Lessons http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/8/0 en Kirk Hammett Lesson: How to Play Metallica's "Master of Puppets" http://www.guitarworld.com/kirk-hammett-lesson-how-play-metallicas-master-puppets <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's one fresh from the <em>Guitar World</em> video archives! </p> <p>It's a clip that appeared on the disc that accompanied our January 2006 issue, which features Metallica's Kirk Hammett on the cover.</p> <p>In the first part of the video, Hammett shows you how to play Metallica's classic "Master of Puppets." After that, Metallica buddy Zach Harmon invites the <em>Guitar World</em> cameras to take an exclusive tour of Metallica HQ, gear and all. Enjoy!</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3815669424001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3815669424001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/kirk-hammett-lesson-how-play-metallicas-master-puppets#comments January 2006 Kirk Hammett Metallica Videos News Lessons Magazine Wed, 01 Oct 2014 16:45:09 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22479 Secrets of Shred with Sammy Boller: Connecting String-Skipping Patterns — Lesson with Tab and Video http://www.guitarworld.com/secrets-shred-sammy-boller-connecting-string-skipping-patterns-lesson-tab-and-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In this lesson, I’m going to demonstrate some basic string-skipping patterns. </p> <p>These patterns are easy to link up with your pentatonic scales, and I think you’ll find them very useful for adding some flash into your riffs and solos. </p> <p>I’m going to play them separately at first, and then at the end of the lesson, I’ll string them all together into a chord progression.</p> <p>First let’s take a look at <strong>EXAMPLE 1</strong>. This is a C#m7 arpeggio in the 9th position starting with the root note on the low E string. Notice that this pattern is in the same position as your typical C# minor pentatonic scale. I tend to play string skipping arpeggios with hammer-ons and pull offs — only picking when I change strings or change direction. </p> <p>Try to learn all of the patterns with this method before you attempt alternate picking every note. You’ll find they’re initially easier to work up to speed.</p> <p>For <strong>EXAMPLE 2</strong>, I’m going to take the shape from <strong>EXAMPLE 1</strong> and move it up a string so that the root of the arpeggio is on the ninth fret on the A string. This changes the chord to an F#m7 arpeggio. Be sure to use the same picking and fingering patterns as the first example, this will help you work up speed and keep your technique consistent.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-09-26%20at%2011.33.04%20AM.png" width="620" height="372" alt="Screen Shot 2014-09-26 at 11.33.04 AM.png" /></p> <p>NOTE: All 7th chord string-skipping patterns that have the root note on the low E string can be moved to the A string to get another arpeggio a 4th higher </p> <p>Moving on to <strong>EXAMPLE 3</strong>, we’re going to stay in the 9th position and play an F#dim7 arpeggio with the root on the A string. This is another common string skipping pattern that I like because the fingering on the G and E strings is exactly the same. Once again, be sure to keep your picking consistent with <strong>EXAMPLES 1 and 2.</strong></p> <p>NOTE: Once you have <strong>EXAMPLE 3</strong> down in the 9th position, try sliding it up three frets to the 12th position. This is the same arpeggio but in the first inversion. You can do this with all diminished string skipping patterns. This pattern can also be moved to the E string for different diminished arpeggios.</p> <p>Finally, for <strong>EXAMPLE 4</strong>, I’m going to combine <strong>EXAMPLES 1, 2, and 3</strong> into a progression in C# minor. The progression is C#m7 – F#m7 – F#dim7. Focus on making the transitions between the arpeggios seamless.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-09-26%20at%2011.33.25%20AM.png" width="620" height="275" alt="Screen Shot 2014-09-26 at 11.33.25 AM.png" /></p> <p>Once you have these patterns down, try throwing them into your leads. They’re in the same position as the C# minor and C# minor pentatonic scale, so they’re easy to find all over the neck in many different keys. Cheers!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/fMoTvP1xeXA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Sammy Boller is the guitarist for the Detroit rock band <a href="https://www.facebook.com/citizenzero">Citizen Zero</a>. They’re touring and recording their first full-length album with Al Sutton and Marlon Young (Kid Rock, Bob Seger, Uncle Kracker). In 2012, Boller was selected by Joe Satriani as a winner of Guitar Center’s Master Satriani competition. He studied music at the University of Michigan. For more about Boller, or to ask him a question, write to him at info@sammyboller.com or follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/sammyboller">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/secrets-shred-sammy-boller-connecting-string-skipping-patterns-lesson-tab-and-video#comments Sammy Boller Secrets of Shred Videos Blogs Lessons Fri, 26 Sep 2014 15:31:34 +0000 Sammy Boller http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22444 The Almighty Riff: Suggestions for Stimulating Musical Creativity http://www.guitarworld.com/almighty-riff-suggestions-stimulating-musical-creativity <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following is a classic column from </em>Guitar World<em> magazine.</em></p> <p>Every great rock song has a great riff, be it a single-note melody or a chordal-based sequence, and that's probably what makes it a great song. </p> <p>Like a great frontman, a really good rock riff should have a hypnotic, star quality. A great riff can take you over; you might find yourself playing it repeatedly for 10 minutes. There's something about it that makes you want to indulge in it.