Lessons http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/8/all en The Francesco Artusato Project Premiere "Our Dying Sun" Lesson Video — Exclusive http://www.guitarworld.com/francesco-artusato-project-premiere-our-dying-sun-lesson-video-exclusive <!--paging_filter--><p>Today, GuitarWorld.com presents an exclusive "Our Dying Sun" lesson video featuring Francesco Artusato of the Francesco Artusato Project.</p> <p>This is the title track from the band's new album, which was released in October by Sumerian Records. You'll also find a transcription of the "Our Dying Sun" guitar solo at the bottom of this story.</p> <p>"This is the solo from 'Our Dying Sun'," says Artusato (Devil You Know, All Shall Perish). "I start by playing a syncopated lick that superimposes a group of four over the 6/4 meter (m.2); this type of rhythmic dissonance (created via polyrhythms) sets the mood for the rest of the solo. </p> <p>"The first long phrase that appears is based around the E diminished scale; it further incorporates additional chromatic notes that push the sound even more outside (m.3-4). Here, the rhythmic dissonance of the polyrhythm transitions into the harmonic dissonance of the diminished scale. </p> <p>"This is followed by an ascending and descending sequence based around one of the two possible whole tone scales (m.5-6). I execute the ascending whole tone sequence via hybrid picking. The rising line which appears in the middle of measure 7 uses the other whole tone scale—when the last two sequences of whole tone scales are taken together, you get the entire chromatic set. </p> <p>"One thing the solo achieves is to break down the chromatic scale into different types of symmetrical sets which form most of the phrases you hear here. Lastly, a tapping line moving up the neck chromatically in quintuplets closes out this entire solo."</p> <p><em>Our Dying Sun</em> is available at <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/our-dying-sun/id913407797">iTunes</a> and <a href="https://play.google.com/store/music/album/The_Francesco_Artusato_Project_Our_Dying_Sun?id=Bn3uu2i6353vrgmrq3b7r2ctwqu&amp;hl=en">Google Play.</a></p> <p>Stay tuned to <a href="https://www.facebook.com/francescoartusatomusic">Artusato's Facebook page</a> for updates and more info. As always, tell us what you think of the video in the comments or on Facebook!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/1eYTsMycSK4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p style=" margin: 12px auto 6px auto; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,Sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14px; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; -x-system-font: none; display: block;"> <a title="View &amp;quot;Our Dying Sun&amp;quot; on Scribd" href="https://www.scribd.com/doc/247964082/Our-Dying-Sun" style="text-decoration: underline;" >&amp;quot;Our Dying Sun&amp;quot;</a></p> <p><iframe class="scribd_iframe_embed" src="https://www.scribd.com/embeds/247964082/content?start_page=1&amp;view_mode=scroll&amp;show_recommendations=true" data-auto-height="false" data-aspect-ratio="undefined" scrolling="no" id="doc_79123" width="100%" height="600" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/francesco-artusato-project-premiere-our-dying-sun-lesson-video-exclusive#comments Francesco Artusato the Francesco Artusato Project Videos News Lessons Mon, 24 Nov 2014 11:49:21 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22940 Monster Licks Unleashed with Glenn Proudfoot: Blues Scale Chaos — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/monster-licks-unleashed-glenn-proudfoot-blues-scale-chaos-video <!--paging_filter--><p>I've found that incorporating the flat 5, major 3rd or 6th into the pentatonic scale can really open up your legato possibilities.</p> <p>Obviously, there's a drastic tonal difference between these notes, but as they are being added to the minor pentatonic, tonally you can get away with it, especially when playing at speed. </p> <p>It creates a very chaotic, manic-sounding effect, which is right up my alley. </p> <p>Players often will combine lots of different modes, etc., to their soloing. I do the same but with a different approach; I base everything around the pentatonic, so instead of playing modes, I simply add the notes to the pentatonic. This way, I always have that rock base behind the sound. </p> <p><strong>The Lick:</strong></p> <p>The stretches are the main challenge here. If they're too much for you, simply move the idea up the neck into a different key where the pattern is more comfortable. Then you can slowly start to move it back down. </p> <p>Once you start to work through the legato pattern, you'll notice the pattern repeats, so the motivation should be that you'll be able to adapt this technique to create your own runs in any position. </p> <p>This sound is captured purely from blues-based scales. It is created by combining two patterns of the pentatonic, rather than playing the scale in the traditional two-note-per-string form. </p> <p>The great thing is you can adapt this idea into many different genres. You can give it a different feel or use it with a cleaner sound, etc. It doesn’t have to be played at a million mph to sound great; it can be used in many different ways. This is just an example of how far you can take the idea. </p> <p><strong>I hope you enjoy this Monster Lick Unleashed! Join me on <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/atomicguitaraudio">YouTube right here!</a> Contact me through <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a> or <a href="https://www.facebook.com/glenn.proudfoot">my Facebook page</a>.</strong></p> <p><em>Australia's Glenn Proudfoot has played and toured with major signed bands and artists in Europe and Australia, including progressive rockers Prazsky Vyber. Glenn released his first instrumental solo album, </em>Lick Em<em>, in 2010. It's available on iTunes and at <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a>. His brand-new instrumental album — </em>Ineffable<em> — is out now and is available through <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a> and <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/au/album/ineffable/id914342943">iTunes</a>.</em></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/JiAgKhw9g74" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p style=" margin: 12px auto 6px auto; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,Sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14px; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; -x-system-font: none; display: block;"> <a title="View Monster Licks - Unleashed No 4a on Scribd" href="https://www.scribd.com/doc/247980869/Monster-Licks-Unleashed-No-4a" style="text-decoration: underline;" >Monster Licks - Unleashed No 4a</a></p> <p><iframe class="scribd_iframe_embed" src="https://www.scribd.com/embeds/247980869/content?start_page=1&amp;view_mode=scroll&amp;show_recommendations=true" data-auto-height="false" data-aspect-ratio="undefined" scrolling="no" id="doc_55866" width="100%" height="600" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/monster-licks-unleashed-glenn-proudfoot-blues-scale-chaos-video#comments Glenn Proudfoot Monster Licks Monster Licks Unleashed Videos Blogs News Lessons Sun, 23 Nov 2014 23:13:45 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22944 Betcha Can't Play This: Nita Strauss Solo Lick from Alice Cooper Tour http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-nita-strauss-solo-lick-alice-cooper-tour <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's a brand-new edition of Betcha Can't Play This featuring Alice Cooper guitarist Nita Strauss, who visited <em>Guitar World</em> HQ last month.