theme (similar to <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>) is a syncopated twist on the standard jump blues walking-bass pattern. </p> <p>To emulate Brown’s sound and playing approach, capo at the third fret, in which case all notes tabbed at the third fret are equivalent to open strings, and pluck aggressively with your bare thumb and fingers to create a dynamic, percussive attack.</p> <p> One of the prime lessons of “Boogie,” and of Brown’s style in general, is the importance of a strong opening phrase. Each of his five solo choruses opens with a distinctive idea, ranging from classic blues (similar to <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>) to pure energy (<strong>FIGURE 3</strong>; note the unorthodox fingering and the recommended picking pattern) to twisted (a rubbery bass-string lick like <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>) to silly (“Here Comes the Bride”) to mocking (a playground taunt, like the first four bars of <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>). </p> <p>Once we’re hooked, Brown can opt either to stretch the same idea or switch to more interchangeable phrases (similar to the last eight bars of <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>) while preparing the next treat.</p> <p>Brown’s more restrained 1954 instrumental masterpiece “Okie Dokie Stomp” would ultimately become his signature tune, but few moments in guitar history match the pure reckless enthusiasm of “Boogie Uproar.” It’s a one-finger salute from a true American original.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F4322126%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-JNGFE"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Talkin%27%20Blues-%20May%202013.png" width="600" height="511" alt="Talkin' Blues- May 2013.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Talkin%27%20Blues-%20May%202013%202.png" width="600" height="470" alt="Talkin' Blues- May 2013 2.png" /></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tkKzSJeRWt0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-signature-tempo-soloing-style-clarence-gatemouth-brown#comments Clarence Gatemouth Brown Keith Wyatt May 2013 Talkin' Blues Lessons Magazine Tue, 01 Sep 2015 21:10:03 +0000 Keith Wyatt 18093 at http://www.guitarworld.com How to Construct Classic Eighties-Style Metal Guitar Parts http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-how-construct-classic-eighties-style-metal-guitar-parts-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Back in the Eighties, during the heyday of metal, bands like Van Halen, Judas Priest and the Scorpions were releasing incredible, killer albums packed with amazing guitar playing. </p> <p>Today, I feel that the majority of metal is more focused on rhythmic parts with less harmonic movement than what I think of as the approach representative of Eighties-style metal. It is from that perspective that I put together the three “classic” metal-style riffs.</p> <p>During the NWOBHM (New Wave of British Heavy Metal) days of the late Seventies and early Eighties, bands like Iron Maiden and Judas Priest were forging blazing, melodic metal earmarked by powerful and memorable song riffs. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> is indicative of Iron Maiden’s style: above the progression of three different pedal tones, shifting two- and three-note chord shapes create the melodic content that keeps this part interesting and moving forward. </p> <p>I begin with an open D5 power chord, using the D string as a repeating pedal tone, and by simply changing the note on the G string, I can move from D5 to Bb/D to G5/D. Be sure to palm-mute all of the open D pedal tones while allowing the higher strings to ring clearly. In bar 3 into bar 4, I shift to an F5 power chord followed by C/F, sounded by lowering the high F on the B string one fret to E, played in unison with the open high E string. </p> <p>After the second ending (bar 5), I transition to the key of A minor, with sliding two-note power chord shapes fretted on the D and G strings, supported by an open A-string pedal tone that is picked in consecutive 16th notes. In bar 8, I move down two whole steps to F5 and use the fretted F note as the pedal tone, followed at the end of bar 9 with a shift from F5 to C5, performed by simply moving from F to G on the D string while keeping the C note on top.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 2</strong> is played at a slower tempo, and, as with <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, the melodic content in this riff is provided by the simple movement of two-note chord shapes sounded above a pedal tone. In bars 1–3, the open A string provides the pedal tone, over which I play a sequence of double-stops that imply Bm, Am, G and F chords. In this example, the melodic element comes from the highest note in each double-stop. </p> <p>Let’s wrap up with a lick reminiscent of George Lynch with Dokken or Queensrÿche, specifically from the latter band’s <em>Operation: Mindcrime</em> period, in terms of the overall approach to the riffs and the feel of the rhythms. </p> <p>In <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I begin with an A5 power chord followed by a repeating open A-string pedal tone, and at the end of bar 1 I use sliding two-note power chords to transition to F5, followed by D7/A, which I sound by moving from F up one fret to F# on the D string. In bar 4, I use the opposite movement, shifting down one fret from D to C# on the A string to change from D5 to A/C#. At the end of the riff, I use pull-offs on the A string to set up the two-note C5 and D5 power chords. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/a3BpNvJ9rgI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/May2015.jpg" width="620" height="763" alt="May2015.jpg" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-how-construct-classic-eighties-style-metal-guitar-parts-video#comments May 2015 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos Blogs Features Lessons Magazine Tue, 01 Sep 2015 15:38:39 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak 23801 at http://www.guitarworld.com Wild Stringdom with John Petrucci: Combining Triad Arpeggios to Form Polytonal Chordal Allusions http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-combining-triad-arpeggios-form-polytonal-chordal-allusions <!