Lessons http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/8/0 en Yngwie Malmsteen Lesson: Cracking the Code, Season 2, Episode 2: "Inside the Volcano" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/yngwie-malmsteem-lesson-cracking-code-season-2-episode-2-inside-volcano-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Guitarist Troy Grady hosts a web series called "Cracking the Code." </p> <p>In each episode, he breaks down a phrase — or something awesome that he has learned or figured out — and then explains it in a detail-packed way that includes an information- and graphics-packed video.</p> <p><strong>Back in August, we shared Episode 1 of the second season of "Cracking the Code." It's an Yngwie Malmsteen-related lesson called "Get Down for the Upstroke," and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/yngwie-malmsteem-lesson-cracking-code-season-2-episode-1-get-down-upstroke-video">you can watch it here.</a></strong></p> <p>Today we bring you the long-awaited Episode 2, "Inside the Volcano"! This time, Grady lays down a set of rules that boils down the entire Yngwie picking technique to five points anyone can implement. </p> <p>From Grady:</p> <p>"Season 2 of 'Cracking the Code' launches a new chapter in the understanding of advanced picking technique. With the discovery of downward pickslanting and its companion technique, chunking, a window opens on a world of speed and clarity we've only dreamed was possible.</p> <p>"Over the course of the first two episodes of Season 2, we'll discover the power of Yngwie's fascinating and genre-defining asymmetrical approach to picking and come to understand the vast importance of downward pickslanting as a cornerstone of some of the greatest techniques in guitar history."</p> <p>So yes — get ready to learn about pickslanting, chunking and lots more in the new video below (posted October 16)!</p> <p><strong>For more about Troy Grady and his instructional videos, visit <a href="http://www.troygrady.com/code/">troygrady.com</a> and <a href="https://gumroad.com/l/ccseason2">gumroad.com</a>.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/iUcHE9ZxjHc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/yngwie-malmsteen">Yngwie Malmsteen</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/yngwie-malmsteem-lesson-cracking-code-season-2-episode-2-inside-volcano-video#comments Troy Grady Yngwie Malmsteen Videos News Lessons Wed, 22 Oct 2014 21:39:58 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22646 Betcha Can't Play This: John Petrucci's Descending E Mixolydian Run http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-john-petruccis-descending-e-mixolydian-run <!--paging_filter--><p> This is a descending E Mixolydian [E F# G# A B C# D] run that moves across the strings and eventually down the neck in a cascading type of contour. </p> <p>It’s based on a recurring nine-note melodic motif of three 16th-note triplets, with three alternate-picked notes followed by two double pull-offs.</p> <p>I begin in ninth position with a fairly compact shape that spans the ninth to 12th frets. At the end of bar 1 and moving into bar 2, the fret hand shifts down two frets and spreads out to cover a four-fret span, from the seventh fret to the 11th. Use your first, second and fourth fingers to fret the notes. </p> <p> The fret hand quickly shifts down to a lower position at the beginning of bars 3, 4 and 5, so try to make these transitions as smooth and seamless as possible. Make sure your pull-offs are loud and clear, and use the palm of your pick hand to mute the unused lower strings during bars 1 and 2.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/fxKLaesuQE0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-02%20at%205.16.42%20PM.png" width="620" height="217" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-02 at 5.16.42 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-john-petruccis-descending-e-mixolydian-run#comments Betcha Can't Play This John Petrucci September 2010 Betcha Can't Play This Blogs News Lessons Magazine Tue, 21 Oct 2014 16:34:56 +0000 John Petrucci http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20924 What in the World: Not (Just) Another "Flight of the Bumblebee" Lesson http://www.guitarworld.com/what-world-not-just-another-flight-bumblebee-lesson <!--paging_filter--><p>"Flight of the Bumblebee" has become a popular piece to play to show off technical prowess on the guitar. </p> <p>Originally written for violin, there are many different versions you will find for guitar. There is no, single, master version for guitar, since it wasn't written for the instrument. Learning a few different versions would be a good idea. The different approaches will present varying techniques and interpretations.</p> <p>Most, if not all, of the videos you see of "Flight of the Bumblebee" are performed at lightning-fast speeds. This was the intention of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, the composer of "Flight of the Bumblebee." He wanted to write a piece of music that painted a musical picture of a bee buzzing around, which he very successfully accomplished. </p> <p>That said, if you cannot play the piece at a fast tempo at this time, you shouldn't be discouraged. Even if you're never able to reach your goal, you will have at least gained something from trying and maybe discovered something new in the process. It’s completely up to you to choose to be discouraged or inspired when trying to accomplish something. </p> <p>Don’t compare your progress to someone else’s; that's the surest way to fail. I used to compare myself to my peers and it did nothing for me, except wasted a lot of mental energy when I should have just relaxed and gone with the process of progress. Everyone develops and learns at different rates. If you see something you think at the time is unattainable, don’t be discouraged. Be inspired and know that with enough hard work, you will be able to do it or better one day. There's no reason to not be inspired 100 percent of the time!</p> <p>The best way to approach learning how to play "Flight of the Bumblebee" is to work on memorizing bits of it at a time. A lot of the piece is essentially a main theme with leadups and outs of that theme, chromatically. Work on the main theme separately as a daily exercise, gradually increasing the tempo.</p> <p>Here's an instance of the main theme:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Riff-00003.jpg" width="620" height="205" alt="Riff-00003.jpg" /> </p> <p>The best fingering for this would be: 4-3-2-1 1-4-3-2 4-3-2-1 1-2-3-4. Compositionally, this is a cool call-and-response phrase.</p> <p>At bar 12, I threw in some hybrid picking. Obviously, this wasn't in the original, but since it wasn’t written for guitar, almost anything goes, as I said earlier. I put this part in to help my students work on their hybrid picking as well as being able to quickly transition from standard picking to hybrid picking. To get into the hybrid phrase, I threw in a short legato line, which will allow you to set up your right hand for the hybrid picking.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/hybrid-00001.jpg" width="620" height="103" alt="hybrid-00001.jpg" /></p> <p>Practice "Flight of the Bumblebee" slowly and memorize it. Eventually you can use it as a warmup “exercise." The best exercises are the most musical ones. If any part of it gives you trouble, isolate that one part and work on it slowly until you get it. You might find yourself working on independent parts of the piece as separate exercises. </p> <p>The tempo I played it at in the video below is 180 bpm. Do your best to play it at whatever tempo sounds good to you. It could be slower than mine or faster. The most important thing is that it sounds good and you are relaxed while playing it at all times. If you begin to tense up, slow it down. It’s a long piece, so you will have to build up endurance to play it at challenging tempos. Have fun with it and good luck!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/0m8kyT_o_U0?list=UUozoKYJmat8MUYcdRo40cHA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/bumblebee-00001.jpg" width="620" height="732" alt="bumblebee-00001.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/bumblebee-00002.jpg" width="620" height="760" alt="bumblebee-00002.