Lessons http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/8/0 en Guitar Strength: Get “Scary” with These Rut-Busting Licks Inspired by “Mr. Scary,” George Lynch http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-strength-get-scary-these-rut-busting-licks-inspired-mr-scary-george-lynch <!--paging_filter--><p>Since the early 1980s, soulful shred sensei Lynch — AKA "Mr. Scary" — has challenged the boundaries of his abilities, constantly evolved with the times and kept his playing fresh. </p> <p>While Lynch’s adventurous style is difficult to emulate, bust out of a rut and get some harmonically fresh and physically engaging “Scary”-ness in your playing with these “Mr. Scary”-inspired licks!</p> <p>Scary lick 1 is an E diminished 7 (E, G, Bb, Db) symmetrical string skipping tap pattern on the G and high E strings. The diminished7 arpeggio pattern (R, b3, b5, bb7) can be visualized on the guitar as notes occurring every three frets from the root on the same string (For example, an open E string root would use the 3rd, 6th, 9th, 12th, 15th, 18th and 21st frets in a repeating single string E dim7 arpeggio). </p> <p>Since G is a note in E dim7, and G and E are both open strings, symmetrical fretting works across both strings and all the way up the fretboard. The pattern in the lick on both the E and G strings is frets 9, 12, 15, 18, 21 (on the high E). Tap the 18th fret with your pick hand middle finger and fret the 9th-12th-15th stretch with index-middle-pinky, respectively (the 21st fret is slid into with a slide of the tapping finger with the note still ringing after the initial tap at the 18th). </p> <p>Scary Lick 1a is the lick in 4/4 time with an “accelerator” shift to sextuplets from sixteenths (6s from 4s) on beat 3. Scary Lick 1b is the pattern looped evenly in ¾ time (also try looping it indefinitely over 4/4 time for a trippy off-center effect). Check out how this lick grabs your attention yet blends seamlessly in an E Dorian/Blues context (as it has the E and G from Em, the Db/C# from E Dorian, and the Bb from E blues).</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/GWorld3GetScary%21%28lick1%29.jpg" width="620" height="360" alt="GWorld3GetScary!(lick1).jpg" /></p> <p>Scary Lick 2a features a major triad shape ascending diagonally up the fretboard a tritone (A.K.A. “The Devil’s Interval," and the <em>Diabolus in Musica</em>) at a time. Kirk Hammett famously “borrowed” a lick similar to this Lynch lick on a certain <em>…And Justice For All</em> track. </p> <p>Lynch’s version can be heard in his searing “Kiss of Death” solo (<em>Back for the Attack,</em> Dokken). Notice the fingering in the notation and move the triad shapes up a string and position at a time using economy picking. </p> <p>Scary Lick 2b is a sequence with the shapes using a “1-2-3, 2-3-4, 3-4-5” type pattern.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/GWorld3GetScary%21%28lick2%29.jpg" width="620" height="553" alt="GWorld3GetScary!(lick2).jpg" /></p> <p>Scary Lick 3 uses Lynch’s infamous “Gothic Octave” shape (illustrated in the lick as the 4th, 5th and 9th frets on the E and A strings, played across 3 octaves), with tapped notes a fret higher than the pinky notes in the shape. There are a lot of “cluster” notes interacting inside of this lick, yet the clusters are spread out intervalically, so there’s also a lot of attention-grabbing movement in it. </p> <p>This lick will work (in different ways) when played quickly and with conviction in F#m/A Major, C#m/E Major and G#m/B Major. Try ending it with some more tap sliding to the “money” notes in the key that you’re trying to fit it in.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/GWorld3GetScary%21%28Lick3%29%21.jpg" width="620" height="336" alt="GWorld3GetScary!(Lick3)!.jpg" /></p> <p>Practice these licks until you’re comfortable with performing them at a brisk pace, and then try channeling the spirit of Mr. Scary by using these licks as a springboard for further experimentation in and around them. Dial in a deadly tone, get fiery with your phrasing, and rock a vicious vibrato. </p> <p>Be sure to check out Dokken’s <em>Beast From the East</em> live greatest-hits CD, Lynch Mob’s <em>Wicked Sensation</em> and George Lynch’s solo covers album <em>Furious George</em> for some KILLER guitar work sure to inspire any guitarist. I’ll have more on Mr. Scary soon. Happy shredding!</p> <p><em>Scott Marano has dedicated his life to the study of the guitar, honing his chops at the Berklee College of Music under the tutelage of Jon Finn and Joe Stump and working as an accomplished guitarist, performer, songwriter and in-demand instructor. In 2007, Scott developed the Guitar Strength program to inspire and provide accelerated education to guitarists of all ages and in all styles through state-of-the-art private guitar lessons in his home state of Rhode Island and globally via Skype. <a href="http://www.guitarstrength.com/">Visit Scott and learn more at www.GuitarStrength.com.</a></em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/george-lynch">George Lynch</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-strength-get-scary-these-rut-busting-licks-inspired-mr-scary-george-lynch#comments Dokken George Lynch Guitar Strength Lynch Mob Scott Marano Blogs Features Lessons Fri, 31 Oct 2014 14:49:26 +0000 Scott Marano http://www.guitarworld.com/article/13368 LessonFace with Steve Stine: Organizing Your Soloing Direction — Absolute Fretboard Mastery, Part 10 http://www.guitarworld.com/lessonface-steve-stine-organizing-your-soloing-direction-absolute-fretboard-mastery-part-10 <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>Steve Stine teaches live online group and private classes at <a href="https://www.lessonface.com/">Lessonface.com</a>. His next course, Blues Fundamentals, is for intermediate-level guitar players and starts Saturday, November 1, 2014. <a href="http://lessonface.go2cloud.org/aff_c?offer_id=7&amp;aff_id=1001">For more information, head here.</a></strong></p> <p>Hey, guys. Welcome to Part 10 of my Absolute Fretboard Mastery series. </p> <p>Over the past 10 months, we’ve touched on a heap of theoretical, technical and creative aspects of guitar playing. And if you’ve followed the series from the very beginning (If you haven’t, <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/achieving-absolute-fretboard-mastery-part-1">start here</a> and be sure to check out all the previous parts of this lesson under RELATED CONTENT, just below my photo).</p> <p>Which brings us to today’s lesson! You see, it’s always great to acquire knowledge, but that knowledge becomes redundant if you don’t know how to apply it. And sometimes when it comes to guitar playing, a massive body of knowledge can be confusing to draw from and organize when creating music. </p> <p>So in this week’s lesson, I want to focus on teaching you how to effectively organize and plan your solos. By the end of this lesson, you’ll have a visual map that will cover all the things we’ve learned and how we’re going to organize them when writing solos. </p> <p><strong>Category 1: Fundamental Concepts</strong></p> <p>If you take some of the greatest guitarists of our time, the one thing they have in common is that they know their fretboard like the back of their hand. If you look at a guitarist like Joe Satriani or Steve Vai or Yngwie Malmsteen, you’ll notice how their hands just seem to dance across the fretboard without looking at it.