--paging_filter--><p>I often use triadic arpeggio forms within my riffs and solos as a tool to create rich-sounding, poly-chordal sounds. </p> <p> I’d like to continue in that vein by presenting different ways in which to move from one arpeggio form to another, using a series of specific triads that complement one another well.</p> <p> Let’s start with the triads F# diminished and D major, as shown in <strong>FIGURES 1</strong> and <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, respectively. The F# diminished triad is built from the notes C, F# and A, and the D major triad is built from almost the same set of notes, D, F# and A. Both <strong>FIGURES 1 and 2</strong> show these triads as played in fifth position for comparison. </p> <p> If I wanted to get a bluesy vibe, I’d use the D major triad and combine it with the F# diminished triad, as demonstrated in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>. Here, the C note is heard as the b7 (flat seventh) of D, implying a D dominant-seven tonality.</p> <p> Now let’s try combining the F# diminished arpeggio with an A minor arpeggio—A C E—as shown in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>. The combination of these two sets of notes gives an F#m7b5 arpeggio (F# A C E: see <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>). These licks work well over an Am chord, as the inclusion of the F# note, the major sixth of A, implies an Am6, A Dorian–mode type of sound.</p> <p> As you probably have noticed, all of these arpeggios are played on the top three strings, and I often like to incorporate sweep picking when using arpeggios like this. <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> illustrates a combination of an Em7 arpeggio—E G B D—and a Gmaj7 arpeggio—G B D F#. As denoted in the example, in order to sweep pick these arpeggio shapes properly, begin with an upstroke on the first note and then use a single down-stroke to rake across the top three strings to play the next three notes. </p> <p> The form ends with another upstroke. I then slide up to 10th position and reverse the process, beginning with a down-stroke and then using a single upstroke to rake across the top three strings, moving from high to low. <strong>FIGURE 7</strong> offers an example of applying this approach to the chord progression Em7 Am9 F#m7b5 Gmaj7.</p> <p> This is the last installment of Wild Stringdom for now. I hope these columns have been useful to you and have served to broaden your knowledge of the guitar while building up your chops. Thanks for reading, and I’ll see you out on the road!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hvBm_lza1N8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-30%20at%2010.38.33%20AM.png" width="620" height="693" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-30 at 10.38.33 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-30%20at%2010.39.19%20AM.png" width="620" height="339" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-30 at 10.39.19 AM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-combining-triad-arpeggios-form-polytonal-chordal-allusions#comments April 2014 Dream Theater John Petrucci Wild Stringdom Videos Blogs Lessons Magazine Tue, 01 Sep 2015 15:00:44 +0000 John Petrucci 20542 at http://www.guitarworld.com Guitar Tricks: Eight Things You Need to Know About Arpeggios http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-tricks-eight-things-you-need-know-about-arpeggios <!--paging_filter--><p>As you advance in your guitar studies, you'll surely come across the term "arpeggio." </p> <p>Arpeggios are a great way to add color and complexity to your playing. You can make riffs out of them, use them in solos or even create melody lines with their fluid sound. </p> <p>Nearly all of the greats use arpeggios. Yet, if you're like a lot of guitarists, you might be shying away from them because you fear being overwhelmed by the "Twin Ts": theory and technique. If you have a basic understanding of how chords work, though, it's high time to get your feet wet. </p> <p>Here are eight things you need to know to help demystify the arpeggio. </p> <p>01. <Strong>What an arpeggio is exactly</strong> The word arpeggio (ar-peh-jee-oh) comes from the Italian word arpeggiare, which means "to play a harp." (If you can visualize harpists, they often articulate notes by plucking the strings one at a time.) Arpeggios, often called broken chords, are simply notes from a chord played individually instead of strummed together. </p> <p>02. <strong>What arpeggios can do for you</strong>. Arpeggios create a fast, flowing sound. Besides using them for speed in playing, arpeggios add a kick to improvisation skills. Because an arpeggio contains all the notes of its chord, you can use them in your solos and link them to what's going on in the chord structure beneath you to create cool sounding licks. Arpeggios always sound good over their matching chord in a progression, therefore, they generally form the melodic home bases and safe notes for improvising guitarists. <a href="http://www.guitartricks.com/v2/chords">This guitar chord chart will help visualize the notes of each arpeggio on the guitar neck.</a></p> <p>03. <strong>Scales vs. arpeggios.</strong> Let's clear up any confusion you might have between scales and arpeggios. Scales are a series of notes played one by one that fit sonically within a particular key signature (e.g., G major scale would be G, A, B, C, D, E, F#). Arpeggios, on the other hand, are a series of notes played one by one that consists of the notes within a particular chord (e.g., G major arpeggio would be G, B, D). Like a scale, an arpeggio is linear: it's a set of notes you play one at a time. Unlike scales that contain some extra notes not always played in chords, arpeggios use only the notes found in a single chord. Both scales and arpeggios can be played in ascending, descending or random order.</p> <p>04. <strong>Arpeggio shapes.