</p> <p>"Siva," from our first album, <em>Gish</em>, had one of those riffs that let me know immediately that I had a song, even though I had yet to work out all the parts. That riff sounded like my band-it had instant identity-and it got my blood going right away. There was something about it that was so distinctive that it made a lot of other songs I'd written seem wimpy and weak by comparison. Since then, I've always tried to find that weird marriage of a great riff and a song that fits with the riff. </p> <p>The "Siva" riff crystallized everything I was trying to do with the band. It had power and immediacy, and the song seemed to write itself around the riff.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/F3wAtWywrP4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>When I wrote "Siva," I was working in a record shop, and I used to bring an acoustic guitar in with me to work. When no one was in the store, I'd just sit behind the counter and play. So, this was a riff that I wrote on acoustic, keeping in mind that I would transfer it to loud, heavily distorted guitar later. It was buzzin' in my head!</p> <p>Almost a reverse-case scenario occurred with the song "Today," from <em>Siamese Dream</em>. I had all of the chords and the melody, but no opening hook. At that point, we just started the song with the verse chord progression [Eb-Bb-Ab], which in and of itself is catchy because of the inherent melody. I knew I had to come up with some sort of opening riff. </p> <p>Then, out of the blue, I heard the opening lick note-for-note in my head. That's the state of mind I've trained myself to be in: I'm always looking for the guitar hook. When I added the opening riff, it completely changed the character of the song. Suddenly, I had a song that was starting out quiet and then got very loud. I could start to hear the shifts in the song as it progressed. I knew that I was going to bring that riff back in for emphasis, and I knew where I could do that.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/xmUZ6nCFNoU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>In the realm of songwriting, you really have to mine the territory and search for good riffs. Both of these examples show that heaviness is not the only thing that makes for a good riff; of far greater importance is the context within which the riff is used. To me, the best rock riff writer right now is Diamond Darrell of Pantera. At the other end of the sonic spectrum is the Edge from U2, who plays completely stylized parts that propel the songs.</p> <p>When I find that I can't seem to escape the shackles of what's already been done, or if I feel that I'm locked into a "traditional" way of thinking, I turn to rhythm guitar. Ultimately, that seems to open up infinite possibilities-far more than just sitting around noodling. Another option is to play the bass, which seems to push my writing in a more rhythmic direction. "I Am One," from <em>Gish</em>, is an example of a song that has a pretty decent guitar riff, but a killer bass riff to support it. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Pi6RJmUNBbw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Another way to inspire yourself to come up with good riffs is to use effects, and to try different tunings. The great thing about effects is that they change the way you hear the guitar, thereby changing the way you react to the guitar. The most mundane licks can turn into something completely different with the right effect. Phasers, flangers, fuzzboxes and especially delay units will all inspire new ideas. David Gilmour has done some incredible things with delays in Pink Floyd.</p> <p>For the song "Starla," from <em>Pisces Iscariot</em>, I had a riff which didn't really do much for me. Then, I ran it through a fuzz (which gave it a drone-y sound and added some different harmonics), and panned it back and forth in time with the song. Soon, I started to hear an orchestration for the song. The effects inspired the arrangement, even though I didn't end up using the original effects on the final version of the tune.</p> <p>Different tunings, like effects, will make the guitar seem like a whole new instrument. James wrote "Mayonnaise" [<em>Siamese Dream</em>], after just screwing around with tunings until he came up with something he liked (Eb, Bb, Bb(same octave), Gb, Bb, D) . Using this tuning, he stumbled across an Ebsus2/Cm/Ab chord progression, which ultimately shaped the song. For the record we're working on now, we're tuned down a half step for everything. This alone is altering the way we play and how our songs will sound.</p> <p>You must force yourself away from what you know into territory that is often uncomfortable, and occasionally disappointing. There is as much potential in songwriting as you are willing to mine, but it doesn't always come easily. You've got to work at it. I wish you the luck of the Metal Gods.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/billy-corgan">Billy Corgan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/almighty-riff-suggestions-stimulating-musical-creativity#comments Billy Corgan Smashing Pumpkins The Smashing Pumpkins Blogs Lessons Fri, 26 Sep 2014 15:12:14 +0000 Billy Corgan http://www.guitarworld.com/article/15263 LessonFace with Steve Stine: Assembling Concepts — Absolute Fretboard Mastery, Part 9 http://www.guitarworld.com/lessonface-steve-stine-assembling-concepts-absolute-fretboard-mastery-part-9 <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>Steve Stine, highly sought-after guitar educator, teaches live online group and private classes at <a href="https://www.lessonface.com/">Lessonface.com</a>. His "Soloing" course starts October 4, 2014. Enrolled students can attend live AND watch later. <a href="http://lessonface.go2cloud.org/aff_c?offer_id=7&amp;aff_id=1001">Head here for more information.