</p> <p>So the first thing I want you to focus on is your visual mastery of the fretboard. So far, we’ve learned things like the notes across our fretboard, the pentatonic shapes, pentatonic expansions and CAGED chord shapes. When you look down at your fretboard, ask yourself if you can see all these theories in visual layers. Be brutally honest here and address any visual “black holes” you might have. For example, if you can’t immediately see all your pentatonic shapes when you look down at your fretboard, revisit that knowledge area and relearn in until you’re absolutely sure of it. </p> <p><strong>Category 2: Understanding Grouping</strong></p> <p>The next category I want you to think about is how each of these theories we’ve learned correlate to each other. For example, when you play a pentatonic scale, do you understand the notes you’re playing? Do you understand how these notes correlate to the chords you’re playing over? Do you instantly know which key you’re playing in? </p> <p>The beauty of learning these various aspects of guitar theory is that in the end it all comes together to form a beautiful mosaic of sorts that makes your understanding of the instrument so much more holistic. </p> <p><strong>Category 3: Technical Ability</strong></p> <p>Sometimes when I talk about technical ability, I hear things like, "Oh, you don’t need to play fast to sound good,” or “You can’t be good unless you can play fast.” But here’s the thing: I’m not here to tell you that you need to play fast or you need to play slow. </p> <p>Instead, all I’m going to tell you is to not limit yourself in any technical aspect. Don’t shy away from a particular aspect of technique just because you think it fits into one category or style of playing. Learn and master as broad an array of techniques that you can so that when you do create your own music, you don’t ever have a disconnect with what you want to play and your actual ability to play it. </p> <p><strong>Category 4: Real Music Direction</strong></p> <p>You know, at the end of the day, it’s not the theoretical understanding or the techniques that make a great guitar player. It’s the human element of their playing. So with this category, the first thing I want you to focus on is the vocal techniques you can use in your guitar playing. What we’re really doing as guitarists is making our instruments sing. So start learning to use things like bends, vibrato, hammer-ons, pull-offs and slides that enhance the vocal element of your playing.</p> <p>The second aspect I want you to focus on in this category is your phrasing. To understand the importance of phrasing, think about how we speak. If you spoke each and every word at a consistent pace, with no stops or pauses, imagine how monotonous it would sound. </p> <p>It’s the same with your playing. When playing guitar, you need to know when to speed up, when to slow down and most importantly, when to stop. Another important aspect of phrasing I want you to pay attention to is repetition. Whether it’s a melody or a rhythm, repetition gives listeners an opportunity to latch onto the music you are playing. I’m not saying you should play the same notes and rhythms over and over again, but create passages with repetition that act as hooks. </p> <p>Next we have intervallic playing. A common mistake a lot of beginner players make is they restrict their playing to simply going up and down a scale. But there’s hardly any musical depth or excitement in this. Instead, focus on strengthening your ability to utilize intervals. Instead of going from tone to tone, try skipping over a couple of tones once in a while. It’ll free up your melodic sensibility a whole lot more and it will make your playing so much more interesting. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/organizing620.jpg" width="620" height="465" alt="organizing620.jpg" /><br /> <em><strong>NOTE: You'll find a larger version of this info-graphic in the photo gallery at the bottom of this story.</strong></em></p> <p>Up next, note chasing and chord chasing. If you listen to singers, you know they don’t just sing random notes over any and every chord. The notes they sing tend to correlate to the chords they’re singing over. And this is exactly what we learned with chord chasing and note chasing. I’m not saying that whatever melodies you play on the guitar need to always use this principle, but say you’re soloing in the key of A minor and the chord moves to G, it makes musical sense to incorporate notes in the scale that correlate with this chord. </p> <p>Dynamic contrast is also a very important aspect of real music direction. If you listen to players like David Gilmour or Gary Moore, you’ll notice how they seem to spend so much attention to the dynamics of their playing. You’ll notice how they play some notes hard and some notes soft, or how they sometimes play really loud before switching to playing really softly. This is what adds the human aspect to their playing. </p> <p>So try to shake things up. If you’ve been going fast, go slow, or stop playing altogether. Think of the story that you’re trying to tell through your solos and use your dynamics to make listeners feel this story. </p> <p>Last but not least, we have the guitar effects element of your playing. Playing guitar isn’t just about cranking up the distortion and just playing licks all day. Listen to some of your favorite guitarists and learn how they use their effects to augment whatever solos they are playing on their guitar. And then start experimenting yourself. In this day and age, there are so many incredible effects we can use to add aspects to our guitar playing that we couldn’t have even imagined 10 years ago. </p> <p>So, what do I want you to take away from today’s lesson? I want you to understand that the real job of a guitar player is to complement and help carry whatever greater musical idea he or she is a part of at any given moment. </p> <p>If you are a player who tries to incorporate every scale, every technique and every lick you know when playing, you’re not doing justice to whatever bigger musical idea you are a part of. Instead, focus on really listening to whatever music you are playing along with, understanding what it needs from you as a guitarist, and using this categorization to work on delivering that. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/4AF5PkA6JIA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Steve Stine’s Blues Fundamentals course, for intermediate-level guitar players, starts this Saturday, November 1, 2014. <a href="http://lessonface.go2cloud.org/aff_c?offer_id=7&amp;aff_id=1001">Click here for more information and to enroll.</a></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Steve Stine is a longtime and sought-after guitar teacher who is professor of Modern Guitar Studies at North Dakota State University. Over the last 27 years, he has taught thousands of students, including established touring musicians, and released numerous video guitar lesson courses via established publishers. A resident of Fargo, North Dakota, today he is more accessible than ever before through the convenience of live online guitar lessons at <a href="http://lessonface.go2cloud.org/aff_c?offer_id=7&amp;aff_id=1001">Lessonface.com.</a></em></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/lessonface-steve-stine-organizing-your-soloing-direction-absolute-fretboard-mastery-part-10#comments Absolute Fretboard Mastery LessonFace Steve Stine Videos Blogs Lessons Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:11:43 +0000 Steve Stine http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22714 How to Adjust Your Guitar's Truss Rod — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/how-adjust-your-guitars-truss-rod-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In this new <em>Guitar World</em> video, GW's tech editor, Paul Riario, shows you how to make basic adjustments to your guitar's truss rod. </p> <p>In the clip, which you can check out below, Riario is joined by an Epiphone ES-339 PRO and a Fender Road Worn Strat.</p> <p>Fear no more, folks! You can do this!</p> <p><strong>For the latest and greatest guitar accessories, visit <a href="https://www.amplifiedparts.com/">amplifiedparts.com</a>.