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/bumblebee-00003.jpg" width="620" height="770" alt="bumblebee-00003.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/bumblebee-00004.jpg" width="620" height="652" alt="bumblebee-00004.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Steve Booke is a composer for film and TV from the New York area. His compositions range from orchestral to metal to world styles from every corner of the earth. A graduate of Berklee College of Music, Steve has played guitar for more than 27 years. He has recorded 10 albums of his own and has played on countless others. He plays gigs in the NY area and tours the East Coast with a variety of bands. He has performed with Ben E. King and members of Mahavishnu Orchestra. He endorses D'Addario/Planet Waves, Larrivee Guitars, Levy's Leathers, Peavey, Stylus Pick, Finale PrintMusic, Pigtronix, Tech 21, Toontrack, Graph Tech, Seymour Duncan, Waves, Studio Devil and L.R. Baggs. His music is available on iTunes and Amazon. He can be contacted at info@stevebooke.com. Visit <a href="http://www.stevebooke.com/">stevebooke.com</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/what-world-not-just-another-flight-bumblebee-lesson#comments Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov Steve Booke What In the World Blogs Lessons Mon, 20 Oct 2014 18:01:14 +0000 Steve Booke http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18202 Three Steps to Shred: Fundamental Daily Practice Techniques in About 15 Minutes http://www.guitarworld.com/three-steps-shred-fundamental-daily-practice-techniques-about-15-minutes <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>Steve Stine, highly sought-after guitar educator, teaches live group and private classes at <a href="https://www.lessonface.com/">LessonFace.com.</a></strong></p> <p>No matter your level of experience, being a guitarist involves pushing your personal boundaries with the instrument. </p> <p>Many players find themselves struggling to develop the physical abilities needed to play like their heroes, and, crucially, they never settle on a consistent set of exercises because they find themselves drowning in so many different suggestions. </p> <p>In this column and video, I discuss some straightforward, essential practice techniques you can work into a simple, short daily routine to improve your dexterity, speed, strength and stamina to help you overcome obstacles and become a better guitar player.</p> <p>These practice techniques are broken into three sections: 01. <strong>Picking hand</strong>: two three-minute exercises; 02. <strong>Fretting hand</strong>: a series of 15- or 20-second strength exercises; and 03. <strong>Both hands</strong>: a symmetrical exercise emphasizing synchronization between the left and right hands. </p> <p>All in all, these exercises should take about 15 minutes. My students have found that, when done faithfully and properly, they yield significant positive results. Please note that it's a good idea to stretch out your hands, wrists and arms for a few minutes before doing these exercises. </p> <p>01. <strong>Picking Hand: Three-Minute Picking Technique</strong></p> <p>This straightforward exercise is broken into two sections: First, perform a series of eighth-note downstrokes in rhythm, at a speed that is comfortable to you, for a period of three straight minutes. Follow this by performing a series of eighth-notes in rhythm using alternate picking — a downstroke followed by an upstroke — at the same speed for the full three minutes. Performing these simple exercises each for the full three minutes allows you to develop your stamina and rhythm abilities, meanwhile developing valuable muscle memory in your picking hand. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202013-06-21%20at%203.33.15%20PM.png" width="620" height="448" alt="Screen Shot 2013-06-21 at 3.33.15 PM.png" /></p> <p>While it seems simple, this exercise can be conceptually difficult in that it often tries the patience of guitarists eager to move on to faster speeds. Just remember: Using a metronome is not a contest. It is important to be honest with yourself about what speed is comfortable for the full three minutes, and resist any urges to rush on to a higher speed you cannot maintain. </p> <p>And remember there is no reason to feel bad about starting with what may seem like a slow speed. Don't let your ego interfere with your practice routine. Sure, there are higher speeds that may be comfortable for a matter of 20 seconds, but you should stick to the speed where you can “lock in," that you can comfortably maintain for the full three minutes, and use that speed with this exercise each day. </p> <p>The alternate-picked section of this exercise initially should be done at the same speed as your downstrokes, which may seem slow to you at first. I advise students to start slow with the alternate picking portion to ensure their upstrokes are highly similar to their downstrokes in dynamic and attack, allowing your alternate picking to sound as identical as possible to your repeated downstrokes. </p> <p>Move the metronome speed up as higher speeds become comfortable to you for the full three minutes. It may take time (weeks or months) to move up the speed, but give yourself that time. Taking an honest approach to this exercise can truly develop your picking hand technique.</p> <p>02. <strong>Fretting Hand: Strength Exercises</strong></p> <p>The next step is a set of legato exercises in which you are utilizing all of the finger combinations in a few groups. These exercises require no picking at all, and are purely legato. They involve a series of hammer-ons and pull-offs performed as hard and fast as you can maintain for 15 seconds at a time. If done correctly, you will really feel this exercise in your fretting hand, wrist and forearm. Once again, it is advisable stretch your hands, wrists and arms before beginning these exercises.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202013-06-21%20at%203.33.36%20PM.png" width="620" height="130" alt="Screen Shot 2013-06-21 at 3.33.36 PM.png" /></p> <p>Take your first (index) finger on your fretting hand and hold it at the fifth fret on the third string. Then hammer on your second (middle) finger one fret up as hard as you can (at the sixth fret on the third string) and immediately pull it off as hard as you can. Do this over and over for 15 seconds. </p> <p>After 15 seconds, without stopping, perform similar hammer-ons and pull-offs with your third (ring) finger one fret up (at the seventh fret) for 15 seconds. Without stopping, follow this with a similar 15-second set of hammer-ons and pull-offs using your fourth (pinky) finger at the eighth fret. Throughout these sets of exercises, your first finger should be held at the fifth fret on the third string.</p> <p>Without stopping, place and hold your second finger down at the sixth fret on the third string and hammer on and pull off your third finger one fret up at the seventh fret for 15 seconds. Then, without stopping, follow this with a similar 15 seconds of hammer-ons and pull-offs of your fourth finger at the eighth fret. Throughout these sets of exercises, your second finger should be held at the sixth fret on the third string.</p> <p>From there, hold your third finger at the seventh fret, and hammer on and pull off your fourth finger at the eighth fret for 15 seconds.</p> <p>Once you can comfortably maintain these exercises for a period of 15 seconds, feel free to increase the times for each exercise to 20 seconds. Additionally, feel free to focus on the sections that give you the most trouble — e.g., many guitarists need extra work holding the position with their second or third fingers and performing hammer-ons and pull-offs with their third and fourth fingers. Indeed, you may want to start with these more difficult ones and move backwards toward the easier ones.</p> <p>03. <strong>Both Hands: Symmetrical Exercise</strong></p> <p>Finally, I recommend closing with a straightforward synchronization exercise that is fairly common, but is important to do it correctly and do it consistently. This dexterity exercise uses your hands together to play each fretting finger across four frets to ascend and descend the strings across the neck.