</a></strong></p> <p>Hey, guys! Welcome to the ninth installment of my “Absolute Fretboard Mastery” series. </p> <p>Today’s lesson is a very exciting one because we’re finally going to start putting together everything we’ve learned over the past eight months into making great music on the guitar. </p> <p>If this is the first time you’re checking out the series, I suggest you hold off on this lesson and get started from the beginning. You can find parts 1 through 8 of this series directly under my photo to the left of these words (Just look for RELATED CONTENT).</p> <p>When I was starting out as a guitar player, it took me a while to understand the ultimate purpose of playing guitar. During those early years, I had some chops and I knew some theory, but my playing felt like it lacked purpose. That’s because it took me a while to understand that the ultimate purpose of playing guitar, at least to me, was to make the instrument an extension of your own self. </p> <p>In the same way a painter uses a brush and a canvas to express what he sees in his mind’s eye, a guitarist should be able to express what he hears in his mind’s ear through his instrument, fluently and freely. </p> <p>In that sense, the various scale theories, chord theories and playing techniques we’ve covered over the last eight months are a guitarist’s color palette and brush strokes. Over the rest of the year, we’re going to learn how to put everything we’ve learned so far to paint our musical pictures. </p> <p>For example, if you decide to jam in a specific key, there are various musical directions you could choose from, ranging from a chunky heavy metal riff or a bluesy guitar solo. But to express these musical ideas, you would need to be familiar with the various scales, expansions, chord progressions and shapes we’ve spoken about over the last eight lessons (Again, check out RELATED CONTENT under my photo).</p> <p>Say, for instance, you were jamming over a G major chord. The first step you could take is to identify and visualize the G major pentatonic scale across your fretboard:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/diagram1%20620.jpg" width="620" height="238" alt="diagram1 620.jpg" /></p> <p>What you can do next is to start thinking about the notes you can add to the G major pentatonic scale to expand it to create the diatonic scale: </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/diagram2%20620.jpg" width="620" height="238" alt="diagram2 620.jpg" /></p> <p>If you’ve followed this series, you’ll remember our practice of “meandering” on these various scale patterns we've learned. If you've worked on your “meandering,” it should have gone a long way toward helping you visualize these scales across your fretboard. But the thing with meandering is that it alone doesn't add much musicality to your playing.</p> <p>In the case of this example, what I could do next is to go back to the CAGED chord system and identify the various G major chords across the fretboard:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/diagram3%20620.jpg" width="620" height="208" alt="diagram3 620.jpg" /></p> <p>Once you can see your G major pentatonic and diatonic scales as well as the G major chords across the fretboard, you can layer them together, if you will, instead of simple playing up or down a scale or an arpeggio. </p> <p>If, for instance, while your rhythm plays a G major chord, you can utilize the notes in any of the five shapes of G major according to the CAGED system along with the notes in the pentatonic or diatonic scale to “meander” with and create melodic phrases. </p> <p>Let’s say your rhythm moved on to another chord. Say, for instance, E minor. You’ll know from our last lesson that the CAGED chord system doesn’t work as well with minor chords. But you’d still be able to identify at least three shapes of E minor across your fretboard:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/diagram4%20620.jpg" width="620" height="208" alt="diagram4 620.jpg" /></p> <p>Then you’d be able to identify your E minor pentatonic and diatonic scales across your fretboard and then entwine those notes with the notes in the various E minor chords to create melody. </p> <p>I call this style of playing "chord chasing," and you can do it with any chord you encounter during your playing and composition. Say you were jamming over a chord progression of G, E minor, C and D; the first thing you’d do is identify that you were playing in the key of G major. Then it’s simply a matter of deciding what scale to use and then understanding which notes to emphasize on at specific points. </p> <p>If I were to break down what we’ve learned so far into three categories, they would be:</p> <p>01. <strong>Understanding</strong>: Knowledge of the various theories we’ve learned so far<br /> 02. <strong>Technique</strong>: Mastering the physical aspect of playing and executing what you’ve learned<br /> 03. <strong>Creativity</strong>: Making what we play sound musical.</p> <p>It’s this last aspect of creativity that I want to work on over the rest of the year. What I want you to do this month is to take a simple chord progression like G, E minor, C, D, and work on this style of chord chasing where you layer your scales with the CAGED chord system. </p> <p>But remember, this doesn’t mean you should religiously follow each and every chord while playing. For instance, you could add a little lick or riff here and there, which doesn’t necessarily fall inside this specific theory. The point is to start understanding the fretboard with these visual layers and also get a feel for navigating the fretboard with theory and musicality. </p> <p>As always, if your technical ability interferes with this exploration of the fretboard — say, for instance, you can’t speed pick or you can’t sweep pick — work on those things simultaneously. </p> <p>Next month I want to get into what goes through a guitar player’s mind when soloing. That’s going to be a very interesting lesson! Practice hard as always and feel free to get in touch with me with whatever questions you might have at <a href="https://www.lessonface.com/">Lessonface.com</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/HUIqeloU2Sg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"Steve Stine’s Soloing Course," a four-week course that enrolled students can attend live AND watch later, starts October 4, 2014. <a href="http://lessonface.go2cloud.org/aff_c?offer_id=7&amp;aff_id=1001">Click here for more information and to enroll.