</strong></p> <p>P.S.: If you just can't get enough of Paul Riario telling you what to do, check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/video-guitar-worlds-guide-building-pedal-board">Guitar World's Guide to Building a Pedal Board — Video.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_jchVLCzZF0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/how-adjust-your-guitars-truss-rod-video#comments Paul Riario Videos News Gear Lessons Thu, 30 Oct 2014 14:28:39 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22698 In Deep: Tribute to the Musical Genius and Signature Lead Guitar Style of Duane Allman http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-tribute-musical-genius-and-signature-lead-guitar-style-duane-allman <!--paging_filter--><p>A true original, the late, great virtuoso guitarist Duane Allman led the Allman Brothers Band into rock history with his ferocious, deeply expressive and trailblazing guitar work. </p> <p>Rounder Records offers ample testimony to the beauty as well as the breadth of Duane’s recorded work in the new, beautifully compiled box set <em>Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective</em>. In this edition of In Deep, we will examine some of the key elements of Duane’s signature style as a lead guitarist. </p> <p>One of the best examples of the genius of Duane Allman can be found on the timeless, classic live album, At Fillmore East (1971), which captures the Allman Brothers Band live in concert at the peak of their powers. </p> <p>Duane’s razor-sharp articulation and masterful touch abound, starting with the slide guitar tour de force “Statesboro Blues,” through the smoldering slow blues “Stormy Monday” and continuing through the fiery, aggressive solos performed on “Whipping Post,” “You Don’t Love Me” and other great tracks.</p> <p>Duane’s rich, warm tone was achieved via his main ax, a 1958 tobacco sunburst Gibson Les Paul Standard, played through Marshall<br /> “Plexi” 50- and 100-watt heads, usually running two 4x12 Marshall bottoms. For additional distortion, he very occasionally used a Dallas-Arbiter Fuzz Face, usually in the studio. </p> <p>A key to Duane’s virtuosity was the fact that, like Jimi Hendrix, he had extensive experience as a session guitarist, working closely alongside R&amp;B greats like Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin and King Curtis. Through his studio work, Duane had developed a great sense of rhythm as well as a keen understanding of economy, in terms of phrasing.</p> <p>This understanding resulted in improvised solos that remained cohesive and conversational no matter how long they stretched out or how far they roamed from the original starting point. For this column, let’s use two of Duane’s signature songs, “Stormy Monday” and “Whipping Post,” as our points of focus.</p> <p>“Stormy Monday,” written and originally recorded by blues great T-Bone Walker, is played in the key of G. For soloing, Duane relied primarily on a few standard “bluesapproved” scales. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates a scale most guitar players are well familiar with, G minor pentatonic (G Bf C D F), as played in third position. <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> illustrates the G blues scale, which is the same as G minor pentatonic but additionally includes the flatted fifth (f5), Df.</p> <p>Most blues players move alternately between minor and major pentatonic scales based on the same root note. Eric Clapton and B.B. King are two great examples of guitarists whose solos are almost always based on a combination of these two scales. <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> illustrates the G major pentatonic scale (G A B D E) in an extended pattern that diagonally traverses the fretboard from third to 12th positions.</p> <p>Duane often used a soloing device that can be traced to B.B. King, one of his biggest influences. King’s signature soloing approach combines the notes of minor and major pentatonic scales in a very specific fretboard pattern, or “shape.” The pattern, known as “B.B.’s box,” is illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>. </p> <p>This small handful of notes can be ordered and phrased in nearly an infinite number of ways, resulting in many great blues licks. <strong>FIGURES 5–8</strong> offer four different ways in which Duane would use this shape as a jumping off point to improvised solo ideas.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/1%20to%207.png" width="620" height="615" alt="1 to 7.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/8%20to%20something.png" width="620" height="389" alt="8 to something.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/8%20part%202.png" width="839" height="504" alt="8 part 2.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART ONE OF THREE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243315216001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243315216001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><hr /> <p>Now let’s focus on soloing over a 12-bar slow blues form along the lines of “Stormy Monday” and in the style of Duane Allman, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 9</strong>. </p> <p>I begin in bars 1 and 2 with a melodic idea based on G major pentatonic, but in bar 3, I morph into G minor pentatonic by overbending the second, A, up and step and a half to the fourth, C. At the end of bar 4 into bar 5, I apply the overbending technique to E, the sixth, bending that note all the way up to the G root note, repeating the melodic motif into bar 6. </p> <p>When performing these bends, line up additional fingers behind the fretting finger—for example, reinforcing the ring finger with the middle finger or both the middle and index—to help it push the string. Doing so will give you better pitch control and stability when bending. The same is true for bend vibratos.</p> <p>Throughout the remainder of the example, I limit my movement to the eighth and 10th positions to demonstrate that a great amount of melodic invention can be found without moving up and down the fretboard. The intent here is to create lines that are expressive and vocal-like while also evoking a bit of the Duane-like focused intensity.</p> <p>For his “Whipping Post” solo, Duane drew primarily from the A Dorian mode (A B C D E Fs G), two fretboard patterns of which are shown in <strong>FIGURES 10 and 11</strong>. Both patterns are very useful for soloing, so you’ll want to memorize them thoroughly.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 12</strong> offers an eight-bar solo along the lines of Duane’s “Whipping Post” solo. The song is played in 12/8 meter, which affords a lot of room for rhythmic creativity, and Duane made the most of the opportunity every time he played it. I begin this solo with a wholestep bend from the A root up to the second, B, followed by subtle movement down through the notes of the A Dorian mode. </p> <p>In bar 2, I play a quick repeated hammer/pull phrase that emphasizes two notes of a G major triad (G and B) before moving into a line based on A minor pentatonic (A C D E G).</p> <p>Bar 5 offers a unique rhythmic superimposition that Duane used often. Another classic Duane-ism is illustrated in bar 7, as quick pulloffs on the top three strings alternate back and forth in an ascending-and-descending manner.</p> <p>Try using your index and ring fingers to execute this phrase as well as your index and middle fingers and index and pinkie, or a combination of any of these. The aim should be, as always, clarity in execution.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/end.png" width="620" height="651" alt="end.