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202013-06-21%20at%203.33.45%20PM.png" width="620" height="149" alt="Screen Shot 2013-06-21 at 3.33.45 PM.png" /></p> <p>The goal is effective synchronization between the two hands and to learn to transfer smoothly in each fretted interval and when switching strings across the neck. It is a good idea to use a metronome and to always go as slow as your slowest transfer, to effectively allow you to increase speed over time. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/3TGDIOT6c0A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Steve Stine is a longtime and sought-after guitar teacher who is professor of Modern Guitar Studies at North Dakota State University. Over the last 27 years, he has taught thousands of students, including established touring musicians, and released numerous video guitar lesson courses via established publishers. A resident of Fargo, North Dakota, today he is more accessible than ever before through the convenience of live online guitar lessons at <a href="https://www.lessonface.com/">LessonFace.com</a>.</em> </p> <p><em>LessonFace.com offers live online music lessons via videoconference, allowing you to access top teachers in a wide variety of instruments from anywhere with a broadband connection. Steve is offering a live online group class for intermediate players this summer called “The Players Series” via the LessonFace.com platform. More information about live online lessons with Steve is available at <a href="https://www.lessonface.com/player">lessonface.com/player</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/three-steps-shred-fundamental-daily-practice-techniques-about-15-minutes#comments LessonFace Steve Stine Videos Blogs News Lessons Mon, 20 Oct 2014 17:47:05 +0000 Steve Stine http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18629 Bent Out of Shape: Wallner's Quick Licks, Part 2 — Arpeggio Intervals http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-wallners-quick-licks-part-2-arpeggio-intervals <!--paging_filter--><p>When soloing, I try to use a balanced mix of scales, intervals and arpeggios. </p> <p>Something I always struggle with is trying to incorporate arpeggios into my solos without having them sound too generic. </p> <p>A lot of the common arpeggio shapes are difficult to use without sounding "cliche" or like a bad Yngwie Malmsteen clone. It might come as a surprise to players to hear that you don't have to use a sweep-picking technique to play arpeggios!</p> <p>Here's an easy arpeggio shape that can be learned and incorporated into your playing relatively easily. The goal is that harmonically it's clear I'm playing the same basic arpeggio — but hopefully in a more creative way. It basically involves playing arpeggios as separate intervals "stuck together." </p> <p>For example, an A minor arpeggio (A-C-E) could be viewed as a minor third interval (A - C) stuck to a major third interval (C - E). <strong>Example 1</strong> maps out an A minor arpeggio across three octaves. Learning this example will demonstrate how to play a simple minor arpeggio in broken intervals. </p> <p>When you factor in the root octave, you end up with the following interval sequence: minor 3rd (A - C), major 3rd (C - E), perfect 4th (E - A). When you play <strong>Example 1</strong>, it's easy to hear the harmony of an A minor arpeggio, but to me it sounds a lot more interesting than a straight-forward arpeggio.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/123329344&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab_3.jpg" width="620" height="353" alt="tab_3.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Example 2</strong> expands on this idea by combining multiple arpeggios in the key of A minor to create a more musical-sounding lick. This example outlines the following arpeggios: A Minor - G Major - F Major. Use this as a starting point and then experiment with your own ideas using my method to make your own unique sequences. </p> <p>The final clip on the audio is an example of a similar lick used in an actual solo from one my own songs. I play a straight-forward E minor arpeggio, which leads into a basic pentatonic descending lick. It's simple but effective!</p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-wallners-quick-licks-part-2-arpeggio-intervals#comments Bent Out of Shape Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Thu, 16 Oct 2014 17:38:36 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19958 Pentatonic Workout: Increase Left-Hand Strength and Produce Great-Sounding Sequences http://www.guitarworld.com/string-skipping-pentatonic-workout-increase-left-hand-strength-produce-great-sounding-sequences <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>Check out Adrian Galysh's last column, <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/scale-will-change-your-life">"The Scale That Will Change Your Life."</a></strong></p> <p>I love playing guitar. I love practicing guitar. Some people find practicing scales and exercises boring; I find it meditative. </p> <p>However, it’s good to mix things up a bit. </p> <p>In this lesson, I’m going to show you a pentatonic scale workout that helps you get the five positions of the pentatonic scale memorized and under your fingers, increases left-hand strength, delivers some great-sounding sequences and even includes some string skipping.
</p> <p>We’ll use the A minor pentatonic scale at the fifth position as our example in this lesson, but you’ll want to make sure you can perform this routine in all five positions.</p> <p>This workout starts with playing the A minor pentatonic scale ascending and descending (Example 1), using consistent alternate picking. </p> <p>After this “establishes” the fingering for your left hand, the workout continues with a two-string sequence, where you ascend four notes, go back one note and start again, ascending four notes. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example_1_0.jpg" width="430" height="155" alt="Example_1_0.jpg" /></p> <p>This continues across the fretboard until you run out of strings. At this point, you simply turn the sequence around (Don’t repeat the top C note) and play the two-string sequence in reverse — from the high C note, you descend four notes, go back one note, descend another four, etc. (Example 2).</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example_2.jpg" width="620" height="319" alt="Example_2.jpg" /></p> <p>The third part of this workout is a sequence that ascends in six-note groups (three strings' worth of pentatonic scale), then back a string, start on D (fifth string) and ascend another six notes (three strings). Continue this pattern until you start the sequence on the G string, at which point you simply turn the pattern around (Don’t repeat the top note C), then perform the sequence in reverse: from the high C note, you descend six notes (three strings), go back a string, start the six-note pattern on the G note (second string) and continue back in the same fashion (Example 3).</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example_3.jpg" width="620" height="320" alt="Example_3.jpg" /></p> <p>The fourth and final part of this pentatonic work out involves string skipping. This starts by playing the two notes on the low E string, skip the A string, play the two notes on the D string, go back to the A string and play the two notes on it, then skip the D string, and play the two notes on the G string. This pattern continues, gets turned around just like before and then works its way back in reverse (Example 4).</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example_4.jpg" width="620" height="164" alt="Example_4.jpg" /></p> <p>These sequences tend to be a very user-friendly for guitarists, as they start on the first note of each string, as they travel across the six strings. </p> <p>I like to string these four examples together, playing then back to back, without stopping. I find this forces me to think ahead, be able to change gears and mix things up in my regular playing more easily.</p> <p>Once you are able to play these four elements back to back without any problems, try it with the other four pentatonic positions. Use a metronome to gauge your progress, and push yourself to play these at a faster tempo once they become comfortable.