Lessons http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/8/all en Monster Licks Unleashed: Stretching the Limits with Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/monster-licks-unleashed-stretching-limits-glenn-proudfoot <!--paging_filter--><p>In this Monster Lick Unleashed, I'm using the diminished 7th scale in the key of E. The notes used in the scale are E, G, Bb and C#. </p> <p>I particularly love this scale for the intense sound it creates when played fast or slow. This scale is perfect to use in combination with the pentatonic. </p> <p>This lick combines some of my favorite techniques for creating runs and passages in solos. I'm always looking to keep a flow going with my soloing. My goal is always to be able to switch in and out of different techniques with ease and fluidity. </p> <p>Obviously, I practice every separate technique with intensity until I have it mastered, but when it comes time to add the ideas to my soling, I focus very heavily on the transitions between the different techniques. </p> <p>This lick is very fast and out there, but the thing to take from it is how you can combine these techniques. This is an extreme example, but you can apply the same ideas to any style of solo. </p> <p>When I'm writing music, I tend to break up these techniques more and focus on melody rather than pure shred. There are sections in some of my songs where things get really crazy, but for the most part when using these techniques I wouldn't shred them out like this. </p> <p>But this is how I practice them. I push myself to the maximum when practicing things like this, so when it comes time to write, I can whip out these ideas with no problem. This should be your focus, too. Push yourself to your limits. </p> <p>All of us have different ways of playing and various styles; it's not important to play this exactly the way I do. What's important is that you understand the ideas and techniques behind the lick and create your own version. </p> <p><strong>I hope you enjoy this Monster Lick Unleashed! Join me on <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/atomicguitaraudio">YouTube right here!</a> Contact me through <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a> or <a href="https://www.facebook.com/glenn.proudfoot">my Facebook page</a>.</strong></p> <p><em>Australia's Glenn Proudfoot has played and toured with major signed bands and artists in Europe and Australia, including progressive rockers Prazsky Vyber. Glenn released his first instrumental solo album, </em>Lick Em<em>, in 2010. It's available on iTunes and at <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a>. His brand-new instrumental album — </em>Ineffable<em> — is out now and is available through <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a> and <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/au/album/ineffable/id914342943">iTunes</a>.</em></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Za15JBqPj-4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p style=" margin: 12px auto 6px auto; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,Sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14px; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; -x-system-font: none; display: block;"> <a title="View Monster Licks - Unleashed No 5a on Scribd" href="https://www.scribd.com/doc/250512223/Monster-Licks-Unleashed-No-5a" style="text-decoration: underline;" >Monster Licks - Unleashed No 5a</a></p> <p><iframe class="scribd_iframe_embed" src="https://www.scribd.com/embeds/250512223/content?start_page=1&amp;view_mode=scroll&amp;show_recommendations=true" data-auto-height="false" data-aspect-ratio="undefined" scrolling="no" id="doc_84838" width="100%" height="600" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/monster-licks-unleashed-stretching-limits-glenn-proudfoot#comments Glenn Proudfoot Monster Licks Monster Licks Unleashed Videos Blogs Lessons Thu, 18 Dec 2014 22:36:24 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23146 Wild Stringdom with John Petrucci: Recognizing Repetitive Fretboard Shapes on All String Groups http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-recognizing-repetitive-fretboard-shapes-all-string-groups <!--paging_filter--><p>Hello, and welcome to my new <em>Guitar World</em> instructional column. </p> <p>In the coming months, I’ll share with you some of the guitar-playing concepts and approaches that have helped me develop my technique and overall playing style. I’d like to start off with an examination of ascending scalar shapes that, by design, cover the majority of the fretboard. </p> <p>I have found such patterns to be very useful for both melodic and shred-style playing and also very helpful in regard to the “greater mission,” which is to gain a fuller and deeper understanding of the construction of musical ideas within the framework of the guitar’s fretboard. </p> <p>The following examples are built from phrases made up of three notes per string that are played across two strings, resulting in various six-note shapes. I play these shapes in a rhythm of straight 16th notes, however, so there is an inherent “threes on twos” kind of rhythm that is alluded to throughout. </p> <p>All of the phrases in this lesson are based on the E natural minor scale (E F# G A B C D), also known as the E Aeolian mode. </p> <p>In <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, using alternate (down-up-downup) picking throughout, I ascend the D and G strings, beginning on the note E on the D string’s second fret, fretted with the index finger. I follow with two more notes on the D string, fretted with the ring finger and pinkie, and then I move over to the G string and play three ascending notes fretted in exactly the same manner—index to ring to pinkie.</p> <p>On the upbeat of beat two, I shift up to the next fretboard position of E natural minor and use my index finger, middle finger and pinkie to sound three notes per string on the D and G strings. A third six-note shape then appears when we move up one more time, with the index finger, middle finger and pinkie employed for the wider stretch needed for the subsequent pair of three-note shapes.</p> <p>Notice that, as you ascend through this riff, there are slight variances in the shapes used on each specific string in order to accommodate the notes of E natural minor. If we move the idea down to the bottom two strings, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, we find that the same fretting shapes are used, albeit in a different sequence. </p> <p>And the same is true when we move the idea up to the top two strings, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>. Only three different physical shapes are used to form the three-note patterns, and this is good, because it enables one to develop muscle memory in the fret-hand, which is immeasurably beneficial.</p> <p>The only exception to this consistency of shapes occurs when playing similar patterns on the G and B strings. That’s because these two strings are tuned a major third apart, whereas the adjacent strings in the other pairs are tuned a perfect fourth apart. </p> <p>As shown in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>, one must move up an additional half step—one fret—when crossing from the G string to the B. <strong>FIGURE 5</strong> offers a clearer representation of this B-string shift within a longer example that moves across all of the strings. Once you have these shapes under your fingers, experiment with moving them to every area of the fretboard, and then transpose the patterns to all 12 keys.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-03-13%20at%2011.10.34%20AM.png" width="620" height="530" alt="Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 11.10.34 AM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-03-13%20at%2011.10.45%20AM.png" width="620" height="305" alt="Screen Shot 2014-03-13 at 11.10.45 AM.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART ONE</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/e3qIi5FA7AQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2717386885001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2717386885001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-recognizing-repetitive-fretboard-shapes-all-string-groups#comments December 2013 Dream Theater John Petrucci Wild Stringdom Blogs News Lessons Magazine Wed, 17 Dec 2014 19:10:28 +0000 John Petrucci http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19402 Guitar Chalk Sessions: Adding Dynamic Appeal to your Power Chords with Intervals and Dyads http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-chalk-sessions-adding-dynamic-appeal-your-power-chords-intervals-and-dyads <!--paging_filter--><p>Power chords, once your fingers are comfortable with the stretching, are <a href="http://www.guitarchalk.com/2014/09/guitar-chords-for-beginners-infographic-cheat-sheet.html">mind-numbingly simple</a>. </p> <p>That's not a bad thing and I wouldn't say that power chords are "cheap" or "too easy."</p> <p>That's dumb.</p> <p>Because they get the job done, right? So why wouldn't we use them? They’re functional and adequate to the task.