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243315196001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243315196001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>PART THREE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243325650001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243325650001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><img src="/files/imce-images/8%20part%202_0.png" width="620" height="372" alt="8 part 2_0.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/duane-allman">Duane Allman</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-tribute-musical-genius-and-signature-lead-guitar-style-duane-allman#comments Allman Brothers Band Andy Aledort Duane Allman In Deep May 2013 In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:54:36 +0000 Andy Aledort http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18091 Betcha Can't Play This: Eric Johnson-Inspired Blues Shred in A Minor by Elliott Klein http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-eric-johnson-inspired-blues-shred-minor-elliott-klein <!--paging_filter--><p>It's time for another edition of Betcha Can't Play This!</p> <p>Welcome a new Betcha Can't Play This guitarist — Elliott Klein — and his first lick, a bit of Eric Johnson-inspired blues shred in A minor.</p> <p>As with the other <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-cascading-harmonics-video">new-for-2014 "Betcha Can't Play This" videos</a>, this is an expanded version of the usually brief "Betcha" videos on GuitarWorld.com.</p> <p>Also, note that there are no tabs, since Klein explains key left- and right-hand techniques in the clip. </p> <p>For other recent Betcha Can't Play This columns, check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-guitarist-ethan-brosh-lays-down-challenge">Betcha Can't Play This: Guitarist Ethan Brosh Lays Down the Challenge</a> and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-diminished-madness-guitarist-ethan-brosh">Betcha Can't Play This: Diminished Madness with Guitarist Ethan Brosh</a>. You'll find more under RELATED CONTENT, below the photo.</p> <p>For more from Klein, check out his lessons on <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/elliott-klein">guitarworld.com</a>.</p> <p>As always, good luck! We have more on the way!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/3iGfMs3xaLM?list=UUqHkFMEmOPFO3ahcrrBAj4w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eric-johnson">Eric Johnson</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-eric-johnson-inspired-blues-shred-minor-elliott-klein#comments Betcha Can't Play This Elliott Klein Eric Johnson Videos News Lessons Tue, 28 Oct 2014 20:37:06 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22697 Full Shred with Marty Friedman: How to Develop Melodic Ideas with Interesting Twists http://www.guitarworld.com/full-shred-marty-friedman-how-develop-melodic-ideas-interesting-twists <!--paging_filter--><p>If I had to pick one thing I place highest in importance when it comes to guitar playing, it would be originality. </p> <p>I am not a fan of the tried-and-true cliché licks that have been used forever by so many guitarists. To me, it’s simply a cop out to mimic fast phrases or standard rock licks that we’ve all heard a million times before. I think it’s much more interesting and appealing to strive for originality through spontaneity and invention. </p> <p>Why play the same lick as someone else when you can express your own distinct musical personality through an idea of your own?</p> <p> Last month, I demonstrated a variety of ways in which to employ string-bending techniques in order to personalize a melodic phrase. Let’s now expand on this concept by taking a similar basic melodic idea and gradually morphing it into lines that become a bit more complex and nuanced.</p> <p> In <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, instead of simply fretting each note of a melodic line, I repeatedly bend up to “target” notes from a half step below, starting with D# bent up to E, and followed by G# bent up to A. Notice that I use a bend-release-bend articulation device. </p> <p> These quick “pitch shifts” emulate the wavering of the human voice and afford me the opportunity to build a more distinct character into the articulation of the phrase. Bar 1 ends with a quick pull-off and slide down the B string, followed by a trill (a quickly repeating hammer-on and pull-off) between the A root note and G#, the major seventh. </p> <p>The phrase concludes with a pull-off from F, the flatted sixth, to E, the fifth. A cool, simple variation on this idea can be applied by changing the flatted sixth to either the major, or natural, sixth, F#, or the flatted seventh, G, as <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> demonstrates.</p> <p> The first three bars of <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> illustrate a way I might switch back and forth between F# and G on the G string while utilizing similar hammer-pull-bend ideas on the B string. At the end of bar 3, I ramp things up a bit by including ascending and descending chromaticism on the B string and then begin the last bar of the phrase by moving the G#-to-A trill up one half step, from A to Bb. The phrase ends with a vibrato-ed whole-step bend on the G string, from G to A.</p> <p> My natural approach in the interpretation of this melody would be to continually look for interesting ways to expand on the basic phrase, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURES 4 and 5</strong>. In bar 2 of <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>, I include the notes of an A major triad, A C# E, and in <strong>FIGURE 5</strong> I place the focus on fast chromatic shapes that move between F#, G, G# and A. </p> <p>Now that you have the idea, try incorporating these articulation devises into every melody you play. You’ll be amazed at what you come up with!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/d7ekAERB3lI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-10-29%20at%204.41.27%20PM.png" width="620" height="551" alt="Screen Shot 2014-10-29 at 4.41.27 PM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-10-29%20at%204.41.39%20PM.png" width="620" height="293" alt="Screen Shot 2014-10-29 at 4.41.39 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/full-shred-marty-friedman-how-develop-melodic-ideas-interesting-twists#comments Full Shred Marty Friedman November 2014 Videos News Lessons Magazine Tue, 28 Oct 2014 15:39:11 +0000 Marty Friedman http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22315 Bent Out of Shape: Add Some "Speed" to Your Playing with a Simple Shred-Style Lick http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-add-some-speed-your-playing-simple-shred-style-lick <!--paging_filter--><p>If you've read my previous columns, you might have caught on to the fact that I'm not a fan of purely technique-based solos. I prefer a more melodic approach to lead guitar playing. </p> <p>However, sometimes in rock and metal, there are moments when fast, "shred style" licks are appropriate. Most of my previous lessons focus on the melodic side of my playing, so I wanted to switch things up and give you a simple "shred" lick that's easy to learn and has many applications. </p> <p>In its most basic form, the lick is a sequence of six notes played as a sextuplet or two sets of triplets (depending on the tempo). The notes are played on the same string, which makes it very easy to alternate-pick and build speed. </p> <p>Once you have mastered the basic pattern, you can apply the lick to different scales and positions to give an almost endless amount of variations. </p> <p>I'm going to guide you through the basic form and then show you a few more of my favorite ideas.