</a></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Steve Stine is a longtime and sought-after guitar teacher who is professor of Modern Guitar Studies at North Dakota State University. Over the last 27 years, he has taught thousands of students, including established touring musicians, and released numerous video guitar lesson courses via established publishers. A resident of Fargo, North Dakota, today he is more accessible than ever before through the convenience of live online guitar lessons at <a href="http://lessonface.go2cloud.org/aff_c?offer_id=7&amp;aff_id=1001">Lessonface.com.</a></em></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/lessonface-steve-stine-assembling-concepts-absolute-fretboard-mastery-part-9#comments LessonFace Steve Stine Blogs Lessons Thu, 25 Sep 2014 21:10:35 +0000 Steve Stine http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22439 Jazz Guitar Corner: Introduction to the Lydian Pentatonic Concept http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-introduction-lydian-pentatonic-concept <!--paging_filter--><p>One of the most common ways to expand your soloing ideas over maj7 chords is to explore the Lydian sound, which produces a maj7#11 chord.</p> <p>While learning the Lydian scale itself is definitely one way to go when adding a maj7#11 sound to your solos, there’s another common and cool-sounding concept you can explore to bring this sound out in your lines. </p> <p>In today’s lesson, we’ll be looking at how you can apply a major pentatonic scale a tone above any maj7 chord to bring out a Lydian vibe in your jazz guitar solos. </p> <p><strong>The Lydian Pentatonic Concept</strong></p> <p>Though it has a big name, the Lydian Pentatonic Concept is a rather easy way to bring out a cool, new sound in your jazz guitar soloing lines and licks. To break it down to its smallest form, the concept is as such:</p> <p>“Playing a major pentatonic scale a tone above the root of any maj7 chord produces a Lydian sound in your solos.”</p> <p>Here’s how that concept looks with a Cmaj7 chord and D scale. When played over a Dmaj7 chord, the D major pentatonic scale produces the intervals:</p> <p>R-2-3-5-6</p> <p>But, when you play this same scale, D major pentatonic, over a Cmaj7 chord, you produce a Lydian sound in your lines. </p> <p>9-3-#11-6-7</p> <p>As you can see, by playing a major pentatonic scale a tone higher than the maj7 chord you are soloing over, you are outlining a maj7#11 sound in your lines. </p> <p>This is a great way to bring out the Lydian sound in your solo, but not just run up and down the normal 7-note Lydian mode in your lines and phrases. </p> <p><strong>Lydian Pentatonic Concept Application</strong></p> <p>Now that you know what the Lydian Pentatonic Concept is, let’s look at how the D major pentatonic scale sounds and looks when played over a Cmaj7 chord. </p> <p>As you will notice, though it is a major pentatonic scale fingering, when played over Cmaj7 the D scale takes on a whole new character, essentially giving you twice as much musical bang for your buck with this fingering. </p> <p>I’ve written out a sample fingering I like to use for this scale, but feel free to use any fingering you like or prefer, as long as you play a major pentatonic scale a tone higher than the root of the maj7 chord you are soloing over the concept will work. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/169199817&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Lydian%20Pentatonic%201.jpg" width="620" height="171" alt="Lydian Pentatonic 1.jpg" /></p> <p>Now that we've checked out the theory background on this concept, let’s explore a sample lick and find out how you can apply this concept to a ii V I chord progression in your jazz guitar solos. </p> <p><strong>Lydian Pentatonic Concept Lick</strong></p> <p>To help you take this concept further in your studies, here is a sample lick that uses the Lydian Pentatonic Concept over the Imaj7 chord, in this case Cmaj7, during the last two bars of the phrase. </p> <p>After you've learned this lick in the given key, try taking it to all 12 keys, and then write a few similar licks of your own that use this concept over the Imaj7 chord. </p> <p>Finally, put on a ii-V-I backing track, in one key to begin then in the other 11 keys from there, and solo over those changes using the Lydian Pentatonic Concept over each Imaj7 chord in your improvised lines and phrases. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/169200537&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Lydian%20Pentatonic%202.jpg" width="620" height="168" alt="Lydian Pentatonic 2.jpg" /></p> <p>Do you have any questions about the Lydian Pentatonic Concept? Share your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below.</p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-introduction-lydian-pentatonic-concept#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Wed, 24 Sep 2014 19:02:11 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22428 In Deep with Andy Aledort: Exploring Mixolydian-Based Melodies and Chord Structures http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-exploring-mixolydian-based-melodies-and-chord-structures <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the November 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-november-14-billy-gibbons-and-jeff-beck/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=NovemberVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>In the last few columns, we looked at ways to build chord shapes, or “grips,” from the Dorian and Aeolian modes (Aeolian is also known as the natural minor scale), which are two of the most widely used minor modes for soloing in rock, blues, and jazz. </p> <p>Last month, we turned our attention to the equally popular and useful Mixolydian mode, which is intervallically spelled 1(root) 2 3 4 5 6 f7. This is the mode that includes the dominant-seven chord tones 1, 3, 5 and f7 and gives us chords like E7, A7 and D7, as well as chords that include “upper-structure tension tones,” or “tensions,” namely the ninth, 11th and 13th. </p> <p>I encourage all guitarists to attain as complete an understanding of the Mixolydian mode as possible, as this will help in broadening one’s understanding of music theory and the fretboard, as well as reap countless options that can be applied to both soloing and rhythm guitar playing. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/NpC-4tsg8Mc?list=UUqHkFMEmOPFO3ahcrrBAj4w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-exploring-mixolydian-based-melodies-and-chord-structures#comments Andy Aledort In Deep November 2014 News Lessons Wed, 17 Sep 2014 15:06:48 +0000 Andy Aledort http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22318 Metal for Life with Metal Mike: Incorporating Suspended Chords into Metal Rhythm Parts http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-incorporating-suspended-chords-metal-rhythm-parts <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the November 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-november-14-billy-gibbons-and-jeff-beck/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=NovemberVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>One of the coolest things about contemporary metal is that its harmonic palette is wide open. It’s not uncommon for a great metal riff to jump back and forth from one type of harmonic environment to another, such as from the natural minor scale to the Phrygian mode to the Mixolydian mode to the blues scale. </p> <p>Countless examples abound in the music of such great bands as Metallica, Megadeth, Pantera, At the Gates, In Flames and others. </p> <p>This month, I’d like to demonstrate a few different examples of rhythm-guitar ideas that jump around harmonically and also feature the incorporation of suspended chords, namely sus2 and sus4 chords.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Urw2_de1dUA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-incorporating-suspended-chords-metal-rhythm-parts#comments Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak November 2014 News Lessons Mon, 15 Sep 2014 20:27:26 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22317 Riffer Madness: Dimebag Darrell on Syncopated Rhythms, Part 1 http://www.guitarworld.com/riffer-madness-dimebag-darrell-syncopated-rhythms-part-1 <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This entry comes from Dimebag Darrell's classic </em>Guitar World<em> column, "Riffer Madness."</em></p> <p>In the last few columns we've been zoning in on lead-playing and shit so let's get back to doing some hard-driving rhythm work for a while-'cos well-balanced players rip on rhythm as well as leads. </p> <p>As far as I'm concerned, it's no good being able to wail out smokin' leads if your rhythm chops hugg! I've been into playing rhythm from day one, and a lot of that has to do with having a brother who kicks ass on drums. I grew up jamming with Vinnie [Paul, Darrell's brother and Pantera's skin-basher] and he definitely taught me the importance of timing and playing tight-and that, along with some great chops, is what rhythm playing is all about.</p> <p><strong>Percussive Picking</strong></p> <p>In a way, I'm kind of a percussionist when it comes to picking because a lot of my rhythm patterns are almost like drum patterns-take the front of "A New Level" (<em>Vulgar Display Of Power</em>) (Figure 1) which is a hard-driving power groove based on one note, the open low E string (tuned down a whole step to D). </p> <p>I actually came up with the idea for this riff by beating on one of those little crystal glasses with some chop sticks at Benihana's! Most riffs are recognizable by their melody, and the fact that you can immediately identify Figure 1 as being "A New Level" from just its rhythmic pattern shows you how important timing and rhythm is! So, in the case of this riff, the focus is on right-hand chops rather than melody.</p> <p><img src="http://guitaraficionado.com/GW/dime/sync1.gif" /></p> <p><strong>Psychotic Syncopation</strong></p> <p>A lot of Pantera's riffs are tight, syncopated grooves like the one we've just looked at. Check out the riff shown in FIGURE 2, which is the beginning of "Psycho Holiday" (<em>Cowboys From Hell</em>).</p> <p><img src="http://guitaraficionado.com/GW/dime/sync2.gif" /></p> <p>Once again, only one note is being hit (F), but you know exactly what the song is, thanks to the rhythmic pattern being pounded out. Anyway, before we go any further, I guess I should explain what syncopation is all about, just so we're clear.</p> <p>All syncopation means is accenting beats that you don't normally accent. If this sounds complicated, don't wig, just hold tight and we'll clean this scene up. Let's say you're chugging out a simple eighth-note pattern on the open low-E string, like in FIGURE 3a.</p> <p><img src="http://guitaraficionado.com/GW/dime/sync3.gif" /></p> <p>The notes you'd normally accent would be the ones that fall on counts "one," "two," "three" and "four." This is shown in FIGURE 3b(the notes to be accented are indicated by the symbol >). All we have to do to make this basic rhythmic idea syncopated is to accent the notes that fall on the "and" counts instead-the eighth-note up-beats. This is shown in FIGURE 3c.</p> <p>FIGURES 4a + 4b are the same shit, but this time applied to a simple 16th-note groove. FIGURE 4a is the unsyncopated version (accents on "one," "two," "three" and "four") while FIGURE 4b is syncopated (accents NOT on "one," "two," "three" and "four").