Lessons http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/8/all en Inventing the Steel: How to Solo Like Angus Young, Jimmy Page and Tony Iommi http://www.guitarworld.com/inventing-steel-how-solo-angus-young-jimmy-page-and-tony-iommi <!--paging_filter--><p>Regarded by many as the three most vital purveyors of pure hard rock/heavy metal sonic evil, AC/DC’s <strong>Angus Young</strong>, Led Zeppelin’s <strong>Jimmy Page</strong> and Black Sabbath’s <strong>Tony Iommi</strong> have each forged a distinct, instantly recognizable guitar style and sound. </p> <p>After decades of dedicated service, all three players continue to influence countless up-and-coming metalheads the world over, and an in-depth study of each guitarist’s distinct musical personality is mandatory for any aspiring hard rock player.</p> <p>Young, Page and Iommi share a few similarities in their respective crafts. </p> <p>All three have relied on Gibson solidbody/dual-humbucker-style guitars for the majority of their careers, inspiring signature models of their respective axes: Angus Young has favored Gibson SG-type guitars and has his own Gibson signature model; Jimmy Page is most closely associated with the 1959 sunburst Les Paul, replicated in limited quantity by Gibson (with a retail price of more than $20,000); and Tony Iommi’s long association with the ’61 SG led to the creation of the similarly designed Gibson Tony Iommi model (as well as the custom-made SG-type Patrick Eggle and JayDee models that Iommi also uses). When soloing, all three guitarists most often use the bridge pickup. </p> <p>Armed with their respective axes, the three defined the sound of metal in the late Sixties and early Seventies by relying on specific amplification: Jimmy Page favors Marshall SLP-1959 100-watt amps modified with KT-88 tubes, while also employing Voxes, Hiwatts, Fender Super Reverbs and Orange amps. </p> <p>Angus Young has generally used Marshall 100-watt “Plexi” models along with JTM-45 “Plexis.” Iommi is also known for his use of Marshall and Orange gear and has long been a fan of Laney amplification; he even has his own Laney 100-watt signature amplifier.</p> <p>Another commonality among the three guitar gods is their choice of scale for soloing. In the spirit of their American blues guitar heroes, all three rely most heavily on the minor pentatonic scale. <strong>FIGURE 1a</strong> shows the A minor pentatonic scale (A C D E G) played in fifth position; <strong>FIGURE 1b</strong> shows the same scale as played in an extended pattern that traverses the neck from the third fret to the 12th. The root notes are circled in each figure; once you have become familiar with these fingering patterns, be sure to move them to all other keys.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/1_5.png" width="620" height="113" alt="1_5.png" /></p> <p>Let’s now look at these two patterns one octave and 12 frets higher: <strong>FIGURE 2a</strong> depicts A minor pentatonic played in 17th position while <strong>FIGURE 2b</strong> shows an extended pattern that spans the 15th–22nd frets, ending with a whole step bend from D to E. Young, Page and Iommi all cover the highest reaches of the neck in many of their solos, so be sure to practice the minor pentatonic scales in every key and all over the fretboard.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/2_3.png" width="620" height="120" alt="2_3.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Angus Young</span></p> <p>With his comedic school-boy outfit and hyperenergetic stage antics, Angus Young has been both celebrated and reviled for his over-the-top persona. But in truth, he is simply one of the greatest rock soloists ever. His intense, exciting playing style is equal parts adrenaline, blues rock fire, and precision, all of it spiked with a crash-and-burn attitude. In other words, it’s hard rock at its absolute best.</p> <p>One of Young’s greatest solos is the one he recorded in the AC/DC classic, “You Shook Me All Night Long” (<em>Back in Black</em>). <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> presents a solo played in this style: it’s played over a repeating I-IV-V-IV chord progression in the key of G—G-C-D-C—and is based primarily on the G minor pentatonic scale (G Bf C D F); bars 1–4 are played in third position, and then the next phrase shifts one octave higher to 15th position in bars 5–8. </p> <p>The figure begins with a whole-step bend from C to D on the G string that is sustained and played with vibrato for three beats. Use your ring finger to fret the note and both your ring and middle fingers to push the string, with the middle finger one fret behind the ring finger. This two-finger bending technique is known as reinforced fingering and is used extensively by Young as well as Page and Iommi. </p> <p>The first note in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> is a prime example of Young’s signature bend vibrato: upon bending the string with the ring and middle fingers (the index finger may also be used to help push the string for additional strength and support), the bend is then repeatedly released partially—somewhere between a quarter step and a half step—and restored to a whole step (“full”) in quick, even rhythm. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/3_1.png" width="620" height="259" alt="3_1.png" /></p> <p>When executing this type of bend vibrato, you’ll find that it helps to push your fret-hand thumb against the top side of the neck, as this provides leverage for the fingers that are pushing and releasing the string. Young’s vibrato is relatively fast and not very wide and will require practice and keen listening to emulate authentically.</p> <p>The C-to-D bend is followed with an index-finger barre across the top two strings at the third fret, and in bar 2 the pinkie frets F (second string/sixth fret), followed by the same reinforced ring-finger bend and release on C (third string/fifth fret). At the end of bar 2, after fretting the G note, roll the tip of the ring finger from the fourth string over to the fifth string and then back. This “finger roll” may take some practice to get used to, but it’s a very useful technique that is worth learning. </p> <p>What makes a solo like this great is its simplicity and melodic quality. Each idea is balanced against the next in an effortless way, and the overall result is a memorable solo that one could easily sing—an earmark of every great hard rock guitar solo. </p> <p>Beginning in bar 5 of <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, the second half of the solo relates to the first half in that it also leads off with a sustained bend, this time from a high F, the flatted seventh, to G, the root note, which is played vibrato in a similar manner. When playing minor pentatonic licks like these in high positions, many blues, blues/rock and hard rock players adopt a three-finger approach—index-middle-ring—for the majority of their licks, presumably because of the closeness of the frets. Young, however, chooses to use his pinkie in many of his licks, regardless of his fretboard position. </p> <p>I wrap the solo up in bar 8 by switching to a riff based on G major pentatonic (G A B D E). A staple of blues soloing is to alternate between the “sweet” sound of major pentatonic and the darker sound of minor pentatonic, and Young does just this in many of his solos. </p> <p>Another great example of Young’s masterful soloing can be heard on the title track to <em>Back in Black</em>. <strong>FIGURE 4</strong> shows a solo played in a similar style. This example is played over a simple repeating chord progression in the key of E: E-D-A (I-fVII-IV). The majority of the solo is based on the E minor pentatonic scale (E G A B D), although I begin with a phrase that incorporates notes from the E Dorian mode (E Fs G A B Cs D) by including the sixth, Cs. The placement of this pitch is critical in relation to the accompanying chord progression, as it lands on the A chord, and Cs is the major third of A. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/4.png" width="620" height="366" alt="4.png" /></p> <p>Like <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, the goal with this example is to illustrate Young’s clear sense of melody and melodic development: <strong>FIGURE 4</strong> begins with a “hooky” phrase that is developed by descending the G string in a similar manner across the first two bars. At bar 3, I jump up to the 12th-position E minor pentatonic “box” pattern, beginning with a high D-to-E bend and vibrato that is sustained through the first two beats of the bar, followed by a fast phrase based on descending 16th-note triplets. </p> <p>The solo then stays rooted in 12th position through the remainder of bar 3, all the way to the end of bar 7. As with the high-position pentatonic licks in the previous example, the majority of these licks may be played comfortably with three fingers. </p> <p>Particularly noteworthy is the classic lightning-fast blues/rock/metal run that spans bar 7 of <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>: based entirely on descending 16th-note triplets, the run begins with a pull-off from a high G (first string/15th fret) to E (12th fret) followed by D (second string/15th fret). The next 16th-note triplet starts one note lower, on E, and is followed by a pull-off from D to B (15th fret to12th fret). The pattern of starting one note lower with each subsequent 16th-note triplet and using pull-offs wherever possible is repeated throughout the run. </p> <p>As the solo develops, analyze each beat and notice how the progression of the lines contributes to the overall phrase. Young is a master of “phrase-ology,” a skill/gift that lends an almost effortless quality to his solos and the feeling of constantly pushing the music forward and telling a story. </p> <hr /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">JIMMY PAGE</span> <p>Jimmy Page was inspired by many of the same American blues guitar heroes as his British blues/rock contemporaries Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Peter Green. These heroes include the three Kings—Albert, B.B. and Freddie—as well as T-Bone Walker, Buddy Guy and Otis Rush. </p> <p>Page was also equally influenced by the fiery intensity of rockabilly guitarists Cliff Gallup (Gene Vincent and the Blue Caps) and Scotty Moore (Elvis Presley), as well as the futuristic daring of Les Paul. A student of many different styles of guitar playing, Page always combines in his solos a well-balanced structure and sense of melodic development with true depth of feeling. His progressive approach to soloing has pushed the nature of blues/rock guitar to previously unimagined territory. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 5</strong> is an eight-bar solo representative of Page’s improvisation style. It’s played in the key of A minor over a repeating Am-G-F (i-fVII-fVI) chord progression. The majority of the solo is based on A minor pentatonic (A C D E G), beginning in fifth position with a D-to-E bend on the G string. This note is bent and shaken using the same reinforced fingering and thumb leveraging techniques described earlier in reference to <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/5_0.png" width="620" height="351" alt="5_0.png" /></p> <p>This initial bend is followed by a stream of cascading 16th notes played across the next four beats on the top three strings, with notes quickly alternating between either the fifth and seventh frets or the fifth and eighth frets. Through the majority of this solo, a balance of eighth and 16th notes is achieved, giving the solo a forward-leaning quality as each phrase flows seamlessly into the next. </p> <p>Over an F chord in bars 2, 4, 6 and 8, I occasionally incorporate an F note into the A minor pentatonic-derived lines in order to clearly relate the solo line to the backing chord progression; this approach is a Page trademark. Adding this one note also serves to broaden the solo beyond the strict blues territory while also strengthening the melodic quality of the licks. </p> <p>Bar 5 begins with a descending run wherein a stream of 16th notes are phrased in two six-note groups that form an interesting melodic contour. A similar phrasing approach is used in bar 6 with successive four-note descending groups. The solo develops interestingly and builds to a climax in bars 7 and 8 with a repeated melodic “shape” that ascends the A minor pentatonic scale in seven-note phrases, starting from either the root note or the fifth each time. </p> <p>While this may sound overly analyzed, in truth it is the application of these melodic phrasing techniques that gives the solo its clear sense of structure, which is a hallmark of all of Page’s best lead work.</p> <hr /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">TONY IOMMI</span> <p>As the progenitor of the heaviest of heavy metal, Tony Iommi set high standards for the writing of demonic-sounding riffs while he simultaneously created the template for the heavy metal soloing of future generations.</p> <p>As a teenager, Iommi, a left-handed player, was the victim of an unfortunate accident in which he lost the tips of his right hand’s middle and ring fingers while working in a sheet metal factory. Discouraged but not defeated, the resourceful guitarist devised plastic covers made from bottle caps to wear over those fingertips. </p> <p>In later years, he would wear custom–fitted leather finger protectors. Iommi also switched to using super light-gauge strings: .008, .008, .011, .018w, .024 and .032, which are much easier to fret and bend than a standard set of .009s or 010s. </p> <p>In its earliest days, Black Sabbath tuned to concert pitch, but soon after Iommi began tuning his strings down one half step (low to high: Ef Af Df Gf Bf Ef) and subsequently tuned down even further by one and a half steps (low to high: Cs Fs B E Gs Cs), all the while continuing to use very light strings. </p> <p>A signature element in the characteristically dark vibe of Iommi’s solos is the incorporation of minor modes. In his outro solo for “War Pigs” (<em>Paranoid</em>), Iommi utilizes the E Aeolian mode (E Fs G A B C D) along with E minor pentatonic (E G A B D). <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> illustrates a solo played with a similar approach. </p> <p>Within the key of E minor, the chord progression simply alternates between Em and D, and in his solo, Iommi’s ties his licks squarely to the chord progression with the use of chord tones that relate to each specific chord. Bars 1–4 of <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> demonstrate this approach by favoring the notes E and G, the root note and minor third, respectively, over Em, and the notes D and Fs, the root and major third, respectively, over D. The additional notes and overall phrasing serve to fill in the space and effectively set up the incorporation of these shifting chord tones (also known as guide tones). </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/6_0.png" width="620" height="339" alt="6_0.png" /></p> <p>Another key aspect of Iommi’s soloing style that <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> demonstrates is the intensity of both the pick attack and vibrato. Iommi’s playing is well-loved for its aggressive power, so lean into the lines with both hands, and listen closely to his recorded works to get a clear picture of and feel for his playing style. </p> <p>Beginning on beat two of bar 5, I repeatedly bend E, third string/ninth fret, up one and one half steps (the equivalent of three frets) to G. When performing “overbends” like this, it’s even more important to harness the strength of at least two fingers, the ring and middle, if not three (the ring, middle and index). This is followed in bar 6 by fast whole-step bends that alternate with hammer-on/pull-of combinations between the seventh and ninth frets on the G string. This is a challenging lick that will take a bit of slow practice to master.</p> <p>In the second half of bar 7, I borrow a signature phrasing technique of Iommi’s, with a 16th-note run that descends the E Aeolian mode in three-note groups on a single string, using pull-offs and finger slides. This type of line serves to add both rhythmic and melodic interest to a pentatonic- or mode-based solo.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 7</strong> offers another example of soloing in Iommi’s style, this time incorporating the detuning of one and one half steps. (All notes and chords sound in the key of C# minor, one and one half steps lower than written.) This example demonstrates Iommi’s penchant for using fast hammer-ons and pull-offs within repeated short phrases, as he does on his solo in “Supernaut” (Vol. 4).</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/7_0.png" width="620" height="365" alt="7_0.png" /></p> <p>The solo is based entirely on the E minor pentatonic scale, played in 12th position, and begins with a repeated phrase that starts with a quick hammer/pull on the first string from the 12th fret to the 15th, followed by D, second string/15th fret. This sequence is played four times through bar 1, and bar 2 consists entirely of trills in 12th position. (A trill is executed by quickly alternating between two notes, usually using hammer-ons and pull-offs in combination.) </p> <p>Bars 3 and 4 are similar in that both feature fast phrases based on 16th-note triplets; in bar 3, note bursts are performed with hammer/pulls on the D string, and in bar 4 the hammers occur on the G string. Bars 5 and 6 offer an example of the “threes on fours” concept—16th notes phrased in groups of three—and bars 7 and 8 wrap up the solo with fast hammer/pulls, played in 16th-nopte triplets, that traverse the strings, moving from high to low. </p> <p>In all of their solos, Young, Page and Iommi combine well-structured melodic ideas, solid execution and spirited performance—essential factors in any great, memorable guitar solo that you should strive to achieve in your own solos.</p> <p><em>Painting: Tim O'Brien</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/tony-iommi">Tony Iommi</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/acdc">AC/DC</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/inventing-steel-how-solo-angus-young-jimmy-page-and-tony-iommi#comments Angus Young Articles GW Archive JamPlay Jimmy Page May 2007 Tim O'Brien Tony Iommi In Deep with Andy Aledort News Features Lessons Magazine Tue, 31 Mar 2015 14:23:56 +0000 Andy Aledort http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19211 Monster Licks Unleashed: Glenn Proudfoot's Tap Fest — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/monster-licks-unleashed-glenn-proudfoots-tap-fest-video <!--paging_filter--><p>I'm using the diminished 7th scale (arpeggio) for this lick. The notes in this arpeggio are E, G, Bb and C#. </p> <p>This lick is very challenging—not for its speed, but for the techniques used. </p> <p>There are no picked notes in this lick; it's all legato and tapping. The big challenge comes with the hammered notes the right-hand index finger hits. While in theory this sounds easy, it's something we generally don't do on the guitar, so it proves quite difficult. </p> <p>Normally we hammer with our second, third or fourth fingers while using our index finger as the pivot point to enable the strength for the hammer. This technique relies on your using your thumb as the sole grip point to create the strength. </p> <p>This is not one of those things that takes months of practice; it will take about an hour or so to really get it happening. The index finger is incredibly strong, so it's just a matter of getting your head around the idea. The key is to practice these hammer-ons and make sure you're sounding all the notes correctly. If not, the lick will lose its appeal. </p> <p>You will notice in the slow demonstration of the lick how hard I'm hitting the notes with my index finger. It's essential to really smack your finger on the note!</p> <p>The possibilities with this technique are endless. It's such a great way to get around the guitar, and it has a very unique sound. You'll also notice in the video that I have a string mute running over the strings. This is just to keep the string noise down. Because I'm not picking any notes the right hand, it's constantly on the move and it makes it harder to mute the strings. You can use anything as a string mute—just wrap some material around the neck of your guitar, and that'll work fine. </p> <p>Don't let any of the above commentary keep you from attempting this lick. These techniques are incredibly fun to play and add to your solos. Just focus on the end result!