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F110358844"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab1_3.jpg" width="620" height="70" alt="tab1_3.jpg" /></p> <p>The basic form is played using the first three notes of the E minor scale on the high E string at the 12th fret. Memorize the pattern, then loop it up to create an alternate picking exercise. As with any other speed-building exercise, use a metronome to track your progress.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab2_4.jpg" width="620" height="70" alt="tab2_4.jpg" /></p> <p>When you are comfortable with the pattern, try moving it through every set of three notes within the E minor scale starting on the fifth fret of the B string. This is a nice ascending pattern that will help you memorize how to play entire scales on one string.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab3_3.jpg" width="620" height="70" alt="tab3_3.jpg" /></p> <p>This is the same approach, but it utilizes switching strings to expand the range of the pattern. An accomplished musician will be able to play any scale vertically and horizontally across the neck and be able to switch between the two at any position within the scale. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab4_1.jpg" width="620" height="70" alt="tab4_1.jpg" /></p> <p>You don't have to stay with just groups of three notes. This idea expands the original pattern into an E minor arpeggio. Yngwie Malmsteen uses a similar lick in "Far Beyond the Sun."</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab5.jpg" width="620" height="70" alt="tab5.jpg" /></p> <p>This final idea is taken from one one of my own solos where I change the feel of the pattern by switching to 16th notes. I change the sequence slightly to make a pattern of 16th notes to fit nicely into a bar. To do this, I play the original six-note pattern twice and then play an additional four notes to complete the bar. This creates an interesting dynamic and makes the lick sound less like an exercise.</p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-add-some-speed-your-playing-simple-shred-style-lick#comments Bent Out of Shape Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Tue, 28 Oct 2014 15:31:27 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19252 Secrets of Shred with Sammy Boller: Extending Common Sweep Patterns http://www.guitarworld.com/extending-common-sweep-patterns <!--paging_filter--><p>In this lesson, I’ll be taking one of the most common sweep picking patterns (<strong>EXAMPLE 1</strong>) and showing you how to slightly alter it, creating several different arpeggios. </p> <p>It’s a cool way to take something ordinary and give it a more unique sound and vibe.</p> <p>First, let's take a look at <strong>EXAMPLE 1</strong>. This is a D minor arpeggio (D, F, A) that starts and ends on the fifth of the chord (A). It’s one of the first sweep patterns rock and metal guitarists learn because of its applicability, and it's relatively easy for your left hand. </p> <p>Notice there are two notes on the lowest string of the sweep (fifth string, A) and two notes on the highest string of the sweep (first string, E). Whenever you are sweeping and need to change direction, you can always put two notes on a string. This simplifies the picking for your right hand and makes it easier to change direction on the fly. The remainder of this lesson is based around this arpeggio, so make sure to have this down before you move on to the next examples.</p> <p>For <strong>EXAMPLE 2</strong>, I’ll be playing the same sweep as <strong>EXAMPLE 1</strong>, but instead of playing the 3rd of the chord, F, on the highest string (first string, 13th fret), I’m going to play E (first string, 12th fret). This makes <strong>EXAMPLE 2</strong> a Dm(add 9) arpeggio (D, F, A, E). This sweep has a completely different sound than a Dm arpeggio, yet it is almost identical in fingering.</p> <p>Now, let's move on to <strong>EXAMPLE 3</strong>. This arpeggio is identical to <strong>EXAMPLE 1</strong> with the exception of one note. Instead of playing the 5th of the chord, A, on the lowest string of the sweep, (fifth string, 12th fret), I’m going to play a Bb (fifth string, 13th fret). This changes the arpeggio from Dm to Bbmaj7. Sonically, this is even farther removed from our original example, yet it is nearly the same shape and the same picking pattern for your right hand.</p> <p>For <strong>EXAMPLE 4</strong>, I’m going to use previous examples and string them together into a four-chord progression. The progression is Dm, Bbmaj7, Fmaj7, Am(add9). The Dm and Bbmaj7 chords are the same fingerings as <strong>EXAMPLE 1</strong> and <strong>EXAMPLE 3</strong>, respectively. The Fmaj7 arpeggio is the same pattern as <strong>EXAMPLE 3</strong>, just shifted down the neck; now the root note of the arpeggio is F (fifth string, eighth fret). Similarly, the Am(add9) arpeggio is the same pattern as <strong>EXAMPLE 2</strong>, just moved down the neck.</p> <p>What I like about this lesson is that even though the final example sounds complex, the picking pattern for every chord is identical, which makes it easy to execute. Once you work the speed up of one example, you should, in theory be able to play the other examples at the same speed. I’d encourage you to take these patterns and create progressions and licks of your own all over the neck. There are endless possibilities. Cheers!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/93YmITSEwoI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-06-03%20at%204.12.45%20PM.png" width="620" height="646" alt="Screen Shot 2014-06-03 at 4.12.45 PM.png" /></p> <p><em>Sammy Boller is the guitarist for the Detroit rock band <a href="https://www.facebook.com/citizenzero">Citizen Zero</a>. They’re touring and recording their first full-length album with Al Sutton and Marlon Young (Kid Rock, Bob Seger, Uncle Kracker). In 2012, Boller was selected by Joe Satriani as a winner of Guitar Center’s Master Satriani competition. He studied music at the University of Michigan. For more about Boller, or to ask him a question, write to him at info@sammyboller.com or follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/sammyboller">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/extending-common-sweep-patterns#comments Sammy Boller Secrets of Shred Blogs Lessons Tue, 28 Oct 2014 15:30:47 +0000 Sammy Boller http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21443 Man of Steel with Steel Panther's Satchel: Triplet Feels, Drop-D Riffing and How to Play “Glory Hole” http://www.guitarworld.com/man-steel-steel-panthers-satchel-triplet-feels-drop-d-riffing-and-how-play-glory-hole <!--paging_filter--><p>Hey kids, Satchel here and I’m back (did I leave?) to teach you more great rock riffs from the latest Steel Panther mega-multi-ultra-Platinum release, <em>All You Can Eat</em>. This month, I’d like to focus on the rhythm and lead guitar parts to a tender love song I wrote called “Glory Hole.” </p> <p>This song is played in drop-D tuning down one half step (low to high, Db Ab Db Gb Bb Eb). Another twist is that the transcribed examples in this column, while written in 4/4, are meant to be played with a triplet feel, which is akin to a 12/8 shuffle-type feel. </p> <p>This means that each pair of eighth notes is to be played as a quarter note and an eighth note within a triplet bracket. If an eighth-note triplet were to sound “DA-da-da,” or “ONE-trip-let,” the idea is to combine the first two notes to sound a quarter note that sustains through the first two eighth notes of the eighth-note triplet (ONE-trip), followed by the remaining eighth note of the triplet (-let), resulting in a rhythm of “DAAA-da-DAAA-da-DAAA-da-DAAA-da.” </p> <p> The solo section of “Glory Hole” is 16 bars long, and <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates the rhythm part behind it. The section is basically in the key of D major, though I do take some liberties and play a bit outside the key center in order to create a little bit of a “twisted” feel. </p> <p> The rhythm part begins with a B5 power chord fretted on the fifth and fourth strings. Playing this chord in this position allows me to repeatedly pull off from B at the second fret of the fifth string to the open A note. Also, when tuned to drop-D, I can easily play three-string power chords by barring a single fret-hand finger across the bottom three strings at any given fret, as I do for the F5 and G5 power chords, as well as sound the D5 power chord by simply strumming the open bottom three strings.