Lessons http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/8/all en Beyond the Fretboard: Visualizing Your Own Scales, Part 1 http://www.guitarworld.com/beyond-fretboard-visualizing-your-own-scales-part-1 <!--paging_filter--><p>As guitar players, we sometimes get too comfortable with certain scale shapes because they can be easy to remember.</p> <p>For example, think about the minor pentatonic scale; almost immediately, the mental image of that familiar box shape is probably conjured in your mind's eye. The fact that we can instantly recall various patterns due to their spacial layout over the fretboard is a great thing. But what if we're relying too heavily on existing scale shapes?</p> <p>Scales are just pre-determined paths that get us from point A (root note) to point B (the octave). Some scales sound very musical, while others have a less-conventional harmonic architecture.</p> <p>For some younger rock guitarists, the process of learning and memorizing existing scales might be the extent of their development when it comes to improvising.</p> <p>But what about arpeggios? Arpeggios seem to be an intimidating concept to beginners, intermediates and even some advanced players for a few reasons:</p> <p>01. The name seems "elitist" in nature and sounds like it should be reserved for classical music.</p> <p>It simply comes from the italian word "arpeggiare," which either translates to "play on a harp" or "broken chord." All this means is we're playing each note of a chord separately, without any of the notes ringing out simultaneously. On a theoretical level, arpeggios and chords are basically the same thing. The only difference is in their execution; one is monophonic (one note at a time), while the other is polyphonic (multiple notes at the same time).</p> <p>02. Arpeggios are viewed as being "synonymous with sweep picking."</p> <p>Not everyone wants to be a shredder. For this reason, some people tend to underestimate or even completely ignore arpeggios because they have been popularly linked with sweep picking. Yes, a lot of technically advanced axe-slingers love using arpeggios. But truth be told, you NEVER have to learn sweep picking in order to effectively use arpeggios.</p> <p>03. Some of the more popular arpeggio shapes seem difficult to play and memorize.</p> <p>Since arpeggios are 'broken chord' patterns, they're usually laid out over the fretboard in familiar chord shapes (derived from the CAGE system). But this brings us back to the previous problem. After all, the most economical way to execute a "C shape" minor arpeggio would be to sweep pick it (because that shape consists of a one-note-per-string sequence).</p> <p>So what's the best way to make arpeggios accessible to ALL guitarists? One way is to visualize them as if they are scales (the only difference is that they consist of chord tones).</p> <p>That sounds reasonable, but there are a few practical limitations to this proposal. First, the most basic arpeggio (triad) is comprised of a meager 3-note grouping. This makes it rather difficult to plot the notes on the fretboard in a 'boxed' format without invoking the sweep picking approach.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/diagram%201.png" width="620" height="855" alt="diagram 1.png" /></p> <p>As you can see, it's doable but challenging if you're not used to a wide shape, which involves tough hand stretching and some tricky finger rolling. But if you're up to the task, these patterns can definitely be useful.</p> <p>Let's try adding an additional note to the mix. The most obvious way to do this would be to experiment with 7th arpeggios (or 7th chords). These chords definitely have a unique harmonic texture that distinguishes itself from the more conventional-sounding triads.</p> <p>The quick theoretical explanation as to why they're called "7th chords" is pretty straightforward; both the major and minor scales each contain seven notes. Triads are simply the first, third and fifth notes of a particular scale played together (becoming a chord) or individually (becoming an arpeggio). If we add the seventh note in a scale to the existing triad, we arrive at a 7th chord (essentially, all of the odd-numbered notes in a 7-note scale played simultaneously; 1,3,5,7).</p> <p>So let's see how these guys help in our quest of creating visually friendly shapes on the fretboard without resorting to sweep picking. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/diagram%202.png" width="620" height="858" alt="diagram 2.png" /></p> <p>(Note: the numbers inside the circles are suggestions for which fingers to use for each note. These are just suggestions, so feel free to use alternate fingering schemes and even slides in some instances) </p> <p>Not bad, but there's still some stretching involved and the shapes are a little too abstract. But at least we've started to look at arpeggios in a two-note-per-string context. Hopefully this is helpful for those of you who do not sweep pick and aren't interested in learning the technique anytime soon. </p> <p>In my next column, we'll dig deeper and try to arrive at some comfortable box shapes rooted in the concept of more extended arpeggios. We might even sprinkle in a few passing tones.</p> <p><em>Chris Breen is a New Jersey-based guitarist with 14 years of experience under his belt. He, along with his brother Jon (on drums) started the two-piece metal project known as <a href="https://www.facebook.com/ScarsicBand">SCARSIC</a> in 2011. They've recently been joined by bassist Bill Loucas and have released an album, </em>A Tale of Two Worlds<em> (available on iTunes, Amazon and Spotify). Chris also is part of an all-acoustic side project called <a href="http://www.reverbnation.com/EyesTurnStone">Eyes Turn Stone</a>. Chris teaches guitar lessons (in person or via Skype). For more information, visit <a href="http://www.breenmusiclessons.com/">BreenMusicLessons.com</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/beyond-fretboard-visualizing-your-own-scales-part-1#comments Beyond the Fretboard Chris Breen Blogs Lessons Mon, 27 Apr 2015 20:14:26 +0000 Chris Breen 21251 at http://www.guitarworld.com Metal For Life with Metal Mike: Mega-Metal Licks in the Style of Metallica, Testament and Pantera http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-mega-metal-licks-style-metallica-testament-and-pantera <!--paging_filter--><p>I’d like to focus on riffs and rhythm ideas that represent what I think of as “the real deal” metal. </p> <p>I’ve designed these riffs to help you build up both your pick-and fret-hand technique in regard to executing pure metal ideas like these with power and precision.</p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> is inspired by the heavy riffs of Testament and Pantera and is built from combining a few different scales, such as E major (E F# G# A B C# D#) and E Phrygian-dominant (E F G# A B C D), with sliding two-note power chords. </p> <p> Across beats one and two, I begin with two-note E5 and F5 power chords that alternate against open low E string accents, all of which are executed with aggressive down-strokes. Across beats three and four, I switch to alternate (down-up) picking. In bar 2, I begin with the same figure over the first two beats, but I switch to a higher single-note riff for beats three and four, one that moves from E major to E Phrygian-dominant.</p> <p>In bar 3 I repeat the figure from bar 1, which I then follow with sliding two-note power chords, fretted on the bottom two strings, first sliding down one half step, from A5 to G#5, and then up one whole step, from A5 to B5.</p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> is inspired by some of Testament’s heavy rhythm parts, such as the one heard in “Over the Wall,” and utilizes a classic metal “gallop” rhythm, which is an eighth note followed by two 16ths. This type of gallop rhythm was previously popularized by Iron Maiden, who used it on many of their biggest songs, such as “Run to the Hills.” </p> <p> The gallop figure shown here is executed with fast downdown-up picking in conjunction with palm muting on beats one through three, followed by eighth-note sliding power chords. This example is played at a rather quick tempo—194 beats per minute—and practicing it at that tempo will definitely add strength and precision to your pick-hand technique. You’ll hear sliding power chord figures like these on Metallica’s “Master of Puppets” as well as Pantera’s “Mouth for War.”