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5pXffxnUBpE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-03-30%20at%202.57.06%20PM.png" width="620" height="385" alt="Screen Shot 2015-03-30 at 2.57.06 PM.png" /></p> <p><strong>I hope you enjoy this Monster Lick Unleashed! Join me on <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/atomicguitaraudio">YouTube right here!</a> Contact me through <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a> or <a href="https://www.facebook.com/glenn.proudfoot">my Facebook page</a>.</strong></p> <p><em>Australia's Glenn Proudfoot has played and toured with major signed bands and artists in Europe and Australia, including progressive rockers Prazsky Vyber. Glenn released his first instrumental solo album, </em>Lick Em<em>, in 2010. It's available on iTunes and at <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a>. His brand-new instrumental album — </em>Ineffable<em> — is out now and is available through <a href="http://www.glennproudfoot.com/">glennproudfoot.com</a> and <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/au/album/ineffable/id914342943">iTunes</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/monster-licks-unleashed-glenn-proudfoots-tap-fest-video#comments Glenn Proudfoot Monster Licks Monster Licks Unleashed Videos News Lessons Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:59:59 +0000 Glenn Proudfoot http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23829 Betcha Can't Play This: Mike Groisman's Monster Multi-Finger Tapping Lick — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-mike-groismans-monster-multi-finger-tapping-lick-video <!--paging_filter--><p>In <em>Guitar World's</em> latest edition of Betcha Can't Play This, New York City-based "subway shredder" Mike Groisman returns with what we're calling a "Monster Multi-Finger Tapping Lick."</p> <p>First he plays it fast, then slow. Then he explains the lick.</p> <p>We shared Groisman's first three Betcha Can't Play This videos earlier this month. Feel free to check out <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-subway-shredder-mike-groismans-sweep-arpeggios-video">"Subway Shredder Mike Groisman's Sweep Arpeggios,"</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-mike-groismans-insane-minor-tapping-lick-video">"Mike Groisman's Insane A Minor Tapping Lick" and <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-subway-shredder-mike-groismans-crazy-fast-alternate-picking-run-video">Mike Groisman's Crazy-Fast Alternate-Picking Run.</a></a></p> <p>If Groisman looks familiar, maybe it's because he often can be found playing "Crazy Train," "Stairway to Heaven" (the metal version, of course) or Europe's "The Final Countdown" at various stops along the New York City subway system.</p> <p><strong>Visit Groisman on YouTube <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/lgontop">right here.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MkOOYjFA2fo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-mike-groismans-monster-multi-finger-tapping-lick-video#comments Betcha Can't Play This Mike Groisman Videos News Lessons Mon, 30 Mar 2015 17:43:29 +0000 Guitar World Staff http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23828 Raising the Barre: Classical Barring Tips from Guitar Salon International http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-raising-barre-classical-barring-tips-guitar-salon <!--paging_filter--><p>This video, presented by Guitar Salon, boasts not only some beautiful classical guitar playing, it’s also a lesson on using partial barres in your left hand fingering technique.</p> <p>Here Scott Morris runs down some tips for strategic use of partial and full barring. Plus some barring technique tips that’ll tune up your barres.</p> <p>Morris wrote the book on classic guitar with his <em><a href="http://www.guitarsalon.com/products.php?viewmode=browse&amp;sortby=-3&amp;status=0&amp;field_18=&amp;field_21=&amp;keywords=morris&amp;categoryid=9">Classical Guitar Complete</a></em> method. </p> <p>This lesson is merely a taste of his genius.</p> <p>Check it out:</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/utguuFcvClw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Guitar Salon International is the world’s largest dealer of fine classical and flamenco guitars since 1983, and the premier online community and resource for guitar related discussion, entertainment and education. </p> <p>The GSI website offers hundreds of performance videos, thousands of guitar listings in both an active webstore and our museum archive, a news blog and countless reference resources. </p> <p>Find out more at <a href="http://www.guitarsalon.com/">www.guitarsalon.com</a></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-raising-barre-classical-barring-tips-guitar-salon#comments Acoustic Nation Guitar Salon International Lessons Videos Blogs Videos News Lessons Mon, 30 Mar 2015 16:14:01 +0000 Acoustic Nation http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23766 Metal for Life with Metal Mike: How to Construct Classic Eighties-Style Metal Guitar Parts — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-how-construct-classic-eighties-style-metal-guitar-parts-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the May 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-15-joan-jett?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=May2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Back in the Eighties, during the heyday of metal, bands like Van Halen, Judas Priest and the Scorpions were releasing incredible, killer albums packed with amazing guitar playing. </p> <p>Today, I feel that the majority of metal is more focused on rhythmic parts with less harmonic movement than what I think of as the approach representative of Eighties-style metal. It is from that perspective that I put together the three “classic” metal-style riffs featured in this month’s column.</p> <p>During the NWOBHM (New Wave of British Heavy Metal) days of the late Seventies and early Eighties, bands like Iron Maiden and Judas Priest were forging blazing, melodic metal earmarked by powerful and memorable song riffs. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> is indicative of Iron Maiden’s style: above the progression of three different pedal tones, shifting two- and three-note chord shapes create the melodic content that keeps this part interesting and moving forward.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-15-joan-jett?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=May2015VideosPage">For the rest of this column, including the tabs, check out the May 2015 issue of Guitar World.</a></strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience4122083130001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="4122083130001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/metal-life-metal-mike-how-construct-classic-eighties-style-metal-guitar-parts-video#comments May 2015 Metal For Life Metal Mike Chlasciak Videos News Lessons Magazine Thu, 26 Mar 2015 20:14:55 +0000 Metal Mike Chlasciak http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23801 Bent Out of Shape: Wallner's Quick Licks, Part 1 — Rolling Harmonics http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-wallners-quick-licks-part-1-rolling-harmonics <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's a quick lick or technique that will work nicely in any guitarists "trick bag." </p> <p>It's not very musical, but it's something I often use in my rhythm and lead playing. I'm not entirely sure if there's a name for this technique, but I like refer to it as "rolling harmonics." </p> <p>The basic idea? You trill on a string with your fretting hand, then use your picking-hand pinky to catch harmonics. You can move your finger back and forth over the pickups, and you will catch different harmonics at different points along the sting. You have to be very gentle with your picking hand, otherwise you will "choke" the string and won't produce harmonics.</p> <p>This technique can be performed on any string and not necessarily with just trills on an open string. You can trill anywhere on the neck, but generally speaking the higher you go the harder it is to catch the harmonics. As I previously stated, it's not very musical but it's a cool effect and a great substitute for pick scrapes.</p> <p>I recorded a quick video demonstrating this technique using a 1959 Les Paul Reissue through an Orange Tiny Terror amp. That particular combination creates a very decent tone, and although there isn't a lot of gain, the harmonics come out very easily. I made a TAB for my video example — but any trills will be fine for you to try. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/hLs5FxjsPVs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/trill.jpg" width="620" height="64" alt="trill.jpg" /></p> <p>I've heard many players use this technique, most notably Eddie Van Halen. Play around with it and see if it fits into your playing. It's not for everyone, but you might find it useful every once in a while. Next week I will begin a new classical study similar to <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-learning-paganinis-16th-caprice-g-minor">my previous Paganini series.</a> </p> <p><em>Will Wallner is a guitarist from England who now lives in Los Angeles. He recently signed a solo deal with Polish record label Metal Mind Productions for the release of his debut album, which features influential musicians from hard rock and heavy metal. He also is the lead guitarist for White Wizzard (Earache Records) and toured Japan, the US and Canada in 2012. Follow Will on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wallnervain">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/willwallner">Twitter</a>.