</p> <p> There is a “relative minor/major” axis during the solo section (see <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>), as I alternate between the chords B5, the relative minor, and D, the relative major. The twist is provided by using a combination of B minor pentatonic (B D E F# A) and D minor pentatonic (D F G A C) over the B5 chord, with the F notes bent up a half step to F#, the major third, over D. </p> <p> Note also the tremolo picking technique used in bar 13 of the solo, as well as the crazy symmetrical lick, based on the D blues scale (D F G Ab A C) that moves from bar 15 into bar 16. Though written as quintuplets (groups of five notes per beat), I simply think of this as trying to “cram too much stuff into a small space”…which seems appropriate for a song called, “Glory Hole.” See you next month!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/bQtCFZjqFEY?list=UUqHkFMEmOPFO3ahcrrBAj4w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-10-28%20at%2011.19.31%20AM.png" width="620" height="619" alt="Screen Shot 2014-10-28 at 11.19.31 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-10-28%20at%2011.24.01%20AM.png" width="620" height="330" alt="Screen Shot 2014-10-28 at 11.24.01 AM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/man-steel-steel-panthers-satchel-triplet-feels-drop-d-riffing-and-how-play-glory-hole#comments Man of Steel November 2014 Satchel Steel Panther Videos News Lessons Magazine Tue, 28 Oct 2014 15:26:29 +0000 Steel Panther&#039;s Satchel http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22314 Led Zeppelin, "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You" — In Deep Video by Andy Aledort http://www.guitarworld.com/led-zeppelin-babe-im-gonna-leave-you-deep-video-andy-aledort <!--paging_filter--><p>In this video from the vast <em>Guitar World</em> archives, Andy Aledort shows you how to play "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You," a track from Led Zeppelin's debut 1969 album.</p> <p>An acoustic masterpiece, this song features a bittersweet circular chord progression presented as ringing, fingerpicked arpeggios. Particularly noteworthy is the way Jimmy Page spins numerous subtle melodic variations on the theme throughout the song (check out the one at 3:40 in the original recording), sweetening the aural pot with dramatic dynamic contrasts.</p> <p>This might be one of the most perfectly recorded and mixed acoustic guitar tracks ever. Notice how, in the song’s intro, the “dry” (up-front and un-effected) acoustic guitar is in the left channel while the right channel is mostly “wet,” saturated in cavernous reverb.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_zadFCjVG0Q" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/led-zeppelin-babe-im-gonna-leave-you-deep-video-andy-aledort#comments Andy Aledort Jimmy Page Led Zeppelin Videos News Lessons Fri, 24 Oct 2014 20:45:05 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22668 Extreme Harmonics Lesson: Making Sick Sounds with Guitarist Mattias Eklundh — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/extreme-harmonics-lesson-sick-sounds-guitarist-mattias-eklundh-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Since we guitarists tend to enjoy sick sounds, we thought we'd share this lesson video by Swedish guitar whiz Mattias Eklundh.</p> <p>In the clip, which is titled "Harmonics #5," Eklundh lays down some basics about how harmonics work.</p> <p>Then, starting around 1:31, 2:15 and (especially) 2:45, things start getting freaky, courtesy of some extreme—even dissonant—harmonics.</p> <p>As always, check out the video and try to incorporate Eklundh's methods into your own playing. (I mean, if you're into that sort of thing, of course.)</p> <p>If you'd like to hear more of Eklundh's playing, be sure to watch <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/caparison-guitars-ah8-eight-string-guitar-demo-video-featuring-mattias-eklundh">this demo video of Caparison Guitars' eight-string AH8 model, which we posted in June.</a></p> <p>For more about Eklundh, visit the appropriately named <a href="http://www.freakguitar.com">freakguitar.com.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zI3PJXbCaOU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/extreme-harmonics-lesson-sick-sounds-guitarist-mattias-eklundh-video#comments Mattias Eklundh Videos News Lessons Fri, 24 Oct 2014 14:16:21 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22659 Yngwie Malmsteen Lesson: Cracking the Code, Season 2, Episode 2: "Inside the Volcano" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/yngwie-malmsteem-lesson-cracking-code-season-2-episode-2-inside-volcano-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Guitarist Troy Grady hosts a web series called "Cracking the Code." </p> <p>In each episode, he breaks down a phrase — or something awesome that he has learned or figured out — and then explains it in a detail-packed way that includes an information- and graphics-packed video.</p> <p><strong>Back in August, we shared Episode 1 of the second season of "Cracking the Code." It's an Yngwie Malmsteen-related lesson called "Get Down for the Upstroke," and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/yngwie-malmsteem-lesson-cracking-code-season-2-episode-1-get-down-upstroke-video">you can watch it here.</a></strong></p> <p>Today we bring you the long-awaited Episode 2, "Inside the Volcano"! This time, Grady lays down a set of rules that boils down the entire Yngwie picking technique to five points anyone can implement. </p> <p>From Grady:</p> <p>"Season 2 of 'Cracking the Code' launches a new chapter in the understanding of advanced picking technique. With the discovery of downward pickslanting and its companion technique, chunking, a window opens on a world of speed and clarity we've only dreamed was possible.</p> <p>"Over the course of the first two episodes of Season 2, we'll discover the power of Yngwie's fascinating and genre-defining asymmetrical approach to picking and come to understand the vast importance of downward pickslanting as a cornerstone of some of the greatest techniques in guitar history."</p> <p>So yes — get ready to learn about pickslanting, chunking and lots more in the new video below (posted October 16)!</p> <p><strong>For more about Troy Grady and his instructional videos, visit <a href="http://www.troygrady.com/code/">troygrady.com</a> and <a href="https://gumroad.com/l/ccseason2">gumroad.com</a>.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/iUcHE9ZxjHc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/yngwie-malmsteen">Yngwie Malmsteen</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/yngwie-malmsteem-lesson-cracking-code-season-2-episode-2-inside-volcano-video#comments Troy Grady Yngwie Malmsteen Videos News Lessons Wed, 22 Oct 2014 21:39:58 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22646 Betcha Can't Play This: John Petrucci's Descending E Mixolydian Run http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-john-petruccis-descending-e-mixolydian-run <!