</p> <p>In the right context, power chords are a beautiful thing. When music demands a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gGQUlaCYg7k">heavy, smooth and easy-to-digest chord progression</a> (like in modern rock, pop, metal, etc.), a root note, a consonant interval (perfect fifth) and perhaps an octave thrown in for good measure, are all you really need.</p> <p>We can play as many chords as we want all using the same shape; just shift frets or strings.</p> <p>But what if we wanted to dress things up a little bit? What if we wanted to make our power chords more dynamic and <a href="http://www.guitarchalk.com/2014/08/how-creating-melody-sets-you-apart-as-guitar-player.html">melodic?</a></p> <p>Adding some flavor and variety to your power chord progressions can really take your playing up a notch and set you apart. It's an especially handy technique for those who fill the role of both a lead and rhythm guitar player.</p> <p>There are two primary techniques you can use to do it; intervals and dyads. Let’s cover intervals first.</p> <p><strong>First Technique: Add Major or Minor Intervals</strong></p> <p>Assume you're lucky enough to be playing a chord progression that is entirely in a major key. Even better, let's just say you're going from D to A. Tabbing it out would look like this:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-12-06%20at%203.49.14%20PM.png" width="99" height="120" alt="Screen Shot 2014-12-06 at 3.49.14 PM.png" /></p> <p>What if you wanted to add some melody or even just variety? We can use major intervals to do so, since we're theoretically dealing with two major chords. So where do we put these intervals?</p> <p>You'll need to target areas where you have long pauses or holds on a single chord. So in this situation, we can assume (for illustrative purposes) that the D chord gets held for a short few beats, while the A chord is held longer.</p> <p>That means the A chord is where we can move a bit more and add some creative intervals.</p> <p>Use the open A note to play your second A chord (bracketed).</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-12-06%20at%203.49.20%20PM.png" width="101" height="118" alt="Screen Shot 2014-12-06 at 3.49.20 PM.png" /></p> <p>We can now start adding intervals to our A chord. Here are a few options:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-12-06%20at%203.49.29%20PM.png" width="223" height="261" alt="Screen Shot 2014-12-06 at 3.49.29 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-12-06%20at%203.49.37%20PM.png" width="256" height="121" alt="Screen Shot 2014-12-06 at 3.49.37 PM.png" /></p> <p>It's a simple, but effective, strategy.</p> <p>You can employ the same interval shifts with any other power chord. Say we don't have an open chord to work with, like in the case of this G:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-12-06%20at%203.49.45%20PM.png" width="70" height="116" alt="Screen Shot 2014-12-06 at 3.49.45 PM.png" /></p> <p>We can still add intervals by shifting the note at the fifth fret, currently a perfect fifth, in relation to the root note at the third fret.</p> <p>Here's what I came up with.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-12-06%20at%203.49.51%20PM.png" width="365" height="118" alt="Screen Shot 2014-12-06 at 3.49.51 PM.png" /></p> <p>As you can see, the only note that needs to change is the interval of the root. The root note itself doesn't move.</p> <p>That means you can use this tactic as often as you want within any power chord in any given progression.</p> <p>If the progression contains minor chords, you'll have to make sure to hit notes that resolve to a minor tune. But that will come with habit, muscle memory and time.</p> <p><strong>Second Technique: Add Octave Dyads</strong></p> <p>A second strategy is to use <a href="http://www.guitarchalk.com/2014/09/learning-simple-guitar-chords-using-dyads-triads.html">simple, two-note dyads</a> to add short melodies over power chords. This has become a widely used technique in the post-grunge era and has been typified by many modern guitarists.</p> <p>To illustrate this example, I find it best to start with an open D chord in drop-D, like the following tab:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-12-06%20at%203.49.58%20PM.png" width="71" height="119" alt="Screen Shot 2014-12-06 at 3.49.58 PM.png" /></p> <p>Start with your D root note on the second string (fifth fret), add its corresponding octave (third string, seventh fret) and reapply some of the intervals we already covered by simply moving the octave shape up the fretboard.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-12-06%20at%203.50.06%20PM.png" width="196" height="119" alt="Screen Shot 2014-12-06 at 3.50.06 PM.png" /></p> <p>We can apply the same principle with the G chord as our base and the 2-3-5 fret climb is our melody.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-12-06%20at%203.50.17%20PM.png" width="154" height="121" alt="Screen Shot 2014-12-06 at 3.50.17 PM.png" /></p> <p>Once you get comfortable, start planting these runs in between chords. Like this:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-12-06%20at%203.50.23%20PM.png" width="349" height="121" alt="Screen Shot 2014-12-06 at 3.50.23 PM.png" /></p> <p>Not only does this break the monotony of a chord progression, but it adds some melodic flavor to what is otherwise a one-dimensional and linear sound.</p> <p>Because sometimes a guitar player needs to handle both rhythm and lead, especially today when many groups employ only one guitarist. Being able to play heavy, while also having enough skill and musical awareness to add melody and variety to your chord progressions makes you a far more valuable musician.</p> <p>And while they aren't all you need to accomplish that, dyadic octaves and intervals can give you a lot of mileage as they're excellent tools to work with.</p> <p>If you play a lot of power chords you shouldn’t feel bad about it.</p> <p>Just learn how to make them count.</p> <p><em>Flickr Commons Image Courtesy of <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/maurymccown/">maury.mccown</a></em></p> <p><em>Robert Kittleberger is the founder and editor of <a href="http://www.guitarchalk.com">Guitar Chalk</a> and <a href="http://www.guitarbargain.net">Guitar Bargain</a>. You can get in touch with him <a href="http://www.guitarchalk.com/p/about-me.html">here</a>, or via <a href="https://twitter.com/guitarchalk">Twitter</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/guitarchalk">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://plus.google.com/u/0/109221824688243850332/posts">Google Plus.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-chalk-sessions-adding-dynamic-appeal-your-power-chords-intervals-and-dyads#comments Bobby Kittleberger Guitar Chalk Sessions Blogs Lessons Fri, 12 Dec 2014 16:10:55 +0000 Bobby Kittleberger http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23089 Bent Out of Shape: Guitar Rehab, Part 1 — Picking-Hand Warmups http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-guitar-rehab-part-1-picking-hand-warmups <!--paging_filter--><p>Welcome to my new series of lessons titled Guitar Rehab. </p> <p>If you follow my column, you might've noticed that I haven't written any new lessons in the past few months. I had a problem with my arm that required surgery. As a result, I was unable to play guitar for three months. </p> <p>Now that I'm able to play again, I'm excited to get back to writing and have many new lessons planned for the following weeks.</p> <p>Lack of inspiration, time commitments such as work, medical problems, loss of interest, even video games are all valid reasons people take a break from playing guitar. </p> <p>For that reason, I decided to start this series of lessons for anyone who has spent a period of time away from playing. These lessons will help you get back into playing regularly and give you some useful exercises to help rebuild your technique. When I started playing again, the first thing I noticed was how stiff my fingers felt and how uncoordinated my picking had become. My stamina was also very bad and my hands felt tired after only an hour of playing.</p> <p>This first lesson will focus on a rhythm guitar warmup, which is primarily geared toward your picking hand. The goal is to warm up your picking wrist and gradually increase your alternate-picking accuracy. </p> <p>For this series, all of the exercises will be played to a backing track, which I think will make them more enjoyable as opposed to just playing to just a click/metronome.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/fig1.jpg" width="620" height="110" alt="fig1.jpg" /></p> <p>This first exercise is a 16th note pedal rhythm. You begin on the open A and play straight open notes. Try to relax your picking wrist and rest your palm on the bridge to mute the strings a little. Your alternate picking should sound smooth and flow with the music.