</strong> As with scales, there are a variety of shapes to learn when playing arpeggios. There are generally five CAGED shapes for each arpeggio, except the diminished 7th, for which there is just one. Learn arpeggios in different positions on the neck so you become familiar with the shape of the arpeggio rather than concentrating on which frets to put your fingers in. Learn the shapes one at a time. Although you need to get all five of the shapes down—eventually—it's far better to be able to play one perfectly than five poorly. Practice moving from one arpeggio shape to another, back and forth and back and forth.</p> <p>05. <strong>Which arpeggios to learn first.</strong> The best guitar arpeggios to learn first are the major triad (1, 3, 5) and the minor triad (1, b3, 5). The major and minor triads are the most common and most used guitar arpeggios in all of music. While a triad contains only three notes, an arpeggio can be extended with chords like a major seventh, a 9th, 11th, 13th, etc., giving you endless possibilities.</p> <p>06. <strong>Different picking styles.</strong> There are several ways you can play arpeggios—alternate picking, legato, <a href="http://www.guitartricks.com/guitarglossary.php?term=Hammer-on">hammer-ons</a> and <a href="http://www.guitartricks.com/guitarglossary.php?term=Pull-off">pull-offs</a>, sweep picking and tapping are among them. (For the more experienced player, there also are lead techniques you should be confident with for playing arpeggios at higher speeds, such as string skipping and finger rolling.) Experiment with each way of playing these arpeggios to see which one works best for you and your particular style. </p> <p>A note here about fingerpicking: While fingerpicked chords are technically arpeggios since the chords are broken up, the individual notes aren't typically muted after they're played and thus ring together. The listener can literally hear the entire chord from the vibrations of each individual note. Arpeggios typically only have one note playing at any given time and are a slightly different idea from broken chords. </p> <p>07. <strong>Grab the arpeggio by the "root."</strong> When you're brand new to arpeggios, you always want to start and end on a root note (the note upon which a chord is built. Literally, the root of the chord.) This will help train your ears to hear the sound of the scale. Start on the lowest pitched root note, play up as far as you can, then go back down as low as you can, and then back up to the root note.</p> <p>08. <strong>Form and speed.</strong> To play arpeggios, you should mute each note immediately after picking it by lifting the fretting finger. This will keep the notes from "bleeding" into one another and sounding like a strummed chord. Every note needs to sound individually. Start off slowly. Perfect your form before you add speed to the mix. You don't want to develop bad habits that you will have to correct later. </p> <p>For more on playing arpeggios, give <a href="http://www.guitartricks.com/guitarglossary.php?term=Arpeggio">some of these "how to play arpeggios" guitar lessons</a> a try, as well as Ben Lindholm's <a href="http://www.guitartricks.com/lesson.php?input=17379&amp;s_id=1310">"10 Ways to Play Arpeggios."</a> </p> <p><em>Kathy Dickson writes for the online guitar lesson site <a href="http://www.guitartricks.com">Guitar Tricks.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-tricks-eight-things-you-need-know-about-arpeggios#comments Guitar Tricks Blogs Lessons Mon, 31 Aug 2015 14:38:02 +0000 Kathy Dickson 22866 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: Using Various Major-Pentatonic Shapes for Soloing — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-using-various-major-pentatonic-shapes-soloing/25281 <!--paging_filter--><p>Most guitarists will agree that the study of scales is an endeavor that will reap many benefits. </p> <p>Along with helping one to learn the “map” of the fretboard in any given position, studying scales reinforces note recognition all over the fretboard while also instilling a broader range of muscle memory in regard to the way one physically navigates the board via repetitive finger movement. </p> <p>In other words, your fingers will adapt to new specific movement patterns as you move from one pattern and position to the next. </p> <p>The greatest benefit of this endeavor is that it helps you from habitually falling into “lick”-type phrases that so many guitarists find themselves stuck with. We all must learn licks in the pursuit of developing our soloing abilities, and the next step is to break those lick habits and instead use your ear to listen to the many melodic possibilities that can be discovered as you play.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates the E major pentatonic scale played in first position, utilizing open strings. A great way to play this pattern is to keep your index finger at the first fret and your remaining fingers at the second, third and fourth frets. This way, there will be no need for moving out of position while playing the notes of the scale. </p> <p>As a general guideline, ascending and descending through groups of threes and fours is a great way to memorize a scale position; <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> illustrates descending in three-note groups through the pattern, and <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> has you descending in groups of four. </p> <p>Now let’s look at how you can improvise melodies while staying within this position of E major pentatonic. <strong>FIGURE 4</strong> offers an example. As I play, I’m simply moving my fingers among notes that are found in the scale in a variety of different patterns and listening to the results. In this way, I’m thinking more about navigating through the scale in this position as opposed to playing licks that I know or licks that I might always find myself typically playing. </p> <p>And as you move up the fretboard, you will discover that each scale position and pattern will offer different melodic patterns as a product of the way the notes lay on the board.