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/1b3PtG6yw1A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Guitarist Adrian Galysh is a solo artist and education coordinator for Guitar Center Studios. He's the author of the book </em>Progressive Guitar Warmups and Exercises<em>. For more information, visit him at <a href="http://www.adriangalysh.com/">AdrianGalysh.com.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/string-skipping-pentatonic-workout-increase-left-hand-strength-produce-great-sounding-sequences#comments Adrian Galysh Blogs Lessons Thu, 16 Oct 2014 17:36:20 +0000 Adrian Galysh http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20175 Essential Blues Basics: Soloing with the Combined Minor/Major Pentatonic Scales http://www.guitarworld.com/essential-blues-basics-soloing-combined-minormajor-pentatonic-scales <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>Steve Stine, highly sought-after guitar educator, teaches live group and private classes at <a href="https://www.lessonface.com/">LessonFace.com.</a></strong></p> <p>One key to becoming a more versatile blues soloist is learning to combine the minor pentatonic and major pentatonic scales to create guitar lines that go beyond the minor pentatonic scale. </p> <p>As a prerequisite to this lesson, you should have a basic understanding of the finger positionings for the minor pentatonic and major pentatonic scales, particularly the first and second positions of both scales. </p> <p>Stepping back, I should note that learning to play within both of these scales at the same time opened new doors for me as a guitar player. </p> <p>Before combining them, I remember first learning to solo over the standard 1-4-5 blues progression, and my teacher at the time gave me a quick trick for alternating between the minor and major pentatonic solos: Use the minor pentatonic for the sections on the “1” and the major pentatonic for the sections on the “4," and alternate back in forth in this manner in the way that sounded best. </p> <p>While this approach can work to give you a more varied sound beyond merely the minor pentatonic scale, this trick is by no means a hard and fast rule, and moving beyond it to learn to combine both scales makes you a more versatile player.</p> <p>A quick point of reference to understand about these scales is that, in respect to physical finger positioning, they are identical, with one scale simply falling three frets below the other on the fretboard. That is to say, in any given key: (i) the finger position for the major pentatonic scale falls three frets down from the minor pentatonic scale, and (ii) the root note is the same for both scales.</p> <p>So, for example, let’s focus on the key of A. The A on the fifth fret of the first string is the root note of both the A minor pentatonic and A major pentatonic scales. This means that, in the A minor pentatonic scale’s first position, the A on the fifth fret of the first string is played with your index finger. </p> <p>And, three frets down playing the same positions for the A major pentatonic scale, the same A is played with your pinky (and your index finger is on the F# — you may also notice at this point that you are in the F# minor pentatonic scale’s first position). The below tabs illustrate this point. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/thing%201.jpg" width="620" height="336" alt="thing 1.jpg" /></p> <p>So, first visualize both major and minor pentatonic scales, and practice them up and down the neck, focusing on their first and second positions for the purposes of this lesson. You can practice them with all downstrokes and/or alternate picking, and in doing so, keep in mind the locations of your root note A’s, which are relevant for playing blues in the key of A. </p> <p>As you will notice, the first position of the A minor pentatonic scale and the second position of the A major pentatonic scale are both within easy reach of the first position of the A minor pentatonic scale (index finger beginning on the fifth fret of the first string, and proceeding on from there). </p> <p>And, as you see below, these scale positions can be overlayed into a hybrid scale that encompasses all of their notes. And, what we want to learn how to do is visualize the first position of the minor pentatonic scale and the second position of the major pentatonic over the same position on the neck, and use the notes from both scales to play blues licks and riffs. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/thing%202.jpg" width="620" height="80" alt="thing 2.jpg" /></p> <p>So, to make a riff using both scales, let’s focus on the top two strings starting at the fifth fret. The A minor pentatonic scale uses the notes at the fifth and eighth frets on these strings, while the A major pentatonic uses the notes at the fifth and seventh frets on these strings. So, to combine the scales and see what it sounds like, let’s play the following lick No. 1. And you can already hear the blues element present when you mix these scales.</p> <p>After you are comfortable with lick No. 1, you can move to lick No 2, which further explores this principle. And at this stage, I would encourage you to start exploring further and have some fun coming up with new licks using the notes from both scales in this position.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/thing%203.jpg" width="440" height="75" alt="thing 3.jpg" /></p> <p>Another common lick that combines these scales using a hammer-on is shown below in lick No. 3, and you have probably heard this combination of notes in many country and blues songs.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/thing%204.jpg" width="135" height="87" alt="thing 4.jpg" /></p> <p>So, bringing a lot of these elements together, you can play something like the following.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/thing%205.jpg" width="390" height="85" alt="thing 5.jpg" /></p> <p>You can always play the scales separately to give your soloing their different flavors. And soon, taking this lesson into account, and with some practice, you will be able to bring these two scales together into a hybrid scale to further expand what you can play, and allow you to play modern blues and some old-school blues in what may be a new way for you.</p> <p>The first step is to be able to see the two scales and then put them together, seeing the minor pentatonic and major pentatonic scales at the same time. </p> <p>As you’ll see, if you know all five positions of the pentatonic scale, you can apply this very same principle all over the guitar neck. And pretty soon the new notes from scale to scale will begin to stick out, giving you new notes to play all over the neck in your blues solos.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="400" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/J9sAhJvG76I" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Steve Stine is a longtime and sought-after guitar teacher who is professor of Modern Guitar Studies at North Dakota State University. Over the last 27 years, he has taught thousands of students, including established touring musicians, and released numerous video guitar lesson courses via established publishers. A resident of Fargo, North Dakota, today he is more accessible than ever before through the convenience of live online guitar lessons at <a href="https://www.lessonface.com/">LessonFace.com</a>.</em> </p> <p><em>LessonFace.com offers live online music lessons via videoconference, allowing you to access top teachers in a wide variety of instruments from anywhere with a broadband connection. Steve is offering a live online group class for intermediate players this summer called “The Players Series” via the LessonFace.com platform. More information about live online lessons with Steve is available at <a href="https://www.lessonface.com/player">lessonface.com/player</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/essential-blues-basics-soloing-combined-minormajor-pentatonic-scales#comments LessonFace Steve Stine Blogs Lessons Thu, 16 Oct 2014 17:34:20 +0000 Steve Stine http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19143 The Guitarist's Guide to Playing Bass: 20 Guidelines to Help You Think and Play Like a Real Bass Guitarist http://www.guitarworld.com/guitarists-guide-playing-bass <!