</p> <p>I'm going take a short break from the lesson to give my personal opinion about pedaling. I've read many lessons where they tell you to develop your alternate picking technique to a point where your down and up strokes sound identical. In my opinion, that’s good advice if you want to sound like a robot. </p> <p>Humans will naturally play the down stroke slightly heavier to create a slight dynamic within alternate picking. Again, this is only my opinion, but I prefer to hear this dynamic as opposed to playing each note identically. Pedaling will groove much better to the music if you have this dynamic.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/fig2.jpg" width="620" height="235" alt="fig2.jpg" /></p> <p>Back to the lesson! After the straight 16th note pedaling of the open A string, you will begin to play notes in sets of four across two stings (Exercise 2). You will play a descending pattern through the A minor scale with the open A between each note. This doesn't require too much coordination between picking and fretting hands but advances the exercise from a single string.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/fig3.jpg" width="620" height="241" alt="fig3.jpg" /></p> <p>The next step is to move from sets of four to sets of two across three stings (Exercise 3). This does start to get challenging, especially when changing stings. For this exercise I move away from A minor and play the same pattern in the keys of B minor, D minor and E minor.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/fig4.jpg" width="620" height="235" alt="fig4.jpg" /></p> <p>The final stage of the lesson is 16th notes, where you change note with every pick (Exercise 4). For this exercise, we just move through the common progression of A minor, G major and F major. I looped this chord progression of this exercise at the end of the backing track for you to improvise some solos over when you've finished.</p> <p>As you can see, with each stage of the exercise it becomes slightly more challenging and requires more accuracy between the fretting and picking hands. I've made a video demonstration and also given you the backing track to practice along to. Cheers!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/6PkrUZujzNk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/181072176&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-guitar-rehab-part-1-picking-hand-warmups#comments Bent Out of Shape Guitar Rehab Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Thu, 11 Dec 2014 20:51:37 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23080 From Bach to Rock: Expanding Your Musicality and Fretboard Knowledge Using Triads and Inversions (Guitar, Un-CAGED) http://www.guitarworld.com/bach-rock-expanding-your-musicality-and-fretboard-knowledge-using-triads-and-inversions-guitar-un-caged <!--paging_filter--><p>When first learning to play guitar, transitioning between chords and playing a few progressions can allow you to play hundreds of songs. </p> <p>While this can keep you entertained for quite a while, you might find there is a large amount of the fretboard that is lacking your attention.</p> <p>One of the many tools that can be used to learn the higher positions is the CAGED system. Though the application can be very useful, aspects of it can be simplified and studied in a more musical approach. Doing this might help you have a better understanding of chord voicing and harmony.</p> <p>The CAGED system uses five guitar chord shapes — C, A, G, E and D — to create barre chords for playing in higher positions. The problem with this system is that its functionality has nothing to do with music itself. It is simply a physical device that works based on the tuning of the strings. It cannot be applied to music in general and is specific only to the guitar.</p> <p>These five chords are all root-position chords, meaning the letter name of the chord is the lowest-sounding note. But music does not always consist of root-position chords, so why should it on the guitar? In this column, I’ll demonstrate another approach for expanding your fretboard knowledge using triads and their inversions.</p> <p>First of all, what is a chord? If you’re asked to play a G chord, what really does that mean? Sure, it can be a shape from a chord diagram, but why that shape? And if it’s different from one diagram to the next, is one of those wrong?</p> <p>As guitarists, we often think about chords as shapes, and we have “go-to” shapes for certain chords. But that’s not thinking musically. So that we can develop a stronger sense of musicianship, we need to understand how chords are constructed. To demonstrate, I’ll use a simple I-V-vi-IV progression in the key of A, so the chords will be A, E, F♯m and D. </p> <p>First, we need to know what notes are in the key of A.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-08-13%20at%205.45.03%20PM.png" width="620" height="92" alt="Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 5.45.03 PM.png" /></p> <p>The basic chord is called a triad and consists of a root, a third and a fifth. The chords in this progression will have these notes:</p> <p><strong>A</strong>: A, C♯, E<br /> <strong>E</strong>: E, G♯, B<br /> <strong>F♯m</strong>: F♯, A, C♯<br /> <strong>D:</strong> D, F♯, A</p> <p>Your “go-to” shapes for these chords might look something like this:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-08-13%20at%205.47.01%20PM.png" width="620" height="173" alt="Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 5.47.01 PM.png" /></p> <p>When first learning to play a chord progression, we’re typically using our basic “guitar” chords. I use quotations because many guitarists think of a chord as a certain shape. That may suffice for a beginner, but to make those root-position chords even more musical, we need to take advantage of the rest of the fretboard. We can do so by learning different chord inversions. </p> <p>As there are three different notes in a basic chord (triad), there are three basic forms for these chords. These forms are presented only on the top four strings. The reasoning for this is twofold: 01. Historically, the developing guitar was a four-string instrument until the Baroque era, when a fifth string was added, and then a sixth. Therefore, chords had to be formed on fewer strings. 02. Chords formed on the top four strings involve a systematic, musical approach to triadic harmony and the use of chord inversions.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-08-13%20at%205.51.05%20PM.png" width="620" height="352" alt="Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 5.51.05 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-08-13%20at%205.51.58%20PM_0.png" width="620" height="87" alt="Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 5.51.58 PM_0.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-08-13%20at%205.52.19%20PM_0.png" width="620" height="271" alt="Screen Shot 2014-08-13 at 5.52.19 PM_0.png" /><br /> <strong>Form I Voicing</strong>: 1-3-5-1 (root, third, fifth, octave)—“root-position.”<br /> <strong>Form II Voicing</strong>: 3-5-1-3 —“first inversion.”<br /> <strong>Form III Voicing</strong>: 5-1-3-5—“second inversion.”</p> <p>There is a clear pattern of intervals with this system of chord inversions. While the official term is “inversion,” using form numbers can help to identify where the root of the chord is. For example, the root in Form I is on the first string, it’s on the second for Form II, and the third for Form III. This applies to both Major and Minor Forms.</p> <p>Applying these forms to the chord progression, A, E, F♯m, D, will give us three different fretboard locations, with each of these having a different sound because of the different chord voicings. The transition from one form to the next is designed so that common chord tones may be used where applicable, and shifting is kept to a minimum.</p> <p><strong>Example 1:</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-08-14%20at%202.59.01%20PM.png" width="620" height="146" alt="Screen Shot 2014-08-14 at 2.59.01 PM.png" /></p> <p><strong>Example 2:</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-08-14%20at%203.01.25%20PM.png" width="620" height="144" alt="Screen Shot 2014-08-14 at 3.01.25 PM.png" /></p> <p><strong>Example 3:</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-08-14%20at%203.02.22%20PM.png" width="620" height="149" alt="Screen Shot 2014-08-14 at 3.02.22 PM.png" /></p> <p>Each of these examples systematically moves through the different chord inversions, and they create sounds very different from the basic, root-position shapes. </p> <p>Learning these six total forms can be much easier than the learning CAGED system. With its musical approach, the focus is on specific chord voicing rather than just root-position chord shapes. Through using these, you can expand your fretboard knowledge in a musical way and gain a better understanding of how chords function. Sonically, if you’re playing the same progression with another guitarist, each of you can play the same chords, but in different positions, creating a wider spectrum of sound.</p> <p>This method of learning chords is presented in my new iBook, <em>Beginning Guitar Method</em>, <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/beginning-guitar-method/id898277915?mt=11">which is available in the Apple iBookstore.