</p> <p> For our last example, <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I’ve put together a riff comprised entirely of single notes, and I intentionally made it obscure in terms of outlining a specific tonality. Though the open low E note is accentuated, creating a connection to E5 or E minor, the notes themselves do not stick within the structure of any scale. My goal was simply to come up with a cool, heavy-sounding riff that features a few different articulation techniques. </p> <p> Through all of bar 1 and the first half of bar 2, I repeatedly play pairs of open low E accents in 16th notes, followed by a variety of three-note melodic shapes. Bar 3 presents a shift to 2/4 meter for the fast trills, after which bars 1 and 2 are repeated. </p> <p>The riff ends with quick pull-off phrases on the bottom two strings, fretted with the index and ring fingers. Apply these techniques to some heavily brutal metal riffs of your own design and have fun with them!</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1423597117001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1423597117001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1423597026001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1423597026001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-22%20at%201.17.24%20PM.png" width="620" height="688" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-22 at 1.17.24 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-mega-metal-licks-style-metallica-testament-and-pantera#comments March 2012 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos Blogs News Lessons Magazine Mon, 27 Apr 2015 20:10:57 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak 14453 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: Modernize Your Jazz Blues Chords http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-modernize-your-jazz-blues-chords <!--paging_filter--><p>Comping over a jazz blues chord progression is something every jazz guitarist needs to be able to do in order to function in a jam or gig situation. </p> <p>While many of us study traditional chord shapes such as 3rds and 7ths, Drop 2 and Drop 3 chords over a jazz blues, sometimes we want to bring a more modern sound into our chord lines over this common jazz progression. </p> <p>One of the best ways to modernize your jazz blues comping is to use 4th chords in your comping phrases, chords that are built by stacking 4th intervals rather than 3rds, as is the case in more traditional chord shapes. </p> <p>In this lesson, you will learn how to play and apply 4th chords to the I7, IV7 and V7 chords of a blues progression in order to bring a modern vibe to your comping ideas, as well as learn a study that you can use to hear these shapes in a musical situation. </p> <p><strong>Modern Jazz Blues Chords Position 1</strong></p> <p>To begin, here are three 4th-chord shapes you can use over the three chords in a 12-bar G blues, using the I7, IV7 and V7 chords, which are G7-C7-D7 in this key. </p> <p>Notice how each chord is built by starting on a chord tone, 7th, root and 2nd in this case, and then stacking 4th intervals on top of these initial chords. </p> <p>This stacking of 4th intervals, which we call 4th chords, creates that cool, modern sound in your chord voicings, and it is the reason these chords can make a jazz blues tune sound modern when applied to those changes. </p> <p>Once you have these shapes under your fingers, put on a G blues backing track and practice applying them to the I7, IV7 and V7 chords over that tune. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Modern%20Blues%20Chords%201.jpg" width="620" height="191" alt="Modern Blues Chords 1.jpg" /></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202821225&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Modern Jazz Blues Chords Position 2</strong></p> <p>To help you expand upon these chord shapes in your practice routine, here are the same notes, but now in a different position of the fretboard. </p> <p>Notice that the G7 chord now uses the shapes from the C7-D7 chords in the first example, and the C7-D7 chords now use the same shapes as the G7 chord in the previous example. This will allow you to quickly move these shapes around the fretboard as you don’t have to learn new chords, you just have to practice playing them in a second position on the neck. </p> <p>Once these chords are familiar, put on a backing track and comp over those chords using both positions on the fretboard to create your lines and phrases. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Modern%20Blues%20Chords%202.jpg" width="620" height="191" alt="Modern Blues Chords 2.jpg" /></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202821215&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Chromatic Passing Chords</strong></p> <p>Besides playing these three chords over each change in the blues progression, you also can add a passing chord between the 2nd and 3rd shapes to bring a sense of chromaticism to your chord lines. Because the 2nd and 3rd chords have the same shape, and are two frets apart, you can fill in the space between those chords with a chromatic chord, which you can see and hear in the example below. </p> <p>When applying these chromatic chords to your comping and chord soloing ideas, you don’t always have to play these chords in order, such as inside-outside-inside. </p> <p>Instead, just think about the chromatic chords as creating tension, which you then need to resolve in your lines by moving to an inside chord by the end of your phrase. </p> <p>Once you have explored the chord shapes below, put on a G blues backing track and comping over those changes using the following chord shapes to create you lines and phrases. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Modern%20Blues%20Chords%203.jpg" width="620" height="191" alt="Modern Blues Chords 3.jpg" /></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202821210&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Modern Jazz Blues Comping Study</strong></p> <p>To finish your study of these three-note, modern-sounding jazz blues chords, here's a comping study written out over a 12-bar G blues that you can learn and explore in the practice room. Try memorizing this study and playing it along with a backing track, as well as writing out a chord study of your own using the shapes learned in this lesson. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Modern%20Blues%20Chords%204.jpg" width="620" height="525" alt="Modern Blues Chords 4.jpg" /> </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202821207&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false"></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> Do you any questions about these modern jazz blues chords? Share your thoughts in the COMMENTS section below. </p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a senior lecturer at the Leeds College of Music and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-modernize-your-jazz-blues-chords#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Mon, 27 Apr 2015 18:42:29 +0000 Matt Warnock 24394 at http://www.guitarworld.com Acoustic Nation with Dale Turner: The Deft Fingerpicking and Odd-Tuning Riffage of Stephen Stills http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-dale-turner-deft-fingerpicking-and-odd-tuning-riffage-stephen-stills <!