</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/bent-out-shape-wallners-quick-licks-part-1-rolling-harmonics#comments Bent Out of Shape Will Wallner Blogs Lessons Thu, 26 Mar 2015 19:39:18 +0000 Will Wallner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19666 Man of Steel with Steel Panther's Satchel: Tips for Keeping Your Chops Warmed Up and Razor Sharp — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/man-steel-steel-panthers-satchel-tips-keeping-your-chops-warmed-and-razor-sharp-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the May 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-15-joan-jett?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=May2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>A question I’m often asked, aside from, “How can you possibly be that good looking?” is, “What do you do to warm up?”</p> <p>Personally, I don’t think about warming up that much, maybe not as much as most players do. But we’ve been touring a lot lately, and, especially in Europe, there just aren’t any heaters anywhere. </p> <p>So, basically, I am freezing all day long. Then I’m given a guitar five minutes before we go onstage, and I’m expected to be able to burn right from the start! And there I am, frozen to the bone. So I will usually grab my guitar a few minutes before the show and play through a bunch of the riffs and patterns illustrated in this month’s column. </p> <p> It’s good to have your fingers warmed up a little for when that first solo comes along in the first song, so one of the things I like to warm up with are legato exercises, where I’ll pick the string once and then sound a long series of notes in a repeating phrase using only hammers-ons and pull-offs. </p> <p>A good example of something I’ll warm up with is the lick shown in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, which is a repeating six-note sequence performed entirely on the high E string. Play the lick over and over, speeding up and slowing down while striving to articulate every note as clearly as possible. The first note, G, 15th fret, is fretted with the pinkie, followed by a pull-off to D, 10th fret, fretted with the index finger. </p> <p>I then hammer onto the 12th fret with my middle finger to sound E, followed by another hammer up to the initial G note, and then a double pull-off back down the string to E and D. The sequence then repeats on each subsequent downbeat, but I hammer-on back up to the initial high G, so that the rest of the phrase is performed entirely with hammers and pulls, which is great for developing good fret-hand “traction.”</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-15-joan-jett?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=May2015VideosPage">For the rest of this column, including the tabs, check out the May 2015 issue of Guitar World.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZzHeEGmjr2M" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/man-steel-steel-panthers-satchel-tips-keeping-your-chops-warmed-and-razor-sharp-video#comments Man of Steel May 2015 Satchel Steel Panther Videos News Lessons Magazine Wed, 25 Mar 2015 20:35:49 +0000 Steel Panther&#039;s Satchel http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23798 String Theory with Jimmy Brown: The E Minor/D Major-Hexatonic Connection — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-jimmy-brown-e-minord-major-hexatonic-connection-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the April 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-april-15-abasi-satriani-govan?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=April2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Last month I presented the six-note E minor hexatonic scale (E F# G A B D), which has a dark, serious quality that’s ideal for creating a pensive, reflective mood. </p> <p>I’d now like to turn you on to another, equally appealing and useful hexatonic scale (depending on your musical tastes), one that is comprised of the very same notes, which would qualify it as a mode, but sounds completely different—beautifully bright and joyous—and that is D major hexatonic (D E F# G A B).</p> <p>As I explained last month, E minor hexatonic is formed by taking E minor pentatonic (E G A B D) and adding one note, the second, F#, resulting in the intervallic spelling 1 2 b3 4 5 b7. </p> <p>It may also be analyzed as the combination of E minor (E G B) and D major (D F# A) triads. D major hexatonic is formed by combining these same two triads, but in this case oriented around a D root note. The two scales may be thought of as opposite sides of the same musical coin, or, as the Chinese say, yin and yang. </p> <p>To illustrate, <strong>FIGURE</strong> 1 shows E minor and D major triad inversions “leapfrogging” each other up the neck on the top three strings, just like <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> from last month’s lesson, only now we’re starting and ending on D instead of Em. (To get the sound of the D root note in your head, pick your open D string before strumming the chords.) </p> <p>To hear the scale played as single notes, play only those on the B string, then try adding finger slides and vibrato and pairing any two of the three strings to create some “down-home,” heart-warming, gospel-flavored harmonies. As an additional resource, <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> shows D and Em triads passing each other up the neck on the D, G and B strings.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-april-15-abasi-satriani-govan?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=April2015VideosPage">For the rest of this column, including the tabs, check out the April 2015 issue of Guitar World.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/d1_30M9wBhU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-jimmy-brown-e-minord-major-hexatonic-connection-video#comments April 2015 Jimmy Brown String Theory Videos News Lessons Magazine Wed, 25 Mar 2015 17:13:11 +0000 Jimmy Brown http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23611 The Next Bend: Basic Country/Blues B-Bender Lick in C — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/next-bend-basic-countryblues-b-bender-lick-c-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Hi there.</p> <p>Welcome back to The Next Bend, the <em>Guitar World</em> column dedicated to B-bending guitarists, guitars, gear, news, licks, songs and more.</p> <p>For the uninitiated, a B-bender is a contraption (the perfect word for it) that lives in- or outside your guitar and allows you to pull—usually with some sort of arm, palm, shoulder or hip movement—your guitar's B string up a perfect whole step. So, a B note would suddenly become a C# (or a C, if you don't bend the string all the way).</p> <p> Although this simple explanation might not convey the wonder of a B-bender (it sounds more like an exercise regimen, to be honest), let's just say the contraption allows guitarists to create sounds that would be impossible otherwise. And it sounds cool as hell. Or "cool as heck" if that offends anyone.</p> <p>Anyway, for today's column, I decided to grab my trusty grey shirt and my <a href="http://www2.gibson.com/Products/Electric-Guitars/Les-Paul/Gibson-USA/Music-City-Jr-B-Bender.aspx">Gibson Music City Jr. with B-Bender</a> (a limited-edition guitar Gibson issued in 2013; it's still on the company's website, which makes me wonder if it's coming back into production) and shoot a few basic B-bender licks. </p> <p>By the way, the only other person I've ever spoken to who has this guitar is Charlie Starr of Blackberry Smoke. <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/blackberry-smokes-holding-all-roses-serves-dozen-southern-fried-cuts">We speak about the guitar briefly in this story.</a></p> <p>A big shout out to the gang at the <a href="http://customshop.seymourduncan.com/humbucker-under-p90-soapbar/">Seymour Duncan Custom Shop,</a> who aided me in my quest for two P90-sized humbuckers, which I recently installed to replace the guitar's stock Gibson P90s. (I'm reeeeally not a P90 guy.)</p> <p>The first couple of licks we shot in GW's underground lair are indeed fairly basic; they're sort of a primer for guitarists who—for some weird reason—have bought a B-bender-equipped guitar and don't really know what to do with it. After all, some of the B-bender videos on YouTube are fairly useless. Just sayin'!</p> <p>This first lick is basically a brief yet self-contained country/blues song (feel free to steal it—and thank me in your liner notes!) in C. It's got elements of pentatonic blues and country, and it starts off on the eighth fret in a very standard "Hey, let's play some upbeat blues in C major" sorta way. There's no tab for this lick, but I really don't think that'll be an issue. </p> <p>If you have any questions, feel free to write me at damian@guitarworld.com. I'll try to reply before 2019. By the way, this guitar uses a Joe Glaser bender and a modified Gibson Nighthawk bridge. It's also set up so that I could turn it into a G-bender, which I won't be doing anytime soon.</p> <p>Enjoy!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CF1V97eLlqE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Damian Fanelli is the online managing editor at </em>Guitar World<em>. He's a B-bending guitarist who collects B-bender-equipped guitars. He has four at the moment. Follow him on <a href="https://twitter.com/DamianFanelli">Twitter.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/next-bend-basic-countryblues-b-bender-lick-c-video#comments Damian Fanelli The Next Bend Videos Blogs News Lessons Tue, 24 Mar 2015 20:53:26 +0000 Damian Fanelli http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23789 Big Strokes: A Beginner's Guide to Sweep Picking http://www.guitarworld.com/big-strokes-beginners-guide-sweeping <!--paging_filter--><p>Although often regarded as a “shredder’s” technique, the notion of sweeping (or raking) the pick across the strings to produce a quick succession of notes has been around since the invention of the pick itself. </p> <p>Jazz players from the Fifties, such as Les Paul, Barney Kessel and Tal Farlow, would use the approach in their improvisations, and country guitar genius Chet Atkins was known to eschew his signature fingerstyle hybrid-picking technique from time to time and rip out sweep-picked arpeggios, proving that the technique is not genre specific. Within rock, Ritchie Blackmore used sweep picking to play arpeggios in Deep Purple’s “April” and Rainbow’s “Kill the King.”