</a> </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/aO1XZJvFXu8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> </p> <p><em>Matthias Young teaches online guitar lessons at <a href="http://www.freeguitarvideos.com/">FreeGuitarVideos.com</a> and is the Head of Guitar at <a href="http://matthiasyoung.com/callanwolde-fine-arts-center-guitar-lessons.html">Callanwolde Fine Arts Center</a> in Atlanta, Georgia. His book and DVD, <em><a href="http://matthiasyoung.com/metal-guitar-method.html">Metal Guitar Method</a></em>, has sold thousands since its publication in 2012. His most recent release, <em>Beginning Guitar Method</em>, is <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/beginning-guitar-method/id898277915?mt=11">available in the Apple iBookstore</a>. You can follow Matthias on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/MatthiasYoungMusic">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/MatthiasYoung">Twitter</a>, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hksBbos-LY&amp;list=PLXAcBwcIb4bXcUIM8jk2tdqO4p-i8BKmV">YouTube</a> and <a href="https://plus.google.com/112484027885679013277/posts">Google+.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bach-rock-expanding-your-musicality-and-fretboard-knowledge-using-triads-and-inversions-guitar-un-caged#comments From Bach to Rock Matthias Young Videos Blogs Lessons Thu, 11 Dec 2014 17:35:48 +0000 Matthias Young http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22123 Video Lesson: Jimmy Brown Shows You How to Play "Silent Night" on Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/video-how-play-silent-night-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p>In this video, <em>Guitar World's</em> Jimmy Brown shows you how to play "Silent Night" — just in time for Christmas.</p> <p>Brown goes over several different arrangements of the song, from basic to more involved. Then he covers the melody line. Then you see him play the melody over the chords.</p> <p>This video lesson of "Silent Night" is from the <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/products/play-christmas-songs-on-the-guitar-dvd/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=JimmyLessonSNight">How to Play Christmas Songs on the Guitar</a> DVD, which is available now at the Guitar World Online Store. </p> <p>Other songs on the DVD include "Oh Come All Ye Faithful," "Deck the Hall," "Jingle Bells," "The First Noel," "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing," "Jingle Bell Rock" and "Auld Lang Syne," plus a Christmas medley for electric guitar featuring "Little Drummer Boy," "Silent Night" and "Auld Lang Syne."</p> <p>There are more than 80 minutes of lessons. For more information or to order, <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/products/play-christmas-songs-on-the-guitar-dvd/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=JimmyLessonSNight">head to the Guitar World Online Store.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="345" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/tpVA1DuSdpA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-brown">Jimmy Brown</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-how-play-silent-night-guitar#comments Christmas Jimmy Brown News Features Lessons Wed, 10 Dec 2014 17:05:43 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/13886 Bent Out of Shape: Guitar Workout 2014 — Symmetrical Scales http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-guitar-workout-2014-symmetrical-scales <!--paging_filter--><p>Last year, I gave you <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-intensive-30-minute-guitar-workout-musicians-go">a 30-minute guitar workout designed for guitarists with limited practice time.</a> </p> <p>The goal of the workout was to give you an intense 30 minutes of practice. The positive response to this workout inspired me make a new version for 2014. As with my previous workout the goal is the same: 30 minutes of intense practice.</p> <p>My original workout was based around taking a diatonic scale playing different sequences, intervals and arpeggios derived from that scale. This workout focuses on using symmetrical scales to create similar sequences. "Symmetrical Scales" is not a musical term, but I've used it to describe the three scales this workout is based around.</p> <p>To begin, I've written the three symmetrical scales, all in the key of A for you to see how each scale is constructed. These are all scales you've seen before, starting with the chromatic scale. The chromatic scale uses all semitone (one-fret) intervals to create a 12-note scale. </p> <p>The second scale is the whole tone scale, which uses all whole tone (two-fret) intervals to create a six-note scale. The third scale is technically a diminished 7th arpeggio, which uses all minor third (three-fret) intervals; this also is commonly known as the diminished scale. As you can see from the TAB, each scale has a unique arrangement on the fretboard, which makes the sequences we derive from the scales more challenging.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab1_7.jpg" width="620" height="137" alt="tab1_7.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab2_8.jpg" width="620" height="160" alt="tab2_8.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab3_7.jpg" width="620" height="160" alt="tab3_7.jpg" /></p> <p>For a detailed explanation on how the following exercises should be practiced, see my original workout. You should begin each exercise at a slow speed of around 80 bpm. Every time you succesfully play the vivien203, increase the tempo by 10 bpm. Keep increasing the tempo until you reach the target bpm for each exercise.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/154661543&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><strong>Part 1: Chromatic Warm Up (Target Speed: 160 bpm)</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab4_3.jpg" width="620" height="132" alt="tab4_3.jpg" /></p> <p>The first exercise combines a linear chromatic sequence with string skipping. This exercise is basically a warm up to get your alternate picking and fretting fingers sync'd up. This should be very easy to build speed up to the target tempo of 160 bpm. Every string has 4 notes which is makes alternate picking very simple.</p> <p><strong>Part 2: Whole Tone Scale Intervals (Target Speed: 120 bpm)</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab5_0.jpg" width="620" height="132" alt="tab5_0.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab6.jpg" width="620" height="132" alt="tab6.jpg" /></p> <p>After warming up, we now move to the whole tone scale, which we will play as interval sequences. As this is a symmetrical scale, every interval is the same for every note of the scale. We start by playing the scale in thirds, which in this case is major thirds. </p> <p>Due to the more complicated picking pattern, I set a target speed of 120 bpm for this exercise. After thirds we play the scale in 4th's which in the whole tone scale is augmented 4th's. This exercise is great for developing an "outside picking" technique. Each pair of 4th's is played across two adjacent strings, and using strict alternate picking means you pick outside each string.</p> <p><strong>Part 3: Diminished Scale Sequences (Target Speed: 160 bpm)</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab7.jpg" width="620" height="160" alt="tab7.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab8.jpg" width="620" height="141" alt="tab8.jpg" /></p> <p>To finish, we will play diminished scale sequences in triplets and 16th notes. Because this scale has much wider intervals than regular diatonic scales these sequences can be very challenging to play at higher speeds. As each string only has two notes and the scale moves in a diagonal direction across the fretboard you will find your picking and fretting hand working much harder than with diatonic sequences. </p> <p>Hopefully you'll find this workout useful and use it as an alternative for my previous workout. I usually use these as a warm up for more intense/lengthy practice sessions but alone they provide you with a good technical practice which should keep your chops in shape, cheers!</p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-guitar-workout-2014-symmetrical-scales#comments Bent Out of Shape Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Wed, 10 Dec 2014 15:37:55 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21570 What In the World: Using String Skipping to See Scales Differently http://www.guitarworld.com/what-world-using-string-skipping-see-scales-differently <!