</p> <p>Last time, she played a <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-nita-strauss-descending-legato-lick-video">Descending Legato Lick.</a> This time, she demonstrates a lick from her solo spotlight section from her shows with Cooper.</p> <p>As with the other <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-cascading-harmonics-video">new-for-2014-and-2015 "Betcha Can't Play This" videos</a>, this is an expanded version of the usually brief "Betcha" videos on GuitarWorld.com.</p> <p>Also, note that there are no tabs, since Strauss explains key left- and right-hand techniques in the clip. </p> <p>For other recent Betcha Can't Play This columns, check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-guitarist-ethan-brosh-lays-down-challenge">Betcha Can't Play This: Guitarist Ethan Brosh Lays Down the Challenge</a> and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-diminished-madness-guitarist-ethan-brosh">Betcha Can't Play This: Diminished Madness with Guitarist Ethan Brosh</a>. </p> <p>As always, good luck! We have more on the way!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/f7W24uUt4Qo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/alice-cooper">Alice Cooper</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-nita-strauss-solo-lick-alice-cooper-tour#comments Alice Cooper Betcha Can't Play This Nita Strauss Videos News Lessons Fri, 21 Nov 2014 22:19:45 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22935 In Deep with Andy Aledort: Slidedog — the Slide Guitar Mastery of Duane Allman http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-slidedog-slide-guitar-mastery-duane-allman <!--paging_filter--><p>Last month, we examined the guitar genius of the great Duane Allman, who, as founder of the Allman Brothers Band, rose to prominence as one of the greatest and universally heralded blues-rock guitarists of all time. </p> <p>In honor of the expansive new box set from Rounder Records, <em>Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective</em>, we focused on his single-note soloing on classic Allman Brothers’ cuts like “Stormy Monday” and “Whipping Post.” This month’s column is dedicated to Duane’s mastery of the art of slide guitar.</p> <p>Duane possessed an instantly recognizable sound on electric slide, earmarked by masterful phrasing and smooth, “singing” vibrato.</p> <p>Great examples of his slide guitar prowess include “Trouble No More” and “Dreams” from the band’s debut release, <em>The Allman Brothers Band</em>; “Don’t Keep Me Wonderin’,” from <em>Idlewild South</em>; “Statesboro Blues” and “Done Somebody Wrong” from <em>At Fillmore East</em>; and “One Way Out” from <em>Eat a Peach</em>. </p> <p>He also lent inspired slide work to the title track and many others on the Derek and the Dominoes album <em>Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs</em>.</p> <p> Incredibly, Duane had been playing slide guitar for only about a year at the time of the band’s debut release. He recalled, “I heard Ry Cooder playing slide on Taj Mahal’s debut album, and I said, ‘Man, that’s for me.’ ” Brother Gregg Allman concurs. “He just picked it up and started burnin’. He was a natural.”</p> <p> For slide playing, Duane wore a small glass Coricidin bottle (Coricidin was a cold medication) on his ring finger. He usually played slide in open tunings, most often open E (low to high, E B E G# B E) and occasionally open A (E A E A C# E). He also played slide in standard tuning on songs such as “Dreams” and “Mountain Jam.” </p> <p>In the early days, Duane would retune his gold-top Gibson Les Paul between songs in order to play slide. Later, co-guitarist Dickey Betts gave Duane a two-pickup 1961 Gibson SG/Les Paul Standard that was used solely for slide playing. The design of the SG, with its double-cutaway body, is well suited to slide work, allowing easy access to the upper regions of the fretboard.</p> <p> Duane chose to wear the SG high on his body to facilitate navigating the board overall. The musical examples in this column focus on the use of open E tuning for slide. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates how to tune to open E: the sixth, second and first strings are tuned normally (E, B and E); the fifth and fourth strings are tuned one whole step higher (A to B and D to E); and the third string is tuned one half step higher (G to G#). The resulting tuning is, low to high, E B E G# B E. Strumming across all of the open strings sounds an E major chord.</p> <p>The same is true when barring or placing the slide across all of the strings at the 12th fret. Likewise, barring a finger or placing the slide across all of the strings at any given fret will form a major chord, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 2.</strong> A great majority of slide licks in open E tuning are formed by moving back and forth between a two-fret span of the fretboard.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 3</strong> illustrates one such pattern, which forms an E hybrid scale, one that combines elements of E minor pentatonic (E G A B D) and E major pentatonic (E F# G# B C#). Two notes are sounded on each string at either the 10th or 12th fret, and three notes are sounded on<br /> the fifth string with the inclusion of Gs, at the ninth fret. </p> <p>Practice this pattern by first fretting normally, and then play it using the slide. Some basic rules for slide playing: For proper intonation, you’ll want to, in most cases, position the slide directly over and parallel to the fret wire. Apply only enough pressure against the string to sound a note clearly; do not allow the slide to “bang” into the frets. Also, lightly lay unused fret-hand fingers across the strings behind the slide to help suppress unwanted overtones and ghost notes.</p> <p> When playing slide, Duane fingerpicked exclusively, using his thumb, index and middle fingers to pick the strings. A major element in the uniqueness of his sound was his pick-hand muting techniques: while one finger picked a string, the other two were used for muting. </p> <p>For example, when he picked a string with his thumb, his index and middle fingers would rest lightly on the higher strings, muting them; when he picked a string with his index finger, his thumb would mute the lower strings; and when he picked with his middle finger, he would mute the string with his thumb and index fingers. This technique afforded Duane’s slide playing unparalleled clarity and precision. An essential slide exercise involves sliding back and forth between notes of the E hybrid scale, with careful attention paid to playing “in tune.” </p> <p> <strong>FIGURES 4 and 5</strong> offer two different ways one can practice sliding to and from each note in this position. One of the most common vehicles for slide soloing in blues and rock is the 12-bar blues shuffle. <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> illustrates a basic shuffle rhythm part played in the key of E using open E tuning. Use only conventional fretting (no slide) to perform this part. <strong>FIGURE 7</strong> offers an example of how to play a slide solo over this rhythm part: repeatedly moving the slide back and forth (higher and lower) on the fretboard creates the sound of a slide vibrato. </p> <p>The “width” of this movement, as well as the speed, is every player’s choice; strive to keep the center of the vibrato movement over the fret for proper intonation. The aforementioned “Statesboro Blues” and “One Way Out” are celebrated slide guitar masterpieces. <strong>FIGURE 8</strong> illustrates a “Statesboro Blues”-like solo, and <strong>FIGURE 9</strong> offers a solo in the style of “One Way Out.”