Lessons http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/8/all en Metal For Life with Metal Mike: How to Craft a Rhythmically and Harmonically Challenging, Heavy Single-Note Riff http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-how-craft-rhythmically-and-harmonically-challenging-heavy-single-note-riff <!--paging_filter--><p> One of the most important aspects of becoming a good metal guitarist is developing the ability to play long single-note lines with absolute precision, in regard to both picking articulation and locking into the beat. </p> <p>Every great metal guitarist I know of—including James Hetfield, Kirk Hammett, Dave Mustaine and Dimebag Darrell—have always displayed the power and precision essential to great metal guitar playing. </p> <p> For this month’s column, I’ve composed a fairly long, rhythmically and harmonically challenging metal-style riff that is intended to help you to sharpen your single-note chops. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> is an original 17-bar riff that is based primarily in the key of E minor but is harmonically ambiguous here and there as well as rhythmically deceptive. </p> <p> For me, some of the best metal songs, like many of the classic tracks on Metallica’s <em>Master of Puppets</em> or Megadeth’s <em>Rust in Peace</em>, have these qualities. </p> <p>The majority of the riff is played in even eighth notes, and I stick with alternate (down-up) picking throughout. In many of the bars, I shift back and forth between a picked note and a pair of notes sounded on the next higher string with a single pick stroke followed by a descending or ascending legato finger slide. </p> <p> In these instances, I still stick with the alternate-picking approach in order to maintain consistency in my attack with the pick hand. Bars 1–9 feature notes played on the bottom two strings only, with palm muting (P.M.) used on the sixth string throughout. </p> <p> Palm muting involves laying the edge of your pick hand across the strings by the bridge saddles. It produces a darker, more percussive and heavier sound. In bars 1–3, all of the notes are derived from the E Aeolian mode (E F# G A B C D), also known as the E natural minor scale. Notice the repeated use of descending index-finger slides on the A string, which serve to set up position shifts.</p> <p> In bar 4, I introduce a line that repeatedly ascends chromatically on the low E string, followed by either a B or C note on the A string. This sets up the switch back to the riff played in bar 3, followed by an inverted version of the riff from bar 2. To accommodate the odd phrasing of the line, the meter changes here from 4/4 to 5/4 and back.</p> <p> In bars 8 and 9, I introduce a diminished-based sequence that moves across the bottom three strings. On each string, a series of three notes is sounded, with each pair of fretted notes being a minor third apart. To provide yet another twist, bars 10–15 shift alternately between 4/4 and 3/4 meters.</p> <p> Using the open A string as a pedal tone, I slide between different positions of E natural minor, working my way up the fretboard. I then wrap things up in the last two bars with a phrase based on the E Phrygian mode (E F G A B C D), applying a pinch harmonic (P.H.) and some hearty finger vibrato to the final E note.</p> <p> As usual, begin practicing this figure at a slow to moderate metronome setting, ramping up the tempo as the notes become more comfortable to play. This exercise riff will help you build solid, dependable single-note metal rhythm chops.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1472151574001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1472151574001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-24%20at%205.44.12%20PM.png" width="620" height="514" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 5.44.12 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-how-craft-rhythmically-and-harmonically-challenging-heavy-single-note-riff#comments April 2012 Metal Mike Chlasciak 2012 Videos Blogs Lessons Magazine Thu, 24 Apr 2014 21:50:25 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21101 Orianthi Shows You How to Play "Heaven In This Hell" — Exclusive Lesson http://www.guitarworld.com/orianthi-shows-you-how-play-heaven-hell-exclusive-lesson <!--paging_filter--><p>In the exclusive lesson video below, Orianthi shows you how to play the solo from "Heaven in This Hell," the title track from her latest studio album.</p> <p>The video, which features close-up shots of the guitarist in action, also features the tabs for everything she plays — not to mention a bit of commentary by Orianthi.</p> <p>“I’d been listening to a lot of Robert Johnson and Howlin’ Wolf,” Orianthi told <em><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/girl-fire-orianthi-turns-heat-her-new-album-heaven-hell">Guitar World</a></em> about the inspiration behind the album, which she recorded in Nashville with former Eurythmics guitarist Dave Stewart at the helm. </p> <p>“I think you can hear the Delta blues thing in something like the intro to ‘Heaven in This Hell,’ which has that down-home acoustic riff.” </p> <p>Still, these aren’t songs meant for front-porch picking. Rather, Orianthi says, “With every track it was like, How is this gonna go down live? That was the main thing I had in mind when writing and recording these songs. We wanted it to be a blast to play onstage.”</p> <p>For more about Orianthi, visit <a href="http://orianthi.com/">orianthi.com</a>.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3504162269001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3504162269001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/orianthi">Orianthi</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/orianthi-shows-you-how-play-heaven-hell-exclusive-lesson#comments April 2013 Orianthi Videos News Lessons Thu, 24 Apr 2014 20:15:52 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21096 Wild Stringdom with John Petrucci: Using Triad Arpeggios to Imply More Complex Chord Qualities http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-using-triad-arpeggios-imply-more-complex-chord-qualities <!