--paging_filter--><p>Stephen Stills’ status as a rock legend stems just as much from his singing and songwriting contributions in Buffalo Springfield, Crosby, Stills &amp; Nash (and Young) and his own solo work as it does from his innovative acoustic and electric guitar offerings. </p> <p>A hybrid stylist steeped in rock, blues, gospel, Latin, country and folk, Stills’ unique acoustic approach mixes a variety of fingerpicking techniques, a distinctive tone, and assorted odd tunings—one of which comprises only the notes E and B! He counts Joe Bonamassa, Ray LaMontagne and Kenny Wayne Shepherd (with whom Stills recently collaborated on the Rides’ <em>Can’t Get Enough</em>) as some of his many guitar celebrity fans. </p> <p>Let’s dig deep into this ax man’s bag of finger tricks.</p> <p>Buffalo Springfield’s roots trace back to Stills’ and songwriting guitarist Richie Furay’s early stints with the Au Go Go Singers (a nine-voice harmonizing group); a tour took them to Canada, where they met Neil Young. By 1966, the three converged in California, added bassist Bruce Palmer to the mix and quickly became the Whisky a Go Go’s “house band,” issuing Buffalo Springfield by year’s end. </p> <p>But it was Buffalo Springfield Again that contained breakout hits like “Rock &amp; Roll Woman,” Stills’ signature drop-D-tuned double-stop riff informing <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>. This song was the result of a jam at Byrds member David Crosby’s house, an interesting fact given that months later, tensions within the Byrds, Hollies (with Graham Nash) and Buffalo Springfield camps would lead to the formation of Crosby, Stills &amp; Nash.</p> <p> During this “band turmoil,” Stills, on April 26, 1968, took matters into his own hands and recorded a songwriter demo. Previously considered “lost,” these gems were commercially released in 2007 as <em>Just Roll Tape</em>, a guitar-and-vocal-only demo containing many future classics. Among these is the double-drop-D-tuned “Treetop Flyer,” akin to <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, a nod to Stills’ Chet Atkins influence. Ray LaMontagne has continuously cited this track (first officially released on 1991’s <em>Stills Alone</em>) as the inspiration for his musical career path.</p> <p> In 1969, Crosby, Stills &amp; Nash released their self-titled debut, showcasing their unique three-part vocal harmonies and layered acoustic guitars—the polar opposite of the era’s blues-based “loud guitar” rock, as popularized by bands like Cream, Led Zeppelin and the Doors. CSN contains many of Stills’ best-known songs, among them “Helplessly Hoping,” a standard-tuned gem propelled by fingerpicking similar to what you see in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>. </p> <p>CSN also introduced the world to “Bruce Palmer modal tuning” (low to high: E E E E B E), which Stills learned from the former Buffalo Springfield bassist and used in “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes,” as well as <em>Déjà vu</em> (CSN’s follow-up album with Neil Young) cuts like “4+20,” “Carry On” and “Word Game” from Stills’ 1971 solo album, <em>Stephen Stills 2.</em> </p> <p>Detune your A string to match the low open E, raise the D string one whole step to E, then detune the G string to match the open fourth string; this creates unison E notes on the bottom two and middle two strings. <strong>FIGURES 4-5</strong> show a mix of moves in this tuning, inspired by the aforementioned Stills songs.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/100530926&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-04-21%20at%204.48.52%20PM.png" width="620" height="721" alt="Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 4.48.52 PM.png" /></p> <p><em>Musician’s Institute instructor and author/transcriber Dale Turner played all the instruments/voices on his latest CD, <em>Mannerisms Magnified</em>. Visit <a href="http://intimateaudio.com/">intimateaudio.com</a> for more information.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-dale-turner-deft-fingerpicking-and-odd-tuning-riffage-stephen-stills#comments Acoustic Nation Dale Turner June 2015 Stephen Stills Lessons Blogs News Lessons Magazine Fri, 24 Apr 2015 18:13:20 +0000 Dale Turner 24352 at http://www.guitarworld.com Metal for Life with Metal Mike: A Practice Piece That Incorporates Useful, Challenging Techniques http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-practice-piece-incorporates-useful-challenging-techniques <!--paging_filter--><p>In my quest to raise my guitar-playing game to the highest level, I find it essential to devise practice techniques that will push my pick- and fret-hand abilities as far as possible. </p> <p>A great way to go about this is to combine the focus on these technical issues with the creative endeavor of writing original riffs and patterns that will hopefully spark new song ideas. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> is a 19-bar etude—a musical exercise that sounds like a mini-composition—I came up with that effectively addresses several fret- and pick-hand techniques that I consider crucial to mastering the art of metal guitar playing. </p> <p>In bars 1–4, I alternate a series of two-note power chords on the A and D strings against the palm-muted open low E string, which functions as a pedal tone. Notice that the E note on the A string’s seventh fret is common to each of the two-note chord shapes as the higher note on the D string ascends chromatically (one fret at a time). </p> <p>In this way, I’ve incorporated a melodic idea into a hard-driving rhythm part. At the end of bar 2, the note on the D string descends in order to set up the restatement of the pattern in a musically satisfying way.</p> <p>In bars 5 and 6, I initially accentuate an E5 power chord on the downbeat of beat one, and then repeatedly accent this chord every three 16th notes. The twist here is that, after the initial attack on each E5 chord, I hammer on from B to C on the A string, which creates a subtle grind that makes the riff sound heavy. </p> <p>Then, in bars 7 and 8, I switch to a single-note figure played in straight 16th notes across the bottom two strings, palm-muting the low E virtually the entire time in order to enhance the idea’s rhythmic power. In bars 9–12, I bring back the rhythmic approach from bar 1 but with different chords: here, a low E5 power chord is followed by C, Cs and D voicings on the A, D and G strings. Once again, I employ quick hammer-ons as I shift from chord to chord.</p> <p> The idea then wraps up in the final seven bars, starting in bars 13–15 with a lick played in steady 16th notes and built around consecutive pull-offs that are performed quickly while rapidly moving across the bottom three strings. I use a different fretting finger on each string—index on the low E, middle on the A and ring on the D—and it will take some practice to master this lick and get it up to the desired brisk tempo. </p> <p>The aggression culminates in bar 16 with a fast descending run that also moves across the bottom three strings, starting with 16th-note-triplet double pull-offs that incorporate a four-fret stretch as I move from the pinkie to the middle finger to the index finger. At the end of the pattern—bar 16, beat four—I shift up the neck slightly and switch the fretting fingers to pinkie, ring and index. </p> <p> All in all, this is a fun and challenging etude. Be sure to work it up to tempo gradually with attention paid to clear and precise articulation. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience4186713775001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="4186713775001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-04-21%20at%204.23.46%20PM.png" width="620" height="776" alt="Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 4.23.46 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-practice-piece-incorporates-useful-challenging-techniques#comments June 2015 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos News Lessons Magazine Fri, 24 Apr 2015 14:38:16 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak 24347 at http://www.guitarworld.com The Iron Maidens' Nita Strauss and Courtney Cox: "The Trooper" Playthrough Video http://www.guitarworld.com/iron-maidens-nita-strauss-and-courtney-cox-trooper-playthrough-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Today, GuitarWorld.com presents an exclusive playthrough video of Iron Maiden's "The Trooper," as performed by Iron Maidens guitarists Nita Strauss, left, and Courtney Cox.