</p> <p>Work through each example carefully, and for inspiration, listen to the recordings and pay strict attention to every detail in Duane’s articulation.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-11-20%20at%2011.59.04%20AM.png" width="620" height="669" alt="Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 11.59.04 AM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-11-20%20at%2011.59.51%20AM.png" width="620" height="340" alt="Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 11.59.51 AM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-11-20%20at%2012.00.12%20PM.png" width="620" height="435" alt="Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 12.00.12 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-11-20%20at%2012.00.35%20PM.png" width="620" height="670" alt="Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 12.00.35 PM.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART ONE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2294181408001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2294181408001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2294181381001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2294181381001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/duane-allman">Duane Allman</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/allman-brothers-band">Allman Brothers Band</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-slidedog-slide-guitar-mastery-duane-allman#comments Allman Brothers Band Andy Aledort Duane Allman In Deep June 2013 In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Thu, 20 Nov 2014 22:16:42 +0000 Andy Aledort http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18241 Secrets of Shred with Sammy Boller: A Guide to Pentatonic Slides http://www.guitarworld.com/secrets-shred-sammy-boller-guide-pentatonic-slides <!--paging_filter--><p>In this lesson, I’ll be demonstrating one of the best ways to transition up and down the neck on the fly. </p> <p>I frequently utilize this technique because it’s easy to play fast and expand into many complex riffs and ideas. </p> <p>The premise of this lesson is based on visualizing the pentatonic scale on one string and expanding it into two-, three- or four-note patterns using adjacent strings. </p> <p>Let’s start with its most basic form in <strong>EXAMPLE 1.</strong></p> <p><strong> EXAMPLE 1</strong> is based on a descending D minor pentatonic scale on the B string. I play a pattern off of every note in the scale—two frets higher on the E string. Then I use my first finger to slide on the B string to the next note in the D minor pentatonic scale. This creates a cascading effect and keeps the fingering very simple. To complete this example, I add a pattern off the Bb on the 11th fret to give it some more color. Be sure to memorize this scale pattern before moving on the next examples. </p> <p> For <strong>EXAMPLE 2</strong>, I play the same pattern and scale, but in a different sequence. This time, the sequence is down two notes in the scale followed by one note up in the scale. This adds to the cascading sound of this technique and creates a great effect with minimal effort from your left hand.</p> <p> <strong>EXAMPLE 3</strong> is nearly identical to EXAMPLE 2, just moved to the D and G strings. Be sure to use the same fingering as the prior examples. Once you have this example down, try moving it down two frets to the E and A strings.</p> <p> <strong>EXAMPLE 4</strong> is where things start to get interesting. For this example, utilize the pattern EXAMPLE 2, but double up the highest note of every pattern with its lower octave on the G string. This creates a three-note sweep pattern. The trick to keeping this simple is only thinking about the note you’re playing on the B string. Stick to the original scale pattern and you’ll have this lick down in no time.</p> <p> Moving on to our final example, <strong>EXAMPLE 5</strong> takes this concept a step further and expands it into a four-note sweep pattern. This is accomplished by doubling up both notes of our original pattern with their lower octaves on the D and G strings. To take this lick to another level, really try to accentuate the slides between positions. By accenting the slides, it will sound cleaner and more modern. </p> <p> This one string scale approach can be used in all types of musical contexts. I tend to use it in solos, but I’ve found it works just as well on the lower strings for writing riffs. I hope these licks spark some creative ideas for you and open some new doors in your playing. Keep shredding! Cheers!</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Final%20Sliding%20Lesson.jpg" width="620" height="634" alt="Final Sliding Lesson.jpg" /></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/m4Rf_I3FyxE?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Sammy Boller is the guitarist for the Detroit rock band <a href="https://www.facebook.com/citizenzero">Citizen Zero</a>. They’re touring and recording their first full-length album with Al Sutton and Marlon Young (Kid Rock, Bob Seger, Uncle Kracker). In 2012, Boller was selected by Joe Satriani as a winner of Guitar Center’s Master Satriani competition. He studied music at the University of Michigan. For more about Boller, or to ask him a question, write to him at info@sammyboller.com or follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/sammyboller">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/secrets-shred-sammy-boller-guide-pentatonic-slides#comments Sammy Boller Secrets of Shred Blogs Lessons Tue, 18 Nov 2014 19:46:38 +0000 Sammy Boller http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22898 Betcha Can't Play This: Nita Strauss' Descending Legato Lick — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-nita-strauss-descending-legato-lick-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's a brand-new edition of Betcha Can't Play This featuring Alice Cooper guitarist Nita Strauss, who visited <em>Guitar World</em> HQ just last month.</p> <p>Try your hand at her new "Descending Legato Lick" below!</p> <p>As with the other <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-cascading-harmonics-video">new-for-2014-and-2015 "Betcha Can't Play This" videos</a>, this is an expanded version of the usually brief "Betcha" videos on GuitarWorld.com.</p> <p>Also, note that there are no tabs, since Strauss explains key left- and right-hand techniques in the clip. </p> <p>For other recent Betcha Can't Play This columns, check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-guitarist-ethan-brosh-lays-down-challenge">Betcha Can't Play This: Guitarist Ethan Brosh Lays Down the Challenge</a> and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-diminished-madness-guitarist-ethan-brosh">Betcha Can't Play This: Diminished Madness with Guitarist Ethan Brosh</a>. </p> <p>As always, good luck! We have more on the way!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/INfDdu6q1jY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-nita-strauss-descending-legato-lick-video#comments Betcha Can't Play This Nita Strauss Videos News Lessons Mon, 17 Nov 2014 18:20:10 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22890 Betcha Can't Play This: Frantic Lydian Arpeggios by Elliot Klein http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-frantic-lydian-arpeggios-elliot-klein <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's a brand-new edition of Betcha Can't Play This featuring New York City guitarist Elliott Klein.</p> <p>Try your hand at his "Frantic Lydian Arpeggios" (our title) lick below!</p> <p>As with the other <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-ethan-broshs-cascading-harmonics-video">new-for-2014 "Betcha Can't Play This" videos</a>, this is an expanded version of the usually brief "Betcha" videos on GuitarWorld.com.