--paging_filter--><p> This is a descending E Mixolydian [E F# G# A B C# D] run that moves across the strings and eventually down the neck in a cascading type of contour. </p> <p>It’s based on a recurring nine-note melodic motif of three 16th-note triplets, with three alternate-picked notes followed by two double pull-offs.</p> <p>I begin in ninth position with a fairly compact shape that spans the ninth to 12th frets. At the end of bar 1 and moving into bar 2, the fret hand shifts down two frets and spreads out to cover a four-fret span, from the seventh fret to the 11th. Use your first, second and fourth fingers to fret the notes. </p> <p> The fret hand quickly shifts down to a lower position at the beginning of bars 3, 4 and 5, so try to make these transitions as smooth and seamless as possible. Make sure your pull-offs are loud and clear, and use the palm of your pick hand to mute the unused lower strings during bars 1 and 2.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/fxKLaesuQE0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-02%20at%205.16.42%20PM.png" width="620" height="217" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-02 at 5.16.42 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-john-petruccis-descending-e-mixolydian-run#comments Betcha Can't Play This John Petrucci September 2010 Betcha Can't Play This Blogs News Lessons Magazine Tue, 21 Oct 2014 16:34:56 +0000 John Petrucci http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20924 What in the World: Not (Just) Another "Flight of the Bumblebee" Lesson http://www.guitarworld.com/what-world-not-just-another-flight-bumblebee-lesson <!--paging_filter--><p>"Flight of the Bumblebee" has become a popular piece to play to show off technical prowess on the guitar. </p> <p>Originally written for violin, there are many different versions you will find for guitar. There is no, single, master version for guitar, since it wasn't written for the instrument. Learning a few different versions would be a good idea. The different approaches will present varying techniques and interpretations.</p> <p>Most, if not all, of the videos you see of "Flight of the Bumblebee" are performed at lightning-fast speeds. This was the intention of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, the composer of "Flight of the Bumblebee." He wanted to write a piece of music that painted a musical picture of a bee buzzing around, which he very successfully accomplished. </p> <p>That said, if you cannot play the piece at a fast tempo at this time, you shouldn't be discouraged. Even if you're never able to reach your goal, you will have at least gained something from trying and maybe discovered something new in the process. It’s completely up to you to choose to be discouraged or inspired when trying to accomplish something. </p> <p>Don’t compare your progress to someone else’s; that's the surest way to fail. I used to compare myself to my peers and it did nothing for me, except wasted a lot of mental energy when I should have just relaxed and gone with the process of progress. Everyone develops and learns at different rates. If you see something you think at the time is unattainable, don’t be discouraged. Be inspired and know that with enough hard work, you will be able to do it or better one day. There's no reason to not be inspired 100 percent of the time!</p> <p>The best way to approach learning how to play "Flight of the Bumblebee" is to work on memorizing bits of it at a time. A lot of the piece is essentially a main theme with leadups and outs of that theme, chromatically. Work on the main theme separately as a daily exercise, gradually increasing the tempo.</p> <p>Here's an instance of the main theme:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Riff-00003.jpg" width="620" height="205" alt="Riff-00003.jpg" /> </p> <p>The best fingering for this would be: 4-3-2-1 1-4-3-2 4-3-2-1 1-2-3-4. Compositionally, this is a cool call-and-response phrase.</p> <p>At bar 12, I threw in some hybrid picking. Obviously, this wasn't in the original, but since it wasn’t written for guitar, almost anything goes, as I said earlier. I put this part in to help my students work on their hybrid picking as well as being able to quickly transition from standard picking to hybrid picking. To get into the hybrid phrase, I threw in a short legato line, which will allow you to set up your right hand for the hybrid picking.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/hybrid-00001.jpg" width="620" height="103" alt="hybrid-00001.jpg" /></p> <p>Practice "Flight of the Bumblebee" slowly and memorize it. Eventually you can use it as a warmup “exercise." The best exercises are the most musical ones. If any part of it gives you trouble, isolate that one part and work on it slowly until you get it. You might find yourself working on independent parts of the piece as separate exercises. </p> <p>The tempo I played it at in the video below is 180 bpm. Do your best to play it at whatever tempo sounds good to you. It could be slower than mine or faster. The most important thing is that it sounds good and you are relaxed while playing it at all times. If you begin to tense up, slow it down. It’s a long piece, so you will have to build up endurance to play it at challenging tempos. Have fun with it and good luck!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/0m8kyT_o_U0?list=UUozoKYJmat8MUYcdRo40cHA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/bumblebee-00001.jpg" width="620" height="732" alt="bumblebee-00001.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/bumblebee-00002.jpg" width="620" height="760" alt="bumblebee-00002.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/bumblebee-00003.jpg" width="620" height="770" alt="bumblebee-00003.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/bumblebee-00004.jpg" width="620" height="652" alt="bumblebee-00004.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Steve Booke is a composer for film and TV from the New York area. His compositions range from orchestral to metal to world styles from every corner of the earth. A graduate of Berklee College of Music, Steve has played guitar for more than 27 years. He has recorded 10 albums of his own and has played on countless others. He plays gigs in the NY area and tours the East Coast with a variety of bands. He has performed with Ben E. King and members of Mahavishnu Orchestra. He endorses D'Addario/Planet Waves, Larrivee Guitars, Levy's Leathers, Peavey, Stylus Pick, Finale PrintMusic, Pigtronix, Tech 21, Toontrack, Graph Tech, Seymour Duncan, Waves, Studio Devil and L.R. Baggs. His music is available on iTunes and Amazon. He can be contacted at info@stevebooke.com. Visit <a href="http://www.stevebooke.com/">stevebooke.com</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/what-world-not-just-another-flight-bumblebee-lesson#comments Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov Steve Booke What In the World Blogs Lessons Mon, 20 Oct 2014 18:01:14 +0000 Steve Booke http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18202 Three Steps to Shred: Fundamental Daily Practice Techniques in About 15 Minutes http://www.guitarworld.com/three-steps-shred-fundamental-daily-practice-techniques-about-15-minutes <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>Steve Stine, highly sought-after guitar educator, teaches live group and private classes at <a href="https://www.lessonface.com/">LessonFace.com.</a></strong></p> <p>No matter your level of experience, being a guitarist involves pushing your personal boundaries with the instrument. </p> <p>Many players find themselves struggling to develop the physical abilities needed to play like their heroes, and, crucially, they never settle on a consistent set of exercises because they find themselves drowning in so many different suggestions. </p> <p>In this column and video, I discuss some straightforward, essential practice techniques you can work into a simple, short daily routine to improve your dexterity, speed, strength and stamina to help you overcome obstacles and become a better guitar player.