--paging_filter--><p>This month, I’m going to demonstrate how one can utilize simple triadic shapes and patterns in order to imply more complex and varied chord qualities. </p> <p>I find this to be a very cool and useful improvisational tool, because you can apply it to playing over either a chord progression that you want to outline melodically or over a static pedal tone or one-chord vamp over which you want to superimpose shifting harmonic colors.</p> <p> Let’s begin by outlining, and then combining, simple major and minor triads. <strong>FIGURES 1 and 2</strong> illustrate the notes of a G major triad—G B D—played in seventh position. The relative minor triad of G major is E minor, and <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> depicts an E minor triad played in the same position. Notice that both triads share two of the same notes, G and B.</p> <p> The “magic” happens when we combine these two triads, and we can utilize and analyze the resulting sound within either a G major or an E minor context. <strong>FIGURE 4</strong> shows the two triads combined, so in essence we’ve simply added the E note to the G major triad. </p> <p>Adding E, the sixth of G, implies the sound of a G6 chord. If we play the same pattern over an E minor tonality, the resultant chordal implication is Em7, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>, and the single-note triadic-based phrases evoke a different harmonic impression.</p> <p> Let’s now apply this approach to a different tonal center. As shown in <strong>FIGURES 6 and 7</strong>, the combination of the notes of a C major triad—C E G—and an A minor triad—A C E—result in either a C6 sound, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 6</strong>, or an Am7 sound, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 7</strong>. The beauty of this exercise is that it demonstrates how the study of one theoretical concept and its associated single-note patterns can easily be applied to more than one tonal environment. </p> <p>On a grand scale, this means that the study of one idea can be applied to many different harmonic environments, yielding a broader understanding of music theory as well as heightening one’s fretboard awareness. </p> <p>Another great way to use this concept is to combine two different triads that are found within the same tonal center. For example, within the G major scale (G A B C D E F#), one can build a series of seven different triads by starting from each note in the scale and adding thirds above the starting note while remaining diatonic to (within the scale structure of) G major. If we start from B, the third degree of the G major scale, a B minor triad is formed by playing B D F#, notes that<br /> are all thirds apart, as they occur within the G major. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 8</strong> illustrates a phrase that combines G major and B minor triads. We can then apply this approach to the relative minor of G, Em7, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 9</strong>. When looked at as a whole, combining G major and B minor triads implies a Gmaj13 chord, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 10.</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3122444060001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3122444060001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-24%20at%202.49.42%20PM.png" width="620" height="677" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 2.49.42 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-24%20at%202.50.00%20PM.png" width="620" height="200" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 2.50.00 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-using-triad-arpeggios-imply-more-complex-chord-qualities#comments Dream Theater John Petrucci March 2014 Wild Stringdom Artist Lessons Blogs News Lessons Magazine Thu, 24 Apr 2014 18:58:38 +0000 John Petrucci http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20319 Full Shred with Marty Friedman: Taking Licks You’ve Learned from Others and Making Them Your Own http://www.guitarworld.com/full-shred-marty-friedman-taking-licks-you-ve-learned-others-and-making-them-your-own <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the June 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-june-14-motley-crue/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=MayVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Hello, and welcome to my new GW instructional column. It’s good to be back! I hope the ideas and concepts I present here in the coming months will give you inspiration and insight into your own path to musical creativity.</p> <p>The most important thing I can say is that you should always strive to make your own distinct musical statement with what you play on the guitar. </p> <p>Once you’ve learned from the examples I present in this column, I would like you to completely disregard the examples themselves and retain only the techniques contained within them. </p> <p>As soon as you get the idea of where I’m coming from with a certain lick or phrase, I want you to change it into something of your own invention and tap into your own creative curiosity as quickly and fully as possible. </p> <p><strong>For the tabs to this lesson, be sure to check out the new June 2014 issue of GW!