</p> <p>Fusion maestro Frank Gambale is widely considered to be the most versatile and innovative sweep picker and the first artist to fully integrate the technique into his style, applying sweeping to arpeggios, pentatonics, heptatonic (seven-note) scales and modes, and beyond. </p> <p>Gambale explains his approach wonderfully in his instructional video, <em>Monster Licks and Speed Picking</em>. Originally released in 1988, it remains a must-watch video for anyone interested in developing a smooth sweep-picking technique.</p> <p>It was Stockholm, Sweden, however that would produce the name most synonymous with sweeping in a rock context, one that gave rise to a guitar movement known as neoclassical heavy metal. </p> <p>Swedish guitar virtuoso Yngwie Malmsteen was influenced by Jimi Hendrix, Ritchie Blackmore and Uli Jon Roth but was also equally enthralled by 19th-century virtuoso violinist Niccolò Paganini. Attempting to emulate on his Fender Stratocaster the fluid, breathtaking passages Paganini would compose and play on violin, Malmsteen concluded that sweep picking was the perfect way to travel quickly from string to string with a smooth, fluid sound much like what a violinist can create with his bow. </p> <p>Malmsteen’s style has since influenced two generations of guitarists, including Tony MacAlpine, Jason Becker, Steve Vai, Mattias “IA” Eklundh, Ritchie Kotzen, Marty Friedman, John Petrucci, Vinnie Moore, Jeff Loomis, Synyster Gates, Alexi Laiho and Tosin Abasi, to name but a few.</p> <p>The first five exercises in this lesson are designed to give you a systematic approach to practicing the component movements of sweep picking: from two-string sweeps to six-string sweeps, and everything in between. Practicing each exercise with a metronome for just two minutes every day will improve your coordination and your confidence to use the technique in your own playing. </p> <p>Work from two strings up to six, keeping your metronome at the same tempo. This means starting with eighth notes, and while this will feel very slow, the technique will become trickier with each successive note grouping: eighth-note triplets, 16th notes, quintuplets and, most difficult of all, 16th-note triplets and their equivalent sextuplets. Focus on synchronizing your hands so that your pick and fretting fingers make contact with the string at exactly the same moment. Only one string should be fretted at any time (this is key!), and any idle strings should be diligently muted with your remaining fingers. </p> <p>If you fail to do this and allow notes on adjacent strings to ring together, it will negate the desired effect and sound like you are simply strumming a chord. When it comes to sweep picking, muting is the key to cleanliness. It is also the aspect that will take the most practice to master.</p> <p>The second set of five exercises handles some common sweep-picking approaches. These are shown in one position and based on one chord type each, thus focusing your attention on the exercise until you have become accustomed to the technique. </p> <p>The final piece helps you tackle the various aspects of sweeping while bolstering your stamina, as the bulk of it consists of nonstop 16th notes, with only a few pauses for “breathing.” Break it down into four-bar sections and practice each with a metronome, gradually building up to the 100-beats-per-minute (100bpm) target tempo. </p> <p><strong>Get the Tone</strong></p> <p>In rock, this technique is best suited to Strat-style guitars, using the neck pickup setting for a warm, round tone. Use a modern tube amp with the gain set to a moderate amount—just enough to give all the notes a uniform volume and sustain, but not so much that string muting becomes an impossible battle. </p> <p>The thickness and sharpness of your pick will hugely impact the tone of your sweep picking. Something with a thickness between one and two millimeters and a rounded tip will provide the right amount of attack and still glide over the strings with ease.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_1_2.jpg" /></p> <p>[FIGURE 1] This Cmaj7 arpeggio on the two middle strings works just as well on the top two or bottom two. Lightly drag your pick across (push down, pull up) the two strings so that there’s very little resistance. This teaches your picking hand to make smooth motions rather than two separate downward or upward strokes.</p> <p>FIGURE 2 is a C7 arpeggio played across three strings. Strive to maintain the same smooth down/up motion with your pick used in the previous example. Focus on the pick strokes that land on downbeats, and allow the in-between, or “offbeat,” notes to naturally fall into place. Every three notes your pick will change direction. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_3.jpg" /></p> <p>Now let’s move on to four strings with this exotic C7 altered-dominant lick, reminiscent of one of Gambale’s fusion forays. Remember, sweep picking is most effective when each note is cleanly separated from the last, so aim to have only one finger in contact with the fretboard at a time in order to keep the notes from ringing together.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_4.jpg" /></p> <p>Now we move on to some five-string shapes, the likes of which you can hear in the playing of Steve Vai and Mattias Eklundh. The phrasing here is 16th-note quintuplets (five notes per beat). Once again, if you focus on nailing the highest and lowest notes along with the beat, the in-between notes should automatically fall into place. Move your pick at a constant speed to ensure the notes are evenly spaced. Say “Hip-po-pot-a-mus” to get the sound of properly performed quintuplets in your mind’s ear.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_5.jpg" /></p> <p>This six-string arpeggio is an A major triad (A C# E), with the third in the bass and a fifth interval added to the high E string’s 12th fret, so we have the right number of notes for 16th-note triplets (six notes per click). When ascending, use a single motion to pick all six strings, making sure only one note is fretted at a time. The descending section includes a pull-off on the high E string, which, although momentarily disruptive to your picking, is preferable to adding another downstroke.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_6.jpg" /></p> <p>This major triad shape is an essential part of the Yngwie Malmsteen school of sweeping. Pay special attention to the picking directions in both the ascending and descending fragments. The alternating eighth-note triplet and quarter-note phrasing allows you to focus on the picking pattern in small bursts and then rest for a beat.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_7.jpg" /></p> <p>This example includes ascending and descending fragments again, this time played together. Concentrate on the general down-up motion of your picking hand rather than each pick stroke. Once you are comfortable with this shape you can apply the same approach to minor, suspended and diminished-seven arpeggios.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_8.jpg" /> </p> <p>This example is reminiscent of players such as Jason Becker and Jeff Loomis. We start with the three-string shapes from the previous example, followed by the six-string shape from FIGURE 5. This is quite challenging for the picking hand, so start very slowly and remember to keep the hand moving smoothly.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_9.jpg" /></p> <p>Here we utilize two-string sweeps with pentatonic shapes. Use your first finger on the fifth fret and third finger on the seventh fret. Keep your fingers flat against the two-string groups, and transfer pressure between strings using a rolling action to mute inactive strings and prevent notes from ringing together. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_10.jpg" /></p> <p>Economy picking requires that your pick take the shortest journey possible when crossing from string to string. This essentially means that when you play a scale, there will be a two-string mini-sweep whenever you move to an adjacent string. This exercise combines the eight-note B whole-half diminished scale (B C# D E F G G# As) and a Bdim7 arpeggio (B D F G#).</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_11.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/sweeppicking_11cont.jpg" /></p> <p>This piece is in the key of A minor. The first part is based around a “V-i” (five-one) progression, with the arpeggios clearly outlining the implied chord changes. We begin with some ascending two-string sweeps using alternating E (E G# B) and Bb (Bb D F) triads. Next come some A minor triads (A C E), played with a progressively increasing number of strings; this is a great way to build your confidence in sweep picking larger shapes. The Bm7b5 (B D F A) arpeggio in bar 4 has a series of three-string sweeps combined with some challenging string skips. Bar 7 is an A minor pentatonic scale (A C D E G) played in fourths using two-string sweeps/economy picking. </p> <p>The second part of the piece has a more neoclassical approach and begins with some Yngwie-style three-string triads incorporating pull-offs. Be sure to follow the indicated picking directions. Bar 12 is the trickiest part of the piece to play and utilizes some Jason Becker–inspired six-string shapes. If you have problems with string muting or note separation, apply some light palm muting to the notes as they are picked. This is an effective way to improve note clarity. The final bar is based on the A harmonic minor scale (A B C E D F G#) and incorporates economy picking when traveling from the fifth string to the fourth. </p> http://www.guitarworld.com/big-strokes-beginners-guide-sweeping#comments Avenged Sevenfold Guitar 101 Steve Vai Sweep Picking Tosin Abasi Yngwie Malmsteen News Features Lessons Tue, 24 Mar 2015 18:14:38 +0000 Charlie Griffiths http://www.guitarworld.com/article/17113 In Deep with Andy Aledort: Using Voice Leading and Close Voicings to Devise Improvised Rhythm Guitar Parts — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-using-voice-leading-and-close-voicings-devise-improvised-rhythm-guitar-parts-video <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the April 2015 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-april-15-abasi-satriani-govan?