</p> <p>The video, which you can check out below, features some extremely up-close fret- and camerawork.</p> <p>"We know there's a lot of Iron Maiden instructional videos out there, showing you exactly what the guys do on the albums," Strauss says in the clip. "But today we're gonna be showing you a little bit of what we do live with the Iron Maidens."</p> <p>Consider this a pro-shot version of a hugely popular fan-filmed <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/iron-maidens-nita-strauss-and-courtney-cox-shred-namm-show-video">video of Strauss and Cox playing "The Trooper" at the BOSS/Roland booth at the 2012 Winter NAMM Show.</a></p> <p>If you want to see Strauss in action this weekend, be sure to tune into VH1 Classic's <em>That Metal Show</em> 9 p.m. (8 p.m. Central) Saturday, April 25. There's a repeat showing at 11 p.m. </p> <p>Strauss' episode also will feature Ace Frehley. And while the former Kiss guitarist has been on the show before, this marks the first <em>TMS</em> appearance by former Grand Funk Railroad vocalist/guitarist Mark Farner. </p> <p>Frehley talks about Kiss’ induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, being onstage with his former bandmates and his frustration that the original Kiss lineup didn't perform at the ceremony. Farner reminisces about the early days of Grand Funk Railroad, including a time the band had the opportunity to open for Led Zeppelin and how blown away he was by their performance. Strauss, the show's guest guitarist, discusses being discovered while playing the national anthem at an L.A. Kiss football game—and her upcoming solo album.</p> <p><strong>For more about <em>That Metal Show</em>, visit <a href="http://www.vh1.com/shows/that_metal_show/">vh1.com.</a></strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience4194260139001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="4194260139001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/iron-maiden">Iron Maiden</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/iron-maidens-nita-strauss-and-courtney-cox-trooper-playthrough-video#comments Courtney Cox Iron Maiden Nita Strauss That Metal Show The Iron Maidens Videos News Lessons Fri, 24 Apr 2015 12:28:28 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24375 at http://www.guitarworld.com Yngwie Malmsteen Pays Tribute to the World's First Shredder, Niccolo Paganini http://www.guitarworld.com/yngwie-malmsteen-pays-tribute-worlds-first-shredder-niccolo-paganini <!--paging_filter--><p>Of all my musical influences, classical violinist Niccolo Paganini has to be on top of the list. </p> <p>Though he lived in the late 18th century (long before image became as important in the making and marketing of musicians as their actual music), his extreme personal magnetism coupled with truly mind-boggling technique made him the world’s first bona fide rock star.</p> <p>Paganini was born in 1782 in Genoa, Italy, and by the time he was 20 he was the most famous violinist of his day. He mesmerized audiences and critics alike with his charismatic stage presence, otherworldly chops and flamboyant showmanship. </p> <p>Apart from his unparalleled technical wizardry on the instrument, Paganini is remembered for his artistic impact on later composers such as Liszt and Chopin, who used his virtuosity as a technical challenge in the search for greater expression in their own works.</p> <p>Apart from his obvious musical and technical brilliance, Paganini proved to me that a great musician doesn’t have to sacrifice virtuosity for showmanship. As a result, I’ve always strived to make my shows as visually exciting as possible without compromising my musical integrity.</p> <p>Paganini’s compositions also influenced me deeply—especially his 24 Caprices Op.1. I remember learning the Fifth Caprice in A minor—I’d practice it incessantly until I got it wired. It not only really helped me with my technique (particularly arpeggios), but opened my ears to harmony and melody.</p> <p>I learned the Fifth Caprice by listening to a recording of it. Because I didn’t have the sheet music, it was a long and painstaking process to pick up the melody by ear, but it was definitely worth it.</p> <p>I think that any guitarist can benefit from learning Paganini’s Caprices. To that end, I’ve written out the first 20 bars of his Fifth Caprice in A minor in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>. I have to warn you—this piece is not for the timid—you have to be very patient and put a lot of time in, but the results are well worth the effort.</p> <p>Keep in mind that guitar music sounds an octave lower than written (so you’ll be playing this piece an octave lower than where a violin would be playing it). The only reason I’m pointing this out is so that you don’t think you’re playing it wrong if you happen to hear a recording of it played on the violin.</p> <p>Also realize that the tab is totally subjective—there is no one “correct” fingering. I’ve written out just one possible fingering option. It’s how I might approach playing the piece (though often I’ll try different fingerings in some sections). You should use my suggested fingerings as a template to work out the fingerings that are most comfortable for you.</p> <p>Pay special attention to all the arpeggios, and work out your right-hand picking accordingly. </p> <p>For example, I’d use sweep picking (If you still have it, see my column in the July 1999 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>) to play the ascending E7 arpeggio in measure 4 and the descending C and G arpeggios in measure 15, and alternate picking (down-up-down-up) to play the two-note-per-string arpeggios in measures 3, 8 and 9. </p> <p>I’d use a combination alternate/sweep picking approach to play the F#dim7 arpeggio in measure 14.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/yngwie_pag.gif" /></p> <p>When playing the descending chromatic scale in measure 16, make sure to execute all the picked slides with your index finger.</p> <p>I hope you benefit as much from learning this Caprice as I did.</p> <p><em>Yngwie Malmsteen is Yngwie Malmsteen.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/yngwie-malmsteen-pays-tribute-worlds-first-shredder-niccolo-paganini#comments Niccolo Paganini Yngwie Malmsteen Blogs Lessons Magazine Thu, 23 Apr 2015 17:28:39 +0000 Yngwie Malmsteen 15506 at http://www.guitarworld.com Rut-Busters for Guitarists, Part 3 of 8: Phrasing http://www.guitarworld.com/rut-busters-guitarists-part-3-8-phrasing <!--paging_filter--><p>Welcome to Part 3 of my series of lessons, "Rut Busters for Guitarists." You can find <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/rut-busters-guitarists-part-1-8-setting-goals">Part 1</a> and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/rut-busters-guitarists-part-2-8-metronomes-and-acoustic-guitars">Part 2</a> under RELATED CONTENT, just below my photo.</p> <p>These lessons are aimed at breaking through barriers that might be preventing you from improving on the guitar.</p> <p>Some of these lessons will simply give you some good food for thought, and some will be more hands-on. Written to help you get past that plateau, these lessons are here to help you mix things up and keep your relationship with the guitar an interesting one.</p> <p>This third lesson discusses phrasing, giving you pointers on how to give your solos a musical, vocal-like quality and sound like you're playing something you meant to play, rather than stumbling upon some good ideas every now and then. Let's get started.</p> <p>Great melodies breath. Like a horn player or vocalist, your solos should have pause for breath. No one enjoys listening to a person who won’t stop talking, nor do we enjoy reading run-on sentences. Taking a pause between phrases prevents fatigue for the listener but also gives you a chance to think about what you'll play next, ensuring that your next lick or riff will be a good one.