</p> <p>Also, note that there are no tabs, since Klein explains key left- and right-hand techniques in the clip. </p> <p>For other recent Betcha Can't Play This columns, check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-guitarist-ethan-brosh-lays-down-challenge">Betcha Can't Play This: Guitarist Ethan Brosh Lays Down the Challenge</a> and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-diminished-madness-guitarist-ethan-brosh">Betcha Can't Play This: Diminished Madness with Guitarist Ethan Brosh</a>. You'll find more by Klein under RELATED CONTENT, just below the photo.</p> <p>For more from Klein, check out his lessons on <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/elliott-klein">guitarworld.com</a>.</p> <p>As always, good luck! We have more on the way!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/FT8vIDPvLXQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-frantic-lydian-arpeggios-elliot-klein#comments Betcha Can't Play This Elliott Klein Videos News Lessons Mon, 17 Nov 2014 15:30:32 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22888 Betcha Can't Play This: Winger's Reb Beach Taps Into His Pentatonic Side http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-wingers-reb-beach-taps-his-pentatonic-side <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's a cool tapping run that starts on the high E string and moves across the neck to the A string. </p> <p>It’s based around the A minor pentatonic box at the fifth fret and includes a couple of color tones added on the D and A strings, namely B and F#.</p> <p>I tap with my middle finger and begin this lick by lightly flicking the string with the finger to get the sound going, basically doing a "phantom" pull-off to the A note at the fifth fret. </p> <p>I then play a sequence that goes "hammer, tap, pull" and repeats as I move across the strings, initiating the first note on each lower string with a "hammer-on from nowhere" with my fret-hand ring finger. I do this a lot in my tapping forays. </p> <p>You’ll notice I backtrack at a couple of points in bars 1 and 2 and move back to the previous string, which I do to extend the run. When doing this, I’ll tap the first note on the higher string.</p> <p>I finish the lick by pulling off to the open A string, which I then lightly touch directly over the fifth fret to produce a high A natural harmonic, two octaves above the fundamental. I then decorate this final note with a whammy bar dip, shake and dive.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/9ih0vH7FW7c" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/reb%20beach.jpg" width="620" height="384" alt="reb beach.jpg" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-wingers-reb-beach-taps-his-pentatonic-side#comments Betcha Can't Play This July 2010 Reb Beach Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Fri, 14 Nov 2014 18:18:47 +0000 Reb Beach http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20933 From Bach to Rock: Using Diatonic Power Chords and Inverted Borrowed Chords to Create More Musical Riffs http://www.guitarworld.com/bach-rock-using-diatonic-power-chords-and-inverted-borrowed-chords-create-more-musical-riffs <!--paging_filter--><p>One of the most enjoyable things when learning to play the guitar can be writing your own music. This was the case for me when I first learned to play, and many of my students love to write their own music as well. </p> <p>The difficulty in writing music as a beginner (or sometimes even as an experienced player) can lie in having a limited knowledge of chords and how they function within a key, or what a key even is. </p> <p>What frequently happens for electric guitar players is that their chord progressions consist only of root-position power chords. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but understanding keys, scales and chords can make your writing much more intricate.</p> <p>This riff-writing exercise will demonstrate how to create diatonic and borrowed chords based on a chromatic bass line while staying in key. For this example, I’m going to use the key of A minor and the harmonic minor scale as my guide for chord construction.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/1_10.png" width="620" height="136" alt="1_10.png" /></p> <p>Here’s my bass line:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/2_8.png" width="620" height="160" alt="2_8.png" /></p> <p>If I take each note of the bass line and create a root-position power chord, here’s what I’ll end up with: Besides having all parallel fifths, there are problems with the chords B5, C♯5 and D♯5. These all contain notes that don’t fit in the key of A minor with the root of the chord given. </p> <p>But how do we know what chords fit? This diagram shows the diatonic chords within the key of A minor. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/3_6.png" width="620" height="88" alt="3_6.png" /></p> <p>Notice all of the chords are built off of the A minor scale. Using just power chords, the fifth will be out of place in several instances. The B5 does not exist in this key, because B5 contains an F♯. C♯5 is incorrect as well, as the G♯ will only be used for the E (V) chord. With D♯5, the A♯ is also outside of the scale. This will very be problematic if you’re writing a melodic line in the key of A minor, as notes are going to clash with these three chords.</p> <p>In the audio file, I’ve recorded a solo in A minor, and you can hear how notes will clash using all root-position power chords:</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/146813759&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p>A simple way to make the appropriate chord move with the bass is to use an alternation of fifths and sixths:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/4_3.png" width="620" height="167" alt="4_3.png" /></p> <p>Using this type of chord alternation with the chromatic bass line creates a very musical progression as several different types of chords are used (or implied). Obviously, the A5 fits. Creating an inverted G chord fits, and it makes a perfect transition to C5. </p> <p>The A7 chord built off of C♯ is a borrowed chord called a secondary dominant. As it doesn’t fit in the key of A minor, if you look to the next chord of D5 and use that key for just that one chord, A7 becomes the dominant (V) chord in the key of D minor. </p> <p>The exact same thing occurs with the B7 chord. The following chord is an E, so by borrowing that key temporarily, the dominant becomes B7. The final two chords are simply creating a suspension with the interval of a fourth resolving to a third (Esus to E) that can then be resolved back to an A5 chord.</p> <p>Using the same solo as before, I’ve combined it with the proper chords for an A minor chromatic progression. Listen to the difference:</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/146813758&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p>Having a working knowledge of music theory can make your musical canvas much easier to paint. It simply gives you a starting point from which to experiment.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/8hksBbos-LY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/bach-rock-are-you-learning-play-songs-or-learning-play-guitar">Check out my last column — "Are You Learning to Play Songs or Learning to Play Guitar?" — here.