--paging_filter--><p>Bass is more than just a guitar with two fewer strings. It has a different tone, scale length, feel and musical role, and in many cases it requires a different conceptual and technical approach. </p> <p>Guitarists who are new to playing bass will often double the guitar part one octave lower. There is certainly a place for lockstep octave doubling—just listen to Aerosmith’s “Sweet Emotion,” Led Zeppelin’s “The Ocean” and Pantera’s “I’m Broken.” </p> <p>But there is so much more that can be done with the bass guitar.</p> <p>As a bassist who later took up guitar, I have developed 20 general guidelines that I live by when I play the bass. Apply them to the instrument, and hear your playing improve as they help you to think and play like a real bass guitarist. </p> <p><strong>1. PLAY FOR THE SONG</strong></p> <p>More often than not, solid bass playing requires that you exercise restraint and subtlety rather than showcase your technique and slick moves. In many situations, it’s best to work mostly with the root notes of the chords and lock in with the drummer’s kick and snare drums. </p> <p><strong>2. LEARN TO WALK</strong></p> <p>“Walking bass” originated in jazz and blues, but it has since been adopted in other styles. The term refers to a way of playing in which the bass line remains in perpetual motion as opposed to staying on or reiterating one note. The line “walks” from one chord’s root note up or down to the next, mostly in a quarter-note rhythm, with the occasional embellishment. </p> <p>To achieve this, you use “transition notes” to smoothly connect the dots and bridge the gap between different root notes as the chords change. The transition notes can be any combination of chord tones (arpeggios), scale tones that relate to the chords, or chromatic passing tones. </p> <p>In general, chord tones are the musically safest bet, as they sound harmonically consonant, while scale tones add a touch of light dissonance when heard against an underlying chord. The more chromatic notes that are used, the more dissonant the line becomes, as these notes momentarily clash with the prevailing chord. Whether this is a good thing or not is up to your discretion and instincts. </p> <p>FIGURE 1 shows a stock blues walking bass line. Although the line is rhythmically animated, with staccato (short, clipped) swing eighth notes and a triplet fill at the end of each bar, it is fairly tame harmonically, as it uses mostly chord tones (the root, fifth and dominant seventh) with a brief chromatic run-up to the fifth. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass1.jpg" /></p> <p>By contrast, FIGURE 2 illustrates a jazz-style walking bass line played over these same two chords for which chromatic passing tones are liberally employed. Note the difference in contour between these two examples, the first being very angular and the second being smooth and rolling. Also note the use of “dead” notes (indicated by Xs in the notation), which help propel the line. These are performed by picking the string while lightly muting it with the fret hand.</p> <p>When crafting a walking bass line, it’s best to land on the root note whenever there’s a chord change. If you’re staying on the same chord for several bars, it’s a good idea to play the root on the downbeat of every other bar or every fourth bar, depending on how grounded you want the line to sound.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass3.jpg" /></p> <p>The walking bass concept isn’t just for swing grooves and can be also employed with great results in a rock context with an even-eighths feel. Inspired by Herbie Flowers’ tasteful bass work on David Bowie’s 1974 hit, “Rebel Rebel,” FIGURE 3 is a fairly straightforward example of a great way to use scalar passing tones and fills to spice up a bass line over a repeating two-chord progression.</p> <p><strong>3. LOCK IN WITH THE DRUMMER</strong></p> <p>In a rhythm section, part of the bass guitar’s role is to function as a liaison between the drums and the rest of the band. In most cases you want to make the bass and drums sound like one entity, and a great way to do this is to craft bass lines that fit like a glove with the drummer’s kick and snare drums. Using octave root notes is often an excellent way to do this, the low octave corresponding to the kick drum and the high octave hitting with the snare, typically on beats two and four, which are also known as the backbeats. </p> <p>Octaves allow you to create an active bass line with an interesting, angular melodic contour without clashing harmonically with the underlying chords, as the octave root note “agrees” perfectly with the chord.</p> <p>“Grooving” doesn’t necessarily mean playing the same thing over and over. John Paul Jones’ playing throughout Led Zeppelin’s “The Lemon Song” is a perfect case in point, as he embellishes the groove and stays within the bass’ role as a support instrument for six solid minutes without repeating himself once.</p> <p><strong>4. USE OCTAVES AND FIFTHS</strong></p> <p>After the octave root, the fifth is the most harmonically agreeable note you can play. Many classic bass lines have been constructed using mostly roots, octaves and fifths as the framework. The great thing about this approach is that it allows you to create a bass line that is interesting and melodic, locks in perfectly with the drums and doesn’t clash harmonically with the underlying chords. FIGURE 4 is an example of this kind of approach, inspired by John Paul Jones’ nimble playing on Led Zeppelin’s “Thank You.”</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass4.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>5. TONE IS IN THE HANDS </strong></p> <p>This old adage could not ring truer for bass playing. Plucking the strings hard and near the base of the fretboard (FIGURE 5a) like Black Sabbath’s Geezer Butler makes them slap against it; plucking the strings near the bridge with just the very tips of your fingers (FIGURE 5b) lets you get that punchy Jaco Pastorius/Rocco Prestia machine-gun 16th-note attack. (Be sure to check out the video demonstrations for these musical examples on GuitarWorld.com to hear the difference in tone between them.) </p> <p>You can go from a dull thud to a sharp, funky punch simply by choosing where along the string you pick it and how aggressively you hit it. Between that, your pickup selector (if your bass has one) and tone controls, you have a considerable range of tonal possibilities before the signal even hits the amp.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass5.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>6. TO PICK OR NOT TO PICK? </strong></p> <p>Not all bassists use their fingers to pluck the instrument. Megadeth’s David Ellefson, Rex Brown of Pantera and Down, Yes’ Chris Squire and Paul McCartney use a pick, and John Paul Jones, the Who’s John Entwistle and Michael Anthony in his Van Halen days were known for switching from fingers to pick depending on the song. If playing with a pick works for you, go for it. I recommend the large, non-celluloid kind, such as Dunlop’s Tortex Triangle, with a thick gauge (at least 1mm). </p> <p>The large surface area of the big triangle picks is well suited to the wide spacing of bass strings and will help you keep a grip on the pick. Tortex (or Delrin, depending on the manufacturer) is also sturdier than celluloid and less likely to break, and the thick, unbendable gauge will allow you to get more volume and power out of those thick strings, with less effort. </p> <p><strong>7. SINGLE-FINGER TECHNIQUE</strong></p> <p>Some record producers actually prefer having bass players use a pick because the attack is more even. But if you’re a fingerstyle player and want to achieve a more consistent attack, try using only one finger, such as the index (instead of alternating between the index and middle fingers) as much as possible. John Paul Jones copped this technique from Motown bass legend James Jamerson and made great use of it on several classic Led Zeppelin tracks, such as “Good Times Bad Times” and “Ramble On.” </p> <p><strong>8. GET YOUR TIME SOLID </strong></p> <p>Someone has to keep the tempo steady, and if the drummer can’t, than the bassist has to. The pocket depends on you, so learn how to be your own metronome. Don’t just count in 4/4—you should also feel in 8/8, especially when playing ballads, where the tendency to rush the tempo is greater. To help you land on the beat more accurately, listen to the drummer’s hi-hat or ride cymbal, not just his kick and snare drums. </p> <p><strong>9. TO FILL OR NOT TO FILL?