</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3499101867001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3499101867001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/marty-friedman">Marty Friedman</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/full-shred-marty-friedman-taking-licks-you-ve-learned-others-and-making-them-your-own#comments Full Shred June 2014 Marty Friedman Videos News Lessons Magazine Wed, 23 Apr 2014 18:29:06 +0000 Marty Friedman http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21056 Bent Out of Shape: An Intensive 30-Minute Guitar Workout for Musicians On the Go http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-intensive-30-minute-guitar-workout-musicians-go <!--paging_filter--><p>Whether you're a professional guitarist or a hobbyist, finding time to practice can be difficult. </p> <p>We all have busy lives and responsibilities that distract us from our playing. For this reason, I've developed a quick, intensive guitar "workout" that can be completed in 30 minutes. You can use this by itself as a quick practice when time is limited or incorporate it into a longer practice session. Either way, this workout will help develop your playing in a number of important areas.</p> <p>The workout involves playing a diatonic scale with specific sequences chosen to improve important areas of your playing. You will improve your knowledge/theory of the scale across the whole fretboard and also improve the speed/accuracy of your picking technique. For this workout, you are going to need a metronome. </p> <p>For my examples, I am using the A minor scale. You will play each of these sequences to a metronome; when completed, you will increase the tempo and repeat all of the sequences again. You want to begin at a slow tempo, around 80 bpm, and after completion increase by 10 bpm (90, 100, 110, 120, etc.). </p> <p>The sequences are of varying difficulty, and as soon as one becomes too difficult, you should drop that sequence and continue with the rest. You should make a note of the highest tempo reached for each sequence so you can chart your progress over time. I have included target bpm's for each sequence. If you start at 80 bpm and take each sequence to its target, you should complete the workout in around 30 minutes. Of course, if you are an advanced player, you might be able take each sequence much higher than the target tempos.</p> <p>For each sequence, I've given you the tab and an audio example playing the sequence at 80 bpm and then at the target bpm. </p> <p><strong>Linear Sequences (Target: 160 bpm) </strong></p> <p>These sequences focus on playing the diatonic scale as "four-notes per sting" instead of the usual "three-notes per string." The idea is to use all four fingers when fretting the scale, as highlighted in the first sequence.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F88630142"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab1.jpg" width="620" height="420" alt="tab1.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Interval Sequences (Target 120 bpm)</strong></p> <p>These focus on playing the diatonic scale in intervals across three octaves. For this workout, we are using 3rd's, 4th's and 5th's. Note: Advanced players also will be able to play the scale in 6th's and 7th's.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F88630059"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab2.jpg" width="620" height="409" alt="tab2.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Arpeggio Sequences (Target 120 bpm)</strong></p> <p>You've probably seen the previous sequences before, but here's something I came up with that's fairly unique. These sequences involve playing the scale across two octaves as arpeggios. The first sequence is played as triad arpeggios (I-III-V). The second sequence is played as 7th arpeggios (I-III-V-VII).</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F88629993"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab3.jpg" width="620" height="278" alt="tab3.jpg" /></p> <p>These sequences could be applied to any diatonic scale in any key. After mastering A minor, try experimenting with different scale. If you have any questions or suggestions, feel free to leave me a comment. Good luck!</p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England now living in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and in 2012 toured Japan, America and Canada. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-intensive-30-minute-guitar-workout-musicians-go#comments Bent Out of Shape Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Wed, 23 Apr 2014 15:18:28 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/18203 Metal For Life with Metal Mike: Mega-Metal Licks in the Style of Metallica, Testament and Pantera http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-mega-metal-licks-style-metallica-testament-and-pantera <!--paging_filter--><p>I’d like to focus on riffs and rhythm ideas that represent what I think of as “the real deal” metal. </p> <p>I’ve designed these riffs to help you build up both your pick-and fret-hand technique in regard to executing pure metal ideas like these with power and precision.</p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> is inspired by the heavy riffs of Testament and Pantera and is built from combining a few different scales, such as E major (E F# G# A B C# D#) and E Phrygian-dominant (E F G# A B C D), with sliding two-note power chords. </p> <p> Across beats one and two, I begin with two-note E5 and F5 power chords that alternate against open low E string accents, all of which are executed with aggressive down-strokes. Across beats three and four, I switch to alternate (down-up) picking. In bar 2, I begin with the same figure over the first two beats, but I switch to a higher single-note riff for beats three and four, one that moves from E major to E Phrygian-dominant.</p> <p>In bar 3 I repeat the figure from bar 1, which I then follow with sliding two-note power chords, fretted on the bottom two strings, first sliding down one half step, from A5 to G#5, and then up one whole step, from A5 to B5.