</p> <p>Music should be conversational. You should be listening to what the other musicians are playing and responding appropriately in your performance. There should be a quality of give and take.</p> <p>Great melodies, songs and solos tend to have a “call and response” element. Some like to describe it as a “question and answer” quality. Listen to classic artists like B.B. King, Chuck Berry and Albert King for great examples of this in their vocal melodies and guitar solos.</p> <p>This "question and answer” idea implies there are at least two phrases. Your initial motif, or basic musical idea, is stated, then a variation on that idea is played. To really create a “question and answer” sound, you’ll want the first phrase to end on a non-chord tone. This gives the impression that the phrase has not resolved itself and is incomplete. The second phrase provides the "answer" and should reiterate the motif, but resolve it by ending on a chord tone. </p> <p>The accompanying video provides an example. I hope it inspires you to introduce a more lyrical approach to your guitar playing.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/lCHmSaKwkVM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Guitarist Adrian Galysh is a solo artist, session musician, composer, as well as Education Coordinator for Guitar Center Lessons. He's the author of the book Progressive Guitar Warmups and Exercises. Adrian uses SIT Strings, Seymour Duncan Pickups and Effects, Brian Moore Guitars, and Morley Pedals. For more information, visit him at <a href="http://adriangalysh.com/">AdrianGalysh.com.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/rut-busters-guitarists-part-3-8-phrasing#comments Adrian Galysh Rut-Busters for Guitarists Videos Blogs Lessons Thu, 23 Apr 2015 17:21:33 +0000 Adrian Galysh 24367 at http://www.guitarworld.com Cracking the Code with Troy Grady: How to Play Vinnie Moore’s “Pepsi Lick” — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/cracking-code-troy-grady-how-play-vinnie-moore-s-pepsi-lick-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Vinnie Moore is not only one of the most accomplished and respected players in rock guitar—he’s also a pioneer of instructional video. </p> <p>In the wake of the Yngwie Malmsteen-inspired sea change toward picking technique virtuosity in the Eighties, Moore was one of the first players to gain prominence for his technical skill. </p> <p>Moore’s debut instructional video, <em>Speed, Accuracy and Articulation</em>, was one of the first close-up displays of picking-hand dominance available on home video. It was a one-hour <em>tour de force</em> of effortless prog-fusion improvisation and pristine plectrum accuracy few could manage, yet it was delivered in Moore’s relatable, regular-guy style that made it approachable and inspiring. It was an instant instructional classic.</p> <p>Even more amazing is that <em>Speed, Accuracy and Articulation</em> was filmed in one straight take, with virtually no edits or re-takes, after a previous studio session left precisely one hour on the clock for the day. As anyone who has filmed video lessons can attest, this is simply a super-human feat of on-camera consistency and cool-headedness.</p> <p>As it happens, this wasn’t Moore’s first time on camera. An early breakthrough in Moore’s career arrived in the form of a now-famous 1984 <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DrjvUTfcpWI" target="_blank">Pepsi commercial</a> in which a guitarist bursts the caps off a crate of Pepsi bottles with nothing but the power of his searing shred. The bottle-opening barrage of 16th-note triplets in the commercial is Vinnie’s, as are the fretboard hand closeups in the commercial. (Incidentally, the air-guitar acting in the wide shots is Honeymoon Suite’s <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uK0AmgDGpPo" target="_blank">Derry Grehan</a>, also a great player.)</p> <p>The “Pepsi Lick” is a classic pattern which we came to know by the late Eighties as “descending sixes." And Moore’s second instructional video, <em>Advanced Lead Guitar Techniques</em>, featured a closeup look at exactly how the lick is played. It turns out that a precise sequence of rotational picking movements is responsible for the accuracy of the intricate threading between the strings. </p> <p>Nearly invisible at normal video speeds, these “two-way pickslanting” movements become clear in slow motion—and more importantly, learnable and repeatable by the rest of us. At shred-level speeds, these movements become critical, as they are the most efficient way to move from one string to another. And this is why you’ll see them in the techniques of all the great three-note-per-string masters, from Al Di Meola to Paul Gilbert. Check out the accompanying video lesson to see exactly how they work.</p> <p>Musically, Vinnie’s take on this venerable pattern is precise and gutsy, capped with a searing four-finger, bent-note shake on the phrase’s final note that drives the statement home in dramatic fashion. It’s a shining example of how musical drama can be created from even simple ideas with just the right mix of “Speed," “Accuracy” and, most of all, “Articulation."</p> <p>For more on the amazing Vinnie Moore, check out the four-hour Masters in Mechanics <a href="http://www.troygrady.com/mechanics/">Antigravity Seminar</a>. Antigravity deconstructs the legendary accuracy of three-note-per-string masters like Vinnie Moore, Michael Angelo Batio, Paul Gilbert, Al Di Meola and John McLaughlin as never before. For the first time in an instructional format, we build a simple recipe of hand movements that explains exactly how these kinds of complex string-changing licks are played.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ln8mmyefT6c" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p style=" margin: 12px auto 6px auto; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,Sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14px; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; -x-system-font: none; display: block;"> <a title="View The Pepsi Lick on Scribd" href="https://www.scribd.com/doc/262842884/The-Pepsi-Lick" style="text-decoration: underline;" >The Pepsi Lick</a></p> <p><iframe class="scribd_iframe_embed" src="https://www.scribd.com/embeds/262842884/content?start_page=1&amp;view_mode=scroll&amp;show_recommendations=true" data-auto-height="false" data-aspect-ratio="undefined" scrolling="no" id="doc_25932" width="100%" height="600" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <p><em>Troy Grady is the creator of <a href="http://troygrady.com/code/">Cracking the Code</a>, a documentary series with a unique analytical approach to understanding guitar technique. Melding archival footage, in-depth interviews, painstakingly crafted animation and custom soundtrack, it’s a pop-science investigation of an age-old mystery: Why are some players seemingly super-powered?</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/vinnie-moore">Vinnie Moore</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/cracking-code-troy-grady-how-play-vinnie-moore-s-pepsi-lick-video#comments Cracking the Code Troy Grady Vinnie Moore Videos Blogs News Lessons Thu, 23 Apr 2015 15:16:08 +0000 Troy Grady 24366 at http://www.guitarworld.com String Theory: Fun with Two Bright-Sounding, Uniquely Flavored Scales Built from the Same Six Notes http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-fun-two-bright-sounding-uniquely-flavored-scales-built-same-six-notes <!--paging_filter--><p><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-jimmy-brown-intriguingly-exotic-sound-c-lydian-hexatonic-video">Last month, I presented the intriguingly exotic C Lydian hexatonic scale</a>, which is formed by combining C and D triads (C E G + D F# A = C D E F# G A). </p> <p>Now, as we had done with E minor and D major hexatonic in the preceding lesson (<a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-jimmy-brown-e-minord-major-hexatonic-connection-video">April 2015 issue</a>), I’d like to reveal the flip side of the musical coin and introduce an appealing mode of C Lydian hexatonic, D Mixolydian hexatonic, which has a bright and playful quality and is comprised of the very same six notes, only reoriented around a D root—D E F# G A C (see <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>). </p> <p>As I will demonstrate, this modal relationship between the two scales is very convenient and useful for crafting sweet-sounding melodies over a C-to-D or D-to-C chord vamp. But first, some more helpful insight into D Mixolydian hexatonic.