</p> <p>These practice techniques are broken into three sections: 01. <strong>Picking hand</strong>: two three-minute exercises; 02. <strong>Fretting hand</strong>: a series of 15- or 20-second strength exercises; and 03. <strong>Both hands</strong>: a symmetrical exercise emphasizing synchronization between the left and right hands. </p> <p>All in all, these exercises should take about 15 minutes. My students have found that, when done faithfully and properly, they yield significant positive results. Please note that it's a good idea to stretch out your hands, wrists and arms for a few minutes before doing these exercises. </p> <p>01. <strong>Picking Hand: Three-Minute Picking Technique</strong></p> <p>This straightforward exercise is broken into two sections: First, perform a series of eighth-note downstrokes in rhythm, at a speed that is comfortable to you, for a period of three straight minutes. Follow this by performing a series of eighth-notes in rhythm using alternate picking — a downstroke followed by an upstroke — at the same speed for the full three minutes. Performing these simple exercises each for the full three minutes allows you to develop your stamina and rhythm abilities, meanwhile developing valuable muscle memory in your picking hand. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202013-06-21%20at%203.33.15%20PM.png" width="620" height="448" alt="Screen Shot 2013-06-21 at 3.33.15 PM.png" /></p> <p>While it seems simple, this exercise can be conceptually difficult in that it often tries the patience of guitarists eager to move on to faster speeds. Just remember: Using a metronome is not a contest. It is important to be honest with yourself about what speed is comfortable for the full three minutes, and resist any urges to rush on to a higher speed you cannot maintain. </p> <p>And remember there is no reason to feel bad about starting with what may seem like a slow speed. Don't let your ego interfere with your practice routine. Sure, there are higher speeds that may be comfortable for a matter of 20 seconds, but you should stick to the speed where you can “lock in," that you can comfortably maintain for the full three minutes, and use that speed with this exercise each day. </p> <p>The alternate-picked section of this exercise initially should be done at the same speed as your downstrokes, which may seem slow to you at first. I advise students to start slow with the alternate picking portion to ensure their upstrokes are highly similar to their downstrokes in dynamic and attack, allowing your alternate picking to sound as identical as possible to your repeated downstrokes. </p> <p>Move the metronome speed up as higher speeds become comfortable to you for the full three minutes. It may take time (weeks or months) to move up the speed, but give yourself that time. Taking an honest approach to this exercise can truly develop your picking hand technique.</p> <p>02. <strong>Fretting Hand: Strength Exercises</strong></p> <p>The next step is a set of legato exercises in which you are utilizing all of the finger combinations in a few groups. These exercises require no picking at all, and are purely legato. They involve a series of hammer-ons and pull-offs performed as hard and fast as you can maintain for 15 seconds at a time. If done correctly, you will really feel this exercise in your fretting hand, wrist and forearm. Once again, it is advisable stretch your hands, wrists and arms before beginning these exercises.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202013-06-21%20at%203.33.36%20PM.png" width="620" height="130" alt="Screen Shot 2013-06-21 at 3.33.36 PM.png" /></p> <p>Take your first (index) finger on your fretting hand and hold it at the fifth fret on the third string. Then hammer on your second (middle) finger one fret up as hard as you can (at the sixth fret on the third string) and immediately pull it off as hard as you can. Do this over and over for 15 seconds. </p> <p>After 15 seconds, without stopping, perform similar hammer-ons and pull-offs with your third (ring) finger one fret up (at the seventh fret) for 15 seconds. Without stopping, follow this with a similar 15-second set of hammer-ons and pull-offs using your fourth (pinky) finger at the eighth fret. Throughout these sets of exercises, your first finger should be held at the fifth fret on the third string.</p> <p>Without stopping, place and hold your second finger down at the sixth fret on the third string and hammer on and pull off your third finger one fret up at the seventh fret for 15 seconds. Then, without stopping, follow this with a similar 15 seconds of hammer-ons and pull-offs of your fourth finger at the eighth fret. Throughout these sets of exercises, your second finger should be held at the sixth fret on the third string.</p> <p>From there, hold your third finger at the seventh fret, and hammer on and pull off your fourth finger at the eighth fret for 15 seconds.</p> <p>Once you can comfortably maintain these exercises for a period of 15 seconds, feel free to increase the times for each exercise to 20 seconds. Additionally, feel free to focus on the sections that give you the most trouble — e.g., many guitarists need extra work holding the position with their second or third fingers and performing hammer-ons and pull-offs with their third and fourth fingers. Indeed, you may want to start with these more difficult ones and move backwards toward the easier ones.</p> <p>03. <strong>Both Hands: Symmetrical Exercise</strong></p> <p>Finally, I recommend closing with a straightforward synchronization exercise that is fairly common, but is important to do it correctly and do it consistently. This dexterity exercise uses your hands together to play each fretting finger across four frets to ascend and descend the strings across the neck.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202013-06-21%20at%203.33.45%20PM.png" width="620" height="149" alt="Screen Shot 2013-06-21 at 3.33.45 PM.png" /></p> <p>The goal is effective synchronization between the two hands and to learn to transfer smoothly in each fretted interval and when switching strings across the neck. It is a good idea to use a metronome and to always go as slow as your slowest transfer, to effectively allow you to increase speed over time. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/3TGDIOT6c0A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Steve Stine is a longtime and sought-after guitar teacher who is professor of Modern Guitar Studies at North Dakota State University. Over the last 27 years, he has taught thousands of students, including established touring musicians, and released numerous video guitar lesson courses via established publishers. A resident of Fargo, North Dakota, today he is more accessible than ever before through the convenience of live online guitar lessons at <a href="https://www.lessonface.com/">LessonFace.com</a>.</em> </p> <p><em>LessonFace.com offers live online music lessons via videoconference, allowing you to access top teachers in a wide variety of instruments from anywhere with a broadband connection. Steve is offering a live online group class for intermediate players this summer called “The Players Series” via the LessonFace.com platform. More information about live online lessons with Steve is available at <a href="https://www.lessonface.com/player">lessonface.com/player</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/three-steps-shred-fundamental-daily-practice-techniques-about-15-minutes#comments LessonFace Steve Stine Videos Blogs News Lessons Mon, 20 Oct 2014 17:47:05 +0000 Steve Stine http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18629