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=April2015VideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>Part of my role as a member of former Allman Brothers Band guitarist Dickey Betts’ band, Great Southern (along with his son, guitarist Duane Betts), is to provide improvised rhythm guitar parts to songs that oftentimes develop into long jams with many instrumental solos. </p> <p>In this type of musical environment, it’s essential for the rhythm guitars to keep the accompaniment interesting and moving forward while also laying down a solid groove for the soloists to play over. </p> <p>Many of these songs—like “Blue Sky,” “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed” and “No One Left to Run With”—feature soloing sections built upon repeating chord vamps. </p> <p>In this endeavor, I have developed a rhythm guitar approach that I can use in any of these jamming-type situations, which is to explore small chord voicings that connect to one another via voice leading techniques, such as close voicing.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-april-15-abasi-satriani-govan?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=April2015VideosPage">For the rest of this column, including the tabs, check out the April 2015 issue of Guitar World.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DTk72XmeBEU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-using-voice-leading-and-close-voicings-devise-improvised-rhythm-guitar-parts-video#comments Andy Aledort April 2015 In Deep Videos News Lessons Magazine Fri, 20 Mar 2015 19:52:59 +0000 Andy Aledort http://www.guitarworld.com/article/23615 Jazz Guitar Corner: Tritone Sub-Patterns, Part 1 — Arpeggios http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-tritone-sub-patterns-part-1-arpeggios <!--paging_filter--><p>One of the most commonly used chord subs in jazz guitar, the tritone sub, is a concept that comes up time and again when studying soloing and comping, but sometimes its meaning and usage isn’t clear. </p> <p>To help clear the air with this important and cool-sounding chord sub, we’ll be using the next few lessons to dissect, apply and practice various chords, scales and arpeggios you can use in order to bring this chord sub concept into your jazz guitar playing. </p> <p>In this first lesson, you’ll learn how to use 7th and 7#11 arpeggios to outline the tritone sub in a ii V I chord progression, allowing you to take your soloing chops up a notch and begin to create lines in the same vibe as your favorite jazz guitarists at the same time. </p> <p>So, let’s dig into tritone sub arpeggios for jazz guitar!</p> <p><strong>What Is a Tritone Sub?</strong></p> <p>To begin, let’s take a look at what a tritone sub is on paper, and then we will be ready to transfer this knowledge to the fretboard. Simply put, a tritone sub is when you have a V7 chord, such as the D7 in the example below, and you sub that chord out with a bII7 chord, such as the Ab7 in the same example. </p> <p>This chord sub works out because both chords share a 3rd and 7th. This means the 3rd and 7th of D7, F# and C, are the same notes as the 7th and 3rd of Ab7, Gb(F#) and C. This connection is what allows these chords to be so easily swapped out for each other in comping and soloing situations. </p> <p>Play through the following example and hear how both chord progressions, ii V I and ii bII I, sound similar but have a different feel to them as well that is created from the bass note movement in each progression. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Tritone%20ii%20V%20I%201.jpg" width="620" height="166" alt="Tritone ii V I 1.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Tritone Sub Arpeggio 1 – 7th Arp</strong></p> <p>Now that you have an idea of what a tritone sub is, let’s take this concept to the fretboard as you begin to apply the theory to your jazz guitar solos and improvised phrases. The first place to start is by learning an arpeggio for the bII7 chord that you can then use to solo over the V7 chord in a ii V I chord progression, as you can see in this first example. </p> <p>Start by learning these arpeggio shapes in this position, taking them to all 12 keys across the neck if possible, and then put on a ii V I backing track and start to solo over those chords using the ii bII I arpeggios from the example below. </p> <p>When you have a handle on these arpeggio shapes, try applying any 7th arpeggio you know to this chord progression, so that you will be able to apply this concept to any area of the fretboard as you take this idea further in your practice routine and jam/gigging situations. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Tritone%20ii%20V%20I%202.jpg" width="620" height="154" alt="Tritone ii V I 2.jpg" /></p> <p>To help you get started with this sound, here is a sample lick written over a ii V I in G major, where the bII7 arpeggio is used over the V7 chord in bar 2 of the phrase. Start by learning this lick in G, then taking it to as many other keys as you can in order to get an idea of how it fits and sounds across the fretboard. </p> <p>When you have worked this lick across the neck, you can try writing out 4 to 5 licks of your own that use the same concept, the bII7 arpeggio over V7, and then begin to solo over a ii V I backing track as you make up similar licks on the spot with these same arpeggios. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/122915399&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Tritone%20ii%20V%20I%203.jpg" width="620" height="160" alt="Tritone ii V I 3.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Tritone Sub Arpeggio 2 – 7#11 Arp</strong></p> <p>You can take this approach one step further by applying a 7#11 sound to your tritone sub chord in bar 2 of a ii V I chord progression, as you can see in the example below. </p> <p>This chord, bII7#11, sits nicely over the V7 harmony as the #11 of a bII shape is the same note as the root of a V7 shape, as you can see with the note D in the example below, which is the #11 of Ab7 and the root of D7. Start by learning the arpeggio fingering below and solo over a ii V I backing track using these shapes in order to begin to hear how the 7#11 chord sounds when superimposed over the V7 chord in this progression. </p> <p>In order to take this idea further in your practicing, you can take any 7th arpeggio you know, on any string set as well, and simply lower the 3rd note, the 5th, to turn that 7th arpeggio into a 7#11 arpeggio. </p> <p>This will allow you to learn new sounds, based on the 7#11 arpeggio, without having to learn a bunch of new shapes on the neck. Instead, you will be creating new sounds from previous knowledge as you transform 7th arpeggios into 7#11 arpeggios with a one-note adjustment. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Tritone%20ii%20V%20I%204.jpg" width="620" height="154" alt="Tritone ii V I 4.jpg" /></p> <p>Here's a sample lick that uses the bII7#11 arpeggio over the V7 chord in bar 2 of a ii V I progression in the key of G major. Once you have this lick under your fingers in G, take it to other keys across the fretboard, and then begin to write out and improvise lines of your own that use the tritone bII7#11 arpeggio in this context. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/122915404&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Tritone%20ii%20V%20I%205.jpg" width="620" height="160" alt="Tritone ii V I 5.jpg" /></p> <p>As you can see, learning how to play 7th and 7#11 arpeggios will allow you to comfortably outline a Tritone Sub ii V I chord progression the next time your want to bring this sound to your jazz guitar improvisational ideas and phrases. </p> <p>Check out these shapes in the woodshed this week and see what you can come up with on your own as you explore tritone arpeggios for jazz guitar in the practice room.</p> <p><em>Matt Warnock is the owner of <a href="http://www.mattwarnockguitar.com">mattwarnockguitar.com</a>, a free website that provides hundreds of lessons and resources designed to help guitarists of all experience levels meet their practice and performance goals. Matt lives in the UK, where he is a lecturer in Popular Music Performance at the University of Chester and an examiner for the London College of Music (Registry of Guitar Tutors).</em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/jazz-guitar-corner-tritone-sub-patterns-part-1-arpeggios#comments Jazz Guitar Corner Matt Warnock Blogs Lessons Fri, 20 Mar 2015 12:14:32 +0000 Matt Warnock http://www.guitarworld.com/article/19887 Spice It Up: Blues and Eastern Fusion, Part 1 http://www.guitarworld.com/spice-it-blues-and-eastern-fusion-part-1 <!--paging_filter--><p>Tired of the same old blues licks in the pentatonic scale? </p> <p>In this series of lessons, I will try to broaden your horizons by introducing you to some elements from "exotic" territories like Middle Eastern, East European and Far Eastern music.</p> <p><strong>Is it D# or Eb?</strong></p> <p>As you might know, the minor blues scale has that unique note that distinguishes it from the pentatonic scale (the augmented 4th or diminished 5th). In A minor blues, for example, it’s Eb or D# (They are enharmonic tones, same pitch, different names). </p> <p>But when should we call it the first or the latter—and what’s the difference? Well, there are a few answers. One of them relates to their different functionality: While Eb can be an alternative to the 5th (E) by flattening it, D# can function as a leading-tone to the 5th.