</strong></p> <p>Fills are the little pieces of ear candy that embellish a solid bass line and help propel a song. Listen to how other bass players set up a new section, and shamelessly jack anything that grabs your ear. Playing fills that conclude one section of a song (such as a verse) and lead into the next (such as the chorus) is a great way to break monotony in a bass part and set yourself apart from whatever the guitarist is doing. </p> <p>Filling is an art form in and of itself, in that there’s a fine line between adding to the song or groove and obscuring it and detracting from it. In keeping with the “bass-and-drums-as-one” concept, make your fills coincide with a drummer’s so that they sound like the same person’s idea being expressed. If a drummer plays a fill, it’s usually at the end of every second, fourth or eighth bar, so listen to the drums and pick your spots to fill accordingly. Of course, all your playing decisions should depend on the style of music you’re playing, and some styles, such as hip-hop or club music, are more about maintaining a relentless groove, with very little variation.</p> <p>For examples of great fills, check out R&amp;B/soul session players such as James Jamerson (countless Motown hits), Chuck Rainey (Aretha Franklin, Steely Dan) and Nathan Watts (especially on Stevie Wonder’s “Do I Do”), or rock players such as Rex Brown, Stone Temple Pilots’ Robert DeLeo (another Jamerson disciple) and Duff McKagan of Guns N’ Roses. And don’t let genre get in the way—just because it’s a “Motown” fill doesn’t mean it can’t be used in a rock context, and vice versa.</p> <p><strong>10. OCTAVE APPROPRIATE</strong></p> <p>Are you playing in the right register (octave)? Perhaps that cool part you came up with sounds badass played down low but may be too heavy for the mood of the song. Or perhaps it’s too high and is interfering with the vocal or guitar part. Make sure your note-range choices are right for the situation.</p> <hr /> <p><strong>11. AVOID LOW-B OBSESSION</strong></p> <p>If you’re playing a five-string, don’t just play sub-E notes, as it can become annoying. It’s one thing to hit a low B or C every now and then for dramatic effect and to show everyone who’s boss, but unless you’re in a Korn or Type O Negative tribute band, don’t live there.</p> <p><strong>12. SUBSTITUTE DIFFERENT CHORD TONES </strong></p> <p>Occasionally playing the third or fifth of the underlying chord instead of its root note can radically change the whole feel of a chord progression, and when done tastefully it can add warmth or tension. This device has been used for centuries by great classical composers like Bach and Beethoven and creates what are known as chord inversions. Master pop songwriters such as Elton John and Paul McCartney use inversions, via bass line substitutions, to build their chord progressions to a harmonic climax. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass6.jpg" /></p> <p>Realize that the ear reckons harmony from the ground up, so as a bass player you have the power to dictate how the chord is going to sound and fundamentally change its character. FIGURE 6 is an example of a common rock chord progression for which the bass line takes a left turn (in bars 2 and 3) to create chord inversions. In the second and third bars, instead of playing the roots (shown in cue-size notes and tab numbers), the third or fifth of the chord are substituted, creating a continually ascending and more melodic bass line in the process. </p> <p><strong>13. GREASE</strong></p> <p>It’s that grimy, funky stuff that oozes between the beats. With all due respect to hardcore prog-rock bands, for which precision is key, rock and roll has always been more about attitude and spirit. </p> <p>This isn’t an excuse to be sloppy and unmusical, but more an exhortation to make low, rumbling noises and revel in it. Listen to John Paul Jones’ low-end grumble during the “Hey baby, oh baby, pretty baby” chorus section of Zeppelin’s “Black Dog” (played with a pick) or Black Sabbath’s Geezer Butler on pretty much any song. For a more modern take, check out session legend Pino Palladino’s work on D’Angelo’s <em>Voodoo</em> album. In some situations, it’s perfectly okay to make excessive fret noise, be a little behind the beat or slide out of a note perhaps a bit longer than you should, as long as it’s not disruptive to the music and contributes to the intended vibe.</p> <p><strong>14. SHAKE IT</strong></p> <p>I’m not talking about a long trill or extreme vibrato but literally shaking a pitch. Fret the note, pick it, then quickly slide, hammer on or pull off to another fret and back, as demonstrated in FIGURE 7. Regardless of what style you’re playing, the resulting sound is funky and adds a little extra kick to the sound of the rhythm section. Sure, guitarists can do this too, but it just doesn’t sound the same (or as good) on that little instrument. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass7.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>15. USE DEAD NOTES AND RAKES</strong></p> <p>Just as you might mute the strings on your guitar with your fretting hand while you strum “chucka-chucka,” the same principle and function applies to bass, whether it’s funk (FIGURE 8) or hard rock (FIGURE 9). Rakes on a bass are executed a bit differently than on guitar: you perform them by dragging a picking finger across the strings in an upstroke, usually in a specified rhythm, as demonstrated in FIGURE 10. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass8.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass9.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>16. ARTICULATION VARIATION</strong></p> <p>As a guitarist, you employ all sorts of techniques to convey your musical statements, and you can do that on bass, too. Check out session legend Will Lee’s work in Dionne Warwick’s “Déjà Vu.” Lee makes use of rakes, palm muting while picking with his thumb, slapping, and finger slides in addition to plain-old conventional fingerstyle playing (FIGURE 11). And he does it without ever interrupting the groove or getting in the way of the vocal. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass11.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>17. IT’S ALL BASS</strong></p> <p>A cool bass part is a cool bass part, regardless of what instrument it was played on, be it electric bass, synth or piano, so be open to hearing new ideas. Next time you’re at that bar and hear house or club music blasting over the sound system, listen to the bass lines. No matter how far-flung it is from your preferred musical style, you can translate it to your own bass playing.</p> <p><strong>18. LESS IS MORE</strong></p> <p>Take “September,” one of Earth, Wind &amp; Fire’s most enduring tunes. Bassist Verdine White is capable of playing so much more, but in this song his bass line is almost rudimentary. Even so, it’s funky as hell, making great use of rests and staccato phrasing—space between notes—and, without fail, people get up and move as soon as that bass line kicks in. For a more modern example, listen to Branden Campbell of Neon Trees. His lines never get more complicated than eighth notes with the rare fill, but his fat tone and solid playing more than adequately complement drummer Elaine Bradley’s grooves and help propel the songs.</p> <p><strong>19. MORE IS MORE</strong></p> <p>A master groove monster like Juan Nelson from Ben Harper’s band can lull you into a groove, then hit you with a fill like the one heard at 4:30 in “Faded,” from The Will to Live album. The groove and lick shown in FIGURE 12 draws its inspiration from this approach.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/guitaristsguidetobass12.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>20. LET IT ALL HANG OUT</strong></p> <p>What do you want people to hear in your playing? Anger? Joy? Whatever it is, get in that zone and play it like you mean it. Whether you’re a shredder or a “feel” player, express yourself. Because if you’re not connecting with people, what’s the point?