</p> <p><img src="http://guitaraficionado.com/GW/dime/sync4.gif" /></p> <p>I know these are real basic illustrations, but remember, simple is bad-assed, if done aggressively! So, attack those accents 'cos that's where the magic is! Check out how much more interesting FIGURE 4b sounds compared to FIGURE 4a, which is pretty straight-sounding. And the only difference between 'em is where we've placed the accents. That's the whole trip with syncopation!</p> <p><img src="http://guitaraficionado.com/GW/dime/sync5.gif" /></p> <p>Shit, I'm outta space again. Next time we'll be getting into more power groove stuff, such as picking techniques and muting tricks. Until then, go crank your rig on 12, let it feedback wide open for a good two minutes, freak your neighbors out and ENJOY THE POWER OF THE GUITAR! "Oh, what a feeling," and it ain't no damned Toyota!!</p> <p><em>The "Dimebag Darrell Riffer Madness" DVD is available through Alfred <a href="http://alfred.com/riffermadness">here</a></em>.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/pantera">Pantera</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dimebag-darrell">Dimebag Darrell</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/riffer-madness-dimebag-darrell-syncopated-rhythms-part-1#comments Dimebag Darrell Pantera Riffer Madness Blogs News Lessons Magazine Mon, 15 Sep 2014 20:13:08 +0000 Dimebag Darrell http://www.guitarworld.com/article/13492 Man of Steel with Steel Panther's Satchel: Triplet Feels, Drop-D Riffing and How to Play “Glory Hole” http://www.guitarworld.com/man-steel-steel-panthers-satchel-triplet-feels-drop-d-riffing-and-how-play-glory-hole <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the November 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-november-14-billy-gibbons-and-jeff-beck/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=NovemberVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Hey kids, Satchel here and I’m back (did I leave?) to teach you more great rock riffs from the latest Steel Panther mega-multi-ultra-Platinum release, <em>All You Can Eat</em>. This month, I’d like to focus on the rhythm and lead guitar parts to a tender love song I wrote called “Glory Hole.” </p> <p>This song is played in drop-D tuning down one half step (low to high, Db Ab Db Gb Bb Eb). Another twist is that the transcribed examples in this column, while written in 4/4, are meant to be played with a triplet feel, which is akin to a 12/8 shuffle-type feel. </p> <p>This means that each pair of eighth notes is to be played as a quarter note and an eighth note within a triplet bracket. If an eighth-note triplet were to sound “DA-da-da,” or “ONE-trip-let,” the idea is to combine the first two notes to sound a quarter note that sustains through the first two eighth notes of the eighth-note triplet (ONE-trip), followed by the remaining eighth note of the triplet (-let), resulting in a rhythm of “DAAA-da-DAAA-da-DAAA-da-DAAA-da.” </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/bQtCFZjqFEY?list=UUqHkFMEmOPFO3ahcrrBAj4w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/man-steel-steel-panthers-satchel-triplet-feels-drop-d-riffing-and-how-play-glory-hole#comments Man of Steel November 2014 Satchel Steel Panther Videos News Lessons Magazine Wed, 10 Sep 2014 15:14:34 +0000 Steel Panther&#039;s Satchel http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22314 The Scale That Will Change Your Life http://www.guitarworld.com/scale-will-change-your-life <!--paging_filter--><p>A number of years ago, I was teaching at a guitar workshop in Pittsburgh. </p> <p>I had taught at this annual workshop a number of times and always looked forward to my week there, not only because I was able to teach a class of students who really wanted to learn guitar, but also for more selfish reasons. I liked meeting and learning from some of the other instructors and clinicians. </p> <p>So during this week, jazz guitarist Henry Johnson and I were jamming on each other's guitars, and I took the opportunity to ask him, "Hey, how can I, as a rock guitarist, get that 'outside' jazzy/Alan Holdsworth-y sound?" </p> <p>His answer was so simple and astonishing. I will share it with you here.</p> <p>He said, "Simply flatten the root of the minor pentatonic scale. Use this whenever you would use the normal minor pentatonic scale."</p> <p>The concept was simple but profound. I spent a few days getting the new shape under my fingers, and before I knew it, I was slipping this into every solo I could! </p> <p>The example below shows the new altered A-minor pentatonic scale. In this A-minor example, this "flattened root scale" sounds outside over Am or an A7 chord, but inside over the dominant V chord (E7).</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Galysh_-_The_Scale_That_Will_Change_Your_Life.jpg" width="620" height="175" alt="Galysh_-_The_Scale_That_Will_Change_Your_Life.jpg" /></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/5hknSMFlIVI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Guitarist Adrian Galysh is a solo artist and education coordinator for Guitar Center Studios. He's the author of the book </em>Progressive Guitar Warmups and Exercises<em>. For more information, visit him at <a href="http://www.adriangalysh.com/">AdrianGalysh.com.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/scale-will-change-your-life#comments Adrian Galysh Blogs News Lessons Wed, 10 Sep 2014 15:03:26 +0000 Adrian Galysh http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20056 Full Shred with Marty Friedman: How to Develop Melodic Ideas with Interesting Twists http://www.guitarworld.com/full-shred-marty-friedman-how-develop-melodic-ideas-interesting-twists <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the November 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-november-14-billy-gibbons-and-jeff-beck/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=NovemberVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>If I had to pick one thing I place highest in importance when it comes to guitar playing, it would be originality. </p> <p>I am not a fan of the tried-and-true cliché licks that have been used forever by so many guitarists. To me, it’s simply a cop out to mimic fast phrases or standard rock licks that we’ve all heard a million times before. I think it’s much more interesting and appealing to strive for originality through spontaneity and invention. </p> <p>Why play the same lick as someone else when you can express your own distinct musical personality through an idea of your own?