--paging_filter--><p>When you first learn the three-note-per-string and/or single position seven-note scale, you learn the patterns starting on the low E string and work your way up to the high E and back. </p> <p>You do this for each of the seven patterns up the neck, practicing and perfecting your scales. </p> <p>This is great! The only problem is, this is how you are training your hands and brain to approach them. </p> <p>Rather than viewing the scales as the available notes you have to choose from in a given key/mode, the order of the notes sometimes becomes how you rely on playing them in an improvising and/or composing situation. </p> <p>There is absolutely nothing wrong with this; it has worked fine and beautifully for hundreds of years. The melody for “Joy to the World” is simply a descending major scale. Learning to approach your scales in a different way will shake things up and hopefully change your habits of approaching scales in only an A-to-Z fashion. </p> <p>String skipping is mostly associated with being a shred technique, covering a lot of ground quickly on the guitar by skipping over adjacent strings. The approach I am presenting is not so much a shred thing, but more of a way to know the scale on only two strings at a time, rather than all six, as most people generally learn them. If anything, this will force you to know the notes of the scale better, rather than relying on muscle memory to get through them. Remember the most important thing when playing music is to consciously create, rather than go through the motions of learned patterns that are embedded in our brains from constant repetition. </p> <p>For the examples, I have written the scales out in the key of F. Once the concept is learned, it should be applied to all keys/modes. As you play through these, you will notice different shapes that repeat across each set of two strings according to the degree of the scale you start on. Eventually you will see that if, for instance, you start a pattern on the third degree of the scale, you will be playing one shape; if you start on the root of the scale, you will be playing a different one, etc. </p> <p><strong>String set 1, High E and G strings:</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Lesson-10-1.jpg" width="620" height="445" alt="Lesson-10-1.jpg" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>String set 2, B and D strings:</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Lesson-10-2.jpg" width="620" height="461" alt="Lesson-10-2.jpg" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>String set 3, G and A strings:</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Lesson-10-3_0.jpg" width="620" height="463" alt="Lesson-10-3_0.jpg" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>String set 4, D and low E strings:</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Lesson-10-4.jpg" width="620" height="461" alt="Lesson-10-4.jpg" /></p> <p>To further learn and integrate this approach to your playing, try improvising with this technique using only one string set at a time. Move up and down one string and then hop over to the other string in the set, keeping in mind to be as melodic as possible at all times, rather than trying to shred through the scale. </p> <p>Being limited to only two strings at a time will force you to approach the instrument in a way that you may not have possibly explored before.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/0d5nGfbLifc?list=UUozoKYJmat8MUYcdRo40cHA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Steve Booke is a composer for film and TV from the New York area. His compositions range from orchestral to metal to world styles from every corner of the planet. A graduate of Berklee College of Music, Steve has played guitar for more than 28 years. He has recorded 10 albums of his own and has played on countless others. He plays gigs in the NY area and tours the East Coast with a variety of bands. He has performed with Ben E. King and members of Mahavishnu Orchestra. He endorses D'Addario/Planet Waves, Larrivee Guitars, Levy's Leathers, Peavey, Stylus Pick, Finale PrintMusic, Pigtronix, Tech 21, Toontrack, Graph Tech, Seymour Duncan, Waves, Studio Devil and L.R. Baggs. His music is available on iTunes and Amazon. Steve is now offering Skype lessons and can be contacted at info@stevebooke.com. Visit <a href="http://stevebooke.com">stevebooke.com</a> and <a href="https://www.facebook.com/SteveBookeGuitaristComposer">Facebook.com/SteveBookeGuitaristComposer</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/what-world-using-string-skipping-see-scales-differently#comments Steve Booke What In the World Videos Blogs Lessons Wed, 10 Dec 2014 15:36:23 +0000 Steve Booke http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22302 Metal for Life with Metal Mike: Continuing Our Look at Drop-D-Based Metal Riffage http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-continuing-our-look-drop-d-based-metal-riffage <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the January 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-january-15-ac-dc?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=January2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Last month, we investigated the great advantages of using drop-D tuning in the development of metal-style riffs and licks. This month, I’d like to continue with this topic and show you some additional advantages that this tuning offers.</p> <p>Drop-D tuning is achieved by tuning the guitar’s low E string down a whole step, to D, resulting in a tuning of, low to high, D A D G B E. As I stated, in this tuning, the bottom two strings are now a fifth apart—D to A—instead of the normal fourth apart—E to A. </p> <p>As the higher D string is tuned a fourth above the A string, sounding the bottom three strings open, or fretting across all three strings at any given fret, will yield a three-note root-fifth-root power chord. This makes it very easy to slide and shift this fat-sounding voicing, as a single finger can be barred across the strings to fret the power chord shape. </p> <p>Alice in Chains guitarist Jerry Cantrell makes very effective use of this technique in songs like “Dam That River,” “We Die Young” and “Them Bones.” Pantera’s Dimebag Darrell was also a big fan of using drop-D tuning to perform heavy riffs in songs like “Walk” and “A New Level,” and Metallica relied on drop-D for “The Thing That Should Not Be.” </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3920003892001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3920003892001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-continuing-our-look-drop-d-based-metal-riffage#comments January 2015 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos News Lessons Magazine Fri, 05 Dec 2014 13:24:01 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23009 Guitar World's Jimmy Brown and Paul Riario Play Rock Arrangement of "Deck the Halls" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-worlds-jimmy-brown-and-paul-riario-play-rock-arrangement-deck-halls-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the January 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-january-15-ac-dc?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=January2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>To help folks get into the holiday spirit this year, <em>Guitar World</em> presents my rock guitar ensemble arrangement of the classic Christmas/holiday song “Deck the Halls,” which begins on Page 111 in the January 2015 issue of GW. </p> <p> It’s set for three electric guitars, all played with distortion and a bright, hard-rock/metal tone (bridge pickup), and electric bass, preferably played with a pick, punk style. The arrangement also works well with just two guitars, or one guitar and bass.</p> <p>Below, you can watch a video of <em>Guitar World's</em> Paul Riario and me performing the entire song. </p> <p>For the complete transcription, plus plenty of performance notes by me, check out the new issue of <em>Guitar World</em>, which is <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-january-15-ac-dc?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=January2015VideosPage">available now at the Guitar World Online Store!</a></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3920137070001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3920137070001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-brown">Jimmy Brown</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-worlds-jimmy-brown-and-paul-riario-play-rock-arrangement-deck-halls-video#comments January 2015 Jimmy Brown Paul Riario Videos News Lessons Magazine Wed, 03 Dec 2014 21:59:13 +0000 Jimmy Brown http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23022 Thrash Course with Dave Davidson: Applying the Diminished Scale to the Pre-Chorus and Chorus of “Deathless” http://www.guitarworld.com/thrash-course-dave-davidson-applying-diminished-scale-pre-chorus-and-chorus-deathless <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the January 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-january-15-ac-dc?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=January2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Last month, I introduced the two different primary forms of the diminished scale, which I use as the basis for the riffs heard on the title track of the latest Revocation release, Deathless. This month, I’d like to go over the song’s pre-chorus and chorus sections.