</p> <p> Another way to think of this scale is to take the seven-note D Mixolydian mode (D E F# G A B C) and omit the sixth, B, which creates a wide, minor-pentatonic-like gap—a minor third interval, between the fifth, A and the minor, or “flat” seventh, C (see <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>). </p> <p>As I pointed out with C Lydian hexatonic versus the full C Lydian mode last month, D Mixolydian hexatonic retains the signature notes of D Mixolydian, in this case the minor seventh, C, and the major third, F#, in a way that sounds slightly less dense and more “open” and arpeggio-like, while offering more useful rhythmic phrasing options, due to the lesser and even number of notes (six instead of seven). </p> <p>You could also think of D Mixolydian hexatonic as being nearly identical to D major hexatonic (D E F# G A B), the only difference being the inclusion of the minor seventh, C, instead of the sixth, B, which subtly changes the scale’s character and flavor (see <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>). To me, this distinction makes D Mixolydian hexatonic sound more “Celtic” than “country.” Speaking of which, <strong>FIGURE 4</strong> is a sprightly, Irish fiddle–style melody in 6/8 meter that’s based on alternating D and C major arpeggios and makes me think of leprechauns. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 5</strong> is a slippery legato run played across the top three strings that alternates between C Lydian hexatonic and D Mixolydian hexatonic and ascends the fretboard through higher “inversions” of each scale, using finger slides to shift positions and create a seamless flow of notes. Try applying this same type of pattern to other string groups. </p> <p>Inspired by Jeff Beck, Joe Satriani and Warren Haynes, <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> is a tumbling lead phrase that descends the fretboard diagonally and exploits a quick, decorative half-step bend and release from F# to G in three different octaves to create a noodle-y, sitar-like effect.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience4186823015001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="4186823015001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-04-21%20at%203.58.48%20PM.png" width="620" height="834" alt="Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 3.58.48 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmy-brown">Jimmy Brown</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-fun-two-bright-sounding-uniquely-flavored-scales-built-same-six-notes#comments Jimmy Brown June 2015 String Theory Videos News Lessons Magazine Thu, 23 Apr 2015 14:34:19 +0000 Jimmy Brown 24346 at http://www.guitarworld.com Betcha Can't Play This: John Petrucci's Descending E Mixolydian Run http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-john-petruccis-descending-e-mixolydian-run <!--paging_filter--><p> This is a descending E Mixolydian [E F# G# A B C# D] run that moves across the strings and eventually down the neck in a cascading type of contour. </p> <p>It’s based on a recurring nine-note melodic motif of three 16th-note triplets, with three alternate-picked notes followed by two double pull-offs.</p> <p>I begin in ninth position with a fairly compact shape that spans the ninth to 12th frets. At the end of bar 1 and moving into bar 2, the fret hand shifts down two frets and spreads out to cover a four-fret span, from the seventh fret to the 11th. Use your first, second and fourth fingers to fret the notes. </p> <p> The fret hand quickly shifts down to a lower position at the beginning of bars 3, 4 and 5, so try to make these transitions as smooth and seamless as possible. Make sure your pull-offs are loud and clear, and use the palm of your pick hand to mute the unused lower strings during bars 1 and 2.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/fxKLaesuQE0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-04-02%20at%205.16.42%20PM.png" width="620" height="217" alt="Screen Shot 2014-04-02 at 5.16.42 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-john-petruccis-descending-e-mixolydian-run#comments Betcha Can't Play This John Petrucci September 2010 Videos Betcha Can't Play This Blogs News Lessons Magazine Thu, 23 Apr 2015 13:39:40 +0000 John Petrucci 20924 at http://www.guitarworld.com From Bach to Rock: Using Diatonic Power Chords and Inverted Borrowed Chords to Create More Musical Riffs http://www.guitarworld.com/bach-rock-using-diatonic-power-chords-and-inverted-borrowed-chords-create-more-musical-riffs <!--paging_filter--><p>One of the most enjoyable things when learning to play the guitar can be writing your own music. This was the case for me when I first learned to play, and many of my students love to write their own music as well. </p> <p>The difficulty in writing music as a beginner (or sometimes even as an experienced player) can lie in having a limited knowledge of chords and how they function within a key, or what a key even is. </p> <p>What frequently happens for electric guitar players is that their chord progressions consist only of root-position power chords. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but understanding keys, scales and chords can make your writing much more intricate.</p> <p>This riff-writing exercise will demonstrate how to create diatonic and borrowed chords based on a chromatic bass line while staying in key. For this example, I’m going to use the key of A minor and the harmonic minor scale as my guide for chord construction.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/1_10.png" width="620" height="136" alt="1_10.png" /></p> <p>Here’s my bass line:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/2_8.png" width="620" height="160" alt="2_8.png" /></p> <p>If I take each note of the bass line and create a root-position power chord, here’s what I’ll end up with: Besides having all parallel fifths, there are problems with the chords B5, C♯5 and D♯5. These all contain notes that don’t fit in the key of A minor with the root of the chord given. </p> <p>But how do we know what chords fit? This diagram shows the diatonic chords within the key of A minor. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/3_6.png" width="620" height="88" alt="3_6.png" /></p> <p>Notice all of the chords are built off of the A minor scale. Using just power chords, the fifth will be out of place in several instances. The B5 does not exist in this key, because B5 contains an F♯. C♯5 is incorrect as well, as the G♯ will only be used for the E (V) chord. With D♯5, the A♯ is also outside of the scale. This will very be problematic if you’re writing a melodic line in the key of A minor, as notes are going to clash with these three chords.</p> <p>In the audio file, I’ve recorded a solo in A minor, and you can hear how notes will clash using all root-position power chords:</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/146813759&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p>A simple way to make the appropriate chord move with the bass is to use an alternation of fifths and sixths:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/4_3.png" width="620" height="167" alt="4_3.png" /></p> <p>Using this type of chord alternation with the chromatic bass line creates a very musical progression as several different types of chords are used (or implied). Obviously, the A5 fits. Creating an inverted G chord fits, and it makes a perfect transition to C5. </p> <p>The A7 chord built off of C♯ is a borrowed chord called a secondary dominant. As it doesn’t fit in the key of A minor, if you look to the next chord of D5 and use that key for just that one chord, A7 becomes the dominant (V) chord in the key of D minor. </p> <p>The exact same thing occurs with the B7 chord. The following chord is an E, so by borrowing that key temporarily, the dominant becomes B7. The final two chords are simply creating a suspension with the interval of a fourth resolving to a third (Esus to E) that can then be resolved back to an A5 chord.