</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1876118165001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="360" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1876118165001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitarists-guide-playing-bass#comments Articles December 2012 GW Archive 2012 Videos News Features Lessons Magazine Thu, 16 Oct 2014 16:18:02 +0000 Matt Scharfglass http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16961 Betcha Can't Play This: Rolling Along with Psycroptic's Joe Haley http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-rolling-along-psycroptics-joe-haley <!--paging_filter--><p> This is an ascending run that’s fairly typical of my playing style in Psycroptic. I like to come up with lines that flow and roll nicely while making things as easy as possible for me technically, and this run is an example of that approach. </p> <p>It’s loosely based on the B natural minor scale, or Aeolian mode [B C# D E F# G A], and works nicely in the key of B minor.</p> <p> I like to play a lot of things legato, using whatever hammer-ons and pull-offs are available in any given position that my fret-hand fingers are in. I’m also inclined to do a lot of hybrid picking [pick and fingers], using picked down-strokes in tandem with upstrokes of the middle finger. This enables me to do a lot of string skipping very efficiently, with much less pick-hand movement and effort than would be required using only the pick. </p> <p> Bar 3 of this run is a perfect example of this. I don’t really think too much when hybrid picking; I just do what feels the most natural and economical for any given note sequence. On beat two of bar 1 I insert a Gs chromatic passing tone [D string, sixth fret] into a descending line to give it a bit of an "outside" flavor and create a smooth legato feel. When you play the run up to speed, the outside note doesn’t sound "wrong" and actually enhances the intended rolling effect.</p> <p> I use G# again in bar 2, this time instead of G, in effect changing the mode to B Dorian [B C# D E F# G# A]. You’ll notice I do a couple of finger slides to shift positions in this bar and also incorporate the open D string between two A notes at the seventh fret to get a quirky, wide-interval dip in the line.</p> <p>Bar 3 features more wide intervals, achieved via the previously mentioned string skips, which create a nice angular melodic contour. The run concludes with another chromatic sequence that again incorporates both G and G#, this time ascending the B string [seventh-ninth frets] and one last finger slide, in this case with the pinkie sliding up to the high B root note at the 12th fret, to<br /> which I apply a nice decorative finger vibrato.</p> <p>When playing this run, try to make all your pull-offs and hammer-ons clear and strong. Also, be sure to lightly rest the side of your palm on the lower bass strings that you’re not playing on to keep them quiet.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/YsQP2Jy-4JY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-06-05%20at%203.52.57%20PM.jpg" width="620" height="129" alt="Screen Shot 2014-06-05 at 3.52.57 PM.jpg" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-rolling-along-psycroptics-joe-haley#comments Betcha Can't Play This Joe Haley November 2009 Psycroptic Betcha Can't Play This News Lessons Magazine Thu, 16 Oct 2014 14:34:58 +0000 Joe Haley http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21474 Betcha Can't Play This with Guitarist Glen Drover — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/glen-drover-betcha <!--paging_filter--><p>Check out this Betcha Can't Play This lesson video (and tab) with former Megadeth guitarist Glen Drover. </p> <p>With this blazing run in B natural minor, Drover shows you how to create striking contrasts between smooth, legato phrasing and intense hurts of alternate picking.</p> <p>For more about Drover, visit <a href="http://www.glendroverband.com/">glendroverband.com</a> and <a href="http://www.magnacarta.net/glendrover/">magnacarta.net</a>.</p> <p>For more Betcha Can't Play This lessons with videos, tab and text, head in <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/lessons/betcha-cant-play">this general direction.</a> And — as always — good luck!</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience993289263001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="993289263001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><img src="/files/imce-images/drover_betcha_0.jpg" width="620" height="762" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/glen-drover-betcha#comments 2011 Betcha Can't Play This Glen Drover Videos Betcha Can't Play This News Lessons Wed, 15 Oct 2014 16:10:15 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/11240 Mozart's "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik": Solo Electric Guitar Arrangement by Jimmy Brown — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/mozarts-eine-kleine-nachtmusik-solo-electric-guitar-arrangement-jimmy-brown-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the December 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-december-14-slipknot/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=DecemberVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>In this bonus video from the December 2014 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>, Jimmy Brown shows you how to play a solo-electric-guitar arrangement of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik."</p> <p>For the tabs that accompany this video lesson, see Page 146 of the December 2014 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>! </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3824458662001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3824458662001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-brown">Jimmy Brown</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/mozarts-eine-kleine-nachtmusik-solo-electric-guitar-arrangement-jimmy-brown-video#comments December 2014 Jimmy Brown Mozart Videos News Lessons Magazine Tue, 14 Oct 2014 16:43:49 +0000 Jimmy Brown http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22580 String Theory with Jimmy Brown: Intro to the Ultimate Jazz-Improv/Theory “Workout,” John Coltrane’s “Giant Steps” http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-jimmy-brown-intro-ultimate-jazz-improvtheory-workout-john-coltrane-s-giant-steps <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the December 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-december-14-slipknot/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=DecemberVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Even if you’ve never listened to the title track to John Coltrane’s 1960 album, <em>Giant Steps</em>, or any of the many covers of this uptempo modern jazz standard that have been recorded over the years, you’ve probably at least heard of the tune’s legendary notoriety from other musicians, and for good reason. </p> <p>The brilliantly innovative and highly influential tenor saxophonist composed the tune back in 1959 to serve as the ultimate “improvisation workout” for himself, so as to take his bebop chops to the next level, as he had seemingly sought a more harmonically challenging soloing vehicle than what the more conventionally structured progressions in his repertoire offered. </p> <p>Over the course of the tune’s repeating 16-bar form, its shifting chords modulate repeatedly to three musically distant and unrelated major keys via rapid “two-five-one” changes that demand a focused, disciplined arpeggio-based soloing strategy and technique, lest you fall behind by attempting to run a scale over each chord. </p> <p>The root notes of the three keys, by the way—B, G and Eb—together form an augmented triad, which consists of widely spaced major-third inervals, thus the apt title of the tune, “Giant Steps.” </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3825173820001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3825173820001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-brown">Jimmy Brown</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-jimmy-brown-intro-ultimate-jazz-improvtheory-workout-john-coltrane-s-giant-steps#comments December 2014 Jimmy Brown John Coltrane String Theory Videos News Lessons Magazine Tue, 14 Oct 2014 16:13:09 +0000 Jimmy Brown http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22530 Jazz Guitar Corner: How to Play Jazzy Jimi Hendrix Chords http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-how-play-jazzy-jimi-hendrix-chords <!