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 5</strong> shows E major pentatonic as it falls in fourth position, and <strong>FIGURES 6</strong> and <strong>7</strong> illustrate descending groups of threes and fours, respectively, played in this pattern, or shape. Once your fingers become accustomed to the shape, try soloing in a free and random way while listening to the melodic contour of the lines and letting your ear decide which note to play next. </p> <p>The next step is to continue the process by moving up through all scale positions of E major pentatonic and then improvising in each new area.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1cFMGcmZ7Y0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-13%20at%202.36.55%20PM.png" width="620" height="488" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-13 at 2.36.55 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-13%20at%202.37.27%20PM.png" width="620" height="356" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-13 at 2.37.27 PM.png" /></p> <p><em>Photo: Cindy Moorhead</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-using-various-major-pentatonic-shapes-soloing/25281#comments Andy Aledort In Deep October 2015 Videos Lessons Magazine Fri, 28 Aug 2015 12:59:10 +0000 Andy Aledort 25281 at http://www.guitarworld.com Stevie Ray Vaughan Lesson: How to Play "Couldn't Stand the Weather" http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-stevie-ray-vaughans-playing-couldnt-stand-weather <!--paging_filter--><p>Stevie Ray Vaughan’s distinctive playing style is earmarked by equal parts pure power, intensity of focus, razor-sharp precision and deeply emotional conviction. And then there’s his tone—probably the best Stratocaster-derived sound ever evoked from the instrument. </p> <p>Stevie tuned his guitar down one half step (low to high, Eb Ab Db Gb Bb Eb), a move inspired by one of his biggest influences, Jimi Hendrix. He also preferred heavy gauge strings: high to low, .013, .015, .019, .028, .038, .058, occasionally switching the high E string to either a .012 or .011. To facilitate the use of such heavy strings, Stevie’s guitars were re-fretted with large Dunlop 6100 or Stewart-MacDonald 150 fretwire.</p> <p>Let’s begin this lesson with a look at the title track from Stevie’s second album, <em>Couldn’t Stand the Weather</em>. The song begins in “free time” (no strict tempo). </p> <p>While brother Jimmie Vaughan tremolo-strums the opening chords—Bm-A7-G7-F#7—Stevie adds improvised solo lines (see transcription bars 1-8): over Bm, Stevie sticks with the B blues scale (B D E F F# A), over A7 he utilizes the A blues scale (A C D Eb E G) and over G7 he uses G blues (G Bb C Db D F). Strive to recreate Stevie’s precision when it comes to his articulation. </p> <p>Over Jimmie’s F#7 chord, Stevie plays a first inversion F#7#9, which places the third of the chord, A#, in the bass (as the lowest note). (Stevie employed this same unusual voicing for E7#9 in “Cold Shot.”) </p> <p>A four-bar, R&amp;B/soul-style single-note riff follows, doubled in octaves by guitar and bass (see bars 9-17). Played four times, two extra beats of rest are added the third time through. This is shown as a bar of 6/4 in bar 13 of the transcription.</p> <p>In bars 18-23, Stevie adds a very Hendrix-y rhythm guitar part, played in 10th position and beginning on beat two with an F octave fretted on the G and high E strings, strummed in 16th notes. Stevie maintains the rhythmic push of steady 16ths through most of the riff by consistently strumming in a down-up-down-up “one-ee-and-a” pattern. </p> <p>At the end of bar 18, barre your middle finger across the top three strings at the 12th fret, and then bend and release the G and B strings one half step. As the notes are held into the next bar, add subtle finger vibrato. Keep your fret-hand thumb wrapped over the top of the fretboard throughout the riff, using it to fret the D root note on the low E string’s 10th fret. Stevie intersperses this low root note into the lick in a few essential spots, akin to Hendrix on his songs “Freedom” and “Izabella.” </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/HppszdNQNXs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_1.jpg" /></p> <p>Stevie displays his true brilliance as an improviser when playing over a slow blues. All of the following examples are played in the key of G, utilizing the G blues scale (G Bb C Db D F) as a basis. Across the first two bars of <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I play two- and three-note chord figures against the low G and C root notes, fretted with the thumb. On beat three of both bars, I play a trill by barring the index finger across the D and G strings and then quickly hammering on and pulling off with the middle finger one fret higher on the G string. </p> <p>When playing bar 3, keep your index finger barred across the top two strings at the third fret while bending notes on the G and B strings. On beat two, quickly hammer on and pull off to the fourth fret on the high E string. This G-Ab-G hammer/pull is a staple for Stevie, used in myriad different and creative ways.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_2.jpg" /></p> <p>Another essential element of Stevie’s slow-blues lead playing approach is the use of Albert King–style multiple-string bends. As shown in <strong>FIGURE 2a</strong>, I bend the high E string up one whole step at the eighth fret using the ring finger (supported by the middle) and simultaneously catch the B string under the fingertip and bend it up a whole step as well so that it “goes along for the ride.” In <strong>FIGURE 2b</strong>, I catch the top three strings under the fingertip. It will take practice to build up the strength and “finger traction” to execute these bends properly.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_3ab.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_3c4a.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_4b.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>FIGURES 3a and 3b</strong> illustrate another way to add pull-offs on the high E string, this time fretting A and then pulling back from Ab to G. This is followed by repeated pull-offs on the B string, illustrated more clearly in <strong>FIGURE 3c. FIGURES 4a and 4b</strong> offer two more permutations of this idea.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5ab.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5c.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5de.