</p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> is inspired by some of Testament’s heavy rhythm parts, such as the one heard in “Over the Wall,” and utilizes a classic metal “gallop” rhythm, which is an eighth note followed by two 16ths. This type of gallop rhythm was previously popularized by Iron Maiden, who used it on many of their biggest songs, such as “Run to the Hills.” </p> <p> The gallop figure shown here is executed with fast downdown-up picking in conjunction with palm muting on beats one through three, followed by eighth-note sliding power chords. This example is played at a rather quick tempo—194 beats per minute—and practicing it at that tempo will definitely add strength and precision to your pick-hand technique. You’ll hear sliding power chord figures like these on Metallica’s “Master of Puppets” as well as Pantera’s “Mouth for War.”</p> <p> For our last example, <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I’ve put together a riff comprised entirely of single notes, and I intentionally made it obscure in terms of outlining a specific tonality. Though the open low E note is accentuated, creating a connection to E5 or E minor, the notes themselves do not stick within the structure of any scale. My goal was simply to come up with a cool, heavy-sounding riff that features a few different articulation techniques. </p> <p> Through all of bar 1 and the first half of bar 2, I repeatedly play pairs of open low E accents in 16th notes, followed by a variety of three-note melodic shapes. Bar 3 presents a shift to 2/4 meter for the fast trills, after which bars 1 and 2 are repeated. </p> <p>The riff ends with quick pull-off phrases on the bottom two strings, fretted with the index and ring fingers. Apply these techniques to some heavily brutal metal riffs of your own design and have fun with them!</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1423597117001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1423597117001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1423597026001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1423597026001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-22%20at%201.17.24%20PM.png" width="620" height="688" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-22 at 1.17.24 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-mega-metal-licks-style-metallica-testament-and-pantera#comments March 2012 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Tue, 22 Apr 2014 17:20:39 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/14453 Bent Out of Shape: Learning Mozart's Symphony No. 25 in G Minor, Part 7 http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-mozarts-symphony-no-25-g-minor-part-7 <!--paging_filter--><p>Today we are going to learn Part 7 of Mozart's 25th Symphony in G Minor. </p> <p>It's been a while since we started learning the piece, but we're getting very close to the end. To catch up on all the other parts of this lesson, look under RELATED CONTENT directly below my photo to the left.</p> <p>You might remember me saying I was learning this piece with you, section by section. For that reason, it was difficult for me to predict how many lessons would be needed to cover the entire piece. I can now tell you that after this lesson, we'll need two more lessons to finish up. </p> <p>Part 7 is very interesting because it relates very closely to <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-mozarts-symphony-no-25-g-minor-part-3">Part 3</a>. This new section follows the same themes within Part 3, but in a different relative key. Part 3 was based around Bb major, which is the relative major scale of G minor. Part 7, however, features the same themes but played in G minor and, in some sections, G harmonic minor. </p> <p>We begin in bars 1 to 8 with an octave theme followed by a harmonic minor line that mirrors Part 3 exactly. This isn't technically challenging, but you might like to experiment with different styles of vibrato for the sustained octave notes. </p> <p>As in Part 3, we now play a series of arpeggios outlining the following chord progression: G minor / C minor / F major / Bb major / Eb major / A diminished. These can be played in several different ways. I demonstrated for you in Part 3 the volume swell technique and also 16th-note tremolo picking. You might also like to play around with triplets or even double-picked 8th notes to see which you prefer. In the example, I play 16th-note tremolo picking, which isn't too difficult as long as you have a good alternate-picking technique. </p> <p>To finish we play a sequence of descending arpeggios, which, for me, are the most challenging part of this section as you need to begin every arpeggio from the high E string. This can be difficult as you finish each arpeggios on the A or low E and then need to skip back to high E without interruption. </p> <p>As with anything technically challenging on the guitar, start off slow to a metronome and gradually increase the tempo. Good luck and see you next week with Part 8! </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/133750265&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_CxrcIxr5gc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/tab-for-will.jpg" width="620" height="749" alt="tab-for-will.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-mozarts-symphony-no-25-g-minor-part-7#comments Bent Out of Shape Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Sun, 20 Apr 2014 16:02:58 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21044 Wild Stringdom with John Petrucci: Moving Across the Fretboard in Unusual Ways to Produce Unique Runs http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-moving-across-fretboard-unusual-ways-produce-unique-runs <!--paging_filter--><p>Over the years, people have noticed that when I play certain runs, my fingers move in the opposite direction of the notes that they hear.