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Ex1.jpg" width="620" height="156" alt="Ex1.jpg" /> </p> <p>In the first phrase (bars 1-2), I used Eb, which replaces E in a pull-off descending effect of a blue note (a well-known musical sigh). In the second phrase (bars 3-4), I used D# as a stepping stone toward E, which emphasizes the 5th in the Am chord. </p> <p>While these are still bluesy, the third phrase (bars 5-6) has a bit more spice and sounds more exotic by using D# with an augmented 2nd interval (C-D#). By adding B from the natural minor scale and drizzling some "HP sauce" on top of them (HP = hammer-on, pull-off), we're starting to get somewhere else.</p> <p>If this is not enough, you can enrich the last phrase by adding more outsider notes like G# (taken from the harmonic minor scale). While the first phrase in Example 2 still keeps some of the blues rhythm, the last phrase is a lively take on that idea and has a Balkan feel:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Ex2.jpg" width="620" height="177" alt="Ex2.jpg" /> </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/jsuuONnnd_U?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Hungarian Blues</strong></p> <p>When taking this idea a few steps further, we can end up with some very interesting results. For instance, we can use a playful scale known as the "Hungarian minor" or "double harmonic minor" (Every "Eastern" scale has at least three different names) and treat it as if it were an altered blues scale. </p> <p>If you play this scale as is—A B C D# E F G# — naturally you get the East European flavors. But if you’ll know how to use these "secret ingredients," you'd be able to transform a simple blues lick into a unique, original phrase. For example:</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Ex3_0.jpg" width="620" height="348" alt="Ex3_0.jpg" /> </p> <p>The first phrase in Example 3 (bars 1-2) includes a blues lick, and the next two versions use the same contour but with "Hungarian" alterations. In both, the notes A, C and E keep the Am chord triad; D and G are a half step higher; and the two additional notes — B and F — spice it up with some extra seasoning.</p> <p>It would be great to hear your take on this. You can use the following backing track and reply with your own licks.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/125248314&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=true"></iframe></p> <p><em>Udi Glaser is a guitarist, guitar teacher, composer, producer and journalist. He has been playing all types of guitars and styles for more than 22 years and has been teaching them for more than 10 years. He holds a bachelor's degree in musicology and philosophy and attained a sound-engineering diploma and an Orchestrating Producing for Film and Games certificate, for which he received a scholarship in the name of Jeff Beck. Visit <a href="http://udiguitar.com">his website</a> and follow his <a href="https://www.facebook.com/udiguitar">Facebook page</a> or <a href="https://twitter.com/Udiguitar">Twitter feed.</a></em></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/spice-it-blues-and-eastern-fusion-part-1#comments Spice It Up Udi Glaser Blogs Lessons Fri, 20 Mar 2015 12:12:00 +0000 Udi Glaser http://www.guitarworld.com/article/20049 Hole Notes: Randy Rhoads' Acoustic Techniques and Riffs http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-randy-rhoads-acoustic-techniques-and-riffs <!--paging_filter--><p>When Ozzy Osbourne was booted from Black Sabbath and went solo in 1979, his quest for a heavy-metal soulmate ended with his discovery of Randy Rhoads. </p> <p> The pair would go on to pen such classic metal cuts as “Crazy Train,” “I Don’t Know,” “Mr. Crowley” and “Flying High Again,” among others. Unfortunately, Rhoads was around long enough to record only two full-length albums with Ozzy: <em>Blizzard of Ozz</em> and <em>Diary of a Madman</em> (the live album, <em>Tribute</em>, was released posthumously in 1987). </p> <p>On March 19, 1982, while “joyriding” in a small plane piloted by Ozzy’s tour bus driver, Rhoads was killed when the pilot flew too close to the band's parked tour bus, clipped its wing and careened into a nearby house.</p> <p>A fan of classical music, Randy Rhoads was one of the first American guitarists to successfully incorporate classical music elements into heavy metal. (“Euro-metal” guitarists, including Ritchie Blackmore, Yngwie Malmsteen, Uli Jon Roth and Michael Schenker, had also experimented with melding the two genres.) </p> <p>Reportedly, Rhoads was contemplating retiring from rock after the tour to study classical guitar at UCLA. In this lesson, we’ll take a look at examples in the style of Rhoads’ classically influenced solo piece “Dee” as well as “Diary of a Madman” and “Goodbye to Romance,” two other Ozzy favorites that prominently feature acoustic guitar. </p> <p>Randy pulled out all the stops for <em>Diary of a Madman</em>’s title track, an epic six-minute-plus piece packed with acoustic and electric guitar textures. Its intro, similar to <strong>Figure 1</strong>, is structured around an elaborate arpeggio passage reminiscent of a modern classical guitar etude by Leo Brouwer (entitled "Etudes Simples: VI," published in 1972) which Rhoads likely learned in his classical guitar studies. Use economy picking to tackle these arpeggios throughout, employing a single pick stroke to sound successive notes found on adjacent strings, as indicated.</p> <p>Rhoads also had a talent for composing striking ballads, as evidenced by the track “Goodbye to Romance” (<em>Blizzard of Ozz</em>), the first song Ozzy cowrote with Rhoads. </p> <p>Penned as Osbourne’s personal farewell to Black Sabbath, the song blends clean-tone electrics with steel-string acoustic sounds, resulting in an almost “harpsichord”-like tonal quality. <strong>Figure 2</strong> depicts a composite in-the- style-of arrangement.</p> <p>“Dee” (Blizzard of Ozz), which inspires <strong>Figure 3</strong>, is a lilting waltz (3/4 meter felt “in one”) that Randy dedicated to his mother, Delores. (Perhaps as a further tribute to his mom, the majority of "Dee" falls in the key of D.) </p> <p>With this track, Rhoads used one of his favorite acoustic multitracking approaches: overdubbing a steel-string acoustic on top of his primary nylon-string part for added sparkle (he also did this in “Diary of a Madman.") Note the pick-hand fingerings included below the notation. For further insight into Randy’s classical guitar technique, check out the “Dee” studio outtakes at the end of the <em>Tribute</em> album.</p> <p><Strong>Check out the videos below and the complete tabs below that.</strong></p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1886514571001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1886514571001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p> <strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1886475000001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1886475000001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-06-20%20at%201.19.25%20PM_0.png" width="620" height="533" alt="Screen Shot 2014-06-20 at 1.19.25 PM_0.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-06-20%20at%201.19.34%20PM_0.png" width="620" height="349" alt="Screen Shot 2014-06-20 at 1.19.34 PM_0.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/randy-rhoads">Randy Rhoads</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-randy-rhoads-acoustic-techniques-and-riffs#comments December 2012 Hole Notes Ozzy Osbourne Randy Rhoads 2012 Videos News Lessons Magazine Thu, 19 Mar 2015 17:46:16 +0000 Dale Turner http://www.guitarworld.com/article/16953 In Deep with Andy Aledort: Ozzy Osbourne's "I Don't Know" Video Lesson http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know-video-lesson <!--paging_filter--><p>Randy Rhoads, one of rock’s most brilliant and original guitarists, made his name on the strength of his spectacular playing on Ozzy Osbourne’s first solo efforts, <em>Blizzard of Ozz</em> and <em>Diary of a Madman.</em></p> <p>In this edition of In Deep, we’ll take a look at the live version of the Ozzy/Randy classic “I Don’t Know,” included with the 30th anniversary remaster of <em>Blizzard</em>. </p> <p> Let’s begin with a quick rundown of Randy’s gear. On <em>Blizzard of Ozz</em>, Randy tuned his guitar to concert pitch (A=440) and used a standard .009–.042 string set. </p> <p>For <em>Diary</em>, he tuned down one half step and switched to a set of .010–.046 strings. His main guitars during his time with Ozzy were his 1970 white Les Paul Custom, his custom-made Karl Sandoval polka-dot Flying V and his custom-made Jackson Flying V guitars: one black, and one white, which he christened the Concorde.</p> <p> Randy’s primary amplifiers were Marshall model 1959 100-watt heads, most likely early Seventies versions with metal fronts, and he used a variety of MXR effect pedals, such as the Distortion +, Stereo Chorus, Flanger and 10-Band Graphic Equalizer, along with a Vox Cry Baby wah.</p> <p> For the live version of “I Don’t Know,” Randy added a subtle twist to the song’s intro. As shown in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, after sliding down from the 17th-fret A root note on the sixth string, he plays a sequence of power chords—A5, B5/A and C5/A—against a palm-muted open A-string pedal tone, followed by G5-D5 and then a restatement of the opening theme. </p> <p>In bar 8, he performs a series of pull-offs across all the strings except for the high E. For the first three C-B pull-offs on the B string, use a hard pick attack and your thumb graze the string to create the squealing “pinch harmonics” (P.H.), as Randy does. </p> <p>On the studio version of the song, Randy played a simpler version of this pull-off lick, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 2a</strong>. In every version of “I Don’t Know,” Randy played something slightly different in this spot, which comes right before the verse vocal enters. Another signature variation is to play fast pull-offs on the G string from different fretted notes, as Randy often did at the end of the first chorus. An example of this is shown in <strong>FIGURE 2b.