</p> <p>Last month, I demonstrated a variety of ways in which to employ string-bending techniques in order to personalize a melodic phrase. Let’s now expand on this concept by taking a similar basic melodic idea and gradually morphing it into lines that become a bit more complex and nuanced.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/d7ekAERB3lI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/full-shred-marty-friedman-how-develop-melodic-ideas-interesting-twists#comments Full Shred Marty Friedman November 2014 Videos News Lessons Magazine Tue, 09 Sep 2014 14:28:45 +0000 Marty Friedman http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22315 What In the World: Using String Skipping to See Scales Differently http://www.guitarworld.com/what-world-using-string-skipping-see-scales-differently <!--paging_filter--><p>When you first learn the three-note-per-string and/or single position seven-note scale, you learn the patterns starting on the low E string and work your way up to the high E and back. </p> <p>You do this for each of the seven patterns up the neck, practicing and perfecting your scales. </p> <p>This is great! The only problem is, this is how you are training your hands and brain to approach them. </p> <p>Rather than viewing the scales as the available notes you have to choose from in a given key/mode, the order of the notes sometimes becomes how you rely on playing them in an improvising and/or composing situation. </p> <p>There is absolutely nothing wrong with this; it has worked fine and beautifully for hundreds of years. The melody for “Joy to the World” is simply a descending major scale. Learning to approach your scales in a different way will shake things up and hopefully change your habits of approaching scales in only an A-to-Z fashion. </p> <p>String skipping is mostly associated with being a shred technique, covering a lot of ground quickly on the guitar by skipping over adjacent strings. The approach I am presenting is not so much a shred thing, but more of a way to know the scale on only two strings at a time, rather than all six, as most people generally learn them. If anything, this will force you to know the notes of the scale better, rather than relying on muscle memory to get through them. Remember the most important thing when playing music is to consciously create, rather than go through the motions of learned patterns that are embedded in our brains from constant repetition. </p> <p>For the examples, I have written the scales out in the key of F. Once the concept is learned, it should be applied to all keys/modes. As you play through these, you will notice different shapes that repeat across each set of two strings according to the degree of the scale you start on. Eventually you will see that if, for instance, you start a pattern on the third degree of the scale, you will be playing one shape; if you start on the root of the scale, you will be playing a different one, etc. </p> <p><strong>String set 1, High E and G strings:</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Lesson-10-1.jpg" width="620" height="445" alt="Lesson-10-1.jpg" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>String set 2, B and D strings:</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Lesson-10-2.jpg" width="620" height="461" alt="Lesson-10-2.jpg" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>String set 3, G and A strings:</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Lesson-10-3_0.jpg" width="620" height="463" alt="Lesson-10-3_0.jpg" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>String set 4, D and low E strings:</strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Lesson-10-4.jpg" width="620" height="461" alt="Lesson-10-4.jpg" /></p> <p>To further learn and integrate this approach to your playing, try improvising with this technique using only one string set at a time. Move up and down one string and then hop over to the other string in the set, keeping in mind to be as melodic as possible at all times, rather than trying to shred through the scale. </p> <p>Being limited to only two strings at a time will force you to approach the instrument in a way that you may not have possibly explored before.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/0d5nGfbLifc?list=UUozoKYJmat8MUYcdRo40cHA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Steve Booke is a composer for film and TV from the New York area. His compositions range from orchestral to metal to world styles from every corner of the planet. A graduate of Berklee College of Music, Steve has played guitar for more than 28 years. He has recorded 10 albums of his own and has played on countless others. He plays gigs in the NY area and tours the East Coast with a variety of bands. He has performed with Ben E. King and members of Mahavishnu Orchestra. He endorses D'Addario/Planet Waves, Larrivee Guitars, Levy's Leathers, Peavey, Stylus Pick, Finale PrintMusic, Pigtronix, Tech 21, Toontrack, Graph Tech, Seymour Duncan, Waves, Studio Devil and L.R. Baggs. His music is available on iTunes and Amazon. Steve is now offering Skype lessons and can be contacted at info@stevebooke.com. Visit <a href="http://stevebooke.com">stevebooke.com</a> and <a href="https://www.facebook.com/SteveBookeGuitaristComposer">Facebook.com/SteveBookeGuitaristComposer</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/what-world-using-string-skipping-see-scales-differently#comments Steve Booke What In the World Videos Blogs Lessons Sun, 07 Sep 2014 21:23:30 +0000 Steve Booke http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22302 Joe Satriani Shows How to Play "Satch Boogie" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-shows-how-play-satch-boogie-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Just like the headline says, here's an official <em>Guitar World</em> video of Joe Satriani showing you how to play his signature 1987 tune, "Satch Boogie."