</p> <p>For example, as my fret hand moves up the fretboard, the sequence of notes that is heard descends (and vice versa). For this month’s column, I’ve put together a few runs that demonstrate this unusual approach as applied to both ascending and descending patterns.</p> <p>This kind of “positional wizardry” can be used to generate interesting melodic patterns that can be used in a variety of ways. </p> <p> In <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I begin on the low E string in a high fretboard position and end on a high string in a lower position. The run is based on the A Aeolian mode (A B C D E F G), which is also known as the A natural minor scale and is intervallically spelled 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7. </p> <p> The overall concept behind this line is a consistent progression of six-note groups, or “cells,” that move to different areas of the fretboard while remaining diatonic to (within the scale structure of) A Aeolian. The run is played in a rhythm of even 16th notes, which, due to its inherent four-note grouping, results in a more unusual melodic “shape” than if I had played the pattern in a triplet or sextuplet rhythm. </p> <p> I begin by ascending through the first six notes—E F G A B C—then “backpedal” slightly and descend to the previous two notes, B and A, in alternating fashion. The next six-note phrase begins on G, two scale degrees higher than the previous starting note, and consists of the notes G A B C D E, played in ascending form. </p> <p>Once again, I alternate between the last two notes in the same way, which sets up the beginning of the next six-note phrase, starting on B on the fourth string’s ninth fret, which is two scale degrees higher than the previous starting point. This “up-six, back-two” pattern then repeats three more times, culminating on a high A root note. Be sure to use consistent alternate (down-up-down-up) picking throughout this figure, and, as always, strive for crystal-clear articulation.</p> <p> In <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, I begin on the high E string and work my way up the fretboard while descending gradually on each lower string, pitch-wise. Like <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, this run is also based on A Aeolian/natural minor and six-note “cells” played in a 16th-note rhythm. </p> <p> After descending through the first six notes—F E D C B A—I quickly shift up the fretboard to a note that is three scale degrees higher in the scale, D, and then repeat the descending six-note pattern. This second sequence ends on F (third string, 10th fret), so I begin the next six-note sequence three scale degrees higher, on B (third string, 16th fret). </p> <p>This process repeats three more times, culminating in a low A root note (sixth string, 17th fret). Again, alternate picking is utilized throughout, so strive for even and precise execution.</p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> provides a clearer picture of the shapes used in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> by illustrating them as eighth-note triplets. Here, one can more easily see how the six-note pattern descends through the notes of A natural minor across two beats at a time. When playing the run in a straight 16th-note rhythm (rather than in an eighth- or 16th-note-triplet rhythm), be cognizant of the difference in feel and where the downbeats fall.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2979782854001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2979782854001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-15%20at%202.25.01%20PM.png" width="620" height="644" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-15 at 2.25.01 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-moving-across-fretboard-unusual-ways-produce-unique-runs#comments Dream Theater February 2014 John Petrucci Wild Stringdom Artist Lessons Videos News Lessons Magazine Thu, 17 Apr 2014 20:21:46 +0000 John Petrucci http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20105 Betcha Can't Play This: Phrygian-Dominant Male — Sylvain Coudret of Soilwork http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-phrygian-dominant-male-sylvain-coudret-soilwork <!--paging_filter--><p> This is a single-note run based on the D Phrygian dominant mode [D Eb F# G A Bb C] that incorporates several different playing techniques to create an interesting, rolling contour. </p> <p> I tune my guitar to drop-B, which is drop-D tuning down one and one half steps [low to high, B F# B E G# C#], so while I’m thinking of the run as being in D, it actually sounds in B [Phrygian dominant].</p> <p> Bars 1–3 are played entirely on the G string and feature sextuplet phrasing [six-note groupings], with an extra two 16th notes tagged onto the end of each bar, which makes it an odd-meter lick [13/8 instead of 12/8]. I alternate pick the first three notes of each sextuplet with palm muting [P.M.], followed by an un-muted double pull-off, which creates a nice contrast, going back and forth from staccato to legato articulation. </p> <p> There’s a four-fret stretch required in these first three bars, so make sure your fingers and wrist are thoroughly warmed up before playing the lick, to avoid uncomfortable cramping or possible injury. Be sure to palm mute the bottom three strings throughout these first three bars, even when doing the pull-offs on the G string, in order to keep them from ringing.</p> <p> Bar 4 is built on diminished-seven arpeggio shapes and introduces some string skipping between the G and high E strings and ascending and descending legato finger slides, which I use to shift positions. </p> <p> The run winds up in bar 5 with some unbroken alternate picking as I ascend the D Phrygian-dominant mode across the top four strings, leading to a high D note at the 10th fret, which I shake then slide down from. Notice that I add a couple of chromatic passing tones on the top two strings during this final ascent. </p> <p>These extra notes serve to smooth out the contour of the line and make for an even number of notes per string [four], which works well with this kind of alternate-picked run.