</p> <p>The two primary forms of the diminished scale are very similar. In essence, they are exactly the same, except the second form simply starts from the second note of the first form. </p> <p>One of the forms is often referred to as “whole-half,” or “W-H-W-H,” etc., which signifies the pattern of ascending a whole step, then a half step, then a whole step, then a half step, etc. If we were to instead start from the second degree of this pattern and make that note the root note, the result would be “half-whole,” or “H-W-H-W,” etc. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3919983299001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3919983299001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/thrash-course-dave-davidson-applying-diminished-scale-pre-chorus-and-chorus-deathless#comments Dave Davidson January 2015 Revocation Thrash Course Videos News Lessons Magazine Wed, 03 Dec 2014 20:43:36 +0000 Dave Davidson http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23007 Soloing Strategies: Randy Rhoads' Scales, Blues Licks and Daring Chromatic Maneuvers http://www.guitarworld.com/soloing_strategies_randy_rhoads <!--paging_filter--><p>In the world of heavy metal, hot guitarists are a dime a dozen. </p> <p>Yet only a precious few stand the test of time and become enduring guitar gods. </p> <p>Randy Rhoads was one such player. Joining forces with singer Ozzy Osbourne in 1979, Rhoads burst onto the metal scene like a bolt from the blue. </p> <p>He was blessed with dazzling chops and an innate comprehension of music theory, and his style had a perfect blend of flash and melodic structure. </p> <p>Flowing legato sections segued to impossibly fast, palm-muted picking passages; incendiary trills and daring chromatic maneuvers coexisted with classically influenced melodies—all of which were derived from a seemingly inexhaustible supply of scales and arpeggios and laid out across an ever-shifting rhythmic landscape. </p> <p>What's more, Rhoads was so precise that he could seamlessly double-track anything he played, for maximum sonic density.</p> <p>Sadly, only three recordings&mdash;<em>Blizzard of Ozz, Diary of a Madman, </em>and <em>Tribute</em>&mdash;captured Rhoads' genius before a tragic airplane crash, in 1982, cut his life short. But the musicianship that lies within those grooves is as stunning and inspirational today as it was then.</p> <p><strong>Sequences and Scales</strong></p> <p>Rhoads would often sprinkle a solo with a flurry of pentatonic pull-offs such as those in <strong>Fig.1</strong>. Built from the A minor pentatonic scale (A-C-D-E-G), this lick is inspired both by the opening moments of the first solo in "Mr. Crowley" and by the fill just before the last verse of "I Don't Know." It's interesting to note that while Rhoads possessed the facility to rip through lines such as these using alternate picking, he often chose a legato approach for a smoother, more flowing outcome.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/rrss1.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p><strong>Fig. 2</strong> features a three-notes-per-string legato scale run inspired by the solos in "Crazy Train," "Suicide Solution," and "Mr. Crowley." This line zips up the A natural minor scale (A-B-C-D-E-F-G) in a blinding flash of hammer-ons. Make sure you hammer firmly onto every second and third note, striving for equal volume of the pick attacks.</p> <p><strong>Blues Licks and Mixed Scales</strong></p> <p>Rhoads was fond of the blues scale (1-f3-4- f5-5-f7), and often milked its flatted 5th for all it was worth. For example, notice the emphasis on the Bf in <strong>Fig. 3A</strong>, an E blues (E-G-A-Bf- B-D) lick inspired by the opening phrases of the "I Don't Know" solo. Rhoads often mixed blues-scale licks with diatonic scales, and modes such as Aeolian (natural minor), Phrygian (1-f2-f3-4-5-f6-f7), and harmonic minor (1-2-f3-4-5-f6-7). </p> <p>Reminiscent of the "Crazy Train" solo, <strong>Fig. 3B</strong> offers a composite of F# Aeolian (F#-G#-A-B-C#-D-E) and F# blues (F#-A-B-C-C#-E).</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/rrss2.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p><strong>Chromaticism</strong></p> <p>Chromaticism is another hallmark of Rhoads's soloing style. His chromatic techniques ran the gamut from the simple use of <em>tension tones</em> (notes that lie outside of pentatonic and diatonic scales) all the way to full-blown chromatically modulating passages such as the ones found in <strong>Figs. 4A-B</strong>. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/rrss3.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p><strong>Fig. 4A</strong> is similar to a move Rhoads used in "S.A.T.O.," where a minor-3rd hammer- on is moved down in half steps. Notice that the lick starts on two solid chord tones (G and E, the f3rd and root), then chromatically targets two resolving tones (D and B, the f7th and 5th). <strong>Fig. 4B</strong> features one of Rhoads's pet motifs: a descending fournote slice of a scale pattern&mdash;in this case, F-E-D-C of the D minor scale (D-E-F-G- A-Bf-C). Ascending chromatically, the palm-muted quadruplets hit sonic fruition with an Af-G-F sequence over the Fm chord. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/rrss4.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p><strong>Fig. 5</strong> features another of the guitarist's favorite chromatic ploys, this one involving major and minor triads, along with partial 7th-chord arpeggios, moving along the top two strings. </p> <p>In this example, an A minor triad (A-C-E) moves up in half steps, then segues to the upper portion of an Am7 arpeggio (A-C-E-G), which also ascends chromatically. <strong>Fig. 6</strong> breaks the bounds of chromaticism with a pick-tapped trill that ascends in pitch via a gradual bend executed with the fret hand's 4th finger. Notice that, again, the example begins and ends on solid chord tones (G# and B [<em>3rd and 5th</em>], and B and D [<em>5th and f7th</em>]).</p> <p><strong> Tapping and Trills</strong></p> <p> Unlike many of his peers in the early Eighties, Rhoads avoided jumping on Eddie Van Halen's tapping bandwagon. When he did choose to tap, though, the results were stunning, as the sequence in <strong>Fig.7</strong> reveals. In the style of the breathtaking climax of the "Flying High Again" solo, the example follows a double-tap/pull-off/hammer-on sequence constructed from triads that outline the changes. Some of the most dazzling Randy Rhoads moments are often mistaken for tapped excursions. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/rrss5.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p>One such passage is the open string- pull-off extravaganza that occurs midway though his solo in the live version of "Suicide Solution," where he dispatches a sizzling array of triads and partials along the 1st [<strong>Fig. 8</strong>] and 2nd strings. </p> <p>Rhoads also had a penchant for classically influenced trills (two notes played in rapid alternation). He would use them to outline the chord tones of specific changes, as seen in <strong>Fig. 9</strong>, where the notes of an Ff7 arpeggio (F-Af-Cf-D) are alternated with notes a half step below.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/rrss6.jpg" width="620" /></p> <p><strong>The Solo</strong></p> <p>The solo [<strong>Fig.10</strong>] is a 15-bar rocker in the style of songs like "I Don't Know," "Flying High Again," and "Crazy Train." The first half (measures 1-8) sits firmly in the key of F# minor, riding a i-fVI-fVII-i-fIII-iv-Vsus-V progression (F#m-D-E-F#m-A-Bm-C#7sus4-C#). Measures 9-12 serve as a bridge, with modulating I-vi cadences (D-Bm and E-C#m) in the temporary keys of D and E major. Measure 13 signals a march back up (fVI- fVII-v-i; D-E-C#m-F#m) to the resolving i-fVII-i (F#m-E-F#m) chordal riff.</p> <p>The solo opens, in typical Rhoadsian fashion, with a head-turning pinch-harmonic bend. To execute this two-octave harmonic, attack the G string aggressively with the side of your pick, simultaneously brushing the string with the side of your pick hand's thumb; the ideal position for this contact is right above the rear edge of the neck pickup. </p> <p>Next comes a pull-off flurry made up of F# blues and F# Aeolian scales, followed by a tremolo- picked E major pentatonic (E-F#-G#- B-C#) climb. (Tremolo picking, in which notes are picked as rapidly and continuously as possible, was another Rhoads staple). An F# minor pentatonic (F#-A-B-C#-E) wrapup (measure 4) mirrors the opening lick.</p> <p>In measure 5, a short melodic passage capped with a quick trill nods to "Crazy Train," then segues to a brief Rhoads motif (see Fig. 4B). Instead of moving chromatically, as expected, the motif spills into a t h ree-notes-per- s t r ing B Dor ian (B-C#-D-E-F#-G-F#) run (see Fig. 2). C# Phrygian dominant (C#-D-E#-F#-G#-A-B; fifth mode of F# harmonic minor) provides the melodic framework for the chromatically enhanced legato phrasing of bars 7-8.