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5f.jpg" /></p> <p>Another nod to Albert is the use of fingerpicking to accent notes on the high E string. I use my middle finger to pick and snap the string back against the fretboard, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURES 5a–5f</strong>. Notice in <strong>FIGURES 5b, 5c and 5e</strong> the use of a half-step bend at the seventh fret on the high E string. Albert was a master of microtonal bending, a technique learned well by Stevie.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_6.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_7.jpg" /></p> <p>Stevie devised some unique position shifts, utilizing bends and slides on the G string. <strong>FIGURES 6a–c</strong> present three examples. </p> <p>The use of the notes A, Ab and G on the high E string allude to the V (five) chord, D, and the D blues scale (D F G Gb A C). <strong>FIGURE 8a</strong> illustrates the scale, and <strong>FIGURES 7 and 8b–d</strong> offer examples played over the V chord. Another staple of Stevie’s style is the use of slides on the G string, exemplified in <strong>FIGURES 9a–c</strong>.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_8ab.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_8c.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_8d.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_9a.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_9b.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_9c.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/stevie-ray-vaughan">Stevie Ray Vaughan</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmie-vaughan">Jimmie Vaughan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-stevie-ray-vaughans-playing-couldnt-stand-weather#comments In Deep Jimmie Vaughan July 2010 Stevie Ray Vaughan Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort Blogs Lessons Magazine Thu, 27 Aug 2015 14:23:58 +0000 Andy Aledort 17124 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: Five Steps to Walking Basslines on Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-five-steps-walking-basslines-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p>When learning how to play jazz guitar, one of the things that many players want to explore and get under their fingers is walking basslines.</p> <p>Though learning how to walk a bassline (and comp at the same time) can take a lot of experience and time in the woodshed, there are a few rules and pointers you can follow in order to get you off on the right foot as you begin to explore the world of basslines for jazz guitar.</p> <p>In this lesson, we’ll be looking at five easy steps you can take to create a cool-sounding and fun-to-play bassline over a ii-V-I chord progression. </p> <p>Check out the notation examples below as a reference, and then view the video for an in-depth look at each of the five steps, including hearing these lines in action. </p> <p>To read more about walking basslines for guitar, check out my series “<a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/category/jazz-guitar-basslines">How to Walk Basslines for Jazz Guitar</a>.” And be sure to read <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/user/161515">my other Jazz Guitar Corner columns here!</a></p> <p><strong>Step 1: ii V I Chords</strong></p> <p>Start off by finding the chord voicings for the ii V I you want to practice with a bassline. In this lesson, we’re using the following chords in the key of G major. Get these chords under your fingers first before moving on to the bassline section of the lesson. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%201%20jPG.jpg" width="620" height="154" alt="Example 1 jPG.jpg" /> </p> <p><strong>Step 2: Add Root on Beat 1</strong></p> <p>Once you have the chords down, you can now start building your bassline by adding in a root note on the first beat of each bar. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%202%20JPG_6.jpg" width="620" height="165" alt="Example 2 JPG_6.jpg" /> </p> <p><strong>Step 3: Add Chromatic Note on Beat 4</strong></p> <p>Once you have the root note on the first beat, you can add a chromatic approach note on beat 4 that leads into the next chord by a half-step above or below that root note. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%203%20JPG_7.jpg" width="620" height="165" alt="Example 3 JPG_7.jpg" /> </p> <p><strong>Step 4: Add Chromatic Note on Beat 3</strong></p> <p>You can now add another chromatic note on beat 3 of the bar. Again, you can use two chromatic notes below the next root, two above the next root, one above and one below, or one below and one above the next root note in the progression. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%204%20JPG_3.jpg" width="620" height="165" alt="Example 4 JPG_3.jpg" /> </p> <p><strong>Step 5: Add Diatonic Note on Beat 2</strong></p> <p>Lastly, you add a diatonic note from the chord or scale you are on to beat 2 of the bar. This completes all four quarter notes and you are now walking a bassline over a ii V I chord progression. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%205%20J.jpg" width="620" height="165" alt="Example 5 J.jpg" /> </p> <p>Learn how to play walking basslines can seem tough at first. But, with a few simple guidelines such as the five presented above, you’ll be walking basslines on your guitar in no time. </p> <p>How do you practice Walking Basslines for guitar? Share your thoughts in the Comments section below! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/IxelR5unAPk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a senior lecturer at the Leeds College of Music and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-five-steps-walking-basslines-guitar#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Wed, 26 Aug 2015 19:33:22 +0000 Matt Warnock 16839 at http://www.guitarworld.com Three Essential Rockabilly Guitar Licks — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/three-essential-rockabilly-guitar-licks-video/25354 <!--paging_filter--><p>Hey there.</p> <p>This time around, I decided to grab my rapidly aging black Levi's shirt, my awesome new <a href="http://www.levysleathers.com/music">Levy's guitar strap</a> and my <a href="http://www.gibson.com/Products/Electric-Guitars/Les-Paul/Gibson-USA/Music-City-Jr-B-Bender.aspx">Gibson Music City Jr. with B-Bender</a> and show you three essential rockabilly licks.