--paging_filter--><p>As guitarists, many of us are fans of the late, great Jimi Hendrix, who has influenced players in all genres of music, including jazz. </p> <p>While Hendrix left a legacy as one of the greatest rock improvisers of all time, he also left his stamp on the harmonic side of the instrument, including a chord that bears his name. </p> <p>Taken from the song “Purple Haze,” and spelling out an E7#9 voicing, this chord has become synonymous with Hendrix’s playing and is even referred to simply as the “Hendrix Chord” by many players. </p> <p>In this lesson, we’ll be taking a look at how you can take the Hendrix Chord and apply it to your jazz guitar comping phrases, slightly altering this classic shape to give it a jazzy feel along the way. </p> <p><strong>Jazzy Jimmy Hendrix Chords</strong></p> <p>Here are four chord shapes to check out on your guitar, the first being the classic “Hendrix Chord,” E7#9, with the next three being jazzy variations of this important voicing. The first jazzy shape simply takes off the root, creating the commonly used “rootless” voicing for this chord. </p> <p>The second shape keeps the root off and adds the 5th on the first string to produce a four-note rootless chord. Finally, the third shape uses the b13 note on top of the chord, producing an E7#9b13 rootless chord based on the original Hendrix Chord shape. </p> <p>Try working these shapes out on the guitar first, to get your fingers around them, and then move on to the comping examples below where these shapes are applied to practical, musical situations. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/hendrix%20chord%201.jpg" width="620" height="877" alt="hendrix chord 1.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Jazzy Hendrix Chord Example 1</strong></p> <p>To help you take these shapes off the page and onto the fretboard, here are three examples of minor ii-V-I progressions with the Hendrix chord used to outline the V7alt chord in each progression. The first example uses a common chord riff that works between the rootless 7#9 and 7b9 chords based off of the original Hendrix chord shape. </p> <p>As well, there is an AmMaj7 shape, G#-C-E, used over Am7, another common jazz choice in this type of progression. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/172003308&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/hendrix%20chord%202.jpg" width="620" height="179" alt="hendrix chord 2.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Jazzy Hendrix Chord Example 2</strong></p> <p>The next example brings the four-note shape to the same progression, with the 5th on top of the chord, using a common jazz rhythm pattern to solidify the changes. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/172003306&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/hendrix%20chord%203.jpg" width="620" height="179" alt="hendrix chord 3.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Jazzy Hendrix Chord Example 3</strong></p> <p>Lastly, here is a cool sounding comping pattern that mixes both the four-note 7#9b13 and 7#9 shapes together, which provides movement to the line as you move from the V7alt to the Im7 chord in this minor ii-V-I progression. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/172003305&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/hendrix%20chord%204.jpg" width="620" height="185" alt="hendrix chord 4.jpg" /></p> <p>Once you've worked out these three comping examples, try to come up with three or more examples of your own using the Hendrix chord and its variations as the basis for your V7alt chords. </p> <p>From there, try comping over your favorite jazz tune and use the Hendrix chord and its variations every time you see a V7 chord in the changes, allowing you to bring these chord shapes to a jam situation in your studies. </p> <p>What do you think of these jazzy Hendrix chords? Share your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the U.K., where he teaches Skype guitar students all over the world, and is an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-how-play-jazzy-jimi-hendrix-chords#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Jimi Hendrix Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Mon, 13 Oct 2014 21:43:05 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22573 Metal for Life with Metal Mike Chlasciak: Defending the Faith of Metal and Rock Guitar with Challenging Soloing Patterns http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-chlasciak-defending-faith-metal-and-rock-guitar-challenging-soloing-patterns <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the December 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-december-14-slipknot/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=DecemberVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Mastering metal and hard rock guitar poses a great variety of musical and technical challenges, encompassing everything from the development of solid and reliable pick- and fret-hand rhythm playing technique to a complete understanding of metal-style licks and patterns and the scales upon which they are based, coupled with fleet-fingered fret-hand technique. </p> <p>This month, I’d like to demonstrate a couple of fast, challenging lead-type phrases that are designed to lift your chops up to the next level.</p> <p>One of my favorite things to do when soloing is play long note sequences based on an unwavering rhythm, such as steady 16th notes or eighth-note triplets, as this approach serves to create rhythmic tension and aids in the construction of a powerful solo. This is something Randy Rhoads loved to do, and his “Over the Mountain” solo is a prime example of this approach</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3824458666001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3824458666001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-chlasciak-defending-faith-metal-and-rock-guitar-challenging-soloing-patterns#comments December 2014 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos News Lessons Magazine Mon, 13 Oct 2014 16:06:46 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22531 Betcha Can't Play This: Karl Sanders' Sweep-Picking Fiesta http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-karl-sanders-sweep-picking-fiesta <!--paging_filter--><p> This is a sweep-picking fiesta that zigzags across the top five strings and up and down the neck. The first six bars consist of a Dm arpeggio (D F A) played in various inversions and positions, with each bar being played in a different position. </p> <p> I use a hammer-on/pull-off combination each time I get to the high E string to give the line a little bit of a legato feel and to help give my pick hand a more time to change direction for each upstroke sweep. </p> <p> I also do a couple of slides with my index finger in bars 5 and 6, which can be a little tricky. I throw in a little twist in bar 7 by playing Dm(maj7) [D F A C#] instead of a straight Dm triad. </p> <p> The top note of this arpeggio, the Cs at the 21st fret, sets up a smooth transition to Dbm [Db Fb Ab] in bar 8. From there, things just get weirder as I move to Bbm [Bb Db F] and Am [A C E] before ending with a Dm “grand finale” in bar 11, which is just the initial root position Dm shape in fifth position alternating with the exact same shape played 12 frets higher, in 17th position.</p> <p> The position shifts are probably the most challenging aspect of playing this lick. Start out slowly and build up speed as you memorize the shapes. Also be sure to palm mute the strings as indicated to keep the noise to a minimum.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/xlfz6iUhKpY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/sanders.jpg" width="620" height="503" alt="sanders.jpg" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-karl-sanders-sweep-picking-fiesta#comments Betcha Can't Play This February 2008 Karl Sanders Nile Videos Betcha Can't Play This News Lessons Magazine Mon, 13 Oct 2014 14:42:34 +0000 Karl Sanders http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21329