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience818756776001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="818756776001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-14%20at%204.57.43%20PM.png" width="620" height="509" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 4.57.43 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-phrygian-dominant-male-sylvain-coudret-soilwork#comments Betcha Can't Play This December 2010 Soilwork Sylvain Coudret Videos Lessons Magazine Mon, 14 Apr 2014 21:16:25 +0000 Sylvain Coudret http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21012 Betcha Can't Play This: Luis Carlos Maldonado's Add9 Roller Coaster http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-luis-carlos-maldonados-add9-roller-coaster <!--paging_filter--><p> This is an alternate-picking run based on an add9 arpeggio shape on the top three strings that’s moved up and down the neck to four different positions and tonal centers, with a slight variation in bar 2. </p> <p>It begins in E, moves down to C with a little twist—more on that in a moment—then up to D and finally A.</p> <p> The first thing you’ll notice is that the pinkie is the lead-off finger in each bar and that a five-fret stretch is required between it and the index finger for the first two notes. [Fret-hand fingerings are indicated throughout the run.] </p> <p>Be sure to ease into these stretches and warm up with them in the upper area of the fretboard before attempting them in the lower positions.</p> <p> For bar 2, I felt it sounded more colorful and interesting to alter the basic Cadd9 arpeggio [C D E G] by incorporating the #11, or #4, F#, into it, and in so doing the notes on the B and G strings are played two frets higher than where they would be if I would have simply applied the initial add9 shape from bar 1 to this position. In bar 3, the pinkie does a quick slide up to D, and the initial cell from bar 1 is used again, only a whole step lower.</p> <p> Notice the common tones on the B and G strings in bars 2 and 3. The run concludes with a long pinkie slide up to A at the 17th fret—be careful not to overshoot it—and an Aadd9 arpeggio.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/FVUgmYFhH7Q" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-14%20at%204.32.24%20PM.png" width="620" height="238" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 4.32.24 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-luis-carlos-maldonados-add9-roller-coaster#comments Betcha Can't Play This Luis Carlos Maldonado May 2010 Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Mon, 14 Apr 2014 21:03:09 +0000 Luis Carlos Maldonado http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21011 Merchant of Menace with Jeff Loomis: Incorporating Sweep Arpeggios with Fast-Moving Position Shifts http://www.guitarworld.com/merchant-menace-jeff-loomis-incorporating-sweep-arpeggios-fast-moving-position-shifts <!--paging_filter--><p> This month, I ’d like to finish our analysis of the guitar solo from the title track of Nevermore’s latest release, <em>The Obsidian Conspiracy</em>, with a look at the last four bars of the solo, which carry into the first bar of the subsequent verse.</p> <p> The majority of what I play during this section is built from sweep arpeggios of B minor triads (B D F#) that shift through a variety of positions. There’s a lot happening in this little four-bar section, so let’s get to it.</p> <p> For this last section of the solo, illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I’m playing over the same rhythm part that was illustrated in last month’s column. </p> <p>As this rhythm part sits on the B minor “home” tonality for two full bars, it gives me plenty of room to explore fast-moving sweeps based on B minor triads: I begin in 10th position on the top three strings, quickly descending as I pull off with the pinkie on F#, first string/14th fret, to the index finger on D, first string/10th fret, followed by the middle finger on B, second string/12th fret. </p> <p>The index finger then moves down to F#, third string/11th fret to complete the first descent, after which I ascend through the same series of notes, and then carry the subsequent descent back through the same note series all the way down to the fifth string in one long upstroke sweep. </p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 2a</strong> illustrates this sweep in isolation; notice that the arpeggio covers three octaves, starting from a high F# (the fifth of B) and carrying through to F# two octaves lower. The nice thing about playing a seven-string is that it allows me to expand this downward sweeping pattern all the way down through another complete octave, culminating on a low F#, seventh string/ninth fret, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 2b</strong>. </p> <p>If you put the pieces of both sweeps together, you get the complete 9th/10th position sweep shown in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>. I recommend that you practice each of these elements with both upstroke and downstroke sweeps, starting slowly and concentrating on clear articulation when either dragging the pick across the strings.</p> <p> Looking back at <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, you can see that I like to “cycle” smaller pieces of the arpeggios before expanding them across the majority of the strings. For example, I begin by repeating the small four-note/three-string sweep on the top three strings, and then, on beat three, I “cycle” the four-note/three-string sweep across the bottom three strings.