</p> <p>Bear in mind, I could've chosen three <em>other</em> "essential" rockabilly licks, but these seemed like nice ones to start with. Hey, there's always next month.</p> <p>I'm really sorry for the lack of tabs, but I think the video does a fine job of showing my fingering, plus there's not really any "shredding" going on here.</p> <p>So, to elaborate (a bit) on the three licks in the video ... </p> <p><strong>The first lick</strong> is a great way to kick off a rockabilly guitar solo; also, since I probably absorbed it as a result of listening to Stevie Ray Vaughan's "Scuttle Buttin'" for three decades, it can be used in upbeat blues situations and maybe even country (the good kind of country; not the crap they play on country radio in 2015). </p> <p>Although a mere word probably won't help anyone, I always imagine that the lick is just "rolling" off the fretboard. I start things off with the open G string, followed quickly by a hammer-on on the first fret (a G#), followed quickly by an open B and an open E—and the rest of it just sort of happens. Sorry I can't be more technical; that's just not gonna happen.</p> <p><strong>The second lick:</strong> As I say in the clip, it's the perfect way to end the I (one) portion of a rockabilly solo or intro before going into the IV. I've heard Brian Setzer do this a million times with Stray Cats. To hear how he uses it (on a nice, newish high-quality studio recording), check out "Rooster Rock," a track from his often-overlooked 2001 rockabilly masterpiece, <em>Ignition!</em> In fact, I've included the song below (second/middle YouTube clip). The lick occurs within the first four seconds.</p> <p>Seriously, if you want to hear one hell of a guitar album, check out <em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/68-Comeback-Special-Brian-Setzer/dp/B00005JIWV">Ignition!</a></em> It's one of my top 10 "guitar albums" of all time. Maybe top 15, but you get the idea.</p> <p><strong>The third lick:</strong> Some of you might recognize this sort of thing from Gene Vincent's "Be-Bob-A-Lula" (which features the great <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-keith-wyatt-tribute-cliff-gallup-s-legendary-flash">Cliff Gallup</a> on lead guitar) or, now that I think about it, John Lennon's cool mid-Seventies version of "Be-Bob-A-Lula" (bottom YouTube clip). The first guitar solo, and this very lick, starts at the 54-second mark in the Lennon clip below.</p> <p>Stay tuned for more videos like this ... although I think I'll use a different guitar in my next video. I feel sorry for the other ones. Whatever. Enjoy! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/t-Rf-QK5sQo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="100" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/m2vhS_PP010" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="100" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RtLnZnxSF7E" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em><a href="https://soundcloud.com/damian-fanelli/mister-neutron-comanchero-1">Damian Fanelli</a> is the online managing editor at </em>Guitar World<em> and </em><a href="http://www.guitaraficionado.com/">Guitar Aficionado</a><em>. His New York-based band, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Blue-Meanies/226938220688464?fref=ts">the Blue Meanies,</a> has toured the world and elsewhere. Fanelli, a former member of Brooklyn jump-blues/swing/rockabilly band <a href="http://www.thegashousegorillas.com/">the Gas House Gorillas</a> and New York City instrumental surf-rock band <a href="http://www.cdbaby.com/Artist/MisterNeutron">Mister Neutron,</a> also <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsQ9pIkLXiA">composes</a> and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7ICimc774Y">records film soundtracks.</a> He writes GuitarWorld.com's <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/next-bend-clarence-white-inspired-country-b-bender-lick-video">The Next Bend</a> column, which is dedicated to <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/next-bend-10-essential-b-bender-guitar-songs-damian-fanelli">B-bender guitars and guitarists.</a> His latest liner notes can be found in Sony/Legacy's </em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/The-Complete-Epic-Recordings-Collection/dp/B00MJFQ24W">Stevie Ray Vaughan: The Complete Epic Recordings Collection.</a><em> Follow him on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/damianfanelliguitar">Facebook,</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/damianfanelli">Twitter</a> and/or <a href="https://instagram.com/damianfanelligw/">Instagram.</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-setzer">Brian Setzer</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/john-lennon">John Lennon</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/three-essential-rockabilly-guitar-licks-video/25354#comments Brian Setzer Cliff Gallup Damian Fanelli John Lennon rockabilly Videos Blogs Lessons Wed, 26 Aug 2015 16:58:48 +0000 Damian Fanelli 25354 at http://www.guitarworld.com Joe Satriani Lesson: Go "Pick Surfing" with Satch! — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-joe-satriani-goes-pick-surfing-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Earlier this summer, Joe Satriani visited <em>Guitar World</em> to shoot a few lesson videos. In fact, you can see his new column in the October 2015 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>—<a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/shredding-alien-joe-satriani-two-effective-approaches-building-melodies/25278">or right here.</a></p> <p>Anyway, he had some time left over to shoot a few licks. We've shared two of them already, and here's the third!</p> <p>This lick features fast pick tapping on the high E string, with a wah pedal used as a filter effect. You might recognize it from <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-30-surfing-alien-joe-satriani">"Surfing with the Alien."</a></p> <p>We're calling it "Pick Surfing." Enjoy!