</a></strong></p> <p><em><a href="http://matthiasyoung.com">Matthias Young</a> teaches online guitar lessons at <a href="http://www.freeguitarvideos.com/">FreeGuitarVideos.com</a> and is the Head of Guitar at <a href="http://callanwolde.org">Callanwolde Fine Arts Center</a> in Atlanta, Georgia. His book, <em><a href="http://www.freeguitarvideos.com/metal/metal-guitar-method.html">Metal Guitar Method</a></em>, has sold thousands since its publication in 2012. Young, who has a bachelor's degree in music from Georgia State University, is pursuing a master of music degree at Boston University. If you’d like to study with Matthias over Skype, visit <a href="http://matthiasyoung.com">MatthiasYoung.com</a>. </em></p> <p>You can follow Matthias on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/MatthiasYoungMusic">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/MatthiasYoung">Twitter</a>, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXAcBwcIb4bXcUIM8jk2tdqO4p-i8BKmV">YouTube</a> and <a href="https://plus.google.com/113890145150829497378/posts">Google+.</a></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bach-rock-using-diatonic-power-chords-and-inverted-borrowed-chords-create-more-musical-riffs#comments From Bach to Rock Matthias Young Videos Blogs Lessons Fri, 14 Nov 2014 18:15:50 +0000 Matthias Young http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21171 Guitar Tricks: Eight Things You Need to Know About Arpeggios http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-tricks-eight-things-you-need-know-about-arpeggios <!--paging_filter--><p>As you advance in your guitar studies, you'll surely come across the term "arpeggio." </p> <p>Arpeggios are a great way to add color and complexity to your playing. You can make riffs out of them, use them in solos or even create melody lines with their fluid sound. </p> <p>Nearly all of the greats use arpeggios. Yet, if you're like a lot of guitarists, you might be shying away from them because you fear being overwhelmed by the "Twin Ts": theory and technique. If you have a basic understanding of how chords work, though, it's high time to get your feet wet. </p> <p>Here are eight things you need to know to help demystify the arpeggio. </p> <p>01. <Strong>What an arpeggio is exactly</strong> The word arpeggio (ar-peh-jee-oh) comes from the Italian word arpeggiare, which means "to play a harp." (If you can visualize harpists, they often articulate notes by plucking the strings one at a time.) Arpeggios, often called broken chords, are simply notes from a chord played individually instead of strummed together. </p> <p>02. <strong>What arpeggios can do for you</strong>. Arpeggios create a fast, flowing sound. Besides using them for speed in playing, arpeggios add a kick to improvisation skills. Because an arpeggio contains all the notes of its chord, you can use them in your solos and link them to what's going on in the chord structure beneath you to create cool sounding licks. Arpeggios always sound good over their matching chord in a progression, therefore, they generally form the melodic home bases and safe notes for improvising guitarists. <a href="http://www.guitartricks.com/v2/chords">This guitar chord chart will help visualize the notes of each arpeggio on the guitar neck.</a></p> <p>03. <strong>Scales vs. arpeggios.</strong> Let's clear up any confusion you might have between scales and arpeggios. Scales are a series of notes played one by one that fit sonically within a particular key signature (e.g., G major scale would be G, A, B, C, D, E, F#). Arpeggios, on the other hand, are a series of notes played one by one that consists of the notes within a particular chord (e.g., G major arpeggio would be G, B, D). Like a scale, an arpeggio is linear: it's a set of notes you play one at a time. Unlike scales that contain some extra notes not always played in chords, arpeggios use only the notes found in a single chord. Both scales and arpeggios can be played in ascending, descending or random order.</p> <p>04. <strong>Arpeggio shapes.</strong> As with scales, there are a variety of shapes to learn when playing arpeggios. There are generally five CAGED shapes for each arpeggio, except the diminished 7th, for which there is just one. Learn arpeggios in different positions on the neck so you become familiar with the shape of the arpeggio rather than concentrating on which frets to put your fingers in. Learn the shapes one at a time. Although you need to get all five of the shapes down—eventually—it's far better to be able to play one perfectly than five poorly. Practice moving from one arpeggio shape to another, back and forth and back and forth.</p> <p>05. <strong>Which arpeggios to learn first.</strong> The best guitar arpeggios to learn first are the major triad (1, 3, 5) and the minor triad (1, b3, 5). The major and minor triads are the most common and most used guitar arpeggios in all of music. While a triad contains only three notes, an arpeggio can be extended with chords like a major seventh, a 9th, 11th, 13th, etc., giving you endless possibilities.</p> <p>06. <strong>Different picking styles.</strong> There are several ways you can play arpeggios—alternate picking, legato, <a href="http://www.guitartricks.com/guitarglossary.php?term=Hammer-on">hammer-ons</a> and <a href="http://www.guitartricks.com/guitarglossary.php?term=Pull-off">pull-offs</a>, sweep picking and tapping are among them. (For the more experienced player, there also are lead techniques you should be confident with for playing arpeggios at higher speeds, such as string skipping and finger rolling.) Experiment with each way of playing these arpeggios to see which one works best for you and your particular style. </p> <p>A note here about fingerpicking: While fingerpicked chords are technically arpeggios since the chords are broken up, the individual notes aren't typically muted after they're played and thus ring together. The listener can literally hear the entire chord from the vibrations of each individual note. Arpeggios typically only have one note playing at any given time and are a slightly different idea from broken chords. </p> <p>07. <strong>Grab the arpeggio by the "root."</strong> When you're brand new to arpeggios, you always want to start and end on a root note (the note upon which a chord is built. Literally, the root of the chord.) This will help train your ears to hear the sound of the scale. Start on the lowest pitched root note, play up as far as you can, then go back down as low as you can, and then back up to the root note.</p> <p>08. <strong>Form and speed.</strong> To play arpeggios, you should mute each note immediately after picking it by lifting the fretting finger. This will keep the notes from "bleeding" into one another and sounding like a strummed chord. Every note needs to sound individually. Start off slowly. Perfect your form before you add speed to the mix. You don't want to develop bad habits that you will have to correct later. </p> <p>For more on playing arpeggios, give <a href="http://www.guitartricks.com/guitarglossary.php?term=Arpeggio">some of these "how to play arpeggios" guitar lessons</a> a try, as well as Ben Lindholm's <a href="http://www.guitartricks.com/lesson.php?input=17379&amp;s_id=1310">"10 Ways to Play Arpeggios."</a> </p> <p><em>Kathy Dickson writes for the online guitar lesson site <a href="http://www.guitartricks.com">Guitar Tricks.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-tricks-eight-things-you-need-know-about-arpeggios#comments Guitar Tricks Blogs Lessons Fri, 14 Nov 2014 15:19:04 +0000 Kathy Dickson http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22866 Chaos Theory with Chris Broderick: Adapting Keyboard-Style Arpeggios to Fretboard Tapping, Part 1 http://www.guitarworld.com/adapting-keyboard-style-arpeggios-fretboard-tapping-part-1 <!