</p> <p> Then on beat four, I sweep back across all of the strings, from low to high. Bar 2 begins in a similar fashion to bar 1, but starting on the upbeat of beat two, with the index finger on F#, fifth string/ninth fret, I change positions by sliding the index finger up to B at the 14th fret, allowing me to initiate upward and downward sweeps across 14th position B minor triads, which I then “cycle” up and down across the top five strings.</p> <p> On the upbeat of beat four in bar 2, I use the index finger once again for a quick position shift, sliding from F# at the 14th fret to the B root note at the 19th fret. Now situated in 19th position in bar 4, I wrap up the solo with more conventional B Aeolian type riffs, utilizing hammer-ons, pulloffs and bends for a legato sound, emphasizing very wide vibratos on each sustained note. </p> <p> I tried to articulate a feeling of rhythmic freedom while executing all of these sweeps, thus the odd groupings of decuplets (10 notes played over one beat) and nonuplets (nine notes played over one beat) as well as pairs of 32nd note sextuplets (six notes) played over one beat.</p> <p> The rhythmic precision of these groupings is less important than the effect created by crossing the strings in alternating sweeps very quickly, which takes a lot of practice to master. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience919847812001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="919847812001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-14%20at%203.43.41%20PM_0.png" width="620" height="498" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 3.43.41 PM_0.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-14%20at%203.43.54%20PM.png" width="620" height="152" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 3.43.54 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jeff-loomis">Jeff Loomis</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/merchant-menace-jeff-loomis-incorporating-sweep-arpeggios-fast-moving-position-shifts#comments 2011 February 2011 Jeff Loomis The Merchant of Menace Blogs Lessons Magazine Mon, 14 Apr 2014 19:50:37 +0000 Jeff Loomis http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21010 Betcha Can't Play This: Bill Hudson's Lydian Cascade http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-bill-hudsons-lydian-cascade <!--paging_filter--><p>This is a scalar run based on the F Lydian mode [F G A B C D E], which is the fifth mode of C major. It incorporates several different lead-playing techniques and sounds cool when played over an F or F5 chord.</p> <p>I start off with an ascending F major triad [F A C] sweep across the top four strings, played in a rhythm of 16th-note triplets. </p> <p>Once I hit the high E string, I switch to legato phrasing, continuing the triplet rhythm and using all four fret-hand fingers, spread out wide, to perform "stacked" hammer-ons and pull-offs, capped off by a pick-hand tap with the middle finger.</p> <p> Once I come back down to the F note at the 13th fret, I skip over to the G string, where I play another legato sequence, this time incorporating a descending finger slide followed by two hammer-ons and three consecutive taps with the pick hand, using the first, second and fourth fingers.</p> <p> When performing this tapping sequence, I temporarily clamp the pick between my thumb and the top side of the fretboard. I then jump back up to the high E string and perform another ascending legato sequence, incorporating taps with the first and third fingers. </p> <p> After the last tapped note, I switch to straight alternate picking and play a descending sequence of cascading 16th notes and 16th-note triplets across the top four strings, followed by an ascending climb that finishes with a high bend. When practicing this lick, be mindful of the different rhythmic subdivisions used.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/9Btp369CEsg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-14%20at%201.08.38%20PM.png" width="620" height="379" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 1.08.38 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-bill-hudsons-lydian-cascade#comments Betcha Can't Play This Bill Hudson February 2011 Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Mon, 14 Apr 2014 17:22:24 +0000 Bill Hudson http://www.guitarworld.com/article/21007 Metal For Life with Metal Mike: Combining Various Techniques to Form Powerful Rhythm Parts http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-combining-various-techniques-form-powerful-rhythm-parts <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This video is bonus content related to the May 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-14-zakk-wylde-joe-satriani/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=MayVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Last month, I demonstrated ways that you can combine metal-style rhythm-guitar techniques and devices, such as two-note power chords and single-note riffs, to form powerfully hooky rhythm parts. </p> <p>When doing this, my goal is to maintain a melodic sensibility within rhythm figures that also serve to propel and drive a song’s groove. This month, I’ll expand on this approach by including full-voiced chords along with droning open strings, fast palm-muted single-note lines, dyads and triads. </p> <p>In doing so, I’ll demonstrate a range of useful metal techniques that you can focus on within one self-contained and intrinsically melodic rhythm part. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3373838774001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3373838774001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-combining-various-techniques-form-powerful-rhythm-parts#comments May 2014 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos News Lessons Magazine Fri, 11 Apr 2014 15:19:15 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20790 String Theory with Jimmy Brown: Hillbilly Shred — How to Sound Like a Bluegrass Mandolin Player http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-jimmy-brown-hillbilly-shred-how-sound-bluegrass-mandolin-player <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This video is bonus content related to the May 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-14-zakk-wylde-joe-satriani/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=MayVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>A while back, I came across a book of traditional bluegrass and old-timey fiddle tunes, which intrigued and inspired me. </p> <p>I had always enjoyed the sound of those upbeat, “honest” folk melodies, with their sprightly contours and swinging eighth-note rhythms, despite their harmonic simplicity—the vast majority of the tunes are based on “one-four-five”-type major-key chord progressions. </p> <p>As the book was written for violinists (the violin and fiddle are the same instrument), the tunes were notated in standard sheet music, without tablature. Being a sightreader, however, I was able to cop the notes, and I began studying some of the tunes and attempting to adapt them to the guitar, pick-style, just as a bluegrass acoustic guitarist or mandolin player would. </p> <p>This month, I’d like to show you how I’ve arranged one of these fiddle tune for guitar and demonstrate a neat trick I came up with to make the guitar sound like a mandolin.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3386706530001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3386706530001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-brown">Jimmy Brown</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-jimmy-brown-hillbilly-shred-how-sound-bluegrass-mandolin-player#comments Jimmy Brown May 2014 String Theory Videos News Lessons Magazine Thu, 10 Apr 2014 19:50:05 +0000 Jimmy Brown http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20789 Wild Stringdom with John Petrucci: Visualizing Melodic Shapes on the Fretboard http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-visualizing-melodic-shapes-fretboard <!--paging_filter--><p>This month, I’d like to delve deeper into concepts for expanding scalar ideas across the fretboard. </p> <p>As in the previous columns, I’ll demonstrate how to move diagonally across the fretboard to connect scale positions, an approach that I employ to a great extent to play melodic phrases and solos. </p> <p>Let’s start with a series of phrases that are all based on the E Aeolian mode, or E natural minor scale (E F# G A B C D). <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> details a series of three different three-note phrases, each played in a three-notes-per-string pattern and starting with the index finger. I begin in seventh position and play through the first six notes of E Aeolian. </p> <p>In bar 2, I shift up to ninth position and play a six-note pattern that begins on the fifth degree of E Aeolian, B, sounding the notes B C D E F# G. Finally, I move up to 11th position to play a six-note pattern beginning on the second, or ninth, F#, sounding the notes F# G A B C D. </p> <p> The high D at the end of the phrase is useful, because it can easily be bent up one whole step to the E root. By connecting all three patterns this way, I am moving up the fretboard in a diagonal path that covers a lot of range. </p> <p> A great way to practice this pattern is within a steady series of eighth-note triplets, as seen in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>. Use alternate (down-up) picking throughout, and strive to make the position shifts seamless. Once you have these “shapes” for each six-note group under your fingers, you should be able to move freely from the A string to the D and G and back, using just your ear to guide the melodic phrases you create.</p> <p> Within the first six-note phrase, we have the notes of an E minor triad: E G B. Now let’s look at how we can apply notes from this series to create different chord types. In <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I demonstrate voicings of Em, Esus2 and another “wide-stretch” Em voicing from the notes found in this pattern. I can then play melodic fills based on it. </p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 4 </strong> offers a more expanded example of this concept. I’ll often use this approach to create chordmelody-type ideas, such as that shown in <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>. Here, I’m using the open low E note as a pedal tone played against various two-note chords. I also like incorporating the ninth, F#, into Em voicings, resulting in the wide-stretch Em(add9) shapes shown in <strong>FIGURE 6.</strong> </p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 7</strong> puts a twist on this idea by adding the second, also F#, to an E minor triad, E G B. Lastly, I use note combinations from the pattern to create a series of two-note chords that live in E Aeolian, as demonstrated in <strong>FIGURE 8.</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2888611424001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2888611424001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-10%20at%202.09.53%20PM.png" width="580" height="604" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-10 at 2.09.53 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-10%20at%202.10.09%20PM.png" width="580" height="334" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-10 at 2.10.09 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dream-theater">Dream Theater</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/wild-stringdom-john-petrucci-visualizing-melodic-shapes-fretboard#comments Dream Theater January 2014 John Petrucci Wild Stringdom Artist Lessons Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Thu, 10 Apr 2014 18:18:16 +0000 John Petrucci http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19912