</p> <p><strong>For more about Satch and his new studio album, <em>Shockwave Supernova,</em> visit <a href="http://www.satriani.com/splash/">satriani.com.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tvZYWoRjMPE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-joe-satriani-goes-pick-surfing-video#comments Joe Satriani Surfing With the Alien Videos News Lessons Wed, 26 Aug 2015 15:04:13 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24820 at http://www.guitarworld.com Time to Burn with Michael Angelo Batio: Using Tapping to Extend Sweep Arpeggios — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/time-burn-michael-angelo-batio-using-tapping-extend-sweep-arpeggios/25275 <!--paging_filter--><p>In the last three columns, I demonstrated the mechanics of my technique for sweep picking arpeggios and some of my go-to shapes. This month, I’d like to show you a great way to expand upon these shapes, by adding a fretboard tap above the highest note played in the sweep. </p> <p>There are different technical approaches to tapping: there’s the “Van Halen” method, wherein you clasp the pick between your thumb and middle finger and use the index finger to tap; I prefer to hold the pick conventionally—between my thumb and index finger—and use my middle finger for tapping. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> depicts an Am arpeggio played in 12th position, starting on the fifth string and moving across the top five strings to the high E. The first note, A, is fretted with the index finger at the 12th fret, after which I hammer-on with my pinkie up to C at the 15th fret. </p> <p>I use a downstroke to sound the subsequent notes up to the high E on the first string’s 12th fret, after which I hammer-on with my pinkie up to the 17th fret. On the downbeat of beat two, I tap a high C note at the 20th fret on that same string and then perform a double pull-off back down to the A and E notes, followed by an upstroke sweep that moves back down across the top five strings. The figure then repeats.</p> <p>We can also add a high tap to other, lower Am sweep arpeggio shapes, as demonstrated in <strong>FIGURES 2</strong> and <strong>3</strong>: individual notes are sounded on each of the five highest strings until I reach the high E, at which point I hammer-on from C up to E then apply a tap on the high A root note at the 17th fret. In <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, as in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, the tap occurs right on beat two. </p> <p>Back in the early Eighties, when many of these rock guitar playing techniques were first being explored, a slick tapping technique became popular that involved sliding a tapped note up and down before pulling back off to a lower note. I like to refer to this technique as the “MI sweep,” in reference to Musician’s Institute in Los Angeles, the guitar school where many great players either attended or taught. </p> <p>As demonstrated in <strong>FIGURES 4–6</strong>, I tap at a given fret and then slide up one or two frets and back before pulling-off from the tap and moving back down through the sweep arpeggio. When pulling off from a tapped note, you’ll want to flick the string slightly sideways to keep the string vibrating and the notes ringing with sufficient volume. This may be accomplished by flicking the string either upward (toward the sky) or downward (toward the ground).</p> <p>This technique also works well with major arpeggios: <strong>FIGURES 7–9</strong> illustrate taps and sliding taps within major triad shapes on different areas of the fretboard. Be sure to play through each figure slowly at first and strive to sound each note clearly and evenly.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WudzjzFzppw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-13%20at%2011.25.40%20AM.png" width="620" height="422" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-13 at 11.25.40 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-08-13%20at%2011.26.52%20AM.png" width="620" height="376" alt="Screen shot 2015-08-13 at 11.26.52 AM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/michael-angelo-batio-0">Michael Angelo Batio</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/time-burn-michael-angelo-batio-using-tapping-extend-sweep-arpeggios/25275#comments Michael Angelo Batio October 2015 Time to Burn Artist Lessons Videos Lessons Magazine Wed, 26 Aug 2015 14:22:21 +0000 Michael Angelo Batio 25275 at http://www.guitarworld.com Musical Fluency: Stealing From Drummers — Single Paradiddle http://www.guitarworld.com/musical-fluency-stealing-drummers-single-paradiddle <!--paging_filter--><p>When you’re running low on ideas, a great place to turn for inspiration is other instruments. Learning a sax lick, a piano chord voicing or a vocal melody can allow you to approach music from an entirely new angle.</p> <p>Getting a peek at how other instrumentalists think also can help you get in sync with your bandmates. </p> <p>If you know what your bass player is trying to do, then you can complement his basslines better with your guitar part. If you understand your drummer’s fills, you can strum along in a way that matches or accents his drum parts.</p> <p>In this post, we’re going to check out a common rhythmic pattern used by drummers called the single paradiddle. Then we'll look at how you can use this sort of pattern to come up with new ideas on the guitar.</p> <p><strong>Single Paradiddle</strong></p> <p>The single paradiddle is an example of what’s known as a drum rudiment. Guitarists practice chord changes and scale runs; drummers practice rudiments. They’re basic drum-stroke patterns that are learned on one drum and can then be applied to different drums or used in a beat.</p> <p>The single paradiddle follows this pattern of right-hand (R) and left-hand (L) drum strokes:</p> <p>R L R R L R L L</p> <p>You can even say the word “paradiddle” twice along with the pattern to help you get a feel for the rhythm. Para-diddle para-diddle.</p> <p>OK, so how does this help us out on the guitar? Let’s take a look at just a few possibilities.