--paging_filter--><p>This month’s column focuses on an original composition of mine that acknowledges the influence of classical pianists on my playing style, specifically the way in which pianists will play arpeggios across several octaves very quickly (see <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>). </p> <p>In order to emulate that sound on the guitar, I’ve devised a few fretboard tapping techniques. In fact, much of my two-hand tapping technique is based on that goal and approach.</p> <p>The idea is to break down the arpeggios into different sequences, such as four-note groups, and play them in a way that would be quite difficult, if not impossible, to play conventionally. This example is also cool because it has some unusual, “advanced classical” chords in it, such as a Neapolitan chord, an augmented III (three) chord, and some diminished seventh chords.</p> <p>Let’s examine the first half of <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>. I start with a second-inversion G minor arpeggio (G Bb D). “Second inversion” means the arpeggio begins (and ends) on the fifth, which in this case is D (see bar 1, beats one through five). On beat six, I switch to a root-position G minor arpeggio, which means that it starts (and ends) on the G root note. </p> <p>All of the phrases in bar 1 are executed with sweep picking. On beat one, I begin with a pull-off from the pinkie to the index finger, and then I reverse rake (or reverse sweep) by dragging the pick in a continuous upstroke across the top five strings through beat two. Beat three begins with a hammer-on and is followed by a forward rake (or downsweep) as the pick is dragged in a continuous downstroke across the strings. The same sweeping techniques are utilized throughout the remainder of the bar. </p> <p>In bar 2, I begin with a G natural minor (G A Bb C D Eb F) legato scalar run across beats one and two, then switch to down-up alternate picking, using notes from the G harmonic minor scale (G A Bb C D Eb F#). Bar 3 features a reference to the VI (six) chord, Eb, and then the II (two major) chord, A, followed in bar 4 with a first inversion (third “in the bass,” or positioned as the lowest note in the chord voicing) Gm/Bb voicing and a second inversion (fifth in the bass) D7/A chord. </p> <p>Bar 5 initiates the section of the piece wherein all of the phrases are executed with tapping, hammer-ons and pull-offs. One can analyze the rhythmic subdivisions of these phrases in a variety of ways, but the prevailing sound is that of an eighth-note triplet feel, with a 16th-note triplet played on each (or the majority of) the eighth notes. In other words, the overall feel is “ONE-trip-let, TWO-trip-let, THREE-trip-let,” etc. This triplet rhythm disguises the fact that the notes are actually phrased in four-note groups, in terms of the line’s melodic contour.</p> <p>The highest note in each four-note melodic group is tapped. This results in two tapped notes per octave, which is a little different than the tapped arpeggios played later in the piece, which include only one tapped note per octave. </p> <p>Beats one and two of bar 5 cover the first octave, and starting on beat three the pattern is repeated an octave higher. Once we reach the highest note in the phrase—D, first string, 22nd fret—at the beginning of bar 6, we descend through G harmonic minor on beat one and then shift to the Neapolitan chord, Ebmaj7, and descend through a series of four-note arpeggios based on the chord tones Eb G Bb D. We then ascend back through the same arpeggiated shapes. This phrase can also be analyzed as G natural minor because these notes all live within the G natural minor scale. </p> <p>This is definitely a complex piece that will require a great amount of practice to get a handle on. The hardest thing of all when playing a piece like this is to keep the idle open strings from ringing. The best advice I can give is use the palm of your pick hand to mute the strings as much as possible, keeping it over the strings that aren’t being played as consistently as you can. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/VRgjCi8OUR4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/chrisbroderick710.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/chris-broderick">Chris Broderick</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/adapting-keyboard-style-arpeggios-fretboard-tapping-part-1#comments Chaos Theory Chris Broderick Chris Broderick - Chaos Theory July 2010 Megadeth Videos Blogs Lessons Magazine Thu, 13 Nov 2014 21:55:33 +0000 Chris Broderick http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17121 Turn Up the Heat in Your Solos in Five Easy Steps http://www.guitarworld.com/turn-heat-your-solos-five-easy-steps <!--paging_filter--><p>Variety is the spice of life. Musically speaking, I think “spice” translates to a certain amount of dissonance. Dissonance is a tension resulting from the lack of harmony among musical notes.</p> <p>In this lesson I discuss a few options I use when playing over dominant 7 chords. I’ll take you through a methodical process of using scales that progressively use more and more dissonant notes. It will be this intermingling of consonant and dissonant sounds that will add a lot of interesting elements to your playing and give your solos the contrast that will keep your audience listening.</p> <p>So you can immediately implement these ideas, I’ll be using only some basic pentatonic and blues scales that you likely already know, as well as a couple of ideas that might not yet be a part of your vocabulary. We’ll use A7 as our key center in these examples.</p> <p>Note: I highly recommend you find a backing track with a dominant 7th key center to practice these ideas over. This will surely help you internalize how these scales sound and contrast with each other in a musical context. YouTube has a bunch!</p> <p>An A7 chord is best described as an A major triad with a minor 7th. This chord is spelled A-C#-E-G. Overall, its tonality is major, but the minor 7th note in the chord lends itself to some minor approaches as well. Let's dig in …</p> <p>The A major pentatonic scale could be considered the most consonant match for this chord, as the scale includes the A major triad. While a little vanilla for some, it works perfectly.</p> <p>To add a just a little dissonance, the A major blues scale can be used. This scale includes all the “right notes” from the major pentatonic scale but adds a minor 3rd to the mix. This minor 3rd doesn’t stand out too much when played briefly as a passing tone, but if you place some focus on it, it will surely grab the listener’s attention before you resolve it to the next note in the scale. With a jam track, try switching from the major pentatonic scale and the major blues scale.</p> <p>It’s this minor 3rd note that leads us to a very common combo: using the minor pentatonic scale over the dominant 7 chord. The minor pentatonic scale includes the root, 5th and minor 7th of the dominant 7 chord we’re playing over, but the minor 3rd is dissonant when heard against the major 3rd in the chord. It is this dissonance that often leads us to bend the minor third up to the major third pitch, giving us that oh-so bluesy sound we love. </p> <p>I often think of players like Jimmy Page and Jimi Hendrix when I hear this being played, but since the minor pentatonic scale is one of the first scales guitar students learn, chances are you are already doing this. With a jam track, try switching from the major pentatonic to the major blues — and now the minor pentatonic scale — and back.</p> <p>If we want to "up" the amount of dissonance even more, we can start to play the minor blues scale over this chord. Not only do we now have that dissonant minor 3rd from the minor pentatonic scale, but now we also have the tritone to bend the listener’s ears even more. If you simply treat the tritone as a passing tone, it may not be too noticeable, but if you focus on that note, you’ll really start getting the listener’s ears to perk up! With a jam track, try switching from the major pentatonic, to the major blues, minor pentatonic, minor blues and back.