</p> <p>Using the same solo as before, I’ve combined it with the proper chords for an A minor chromatic progression. Listen to the difference:</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/146813758&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p>Having a working knowledge of music theory can make your musical canvas much easier to paint. It simply gives you a starting point from which to experiment.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/8hksBbos-LY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/bach-rock-are-you-learning-play-songs-or-learning-play-guitar">Check out my last column — "Are You Learning to Play Songs or Learning to Play Guitar?" — here.</a></strong></p> <p><em><a href="http://matthiasyoung.com">Matthias Young</a> teaches online guitar lessons at <a href="http://www.freeguitarvideos.com/">FreeGuitarVideos.com</a> and is the Head of Guitar at <a href="http://callanwolde.org">Callanwolde Fine Arts Center</a> in Atlanta, Georgia. His book, <em><a href="http://www.freeguitarvideos.com/metal/metal-guitar-method.html">Metal Guitar Method</a></em>, has sold thousands since its publication in 2012. Young, who has a bachelor's degree in music from Georgia State University, is pursuing a master of music degree at Boston University. If you’d like to study with Matthias over Skype, visit <a href="http://matthiasyoung.com">MatthiasYoung.com</a>. </em></p> <p>You can follow Matthias on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/MatthiasYoungMusic">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/MatthiasYoung">Twitter</a>, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXAcBwcIb4bXcUIM8jk2tdqO4p-i8BKmV">YouTube</a> and <a href="https://plus.google.com/113890145150829497378/posts">Google+.</a></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bach-rock-using-diatonic-power-chords-and-inverted-borrowed-chords-create-more-musical-riffs#comments From Bach to Rock Matthias Young Videos Blogs Lessons Thu, 23 Apr 2015 13:31:55 +0000 Matthias Young 21171 at http://www.guitarworld.com Metal for Life: Killer Runs to Sharpen Your Pick-Hand and Fret-Hand Skills http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-killer-runs-sharpen-your-pick-hand-and-fret-hand-skills <!--paging_filter--><p>In this month’s column, I’d like to present a few single-note patterns that are designed to fortify fret-hand/pick-hand coordination while they strengthen your overall chops and ability to play fast and clean. In my own experience, I have found that drilling on one or two very specific melodic fretboard shapes works wonders in uncovering technical areas of weakness in both hands. Doing this over a long period of time will deliver solid results and make a marked improvement in your playing. <img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/metalforlife0612_1.jpg" /> <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> is a 16th-note run that begins with two bars of a melodic pattern based on the G major scale (G A B C D E F#), which I then transpose, in bars 3 and 4, up a fourth, to C major (C D E F G A B), via a quick position shift. For both of these shapes, I use my fret-hand’s first, second and fourth fingers (index, middle and pinkie) throughout. Playing a shape like this over and over will uncover any shortcomings in your fret-hand dexterity. Be sure to fret using only your fingertips, with the thumb placed squarely on the back of the guitar neck in order for the fret-hand fingers to be positioned with a nice, high arch. Additionally, I use alternate (down-up) picking throughout and strive for absolute smoothness and even execution as the patterns are played over and over across the top two strings. <img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/metalforlife0612_2.jpg" /> Now let’s add a slight twist to the melodic shape in order to work the fret hand a little more. In <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, the melody played across beats one and two is identical to that of <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, but I play different shapes across the last two beats of the bar, beginning with a pull-off on the high E string, followed by more alternate picking. Here, the initial melodic shape is played four times in G before I transpose it up to C. Notice, however, that I do change the very end of the initial phrase, in bar 3, to accommodate the abrupt shift up to 12th position on the last 16th note. <img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/metalforlife0612_3.jpg" /> In <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I use the previous melodic sequence as the basis for a new exercise run that ascends the fretboard through three different fingering patterns of the G major scale. Here, I play the patterns as 16th-note triplets, ascending and then descending on each successive eighth note. Again, I rely on strict alternate picking and strive for absolute clean, even execution. As a whole, this pattern is much simpler than the previous ones, as it simply ascends and descends, but as you will find, getting it up to “shred speed” will require real work and diligence.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience1573989017001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1573989017001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-killer-runs-sharpen-your-pick-hand-and-fret-hand-skills#comments June 2012 Metal For Life Metal Mike Metal Mike Chlasciak 2012 Blogs News Lessons Magazine Wed, 22 Apr 2015 19:53:51 +0000 Metal Mike 15510 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jazz Guitar Corner: Break Open ii-V’s With This Nine-Note Scale http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-break-open-ii-v-s-nine-note-scale <!--paging_filter--><p>ii-Vs are some of the most commonly used and important chords in the jazz repertoire. It’s a progression you’ll see often as a jazz guitarist, so being able to confidently solo over these chords is an essential skill. </p> <p>When first learning to blow over these chords, we often start with the Dorian and Mixolydian modes over each chord, respectively. But, while playing these modes is correct, they often sound too diatonic, not enough tension to really be “jazzy.”</p> <p>This is where Bebop Scales come into play. In this article, we’ll explore the Minor Bebop Scale, the Dominant Bebop Scale and a hybrid I like to call the Combined Bebop Scale. </p> <p>As a bonus, there’s a video included to show you how these scales sound in an improvisational context. </p> <p>So grab your guitar, crank your amp and get ready to add a little jazziness to your solos. </p> <p><strong>Minor Bebop Scale</strong></p> <p>The first scale we’ll look at is the Minor Bebop Scale. This scale is built by taking the Dorian Mode and adding in a #7 interval. You can use this scale to solo over a m7 chord as it uses the related mode, and the #7 provides that extra “jazziness” the diatonic modes don’t provide on their own. </p> <p>Once you have the Minor Bebop Scale under your fingers in the position below, with the root on the 5th string, put on a Dm7 backing track and practice improvising with this scale. Then, move it to other keys around the neck to really ingrain this fingering in your hands and your ears. </p> <p>As you move on to the next scale in this lesson, you’ll use the Minor Bebop Scale as the foundation for further adaptation. So, having a strong grasp on this fingering and scale is an important step in ensuring that you get the most out of the next sections in this lesson. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%201%20Dorian%20Mode%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="160" alt="Example 1 Dorian Mode JPG.