</p> <p><strong>Riff Rhythm</strong></p> <p>One way to use the paradiddle pattern on the guitar is to develop accented rhythms for guitar riffs. For example, let's assign each drum stroke to a string or set of strings. For every right-hand stroke in the paradiddle pattern, hit the sixth string. For every left-hand stroke, hit the fifth and fourth strings together.</p> <p>Let’s take this new paradiddle picking and apply it to just a couple of chords to see how it sounds. Here’s an example in drop D tuning using Bsus2 and Gsus2 chords.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%201.png" width="620" height="315" alt="Example 1.png" /></p> <p>If this sounds familiar, it may remind you of “Everlong” by the Foo Fighters, which uses a similar rhythm with these types of chord voicings. Since Dave Grohl is a drummer, it makes sense that he would look at the guitar as if the strings are different drums on a kit.</p> <p><strong>Lead Licks</strong></p> <p>Now let’s take the same idea of assigned different drum strokes to different strings, but apply it to a lick on the top two strings. The right-hand stroke becomes the 2nd string, and the left-hand stroke becomes the first string. </p> <p>Here’s an example in the key of B minor, with a couple of slides thrown in to give the lick a smoother sound.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%202.png" width="620" height="155" alt="Example 2.png" /></p> <p><strong>Getting Creative</strong></p> <p>There are so many more uses for this basic single paradiddle rhythm. The idea is to think of the pattern as just A-B-A-A, B-A-B-B, where the A’s and B’s can stand for anything that you want.</p> <p>Like we’ve done in this post, the A could be one string and the B another. Or you could create fingerpicking patterns. The A could stand for one finger in your plucking hand, while B stands for another finger or group of fingers.</p> <p>Or you could make the A’s and B’s stand for two different notes in a scale or arpeggio. The possibilities really are endless, so see what you can come up with!</p> <p><em>Ben Rainey works as a guitar teacher and freelance guitarist in the Pittsburgh area. He's also in charge of music content at <a href="https://tunessence.com/">Tunessence.com.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/musical-fluency-stealing-drummers-single-paradiddle#comments Ben Rainey Musical Fluency Blogs Lessons Tue, 25 Aug 2015 18:18:32 +0000 Ben Rainey 20192 at http://www.guitarworld.com The Genius of Guitarist Chet Atkins — Lesson with Tab and Video http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-genius-chet-atkins <!--paging_filter--><p>Chet Atkins made countless recordings as a studio musician, producer and solo artist. </p> <p>Many of his recordings—particularly those of the artists he produced in Nashville, like Elvis Presley, Roy Orbison and the Everly Brothers—laid the foundation for early rock and roll. Though Atkins played many styles, he is most often associated with country music and acoustic guitars. </p> <p>By using a combination of thumbpick and fingers, Chet created his signature “fingerpicking” sound. This month, I’m going to look at two patented Chet Atkins techniques. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> shows an approach Atkins often used when playing scales. With the fret hand near fourth position, ascend/descend A Mixolydian (A B C# D E F# G), grabbing each successive scale tone on a neighboring string and mixing in all available open notes. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holenotes0910_1.jpg" /></p> <p>It should sound similar to playing a scale on a harp, or on a piano with the sustain pedal held down. Keep your fret-hand fingers depressed as long as possible so that notes overlap, and follow the indicated picking/fingerstyle indications to get the full effect. This “harp trick” is common in the lines of country players like Albert Lee and Brent Mason, and can be done with any scale, provided the open strings are “in key.” </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holenotes0910_2.jpg" /></p> <p>The last note of each chord in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> is a harp harmonic, another technique pioneered by Atkins (and later taken to new heights by Lenny Breau, Ted Greene and Tommy Emmanuel). On beat four of each bar, you will see “H.H.” Touch a fretted string with the plucking-hand’s index finger precisely 12 frets higher than the note appearing parenthetically in tab, then pluck that string behind your index finger’s point of contact, using the thumb (or thumbpick) to produce a chiming “octave overtone” harmonic. The preceding notes of each chord are played using traditional fingerstyle technique (without harmonics). </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/holenotes0910_3.jpg" /></p> <p>Atkins often wove the aforementioned techniques (and more) into stunning solo guitar arrangements rooted in Travis picking (named after Travis). This somewhat country-like fingerstyle approach involves thumbpicking alternating bass notes (usually the root and fifth) on different strings while sounding melodic parts (typically built around a fretted chord shape) with the plucking hand’s remaining fingers. In <strong>FIGURE 3,</strong> a 12-bar blues in A, you’ll see this technique in action with a variety of A7, D7 and E7 shapes. </p> <p>Familiarize yourself with each chord voicing first, study the structure of each bass note pattern and practice repeatedly (while chord shapes are held down) until the bass line feels automatic. Then slowly add the melody notes, focusing on one bar at a time until you have it perfected.</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1739754493001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1739754493001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <br /><strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1739715226001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1739715226001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <br /><strong>Part 3</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1739665132001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1739665132001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-genius-chet-atkins#comments Chet Atkins Hole Notes 2012 Videos Blogs Lessons Magazine Mon, 24 Aug 2015 21:08:31 +0000 Dale Turner 16332 at http://www.guitarworld.com