</p> <p>The fireworks in measures 9-10 are inspired by the open-string pull-off concepts described in Fig. 8. Accenting the first and fourth note in each sextuplet should give you the propulsion needed for this rapid passage. A six-note pattern&mdash;down five scale steps, then up one&mdash;lies at the heart of the E major pentatonic phrase in measure 11. Visualize the pattern before putting the entire phrase together. In measure 12 a C#m7 arpeggio is laid out almost entirely on the G string; keep your eye on the 9th fret in order to hit it precisely. </p> <p>The trills come fast and furious in the next measure. Targeting the notes of a D major triad (D-F#-A) will guide you through this quarter-note-triplet passage. Finally, a relatively simple run up the E major pentatonic scale and a pair of dyads (F#/C# and E/B) provide a logical and musical conclusion to the solo. Now that we've gone through the solo bit by bit, look back over it and take note of its the rhythmic diversity&mdash;yet another characteristic of Rhoads's brilliant soloing work.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/rrss7.jpg" width="620" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/randy-rhoads">Randy Rhoads</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/soloing_strategies_randy_rhoads#comments Ozzy Osbourne Randy Rhoads News Soloing Strategies Lessons Magazine Wed, 03 Dec 2014 17:54:57 +0000 Tom Kolb http://www.guitarworld.com/article/209 Man of Steel with Steel Panther's Satchel: How to Play the Bridge and Guitar Solo from “Gang Bang at the Old Folk’s Home” http://www.guitarworld.com/man-steel-steel-panthers-satchel-how-play-bridge-and-guitar-solo-gang-bang-old-folk-s-home <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the January 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-january-15-ac-dc?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=January2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Hey! Satchel here, with part two of our look at the Steel Panther classic, “Gang Bang at the Old Folk’s Home,” from our latest release, <em>All You Can Eat</em>. </p> <p>It never gets old, does it? I mean, it does get old, no pun intended, but no matter how old it gets, it’s still fun—that’s what I’m trying to say! This month we are going to examine the bitchin’ bridge and solo sections of this bitchin’ song.</p> <p>As opposed to the all-downstroked verse section, the bridge section, illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, is very strummy in that it is played with a basic strum pattern of steady 16th notes performed with alternate (down-up) picking. </p> <p>In this figure, I switch between bars of steadily strummed 16th notes and bars with either sparse chordal hits or combinations of two-note chords and single notes, which balance well against the feel of the steadily strummed chords. Notice in particular the fast pull-off riff in bar 4. Fretting with the ring and index fingers, I repeatedly pull off from the fourth fret to the second fret and then to the open string across the third, fourth and fifth strings before moving back into power-chord accents.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3919983277001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3919983277001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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Welcome to Part 11 of my "Absolute Fretboard Mastery" series. </p> <p>In this month’s lesson, I want to talk a bit about modes, which is a very interesting area of music theory. The great thing about modes is that once you master them, they can give you a whole new degree of freedom when creating melodies and composing solos. But they also can be a bit tricky to understand at first. </p> <p>So what I’m going to do is divide this body of knowledge into two parts and keep things as simple as I can to give you a comprehensive and absolute understanding of what modes are. </p> <p>To start off, let’s go back to <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/lessonface-steve-stine-absolute-fretboard-mastery-part-6-chord-progressions-video">Part 6 of this series</a>, where I spoke about chord progressions. You’ll recall I mentioned that when we’re in any major key, our I, IV and V chords are major and our ii, iii and vi chords are minor. </p> <p>For example, if we’re in the key of C major, our major chords, or our I, IV and V chords, are C major, F major and G major. Our minor chords, or our ii, iii and vi chords are D minor, E minor and A minor. In addition, we have our vii chord, which is a B diminished. </p> <p>It can sometimes be hard to recall all seven chords of a major key off the top of our head, especially when the key has sharps and flats, which is why we used a little visualization technique based on the root notes on our sixth and fifth strings to figure out our chord positions, even if we don’t know what those chords are. </p> <p>For example, if we apply this visualization technique to the key of C major, our chords would be spread out like this:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/image1-620.jpg" width="620" height="216" alt="image1-620.jpg" /> </p> <p>The great thing about this visual pattern is that we can apply it to any major key and figure out the seven chords in that key. </p> <p>For example, to figure out the chords in the key of G major, all we have to do is move the pattern up so that the I chord is on G:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/image2-620.jpg" width="620" height="216" alt="image2-620.jpg" /></p> <p>We can do this for relatively harder-to-figure-out keys, such as A flat:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/image3-620.jpg" width="620" height="216" alt="image3-620.jpg" /></p> <p>Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying you shouldn’t be thorough with your theory. As you progress as a guitarist, your theoretical knowledge should develop to such an extent that you know what your I through vii chords are no matter what key you’re in. But in situations where you need to quickly figure out which chords to play without actually knowing them, this visualization is a great tool. </p> <p>Going back to the key of C, we have our three major chords, which are C major, F major and G major. We also have our three minor chords, which are D minor, E minor and A minor. In addition we have our vii chord, which is the B diminished chord; but it isn’t really used as much functionally as the other six chords. If you’ve taken a look at the chord progressions in a few rock, blues or pop songs, you would have noticed the chord progressions in these songs tend to mostly revolve around the C major (I) and the A minor (vi) chords. </p> <p>For example, a typical verse-chord progression would go from A minor (vi) to F major (IV) to G major (V), and a typical chorus chord progression would go from C major (I) to G major (V) to A minor (vi) to F major (IV). Now in general terms, here we would say we’re in the key of A minor for the verse and the key of C major for the chorus. But what we’re really doing is emphasizing a different chord while remaining in the key of C. </p> <p>So a mode, in the most simplest of terms, is simply a way of referencing which scale degree or chord we’re emphasizing in a particular key. For instance, in the example above when we emphasize the I chord or the C major chord, in theoretical terms we say we’re in C Ionian. And when we’re emphasizing the vi chord or the A minor chord, we say we’re in A Aeolian. </p> <p>Likewise, in the key of C we have six chords, the I, ii, iii, IV, V and vi chords, that we can emphasize on, all while remaining in the key of C. For example, we can decide to emphasize the ii chord and play a chord progression that goes from D minor to A minor. So although we’re in the key of C, we’re not actually playing the C chord in the progression. And if we were to solo over this chord progression we’d still be in the key of C. </p> <p>Something that confused me when I was first learning modes was that I looked at all the different modes as separate entities and it took me a while to realize that they were simply just parts of one family. </p> <p>So when someone says they’re in the Dorian mode, it simply means that they’re emphasizing the second chord of another key. And since the second chord of a major scale is always minor, we know that we’re playing a minor element. So in our example above, when we’re emphasizing the D minor chord in the key of C, we say we’re playing D Dorian. </p> <p>Likewise, the third chord is called Phrygian, which is also minor, because the third chord of a major key is always minor. So if I were to tell you to play in E Phrygian, what I’m actually telling you is to emphasize the E minor chord while playing in the key of C. </p> <p>When we refer to a major or minor key, we don’t commonly use these fancy terms. And that’s because when we say we’re in G major, for instance, it’s implied that this is the I chord. Or if we say we’re in the key of B minor, it’s implied that B minor is the vi chord of another key. </p> <p>However, when we emphasize other chords in a key, like the ii chord in the key of C for instance which is the D minor chord, we can’t say that we’re in the key of D minor because that would imply that D minor is the vi chord of another key. And this is why we use the terms for the seven modes to identify the key we’re in and the chord we’re emphasizing. </p> <p>So in the “real world” when someone says they’re in (_) major, they’re referring to the I chord, and when