</p> <p>As if this wasn’t enough to mix things up and make your solos more interesting, I also like to include a couple more ideas to achieve that “outside sound” in my solos. The first is what I like to call the “Flatted Root Minor Pentatonic Scale." This scale simply flattens the root (A) in the A minor pentatonic scale. This scale is spelled Ab-C-D-E-G. If there was ever a note to alter to create bit of dissonance, it’s the root! Watch as audience members look up from their smartphones when you lay this scale’s sound on them. </p> <p>Another easy technique for getting a dissonant “outside” sound is to simply move the minor pentatonic scale up a half step for a brief moment. This side-stepping technique works well during scale runs, just move up one fret half way through your phrase and enjoy the dissonance. Just remember to move back into key, as a little bit of this ‘spice’ goes a long way. </p> <p>These six sounds should give you plenty of ways to turn the heat up in your solos. Just like cooking with spices, you can dial in a little or a lot according to your taste. I like to rank the scales like my favorite chicken wings:</p> <p><strong>Major Pentatonic:</strong> Mild<br /> <strong>Major Blues:</strong> Sweet 'n’ Spicy<br /> <strong>Minor Pentatonic:</strong> Medium<br /> <strong>Minor Blues:</strong> Hot<br /> <strong>Flatted Root Minor Pentatonic:</strong> Wild<br /> <strong>Side-Step Minor Pentatonic:</strong> Blazing!</p> <p>Jam these scales to a play-along track, mixing them up in a variety of ways. Change it up incrementally for some tasty licks, or implement big contrasts for some really bold flavors.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Galysh%20Lesson%20Ex.%201.jpg" width="620" height="462" alt="Galysh Lesson Ex. 1.jpg" /></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/V80oPY2lcHY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Guitarist Adrian Galysh is a solo artist and education coordinator for Guitar Center Studios. He's the author of the book </em>Progressive Guitar Warmups and Exercises<em>. For more information, visit him at <a href="http://www.adriangalysh.com/">AdrianGalysh.com.</a></em></p> <p><strong><a href="http://adriangalysh.com/download.html">GuitarWorld.com online readers can enjoy a FREE download of Adrian Galysh's song "Spring (The Return)" by clicking HERE.</a></strong></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/turn-heat-your-solos-five-easy-steps#comments Adrian Galysh Videos Blogs Lessons Wed, 12 Nov 2014 21:44:33 +0000 Adrian Galysh http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22852 Symphony of Instruction with Dave Mustaine: Exotic Voicings, Major and Minor Diads and "Upside-Down" Chords http://www.guitarworld.com/symphony-instruction-dave-mustaine-exoting-voicings-major-and-minor-diads-and-upside-down-chords <!--paging_filter--><p>I'm writing this column while in Europe, where we’re currently on tour. </p> <p>As you’ve probably already heard, we have a new guitarist, Chris Broderick [Nevermore, Jag Panzer]. Chris is heavily influenced by Marty Friedman, which is great, because Megadeth play more music from that era of the band than any other and I’ve always liked that particular style. </p> <p>I look at Chris as raw talent. He sounds just like Marty, and with him in the band we have a new lease on life. Glen Drover, who recently left the band, endorsed Chris as his replacement, and Chris has come in and kicked everything up to a whole new level.</p> <p> Last time out, in the April 2008 column, I touched upon the technique of picking chords upside down, meaning with an upstroke strum. This month I’m going to continue with this topic and give you some examples of how to use this move to good musical effect. </p> <p><strong>DIAGRAMS 1-3</strong> show three somewhat unusual chord voicings where, if you strum them upside down, you get the high notes sounding before the low ones have a chance to eat them up. I don’t know what the names of those chords are, but I’m sure that the guys at <em>Guitar World</em> and some of you readers could tell me.</p> <p> During the earliest days of Megadeth, even before David Ellefson was on bass, I jammed with a strange guitarist a few times, but we never played a gig together. He played a lot of really weird, cool chords, like those George Lynch and Warren DiMartini used sometimes.</p> <p>I watched what he did, took several of those chords that I liked and worked them into a progression that I thought was pretty scary sounding. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> shows what I came up with, which is similar to something I do in “Looking Down the Cross.” As you can see, I used the chords from <strong>DIAGRAMS 1 and 2</strong>, and they’re picked upside down.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 7</strong> is a progression similar to one I play in “Holy Wars…The Punishment Due,” and <strong>FIGURES 2–6</strong> show this part broken down into five small, simplified sections. I’m using upside-down picking for all the chords, most of which are major or minor diads. All I’m doing with these chords is playing a root note and a major or minor third above it, instead of the more typical root/fifth power chords.</p> <p>There’s no mathematical reason for me doing this; it was merely for the colorful sound of the chords. I was listening to a lot of Merciful Fate and Diamond Head at the time, two bands that have a lot of really great riffs built around these same kinds of two-note major and minor-chord voicings, and I found myself really enjoying their songs. </p> <p>To truly appreciate how much color these kinds of major and minor diads add to a riff, try playing <strong>FIGURE 7</strong> again, this time substituting a root/fifth power chord for every chord. You’ll hear the difference immediately.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3886089495001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3886089495001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-11-11%20at%2011.34.28%20AM.png" width="620" height="600" alt="Screen Shot 2014-11-11 at 11.34.28 AM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-11-11%20at%2011.34.44%20AM.png" width="620" height="233" alt="Screen Shot 2014-11-11 at 11.34.44 AM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dave-mustaine">Dave Mustaine</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/symphony-instruction-dave-mustaine-exoting-voicings-major-and-minor-diads-and-upside-down-chords#comments Dave Mustaine June 2008 Megadeth Symphony of Instruction Videos News Lessons Magazine Tue, 11 Nov 2014 17:24:06 +0000 Dave Mustaine http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22831 Monster Licks Unleashed: Glenn Proudfoot Unleashes the Madness — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/monster-licks-unleashed-glenn-proudfoot-unleashes-madness-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In this Monster Lick Unleashed, I'm using the diminished 7th scale in the key of E. </p> <p>This is a real technical challenge because I'm switching my fretting hand over the top of the fretboard to play one of the arpeggio sections. This should only be looked at as a technical challenge and nothing more. </p> <p>Whenever you stretch your metal and physical boundaries, you are growing as a player and musician.