</strong></p> <p> The primary riff appears many times throughout the song, and Randy always spun variations on it, such as adding artificial and natural harmonics in different spots. <strong>FIGURE 3a</strong> includes a pinch harmonic on A in bar 1 and natural harmonics (N.H.) over both the G and D chords in bar 4. A natural harmonic is sounded by lightly laying a fret-hand finger directly above a specific fret as you pick the string. <strong>FIGURE 3b</strong> offers a string-bending variation that Randy would use across bars 3 and 4 of the riff. </p> <p> Another great variation is the “neck-bending” trick shown in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>. After sounding a natural harmonic at the G string’s fifth fret, secure the body of the guitar while pushing against the back of the headstock, which will cause the note to drop in pitch. </p> <p>Exercise caution, however—Slash once cracked the neck on his favorite Les Paul by pushing just a little too hard. Randy’s adventurous nature inspired him to creatively interpret each section of the song, as he often did during the pre-chorus as well. <strong>FIGURE 5</strong> illustrates his approach to the first pre-chorus on the new live version. Notice the ways in which he approaches the figures over F/G in bars 2, 4 and 6.</p> <p> The bridge of “I Don’t Know” shifts to half time, and here Randy arpeggiates most of the chords in the progression by picking each note individually in succession and allowing them to sustain. See <strong>FIGURE 6</strong>. Randy’s live guitar solo includes a few subtle differences from the one he plays in the studio version. </p> <p>The first four bars, based on the G blues scale (G Bb C C# D F) in 15th position, are shown in <strong>FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8</strong> illustrates the next four bars, wherein Randy bends the B string while tapping onto the fretboard three frets higher with the edge of the pick, then trills between the open G string and Bf at the third fret while pushing on the string behind the nut, raising the pitch.</p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 9</strong> shows the end of the solo, with bars 1 and 2 based on a melodic “shape” that chromatically descends the fretboard, moving into a classic G blues scale/Aeolian (G A Bb C D Eb F) lick in bar 3.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience937170092001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="937170092001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><strong>Lesson Contents</strong> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know">Figure 1</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,1">Figures 2-4</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,2">Figures 5-6</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,3">Figure 7</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,4">Figure 8</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,5">Figure 9</a></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/01_2.png" width="620" height="630" alt="01_2.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/02_1.png" width="620" height="387" alt="02_1.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/03_1.png" width="620" height="621" alt="03_1.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/04_1.png" width="620" height="537" alt="04_1.png" /></p> <hr /> <p><em>This video is bonus content related to the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For full print reviews, lesson tabs and more, look for the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> on newsstands now!</em><br /> In this series of videos, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Andy Aledort will break down everything you need to know to play the newly released live version of Ozzy Osbourne's "I Don't Know," featuring the otherworldly guitar playing of the late Randy Rhoads. The full transcription of the song, along with detailed notes can be found in the July 2011 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>. <strong>Figures 2-4</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience937161726001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="937161726001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><strong>Lesson Contents</strong> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know">Figure 1</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,1">Figures 2-4</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,2">Figures 5-6</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,3">Figure 7</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,4">Figure 8</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,5">Figure 9</a></p> <hr /> <p><em>This video is bonus content related to the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For full print reviews, lesson tabs and more, look for the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> on newsstands now!</em><br /> In this series of videos, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Andy Aledort will break down everything you need to know to play the newly released live version of Ozzy Osbourne's "I Don't Know," featuring the otherworldly guitar playing of the late Randy Rhoads. The full transcription of the song, along with detailed notes can be found in the July 2011 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>. <strong>Figures 5-6</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience937157263001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="937157263001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><strong>Lesson Contents</strong> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know">Figure 1</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,1">Figures 2-4</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,2">Figures 5-6</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,3">Figure 7</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,4">Figure 8</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,5">Figure 9</a></p> <hr /> <p><em>This video is bonus content related to the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For full print reviews, lesson tabs and more, look for the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> on newsstands now!</em><br /> In this series of videos, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Andy Aledort will break down everything you need to know to play the newly released live version of Ozzy Osbourne's "I Don't Know," featuring the otherworldly guitar playing of the late Randy Rhoads. The full transcription of the song, along with detailed notes can be found in the July 2011 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>. <strong>Figure 7</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience937161682001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="937161682001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><strong>Lesson Contents</strong> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know">Figure 1</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,1">Figures 2-4</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,2">Figures 5-6</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,3">Figure 7</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,4">Figure 8</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,5">Figure 9</a></p> <hr /> <p><em>This video is bonus content related to the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For full print reviews, lesson tabs and more, look for the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> on newsstands now!</em><br /> In this series of videos, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Andy Aledort will break down everything you need to know to play the newly released live version of Ozzy Osbourne's "I Don't Know," featuring the otherworldly guitar playing of the late Randy Rhoads. The full transcription of the song, along with detailed notes can be found in the July 2011 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>. <strong>Figure 8</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience937157219001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="937157219001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><strong>Lesson Contents</strong> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know">Figure 1</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,1">Figures 2-4</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,2">Figures 5-6</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,3">Figure 7</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,4">Figure 8</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,5">Figure 9</a></p> <hr /> <p><em>This video is bonus content related to the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For full print reviews, lesson tabs and more, look for the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> on newsstands now!</em><br /> In this series of videos, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Andy Aledort will break down everything you need to know to play the newly released live version of Ozzy Osbourne's "I Don't Know," featuring the otherworldly guitar playing of the late Randy Rhoads. The full transcription of the song, along with detailed notes can be found in the July 2011 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>. <strong>Figure 9</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience937161639001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="937161639001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><strong>Lesson Contents</strong> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know">Figure 1</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,1">Figures 2-4</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,2">Figures 5-6</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,3">Figure 7</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,4">Figure 8</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,5">Figure 9</a></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/randy-rhoads">Randy Rhoads</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/ozzy-osbourne">Ozzy Osbourne</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know-video-lesson#comments 2011 Andy Aledort July 2011 Ozzy Osbourne Randy Rhoads Videos July In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Thu, 19 Mar 2015 15:19:50 +0000 Andy Aledort http://www.guitarworld.com/article/10970