they say they’re in (_) minor, they’re referring to the vi chord. However, if you want to be in ii we need to say Dorian, which means that we’re emphasizing the second chord in that particular key. And when we want to be in the iii chord we say we’re in Phyrigian, which means that we’re emphasizing the third chord in that key. </p> <p>Likewise, when emphasizing the IV chord we say Lydian, and when emphasizing the V chord we say we’re in Mixolydian. And then we have our vi chord which is Aeolian and finally the vii diminished chord which is referred to as Locrian. </p> <p>To summarize the terms for the seven modes are: </p> <p>I – Ionian<br /> ii – Dorian<br /> iii – Phyrigian<br /> IV – Lydian<br /> V – Mixolydian<br /> vi – Aeolian<br /> vii – Locrian </p> <p>What I want you to work on this month is on understanding the relationship between these modes and how they’re used as a reference tool. For example, if someone says you need to play in D Mixolydian, you need to quickly be able to understand that the D is your V chord and count backwards and realize you’re in the key of G. </p> <p>Once you have a thorough understanding of how these modes work in terms of chords, the scale knowledge we’re going to touch on for the final lesson in this series will be a whole lot easier to grasp. Practice hard as always. I’ll see you next month! </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/H8TnXPTNpR0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Steve Stine’s newly designed course, <a href="http://lessonface.go2cloud.org/SHI">Essential Elements for Guitar</a>, kicks off Saturday, December 6. <a href="http://lessonface.go2cloud.org/SHI">Learn more and enroll right here.</a> Try any lesson or class on Lessonface.com. Your satisfaction is guaranteed.</strong></p> <p><strong><em>Steve Stine is a longtime and sought-after guitar teacher who is professor of Modern Guitar Studies at North Dakota State University. Over the last 27 years, he has taught thousands of students, including established touring musicians, and released numerous video guitar lesson courses via established publishers. A resident of Fargo, North Dakota, today he is more accessible than ever before through the convenience of live online guitar lessons at <a href="http://lessonface.go2cloud.org/aff_c?offer_id=7&amp;aff_id=1001">Lessonface.com.</a></em></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/lessonface-steve-stine-understanding-modes-absolute-fretboard-mastery-part-11#comments LessonFace Steve Stine Videos Blogs News Lessons Tue, 02 Dec 2014 16:29:51 +0000 Steve Stine http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22997 Jazz Guitar Corner: Learn All Seven Major Modes the Easy Way http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-learn-all-seven-major-modes-easy-way <!--paging_filter--><p>When learning how to play the seven major modes on the guitar, most of us begin with the Ionian mode then move on to Dorian and progress up the fretboard in this way until we’ve learned all seven positions of the major scale. </p> <p>While this can be an effective way of learning modes, in this lesson you will learn a shortcut that will allow you to quickly and easily learn all seven modes by starting with Lydian and simply lowering one note at a time until you can play all seven modes on the fretboard. </p> <p>When learning the modes in this way, by changing one note between each subsequent mode, you will practice them out of the normal order. </p> <p>Here is the normal order of the major modes for review. </p> <p>• Ionian<br /> • Dorian<br /> • Phrygian<br /> • Lydian<br /> • Mixolydian<br /> • Aeolian<br /> • Locrian</p> <p>When working them from the one-note changing perspective, you wind up with this order of modes. </p> <p>• Lydian<br /> • Ionian<br /> • Mixolydian<br /> • Dorian<br /> • Aeolian<br /> • Phrygian<br /> • Locrian</p> <p>Start by learning the modes, memorizing them in the new order so you can use the one-note changing method. From there, you can go back and play them in the original order when putting them together in one key on the fretboard. </p> <p>Doing things this way will allow you to quickly learn the modes and then bring them back into normal order, rather than learning them as seven distinct fingerings in normal order from the beginning. </p> <p>A quick note about the chord grids below. There are three colors on each grid, here is the legend for those colors. </p> <p><strong>Red</strong>: Root note for that mode<br /> <strong>Black</strong>: Static notes between the last mode and this mode<br /> <strong>Blue</strong>: The one note that has been moved from the previous mode to form the new mode you are playing.</p> <p>So, now that you know a bit about the concept we're exploring today, let’s take it to the fretboard. </p> <p><strong>Lydian Mode</strong></p> <p>To begin, you are going to learn the Lydian mode, which contains one sharp in its construction, the #4. This is going to be the base mode for all seven shapes, so make sure to get this shape down comfortably before moving on to the next mode in the system. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%201.png" width="620" height="331" alt="major modes 1.png" /></p> <p><strong>Ionian Mode</strong></p> <p>Now you will take the Lydian mode you just learned and alter one note to form the Ionian mode. In this case, you will lower the 4th note of Lydian to produce the Ionian fingering. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%202.png" width="620" height="315" alt="major modes 2.png" /></p> <p><strong>Mixolydian Mode</strong></p> <p>Continuing on to the final major-based mode, you will now alter the Ionian mode by one note to form a Mixolydian mode fingering. When doing so, you lower the 7th of Ionian to form the Mixolydian mode. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%203.png" width="620" height="312" alt="major modes 3.png" /></p> <p><strong>Dorian Mode</strong></p> <p>We can progress to the minor modes now as you alter one note of Mixolydian to form the Dorian mode. Here, you will lower the 3rd of Mixolydian to form the Dorian mode fingering. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%204.png" width="620" height="320" alt="major modes 4.png" /> </p> <p><strong>Aeolian Mode</strong></p> <p>To form the second minor mode, you will lower one note of Dorian to produce the Aeolian mode on the fretboard. To do so, you will lower the 6th of Dorian to form the Aeolian fingering. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%205.png" width="620" height="323" alt="major modes 5.png" /> </p> <p><strong>Phrygian Mode</strong></p> <p>Next, you will lower one note of Aeolian to form the Phrygian mode. When doing so, you lower the 5th of Aeolian to form the Phrygian fingering on the fretboard. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%206.png" width="620" height="299" alt="major modes 6.png" /> </p> <p><strong>Locrian Mode</strong></p> <p>Lastly, you will take the Phrygian mode and lower one note to produce the Locrian mode. Here, you lower the 2nd note of Phrygian to produce the Locrian fingering. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/major%20modes%207.png" width="620" height="320" alt="major modes 7.png" /></p> <p>As you can see, by starting on Lydian and lowering one note at a time, you can quickly and easily build and memorize all seven modes of the major scale on the guitar. Also, you will be able to see and hear how closely related these modes are, which isn’t always apparent when learning all seven fingerings on their own in the more traditional manner. </p> <p><strong>Learning Modes Exercises</strong></p> <p>Once you've worked out each of these seven major modes on the note G, you can try out the following exercises to help you solidify these shapes further in your studies. </p> <p>01. Play through all three major modes: Lydian-Ionian-Mixolydian from one root note. Repeat in 12 keys.<br /> 02. Play through all four minor-based modes: Dorian-Aeolian-Phrygian-Locrian from one root note. Repeat in 12 keys.<br /> 03. Play all seven major modes in the order presented at the start of this lesson from one root note. Repeat in all 12 keys.<br /> 04. Put on a major chord backing-track, such as G, and solo over this chord moving between Lydian, Ionian and Mixolydian to hear how these modes color a major chord in a soloing situation.<br /> 05. Repeat this soloing exercise but put on an Am backing track and solo between A Dorian, Aeolian, Phrygian and Locrian.<br /> 06. Repeat exercises 4 and 5 in all 12 keys. Then, begin to move between two chords, so G-C or Am-Dm, and work all seven modes over both of those chord progressions. </p> <p>Do you have a question about how to learn all seven major modes the easy way? Post your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below.</p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the U.K., where he teaches Skype guitar students all over the world, and is an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-learn-all-seven-major-modes-easy-way#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Mon, 01 Dec 2014 16:10:15 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22989