</p> <p>Many of us fall into the trap of practicing the same old stuff over and over again. This is why so many players find they hit a point where they don't get better. This has nothing to do with age or physical limitations; it's because they are not practicing or challenging themselves. They are doing nothing but maintaining. </p> <p>In no way am I suggesting you must practice eight hours a day. The point is to challenge yourself for no reason other than to improve your skills. </p> <p><strong>The Lick:</strong></p> <p>The start of this lick utilizes three-note-per-string legato and string skipping. As I am moving down the the neck, the legato patterns are moving forward (starting with the index finger). When I'm moving back up the neck, the legato patterns are moving backwards (starting with the pinky/little finger). This will help you if you want to expand on this legato idea and create your own runs.</p> <p>The transition to the "over the top" section starts with a six-string arpeggio. This begins on the ninth fret of the high E and finishes on the 12th fret of the low E. This note is what creates the pivot point to swing your hand over the top. This is, by far, the trickiest part of the lick. It’s important to master this slowly first then take it up to speed. Make sure your thumb is supporting your fretting hand behind the neck, just as if you were fretting the guitar in the normal position. This will give you the strength you need to fret the notes correctly. </p> <p>The transition back is the same as the first transition. Focus on these sections; they are the key to mastering this technique. The lick finishes with a legato tapping line and then another six-string arpeggio. </p> <p>As I said above, the important thing is to enjoy the challenge. There are plenty of ideas and techniques here that you can adapt to your own soloing and playing. </p> <p><strong>I hope you enjoy this Monster Lick Unleashed! Join me on <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/atomicguitaraudio">YouTube right here!</a> Contact me through <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a> or <a href="https://www.facebook.com/glenn.proudfoot">my Facebook page</a>.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/uTRJyiCO5TM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab_9.jpg" width="620" height="550" alt="tab_9.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Australia's Glenn Proudfoot has played and toured with major signed bands and artists in Europe and Australia, including progressive rockers Prazsky Vyber. Glenn released his first instrumental solo album, </em>Lick Em<em>, in 2010. It is available on iTunes and at <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a>. His latest album — <em>Ineffable</em> — will be out soon and is available for pre-order through <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a> and <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/au/album/ineffable/id914342943">iTunes</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/monster-licks-unleashed-glenn-proudfoot-unleashes-madness-video#comments Glenn Proudfoot Monster Licks Monster Licks Unleashed Videos Blogs Lessons Tue, 11 Nov 2014 16:01:02 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/22830 Deep Water: Add Some Color to Your Sound with This Fake 12-String Technique http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-water-add-some-color-your-sound-fake-12-string-technique <!--paging_filter--><script type="text/javascript" src="http://mediaplayer.yahoo.com/js"></script><p>A while back, I was thinking about the sound of a 12-string guitar, and how much I liked it, but really would like to hear it used on only certain notes and melodic lines within a song. </p> <p>When you're recording, you can use all kinds of exotic instruments for embellishing sections of a song. </p> <p>But you probably would like to be able to recreate your recorded performance live. It would be cool to be playing something on a six-string and have certain notes of the melody jump out with a 12-string sound and attack. </p> <p>I like to use a flat pick held with the thumb and first finger, and use the middle finger for the high-octave sound. This is a good start for rock guitar players to get into branching out into some new sounds and adding some color. You're also in position to play rockabilly-style alternating bass notes on the fly within your rock riffing. </p> <p>The 12-string sound works well with all types of amp sounds, from clean to high gain. It works well with a high gain sound because octaves are "perfect" intervals. An example: "A" is 440 cycles per second, and an octave up from that is 880 cycles per second. </p> <p>It really helps to grow your fingernails out a bit, so the sound of the octave can sound the same as the picked note, and you can get some nice-sounding attack. I've become so dependent on the sound of this technique, that now, certain songs I write cannot be played without this sound. </p> <p>So to help insure that I could make it through a tour without breaking a nail, and not sound like I'm making a lame excuse for not playing certain songs, I go to manicure shops to get a clear, hard coating put onto just my middle and third fingernails. You rockabilly cats are probably already doing this!</p> <p>Give this an honest try, and I think you will be rewarded by the results. To get into this, start with this descending melody. This is in the key of C, starting and ending on G. Some of the fingering may seem odd, but doing it as I've written it helps to make smooth transitions possible:</p> <p>Here it is, changing notes on 1/4 notes:</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitaraficionado.com/GW/FakeTwelveStringEffect1.mp3">Fake Twelve String Effect 1</a></strong></p> <p>Here it is, half-time:</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitaraficionado.com/GW/FakeTwelveStringEffect2.mp3">Fake Twelve String Effect 2</a></strong></p> <p>• Fretted G on the first string, third fret, use third finger ~ Open G on third string<br /> • Fretted F on the first string, first fret, use first finger ~ Fretted "F" on fourth string, third fret, use middle finger<br /> • Open E on first string ~ Fretted E on fourth string, second fret, use middle finger<br /> • Fretted D on second string, third fret, use third finger ~ Open D on fourth string<br /> • Fretted C on second string, first fret, use first finger ~ Fretted C on fifth string, third fret, use middle finger<br /> • Open B on second string ~ Fretted B on fifth string, second fret, use middle finger<br /> • Fretted A on third string, second fret, use middle finger ~ Open A on fifth string<br /> • Open G on third string ~ Fretted G on sixth string, third fret</p> <p>Then try going up using the same fingering as you did going down:</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitaraficionado.com/GW/FakeTwelveStringEffect3.mp3">Fake Twelve String Effect 3</a></strong></p> <p>Here's an example of how I used this technique in one of my songs, "Bird Bone," from the album <em>Into The Blue Sparkle</em> by my band, Slacktone:</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitaraficionado.com/GW/FakeTwelveStringEffect4BirdBone.mp3">Fake Twelve String Effect 4 - "Bird Bone"</a></strong></p> <p><em>Guitarist <a href="http://www.davewronski.com/">Dave Wronski</a> is one third of <a href="http://www.slacktone.com/">Slacktone, a Southern California-based modern surf band</a> that has toured the world and elsewhere. He also has written and recorded music for TV-show themes, commercial soundtracks and films.</em></p> <p><em>"Bird Bone" © Dave Wronski, Slacksong Music BMI</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-water-add-some-color-your-sound-fake-12-string-technique#comments Dave Wronski Deep Water Slacktone surf Blogs Lessons Mon, 10 Nov 2014 17:54:27 +0000 Dave Wronski http://www.guitarworld.com/article/11559