</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3769770598001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3769770598001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/joe-satriani-shows-how-play-satch-boogie-video#comments April 2006 Joe Satriani Artist Lessons Videos News Lessons Fri, 05 Sep 2014 19:56:05 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22296 Bent Out of Shape: Learning Paganini's 16th Caprice in G Minor http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-paganinis-16th-caprice-g-minor <!--paging_filter--><p>A couple of weeks ago, <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-intensive-30-minute-guitar-workout-musicians-go">I gave you a short, 30-minute guitar workout</a> designed for guitarists whose practice time is limited. </p> <p>The positive response I received prompted me to create an additional lesson, which, in combination with my original workout, will give you a good hour of intensive practice. </p> <p>For this lesson, I have selected a classical piece for you to learn: Paganini's 16th Caprice in G minor. Learning classical pieces is a great way to improve your technique and theory. It's also more beneficial to practice something musical, rather than just working on exercises. Use my 30-minute workout as a warmup and then spend an additional 30 minutes to an hour working on this piece. </p> <p>It's very challenging and features a good selection of arpeggios, wide intervals, chromatic runs, string skipping and sequences. It's very rewarding to learn and play in its entirety. Because of its length, I have the divided the piece into three parts. </p> <p>Your first task will be to memorize the notes, which in itself is a big challenge. I would suggest taking it one bar at a time, memorizing the notes and working out the fingering. Then attempt to perform the bar in full. Start at the beginning with bar 1, and add a new bar every day. Once the notes are memorized, you can begin to work with a metronome and build speed. </p> <p>Start at 80 bpm playing 8th notes and increase the metronome by 10 bpm after each successful performance. When you reach 120 bpm, go back to 60 bpm and play the piece as 16th notes. From there, take it as fast you can. </p> <p>It's meant to be at a tempo of 165 bpm, which is incredibly fast for a piece so complex. I can only get to around 120 bpm before it becomes too challenging. For this lesson, I have recorded myself performing the piece in full at the comfortable tempo of 100 bpm. Use this as a reference for yourself when learning. I have also marked in the Soundcloud link where each of the three parts begins to help you navigate.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F90255673"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/caprice1.jpg" width="620" height="1145" alt="caprice1.jpg" /></p> <p>The first part begins with several arpeggios which you will need to play using sweep picking (bars 1 to 6). Everything else should be played with alternate picking. There's a tricky string skipping section at bar 7, which you can either play with your second finger or entirely with the pick. After bar 8, it repeats from the beginning. From bars 9 to 14, you have more arpeggios and string-skipping, but this time you will not need to sweep the arpeggios. Bar 14 ends with a long A# major arpeggio over three octaves. </p> <p>Next week, we will look into detail at the second part of the piece and also analyze some of the theory used in its composition. Best of luck, cheers!</p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England now living in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and in 2012 toured Japan, America and Canada. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-paganinis-16th-caprice-g-minor#comments Bent Out of Shape Niccolo Paganini Will Wallner Blogs News Lessons Fri, 05 Sep 2014 17:40:03 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18306 Betcha Can't Play This: Ethan Brosh's C Lydian Voyage, with Tap and Bend http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-c-lydian-voyage-tap-and-bend <!--paging_filter--><p>In this brand-new edition of Betcha Can't Play This, metal guitarist Ethan Brosh (using a Fender HM Strat) demonstrates a lightning-fast C Lydian lick that sounds a bit like <em>The Simpsons</em> theme, at least at the very beginning.</p> <p>As with the other <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-cascading-harmonics-video">new-for-2014 "Betcha Can't Play This" video by Brosh</a>, which we shared last week, this is an expanded version (nearly six minutes long) of the usually brief "Betcha" videos on GuitarWorld.com.</p> <p>Also, note that there are no tabs, since Brosh explains key left- and right-hand techniques in the clip. </p> <p>For two other Betcha Can't Play This columns by Brosh, check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-guitarist-ethan-brosh-lays-down-challenge">Betcha Can't Play This: Guitarist Ethan Brosh Lays Down the Challenge</a> and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-diminished-madness-guitarist-ethan-brosh">Betcha Can't Play This: Diminished Madness with Guitarist Ethan Brosh</a>. You'll find more under RELATED CONTENT, below the photo.</p> <p>For more about Brosh, visit <a href="http://ethanbrosh.com/">ethanbrosh.com</a>.</p> <p>As always, good luck! We have more on the way!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/kDFQ0tJbGRA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-c-lydian-voyage-tap-and-bend#comments Betcha Can't Play This Ethan Brosh Videos News Lessons Mon, 25 Aug 2014 20:42:57 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22196