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Dominant Bebop Scale</strong></p> <p>With the Minor Bebop Scale under your fingers you can move on to the V chord in the ii-V progression and learn the Dominant Bebop Scale in this position. Notice that you don’t have to move your hand on the neck to get this next scale under your fingers. It sits right above the Minor Bebop Scale on the fretboard. </p> <p>The Dominant Bebop Scale is built by taking the Mixolydian Mode and adding in one extra note, the #7 interval. This produces an eight-note scale, just like the Minor Bebop Scale, except it’s used to solo over 7th chords. </p> <p>Once you have the fingering down in the example below, put on a G7 backing track and solo over that chord with this scale. Then, take it to the other 11 keys to see how it sits in different areas of the neck. </p> <p>If you are feeling confident with these two scales at this point, you can put on a ii-V backing track, maybe starting with 4-bars per chord, and improvise over each chord using the appropriate scale. For Dm7 you would solo for four bars using the D Minor Bebop scale, then switch over to four bars of the G Dominant Bebop Scale over G7. </p> <p>Once you have a handle on the four-bar phrases, you can shrink it down to two-bars per chord, then one-bar per chord and finally if you’re feeling adventurous, two-beats per chord. The goal is to be able to use each scale to improvise over the appropriate chord in a progression, helping you to inject the Bebop Scale sound into your playing, while thinking about each chord as a separate entity at the same time. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%202%20Mixolydian%20Mode%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="160" alt="Example 2 Mixolydian Mode JPG.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>The “Combined” Bebop Scale</strong></p> <p>One of the cool things I discovered when I was first studying these scales is that not only can you apply them separately to each chord in a ii-V, but you can use them together over both of these chords with a “Combined” Bebop Scale. </p> <p>When doing so, the passing notes from each individual scale create a new tension over the other chord in the progression, which you can see here as a reference. </p> <p>Key of C</p> <p>Dm7 = C# (#7) and F# (M3)<br /> G7 = C# (b5 Blues Note) and F# (#7)</p> <p>Like any chromatic note, you probably don’t want to sit on these passing notes in your lines. It’s cool to start an idea on these notes, or to inject them into the middle of a line, but unless you’re looking to create a high-level of tension in your solo, it’s probably not a great idea to end a line on one of these notes, or pause on them for a long time in your playing. </p> <p>Once you have this fingering down, I added the A B C on the top string to fill out the fingering in this position, put on a Dm7-G7 backing track and solo over both chords using this scale. This gives you an added layer of melodic material to choose from over these chords, on top of the individual scales addressed earlier. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Example%203%20Combined%20Bebop%20Scale%20JPG.jpg" width="620" height="171" alt="Example 3 Combined Bebop Scale JPG.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Accompanying Video Lesson</strong></p> <p>Check out the video lesson below to see this scale explained in detail, hear it played on the guitar and check out this great sounding scale in action in an improvised solo. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/24YV2oNTZt0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Did you check this “combined” bebop scale out in the practice room? What are your thoughts on this nine-note scale?</p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com/">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a senior lecturer at the Leeds College of Music and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-break-open-ii-v-s-nine-note-scale#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Wed, 22 Apr 2015 19:51:35 +0000 Matt Warnock 15579 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: How to Create Flowing, Stylish Licks Like Eric Clapton — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-how-create-flowing-stylish-licks-eric-clapton-video <!--paging_filter--><p>The eternally great Eric Clapton—sometimes known as “God” in certain circles—turned 70 this year, and is set to celebrate this milestone with a pair of spring concerts at New York’s legendary Madison Square Garden. </p> <p>What better time than to examine his effortlessly beautiful and seamlessly flowing soloing technique, first heard in full bloom on his timeless recordings with Cream, featuring the late, great Jack Bruce on bass and Ginger Baker on drums. </p> <p>When it comes to spontaneous, improvised phrasing, there is perhaps no better blues-rock guitarist than Eric, especially when heard within the context of the many extended jams he performed with Cream and Blind Faith. </p> <p>He has the innate ability to move smoothly from one great, imminently melodic phrase into the next while also both riding the groove and pushing it along. When improvising, Clapton will subtly mix up the rhythms of his lines to create clearly defined syncopations that serve to strengthen the melodic quality of his solos. </p> <p><strong> FIGURE 1</strong> presents an extended solo that moves through an entire 12-bar blues progression in the key of D, the three chords being D7, G7 and A7. The tempo is a fairly slow 80 beats per minute, which allows for the steady articulation of 16th-note rhythms that employ subtle phrasing variations. In bars 1–3, I stick with the notes from the D minor pentatonic scale (D F G A C). At the end of bar 3, I transition to sliding sixth intervals by sounding pairs of notes that are six scale degrees apart within the D Mixolydian mode (D E F# G A B C), with all of the notes played on the D and B strings. </p> <p> This sets up the move to the four chord, G7, in bar 5, and here I play a simple melody based on G minor pentatonic (G Bb C D F), returning to D minor pentatonic in bar 6 to anticipate the change back to the one chord, D7, in bar 7. </p> <p>On beat three of bar 7, I make very brief reference to the parallel D major pentatonic scale (D E F# A B), used to add some brightness and warmth to the melody and also as a transition to get back into D minor pentatonic in 10th position. Alternating between parallel minor and major pentatonic scales is a standard technique used by all blues guitar greats, such as T-Bone Walker, B.B. King, Buddy Guy and many others, and Clapton learned this technique from his intense study of the recordings of all of these masters and made it one of the hallmarks of his unique style.</p> <p> Bar 9 moves to the five chord, A7, and bar 10 shifts to the four chord, G7, and for each of these chords I base my lines on the associated minor pentatonic scales (A minor pentatonic: A C D E G). At the return to the tonic in bars 11 and 12, I revert to D minor pentatonic and move freely between third and fifth positions. </p> <p> When playing these melodic shapes and ideas, strive for smooth articulation and, as always, listen closely to the many great live recordings of Cream—and the studio recordings of Blind Faith—to hear priceless examples of Clapton’s stellar soloing. <strong>FIGURES 2 and 3</strong> illustrate extended patterns for D minor pentatonic and D major pentatonic, so be sure to study these too. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience4186755233001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="4186755233001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-04-21%20at%204.32.55%20PM.png" width="620" height="783" alt="Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 4.32.55 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eric-clapton">Eric Clapton</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-how-create-flowing-stylish-licks-eric-clapton-video#comments Andy Aledort Eric Clapton In Deep June 2015 Videos News Lessons Magazine Tue, 21 Apr 2015 20:41:05 +0000 Andy Aledort 24348 at http://www.guitarworld.com